Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Campos-Beltran, Diana
    et al.
    Univ Lubeck, Inst Expt & Clin Pharmacol & Toxicol, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23562 Lubeck, Germany.
    Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quintero, Jorge E.
    Univ Kentucky, CenMeT, Lexington, KY 40506 USA;Quanteon LLC, Nicholasville, KY 40356 USA.
    Marshall, Lisa
    Univ Lubeck, Inst Expt & Clin Pharmacol & Toxicol, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23562 Lubeck, Germany.
    Amperometric Self-Referencing Ceramic Based Microelectrode Arrays for D-Serine Detection2018In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    D-serine is the major D-amino acid in the mammalian central nervous system. As the dominant co-agonist of the endogenous synaptic NMDA receptor, D-serine plays a role in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Alterations in D-serine are linked to neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Thus, it is of increasing interest to monitor the concentration of D-serine in vivo as a relevant player in dynamic neuron-glia network activity. Here we present a procedure for amperometric detection of D-serine with self-referencing ceramic-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) coated with D-amino acid oxidase from the yeast Rhodotorula gracilis (RgDAAO). We demonstrate in vitro D-serine recordings with a mean sensitivity of 8.61 +/- 0.83 pA/mu M to D-serine, a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.17 +/- 0.01 mu M, and a selectivity ratio of 80:1 or greater for D-serine over ascorbic acid (mean +/- SEM; n = 12) that can be used for freely moving studies.

  • 2.
    Carrasco, Sergio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Development of Biosensors: A Current Overview2018In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 92Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review focuses on the fabrication of biosensors using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as recognition and/or transducer elements. A brief introduction discussing the importance of the development of new biosensor schemes is presented, describing these coordination polymers, their properties, applications, and the main advantages and drawbacks for the final goal. The increasing number of publications regarding the characteristics of these materials and the new micro- and nanofabrication techniques allowing the preparation of more accurate, robust, and sensitive biosensors are also discussed. This work aims to offer a new perspective from the point of view of materials science compared to other reviews focusing on the transduction mechanism or the nature of the analyte. A few examples are discussed depending on the starting materials, the integration of the MOF as a part of the biosensor and, in a deep detail, the fabrication procedure.

  • 3.
    Diouani, Mohamed Fethi
    et al.
    Inst Pasteur Tunis, LR11IPT03, LEMV, Tunis 1002, Tunisia;Univ Tunis El Manar, Tunis 1068, Tunisia.
    Ouerghi, Oussama
    Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz Univ, Al Kahrj 11942, Saudi Arabia;Univ Tunis El Manar, Tunis 1068, Tunisia.
    Belgacem, Kamel
    Inst Pasteur Tunis, LR11IPT03, LEMV, Tunis 1002, Tunisia.
    Sayhi, Maher
    Inst Pasteur Tunis, LR11IPT03, LEMV, Tunis 1002, Tunisia;Univ Tunis El Manar, Tunis 1068, Tunisia.
    Ionescu, Radu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Laouini, Dhafer
    Univ Tunis El Manar, Tunis 1068, Tunisia;Inst Pasteur Tunis, LR11IPT02, LTCII, Tunis 1002, Tunisia.
    Casein-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles for Amperometric Detection of Leishmania infantum2019In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensitive and reliable approaches targeting the detection of Leishmania are critical for effective early diagnosis and treatment of leishmaniasis. In this frame, this paper describes a rapid quantification assay to detect Leishmania parasites based on the combination of the electrocatalytic ability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to act as a catalyst for the hydrogen formation reaction along with the specificity of the interaction between casein and the major surface protease of the Leishmania parasite, GP63. First, pure and casein-modified AuNPs were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Then, casein-conjugated AuNPs were incubated with Leishsmania parasites in solution; the formed complex was collected by centrifugation, treated by acidic solution, and the pelleted AuNPs were placed on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) and chronoamperometric measurements were carried out. Our results suggest that it is possible to detect Leishmania parasites, with a limit less than 1 parasite/mL. A linear response over a wide concentration interval, ranging from 2 x 10(-2) to 2 x 10(5) parasites/mL, was achieved. Additionally, a pretreatment of Leishmania parasites with Amphotericin B, diminished their interaction with casein. This findings and methodology are very useful for drug efficacy assessment.

  • 4.
    Elmlund, Louise
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Söderberg, Pernilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety2014In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 137-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. 

  • 5.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
    Ozalp, Veli Cengiz
    Institute for Polymer Materials (Polymat), University of the Basque Country, Avda. Tolosa 72, San Sebastian 20018, Spain.
    Graphene and other nanomaterial-based electrochemical aptasensors.2012In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical aptasensors, which are based on the specificity of aptamer-target recognition, with electrochemical transduction for analytical purposes have received particular attention due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, simple instrumentation, as well as low production cost. Aptamers are functional nucleic acids with specific and high affinity to their targets, similar to antibodies. However, they are completely selected in vitro in contrast to antibodies. Due to their stability, easy chemical modifications and proneness to nanostructured device construction, aptamer-based sensors have been incorporated in a variety of applications including electrochemical sensing devices. In recent years, the performance of aptasensors has been augmented by incorporating novel nanomaterials in the preparation of better electrochemical sensors. In this review, we summarize the recent trends in the use of nanomaterials for developing electrochemical aptasensors.

  • 6.
    Martín-Yerga, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Electrochemical Detection and Characterization of Nanoparticles with Printed Devices2019In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 47Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative methods to achieve the user-friendly, quick, and highly sensitive detection of nanomaterials are urgently needed. Nanomaterials have increased importance in commercial products, and there are concerns about the potential risk that they entail for the environment. In addition, detection of nanomaterials can be a highly valuable tool in many applications, such as biosensing. Electrochemical methods using disposable, low-cost, printed electrodes provide excellent analytical performance for the detection of a wide set of nanomaterials. In this review, the foundations and latest advances of several electrochemical strategies for the detection of nanoparticles using cost-effective printed devices are introduced. These strategies will equip the experimentalist with an extensive toolbox for the detection of nanoparticles of different chemical nature and possible applications ranging from quality control to environmental analysis and biosensing.

  • 7.
    Pereira da Silva Neves, Marta Maria
    et al.
    Inst Politecn Porto, Inst Super Engn Porto, REQUIMTE LAQV, P-4200072 Porto, Portugal..
    Martín-Yerga, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Advanced Nanoscale Approaches to Single-(Bio)entity Sensing and Imaging2018In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 100Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual (bio)chemical entities could show a very heterogeneous behaviour under the same conditions that could be relevant in many biological processes of significance in the life sciences. Conventional detection approaches are only able to detect the average response of an ensemble of entities and assume that all entities are identical. From this perspective, important information about the heterogeneities or rare (stochastic) events happening in individual entities would remain unseen. Some nanoscale tools present interesting physicochemical properties that enable the possibility to detect systems at the single-entity level, acquiring richer information than conventional methods. In this review, we introduce the foundations and the latest advances of several nanoscale approaches to sensing and imaging individual (bio)entities using nanoprobes, nanopores, nanoimpacts, nanoplasmonics and nanomachines. Several (bio)entities such as cells, proteins, nucleic acids, vesicles and viruses are specifically considered. These nanoscale approaches provide a wide and complete toolbox for the study of many biological systems at the single-entity level.

  • 8. Sepehri, Sobhan
    et al.
    Agnarsson, Björn
    de la Torre, Teresa Zardán Gómez
    Schneiderman, Justin E.
    Blomgren, Jakob
    Jesorka, Aldo
    Johansson, Christer
    Nilsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Albert, Jan
    Strømme, Maria
    Winkler, Dag
    Kalaboukhov, Alexei
    Characterization of Binding of Magnetic Nanoparticles to Rolling Circle Amplification Products by Turn-On Magnetic Assay2019In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific binding of oligonucleotide-tagged 100 nm magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to rolling circle products (RCPs) is investigated using our newly developed differential homogenous magnetic assay (DHMA). The DHMA measures ac magnetic susceptibility from a test and a control samples simultaneously and eliminates magnetic background signal. Therefore, the DHMA can reveal details of binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles at very low concentrations of RCPs. From the analysis of the imaginary part of the DHMA signal, we find that smaller MNPs in the particle ensemble bind first to the RCPs. When the RCP concentration increases, we observe the formation of agglomerates, which leads to lower number of MNPs per RCP at higher concentrations of RCPs. The results thus indicate that a full frequency range of ac susceptibility observation is necessary to detect low concentrations of target RCPs and a long amplification time is not required as it does not significantly increase the number of MNPs per RCP. The findings are critical for understanding the underlying microscopic binding process for improving the assay performance. They furthermore suggest DHMA is a powerful technique for dynamically characterizing the binding interactions between MNPs and biomolecules in fluid volumes.

  • 9.
    Sepehri, Sobhan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Agnarsson, Björn
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Torre, Teresa
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Schneiderman, Justin
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomgren, Jakob
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo.
    Jesorka, Aldo
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Albert, Jan
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Winkler, Dan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kalaboukhov, Alexei
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Characterization of Binding of Magnetic Nanoparticles to Rolling Circle Amplification Products by Turn-On Magnetic Assay2019In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 9, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific binding of oligonucleotide-tagged 100 nm magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to rolling circle products (RCPs) is investigated using our newly developed differential homogenous magnetic assay (DHMA). The DHMA measures ac magnetic susceptibility from a test and a control samples simultaneously and eliminates magnetic background signal. Therefore, the DHMA can reveal details of binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles at very low concentrations of RCPs. From the analysis of the imaginary part of the DHMA signal, we find that smaller MNPs in the particle ensemble bind first to the RCPs. When the RCP concentration increases, we observe the formation of agglomerates, which leads to lower number of MNPs per RCP at higher concentrations of RCPs. The results thus indicate that a full frequency range of ac susceptibility observation is necessary to detect low concentrations of target RCPs and a long amplification time is not required as it does not significantly increase the number of MNPs per RCP. The findings are critical for understanding the underlying microscopic binding process for improving the assay performance. They furthermore suggest DHMA is a powerful technique for dynamically characterizing the binding interactions between MNPs and biomolecules in fluid volumes.

  • 10.
    Sepehri, Sobhan
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Microtechnol & Nanosci MC2, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Agnarsson, Björn
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Phys, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Schneiderman, Justin F.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Microtechnol & Nanosci MC2, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, MedTech West, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomgren, Jakob
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jesorka, Aldo
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Stockholm Univ, Sci Life Lab, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Solna, Sweden.
    Albert, Jan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Winkler, Dag
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Microtechnol & Nanosci MC2, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kalaboukhov, Alexei
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Microtechnol & Nanosci MC2, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Characterization of Binding of Magnetic Nanoparticles to Rolling Circle Amplification Products by Turn-On Magnetic Assay2019In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific binding of oligonucleotide-tagged 100 nm magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to rolling circle products (RCPs) is investigated using our newly developed differential homogenous magnetic assay (DHMA). The DHMA measures ac magnetic susceptibility from a test and a control samples simultaneously and eliminates magnetic background signal. Therefore, the DHMA can reveal details of binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles at very low concentrations of RCPs. From the analysis of the imaginary part of the DHMA signal, we find that smaller MNPs in the particle ensemble bind first to the RCPs. When the RCP concentration increases, we observe the formation of agglomerates, which leads to lower number of MNPs per RCP at higher concentrations of RCPs. The results thus indicate that a full frequency range of ac susceptibility observation is necessary to detect low concentrations of target RCPs and a long amplification time is not required as it does not significantly increase the number of MNPs per RCP. The findings are critical for understanding the underlying microscopic binding process for improving the assay performance. They furthermore suggest DHMA is a powerful technique for dynamically characterizing the binding interactions between MNPs and biomolecules in fluid volumes.

  • 11.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nawaz, Hazrat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Ndizeye, Natacha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Hierarchical Thin Film Architectures for Enhanced Sensor Performance: Liquid Crystal-Mediated Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Imprinted Polymer Films for the Selective Recognition of Bupivacaine2014In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 90-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured bupivacaine-selective molecularly imprinted 3-aminophenylboronic acid-p-phenylenediamine co-polymer (MIP) films have been prepared on gold-coated quartz (Au/quartz) resonators by electrochemical synthesis under cyclic voltammetric conditions in a liquid crystalline (LC) medium (triton X-100/water). Films prepared in water and in the absence of template were used for control studies. Infrared spectroscopic studies demonstrated comparable chemical compositions for LC and control polymer films. SEM studies revealed that the topologies of the molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared in the LC medium (LC-MIP) exhibit discernible 40 nm thick nano-fiber structures, quite unlike the polymers prepared in the absence of the LC-phase. The sensitivity of the LC-MIP in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was 67.6 ± 4.9 Hz/mM under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions, which was ≈250% higher than for the sensor prepared using the aqueous medium. Detection was possible at 100 nM (30 ng/mL), and discrimination of bupivacaine from closely related structural analogs was readily achieved as reflected in the corresponding stability constants of the MIP-analyte complexes. The facile fabrication and significant enhancement in sensor sensitivity together highlight the potential of this LC-based imprinting strategy for fabrication of polymeric materials with hierarchical architectures, in particular for use in surface-dependent application areas, e.g., biomaterials or sensing.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf