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  • 1. Andersson, Johnn
    et al.
    Plummer, Paul
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och industriell teknik, Industriell teknik.
    Lennerfors, Thomas Taro
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och industriell teknik, Industriell teknik.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Socio-techno-ecological transition dynamics in the re-territorialization of food production: the case of wild berries in Sweden2024Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent geopolitical and economic crises underline the need for a European transition towards a more sustainable food system. Scholars and policymakers have called for a re-territorialization of food production to strike a better balance between local, regional and global value chains. This paper explores the role of re-territorialization through an analysis of the emergence, development and current transformation of the Swedish wild berry value chain. The analysis combines the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions with a socio-techno-ecological system approach and draws on interviews, informal conversations, participant observations and a range of secondary sources. The resulting case narrative shows how processes of de-territorialization may result in regimes that fail to address sustainability potential and problems. It also highlights that processes of re-territorialization challenge established regimes by promoting niches that represent different, albeit complementary, value chain configurations. Apart from a rich empirical narrative that brings useful knowledge to stakeholders to the Swedish wild berry value chain, the paper contributes to the theoretical understanding re-territorialization, shows how the ecological dimension can be accounted for with the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions and presents a number of general policy implications.

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    fulltext
  • 2.
    Andersson, Johnn
    et al.
    Department System Transition, Division Built Environment, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Plummer, Paul
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lennerfors, Thomas Taro
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Socio-techno-ecological transition dynamics in the re-territorialization of food production: the case of wild berries in Sweden2024Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent geopolitical and economic crises underline the need for a European transition towards a more sustainable food system. Scholars and policymakers have called for a re-territorialization of food production to strike a better balance between local, regional and global value chains. This paper explores the role of re-territorialization through an analysis of the emergence, development and current transformation of the Swedish wild berry value chain. The analysis combines the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions with a socio-techno-ecological system approach and draws on interviews, informal conversations, participant observations and a range of secondary sources. The resulting case narrative shows how processes of de-territorialization may result in regimes that fail to address sustainability potential and problems. It also highlights that processes of re-territorialization challenge established regimes by promoting niches that represent different, albeit complementary, value chain configurations. Apart from a rich empirical narrative that brings useful knowledge to stakeholders to the Swedish wild berry value chain, the paper contributes to the theoretical understanding re-territorialization, shows how the ecological dimension can be accounted for with the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions and presents a number of general policy implications.

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  • 3.
    Andersson, Johnn
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Samhällsbyggnad, Systemomställning och tjänsteinnovation.
    Plummer, Paul
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lennerfors, Thomas Taro
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Socio-techno-ecological transition dynamics in the re-territorialization of food production: the case of wild berries in Sweden2024Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recent geopolitical and economic crises underline the need for a European transition towards a more sustainable food system. Scholars and policymakers have called for a re-territorialization of food production to strike a better balance between local, regional and global value chains. This paper explores the role of re-territorialization through an analysis of the emergence, development and current transformation of the Swedish wild berry value chain. The analysis combines the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions with a socio-techno-ecological system approach and draws on interviews, informal conversations, participant observations and a range of secondary sources. The resulting case narrative shows how processes of de-territorialization may result in regimes that fail to address sustainability potential and problems. It also highlights that processes of re-territorialization challenge established regimes by promoting niches that represent diferent, albeit complementary, value chain confgurations. Apart from a rich empirical narrative that brings useful knowledge to stakeholders to the Swedish wild berry value chain, the paper contributes to the theoretical understanding re-territorialization, shows how the ecological dimension can be accounted for with the multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions and presents a number of general policy implications.

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    fulltext
  • 4.
    Ayers, James
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för teknikvetenskaper, Institutionen för strategisk hållbar utveckling.
    Missimer, Merlina
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för teknikvetenskaper, Institutionen för strategisk hållbar utveckling.
    Bryant, Jayne
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för teknikvetenskaper, Institutionen för strategisk hållbar utveckling.
    Intrapersonal capacities for sustainability: a change agent perspective on the ‘inner dimension’ of sustainability work2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 1181-1197Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An ongoing discussion in education for sustainable development (ESD) research has focused on defining a list of agreed upon sustainability competencies required for the work of sustainability change agents. This discussion has included the consideration of an ‘Intrapersonal’ perspective that considers the role of inner qualities in change agents and how this impacts their ability to implement sustainability. While many researchers have looked at the ‘inner dimension’ of sustainability work, the identification and function of an ‘Intrapersonal’ competence remains in question. Utilizing practitioner responses, this paper identifies eight Intrapersonal capacities that change agents described as beneficial to their implementation of sustainability. These capacities are the ability to: Hold complexity, Foster a learner’s mindset, Deeply value others, Let be, Show up as one’s full self, Regulate and manage the self, Persist with lightness and Ensure one’s wellbeing. The study provides insights into the identification of the capacities and their relationship to a wider Intrapersonal research field. It also discusses the implications this perspective has on education for sustainable development should it consider incorporating such capacities into teaching and learning. While much literature in the field is of conceptual nature, this paper offers an empirical contribution by including the voice and perspective of change agents to the Intrapersonal discussion. © 2023, The Author(s).

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  • 5.
    Basnet, Shyam
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Wood, Amanda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Röös, Elin
    Jansson, Torbjörn
    Fetzer, Ingo
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Organic agriculture in a low-emission world: exploring combined measures to deliver a sustainable food system in Sweden2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 501-519Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the EU, including Sweden, organic farming is seen as a promising pathway for sustainable production, protecting human health and animal welfare, and conserving the environment. Despite positive developments in recent decades, expanding organic farming to the Swedish national target of 30% of farmland under organic production remains challenging. In this study, we developed two scenarios to evaluate the role of organic farming in the broader context of Swedish food systems: (i) baseline trend scenario (Base), and (ii) sustainable food system scenario (Sust). Base describes a future where organic farming is implemented alongside the current consumption, production and waste patterns, while Sust describes a future where organic farming is implemented alongside a range of sustainable food system initiatives. These scenarios are coupled with several variants of organic area: (i) current 20% organic area, (ii) the national target of 30% organic area by 2030, and (iii) 50% organic area by 2050 for Sust. We applied the ‘FABLE (Food, Agriculture, Biodiversity, Land-use and Energy) Calculator’ to assess the evolution of the Swedish food system from 2000 to 2050 and evaluate land use, emissions and self-sufficiency impacts under these scenarios. Our findings show that expanding organic farming in the Base scenarios increases the use of cropland and agricultural emissions by 2050 compared to the 2010 reference year. However, cropland use and emissions are reduced in the Sust scenario, due to dietary changes, reduction of food waste and improved agricultural productivity. This implies that there is room for organic farming and the benefits it provides, e.g. the use of fewer inputs and improved animal welfare in a sustainable food system. However, changing towards organic agriculture is only of advantage when combined with transformative strategies to promote environmental sustainability across multiple sections, such as changed consumption, better production and food waste practices.

  • 6. Bengtsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Alfredsson, Eva
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Strategiska hållbarhetsstudier.
    Cohen, Maurie
    New Jersey Inst Technol, Newark, NJ 07102 USA..
    Lorek, Sylvia
    Sustainable Europe Res Inst, Cologne, Germany..
    Schroeder, Patrick
    Inst Dev Studies, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Transforming systems of consumption and production for achieving the sustainable development goals: moving beyond efficiency2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 6, s. 1533-1547Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The United Nations formulated the sustainable development goals (SDGs) in 2015 as a comprehensive global policy framework for addressing the most pressing social and environmental challenges currently facing humanity. In this paper, we analyse SDG 12, which aims to ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. Despite long-standing political recognition of this objective, and ample scientific evidence both on its importance and on the efficacy of various ways of promoting it, the SDGs do not provide clear goals or effective guidance on how to accomplish this urgently needed transformation. Drawing from the growing body of research on sustainable consumption and production (SCP), the paper identifies two dominant vantage pointsone focused on promoting more efficient production methods and products (mainly through technological improvement and informed consumer choice) and the other stressing the need to consider also overall volumes of consumption, distributional issues, and related social and institutional changes. We label these two approaches efficiency and systemic. Research shows that while the efficiency approach contains essential elements of a transition to sustainability, it is by itself highly unlikely to bring about sustainable outcomes. Concomitantly, research also finds that volumes of consumption and production are closely associated with environmental impacts, indicating a need to curtail these volumes in ways that safeguard social sustainability, which is unlikely to be possible without a restructuring of existing socioeconomic arrangements. Analysing how these two perspectives are reflected in the SDGs framework, we find that in its current conception, it mainly relies on the efficiency approach. On the basis of this assessment, we conclude that the SDGs represent a partial and inadequate conceptualisation of SCP which will hamper implementation. Based on this determination, this paper provides some suggestions on how governments and other actors involved in SDGs operationalisation could more effectively pursue SCP from a systemic standpoint and use the transformation of systems of consumption and production as a lever for achieving multiple sustainability objectives.

  • 7.
    Berg, Håkan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi.
    Söderholm, Agnes Ekman
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi.
    Söderström, Anna-Sara
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi.
    Tam, Nguyen Thanh
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi. Nong Lam University, Vietnam.
    Recognizing wetland ecosystem services for sustainable rice farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam2017Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 137-154Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased rice production in the Mekong Delta during the last two decades has improved agricultural income and reduced poverty, but it has also had negative impacts on the environment and human health. This study shows that integrated rice-fish farming and integrated pest management strategies provide sustainable options to intensive rice farming, because of a more balanced use of multiple ecosystem services that benefit the farmers' health, economy and the environment. The study investigates and compares farming strategies among 40 rice and 20 rice-fish farmers in two locations in the Mekong Delta. Production costs and income are used to compare the systems' financial sustainability. The farmers' perception on how their farming practices influence on ecosystem services and their livelihoods are used as an indication of the systems' ecological and social sustainability. Although rice-fish farmers used lower amount of pesticides and fertilisers than rice farmers, there were no statistical differences in their rice yields or net income. Rice was seen as the most important ecosystem service from rice fields and related wetlands, but also several other ecosystem services, such as water quality, aquatic animals, plants, habitats, and natural enemies to pests, were seen as important to the farmers' livelihoods and wellbeing. All farmers perceived that there had been a general reduction in all these other ecosystem services, due to intensive rice farming during the last 15 years, and that they will continue to decline. The majority of the farmers were willing to reduce their rice yields slightly for an improved quality of the other ecosystem services.

  • 8.
    Boda, Chad S
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund, Sweden.
    Values, science, and competing paradigms in sustainability research: furthering the conversation2021Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 16, nr 6, s. 2157-2161Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability science is fundamentally a problem-driven and solutions-oriented science which necessitates engagement with questions of interdisciplinarity and normativity. Nagatsu et al. (2020) recently investigated the significance of these peculiar characteristics and produce a useful and timely overview of the problems facing sustainability science, as a science. Perhaps the most crucial and crosscutting challenge they identify regards the need for researchers to justify the particular values guiding sustainability research. In the spirit of advancing Nagatsu et al.’s agenda for further developing the role of values in sustainability science, I argue two things. First, that there are in practice several active and competing approaches to dealing with the problem of normativity in sustainablity science that provide options to researchers. Second, that this unresolved tension at the core of sustainability science points to a more overarching problem, namely the need to more explicitly identify coherent, competing research paradigms within the field.

  • 9.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Has sustainability science turned left?2021Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 16, nr 6, s. 2151-2155Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    As the urgent need for societies to steer towards sustainability is becoming increasingly apparent, sustainability science as a research community is facing difficult challenges successfully navigating the intensifying and often harsh political debates. An important line of conflict is (still) between the political left and right, although other conflicts are gaining increasing attention. As private corporations are stepping up their conservation agendas and non-governmental organizations are increasingly embracing market mechanisms to achieve healthier ecosystems, the scholarly community of sustainability science appears to be turning more to the political left. To navigate these entangled scientific and political landscapes, accomplishing constructive debates emphasizing the value of nurturing a broad spectra of viewpoints should be given higher priority in all forums where issues of sustainability are discussed. 

  • 10.
    Boonstra, Wiebren Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Masterson, Vanessa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Human responses to social-ecological traps2016Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 11, nr 6, s. 877-889Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological (SE) traps refer to persistent mismatches between the responses of people, or organisms, and their social and ecological conditions that are undesirable from a sustainability perspective. Until now, the occurrence of SE traps is primarily explained from a lack of adaptive capacity; not much attention is paid to other causal factors. In our article, we address this concern by theorizing the variety of human responses to SE traps and the effect of these responses on trap dynamics. Besides (adaptive) capacities, we theorize desires, abilities and opportunities as important additional drivers to explain the diversity of human responses to traps. Using these theoretical concepts, we construct a typology of human responses to SE traps, and illustrate its empirical relevance with three cases of SE traps: Swedish Baltic Sea fishery; amaXhosa rural livelihoods; and Pamir smallholder farming. We conclude with a discussion of how attention to the diversity in human response to SE traps may inform future academic research and planned interventions to prevent or dissolve SE traps.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 11.
    Boonstra, Wiebren Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Masterson, Vanessa
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Human responses to social-ecological traps2016Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 11, nr 6, s. 877-889Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological (SE) traps refer to persistent mismatches between the responses of people, or organisms, and their social and ecological conditions that are undesirable from a sustainability perspective. Until now, the occurrence of SE traps is primarily explained from a lack of adaptive capacity; not much attention is paid to other causal factors. In our article, we address this concern by theorizing the variety of human responses to SE traps and the effect of these responses on trap dynamics. Besides (adaptive) capacities, we theorize desires, abilities and opportunities as important additional drivers to explain the diversity of human responses to traps. Using these theoretical concepts, we construct a typology of human responses to SE traps, and illustrate its empirical relevance with three cases of SE traps: Swedish Baltic Sea fishery; amaXhosa rural livelihoods; and Pamir smallholder farming. We conclude with a discussion of how attention to the diversity in human response to SE traps may inform future academic research and planned interventions to prevent or dissolve SE traps.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Brink, Ebba
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University.
    Adolfsson, Maria
    Trelleborg Municipal.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Kristianstad Municipal.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Bjorn, Helena
    Lomma Municipal.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Jephson, Therese
    SALA.
    Narvelo, Widar
    Helsingborg Municipal.
    Ness, Barry
    lund University.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Palo, Thomas
    SLU Umeå.
    Sjeldrup, Magnus
    Bjuv Municipal.
    Stalhammar, Sanna
    Lund University.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Lomma Municipal.
    On the road to 'research municipalities': analysing transdisciplinarity in municipal ecosystem services and adaptation planning2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 765-784Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research and collaboration is widely acknowledged as a critical success factor for solution-oriented approaches that can tackle complex sustainability challenges, such as biodiversity loss, pollution, and climate-related hazards. In this context, city governments' engagement in transdisciplinarity is generally seen as a key condition for societal transformation towards sustainability. However, empirical evidence is rare. This paper presents a self-assessment of a joint research project on ecosystem services and climate adaptation planning (ECOSIMP) undertaken by four universities and seven Swedish municipalities. We apply a set of design principles and guiding questions for transdisciplinary sustainability projects and, on this basis, identify key aspects for supporting university-municipality collaboration. We show that: (1) selecting the number and type of project stakeholders requires more explicit consideration of the purpose of societal actors' participation; (2) concrete, interim benefits for participating practitioners and organisations need to be continuously discussed; (3) promoting the 'inter', i.e., interdisciplinary and inter-city learning, can support transdisciplinarity and, ultimately, urban sustainability and long-term change. In this context, we found that design principles for transdisciplinarity have the potential to (4) mitigate project shortcomings, even when transdisciplinarity is not an explicit aim, and (5) address differences and allow new voices to be heard. We propose additional guiding questions to address shortcomings and inspire reflexivity in transdisciplinary projects.

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    fulltext
  • 13.
    Brink, Ebba
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University .
    Adolfsson, Maria
    Trelleborg Municipality.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Kristianstad Municipality.
    Beery, Thomas H.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Björn, Helena
    Lomma Municipality.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Lund University.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University.
    Jephson, Therese
    Scania Association .
    Narvelo, Widar
    Helsingborg municipality.
    Ness, Barry
    Lund University .
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Palo, Thomas
    SLU Umeå.
    Sjeldrup, Magnus
    Bjuv Municipality.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University .
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Lomma Municipality.
    On the road to ‘research municipalities’: analysing transdisciplinarity in municipal ecosystem services and adaptation planning2017Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research and collaboration is widely acknowledged as a critical success factor for solution-oriented approaches that can tackle complex sustainability challenges, such as biodiversity loss, pollution, and climate-related hazards. In this context, city governments’ engagement in transdisciplinarity is generally seen as a key condition for societal transformation towards sustainability. However, empirical evidence is rare. This paper presentsa self-assessment of a joint research project on ecosystem services and climate adaptation planning (ECOSIMP) undertaken by four universities and seven Swedish municipalities. We apply a set of design principles and guiding questions for transdisciplinary sustainability projects and, on this basis, identify key aspects for supporting university–municipality collaboration. We show that: (1) selecting the number and type of project stakeholders requires more explicit consideration of the purpose of societal actors’ participation; (2) concrete, interim benefits for participating practitioners and organisations need to be continuously discussed; (3) promoting the ‘inter’, i.e., interdisciplinary and inter-city learning, can support transdisciplinarity and, ultimately, urban sustainability and long-term change. In this context, we found that design principles for transdisciplinarity have the potential to (4) mitigate project shortcomings, even when transdisciplinarity is not an explicit aim, and (5) address differences and allow new voices to be heard. We propose additional guiding questions to address shortcomings and inspire reflexivity in transdisciplinary projects.

  • 14.
    Brink, Ebba
    et al.
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), P.O. Box 170, 221 00 Lund, Sweden; Lund University Centre of Excellence for Integration of Social and Natural Dimensions of Sustainability (LUCID), P.O. Box 170, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Wamsler, Christine
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), P.O. Box 170, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Maria
    Department of Sustainable Development, Trelleborg Municipality, Algatan 13, 231 83 Trelleborg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Monika
    Department for Environment and Urban Planning, Kristianstad Municipality, 291 80 Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Beery, Thomas
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, 291 88 Kristianstad, Sweden; Minnesota Sea Grant, University of Minnesota Duluth, 31 W College St, Duluth, MN 55812 USA.
    Björn, Helena
    Department of Sustainable Development (Planning Section), Lomma Municipality, 234 81 Lomma, Sweden.
    Bramryd, Torleif
    Environmental Strategy, ISM, Lund University, Campus Helsingborg, P.O. Box 882, 251 08 Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Jephson, Therese
    Research and Development, Scania Association of Local Authorities (SALA), Box 53, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Narvelo, Widar
    Comprehensive Planning Unit, City Planning and Technical Services Department, Helsingborg municipality, 251 89 Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Ness, Barry
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), P.O. Box 170, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Ingemar K
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, 291 88 Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Palo, Thomas
    Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU Umeå, 901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjeldrup, Magnus
    City Planning Department, Bjuv Municipality, Box 501, 267 25 Bjuv, Sweden.
    Stålhammar, Sanna
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), P.O. Box 170, 221 00 Lund, Sweden; Lund University Centre of Excellence for Integration of Social and Natural Dimensions of Sustainability (LUCID), P.O. Box 170, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Department of Sustainable Development (Planning Section), Lomma Municipality, 234 81 Lomma, Sweden.
    On the road to research municipalities: Analysing transdisciplinarity in municipal ecosystem services and adaptation planning2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 765-784Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transdisciplinary research and collaboration is widely acknowledged as a critical success factor for solution- oriented approaches that can tackle complex sustainability challenges, such as biodiversity loss, pollution, and climate-related hazards. In this context, city governments’ engagement in transdisciplinarity is generally seen as a key condition for societal transformation towards sustainability. However, empirical evidence is rare. This paper presents a self-assessment of a joint research project on ecosystem services and climate adaptation planning (ECOSIMP) undertaken by four universities and seven Swedish municipalities. We apply a set of design principles and guiding questions for transdisciplinary sustainability projects and, on this basis, identify key aspects for supporting university–municipality collaboration. We show that: (1) selecting the number and type of project stakeholders requires more explicit consideration of the purpose of societal actors’ participation; (2) concrete, interim benefits for participating practitioners and organisations need to be continuously discussed; (3) promoting the ‘inter’, i.e., interdisciplinary and inter-city learning, can support transdisciplinarity and, ultimately, urban sustainability and long-term change. In this context, we found that design principles for transdisciplinarity have the potential to (4) mitigate project shortcomings, even when transdisciplinarity is not an explicit aim, and (5) address differences and allow new voices to be heard. We propose additional guiding questions to address shortcomings and inspire reflexivity in transdisciplinary projects.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Bryant, Jayne
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för teknikvetenskaper, Institutionen för strategisk hållbar utveckling.
    Thomson, Giles
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Fakulteten för teknikvetenskaper, Institutionen för strategisk hållbar utveckling. Curtin University, AUS.
    Learning as a key leverage point for sustainability transformations: a case study of a local government in Perth, Western Australia2021Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 16, nr 3, s. 795-807Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study about embedding sustainability into a local government in Perth, Western Australia, through the introduction of a sustainability policy and the accompanying education and culture change program. This longitudinal case study describes the approach and impact of the program initiated and delivered by internal officers between 2011 and 2016. The use of personal experience, document review and staff interviews present an ethnography of a bureaucracy that casts some light upon the seldom seen inner workings of a local government organisation as it introduced a sustainability program over a period of more than 5 years. The case study provides evidence of the potential power of learning as a key leverage point for transformational sustainability change.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Learning as a key leverage point for sustainability transformations: a case study of a local government in Perth, Western Australia
  • 16. Butz, Christoph
    et al.
    Liechti, Jürg
    Bodin, Julia
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Towards defining an environmental investment universe within planetary boundaries2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 4, s. 1031-1044Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Science is increasingly able to identify precautionary boundaries for critical Earth system processes, and the business world provides societies with important means for adaptive responses to global environmental risks. In turn, investors provide vital leverage on companies. Here, we report on our transdisciplinary science/business experience in applying the planetary boundaries framework (sensu Rockstrom et al., Ecol Soc 14, 2009) to define a boundary-compatible investment universe and analyse the environmental compatibility of companies. We translate the planetary boundaries into limits for resource use and emissions per unit of economic value creation, using indicators from the Carnegie Mellon University EIO-LCA database. The resulting precautionary 'economic intensities' can be compared with the current levels of companies' environmental impact. This necessarily involves simplifying assumptions, for which dialogue between biophysical science, corporate sustainability and investment perspectives is needed. The simplifications mean that our translation is transparent from both biophysical and financial viewpoints, and allow our approach to be responsive to future developments in scientific insights about planetary boundaries. Our approach enables both sub-industries and individual companies to be screened against the planetary boundaries. Our preliminary application of this screening to the entire background universe of all investable stock-listed companies gives a selectivity of two orders of magnitude for an investment universe of environmentally attractive stocks. We discuss implications for an expanded role of environmental change science in the development of thematic equity funds.

  • 17. Care, O.
    et al.
    Bernstein, M. J.
    Chapman, M.
    Diaz Reviriego, I.
    Dressler, G.
    Felipe-Lucia, M. R.
    Friis, C.
    Graham, S.
    Haenke, H.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hernández-Morcillo, M.
    Hoffmann, H.
    Kernecker, M.
    Nicol, P.
    Piñeiro, C.
    Pitt, H.
    Schill, Caroline
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Seufert, V.
    Shu, K.
    Valencia, V.
    Zaehringer, J. G.
    Creating leadership collectives for sustainability transformations2021Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 703-708Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Enduring sustainability challenges requires a new model of collective leadership that embraces critical reflection, inclusivity and care. Leadership collectives can support a move in academia from metrics to merits, from a focus on career to care, and enact a shift from disciplinary to inter- and trans-disciplinary research. Academic organisations need to reorient their training programs, work ethics and reward systems to encourage collective excellence and to allow space for future leaders to develop and enact a radically re-imagined vision of how to lead as a collective with care for people and the planet.

  • 18.
    Collste, David
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Pedercini, Matteo
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Policy coherence to achieve the SDGs: using integrated simulation models to assess effective policies2017Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 12, nr 6, s. 921-931Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Coherently addressing the 17 Sustainable Development Goals requires planning tools that guide policy makers. Given the integrative nature of the SDGs, we believe that integrative modelling techniques are especially useful for this purpose. In this paper, we present and demonstrate the use of the new System Dynamics based iSDG family of models. We use a national model for Tanzania to analyse impacts of substantial investments in photovoltaic capacity. Our focus is on the impacts on three SDGs: SDG 3 on healthy lives and well-being, SDG 4 on education, and SDG 7 on energy. In our simulations, the investments in photovoltaics positively affect life expectancy, years of schooling and access to electricity. More importantly, the progress on these dimensions synergizes and leads to broader system-wide impacts. While this one national example illustrates the anticipated impact of an intervention in one specific area on several SDGs, the iSDG model can be used to support similar analyses for policies related to all the 17 SDGs, both individually and concurrently. We believe that integrated models such as the iSDG model can bring interlinks to the forefront and facilitate a shift to a discussion on development grounded in systems thinking.

  • 19. Constantino, S. M.
    et al.
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Weber, E. U.
    Wijermans, Ferdinanda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cognition and behavior in context: a framework and theories to explain natural resource use decisions in social-ecological systems2021Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, nr 16, s. 1651-1671Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex, context-dependent, and dynamic nature of human behavior is increasingly recognized as both an important cause of sustainability problems and potential leverage for their solution. Human beings are diverse, as are the social, ecological, and institutional settings in which they are embedded. Despite this recognition and extensive knowledge about human decision-making in the behavioral sciences, empirical analysis, formal models, and decision support for sustainability policy in natural resource management often either neglect human behavior or are based on narrow and overly simplistic assumptions. Integrating insights from behavioral sciences into sustainability research and policy remains a challenge. This is in part due to the abundance and fragmentation of theories across the social sciences and in part the challenges of translating research across disciplines. We provide a set of tools to support the integration of knowledge about human behavior into empirical and model-based sustainability research. In particular, we (i) develop a process-oriented framework of embedded human cognition (Human Behavior-Cognition in Context or HuB-CC), (ii) select an initial set of 31 theories with the potential to illuminate behavior in natural resource contexts and map them onto the framework, and (iii) suggest pathways for using the framework and mapping to encourage trans-disciplinary investigations, identify and compare theories, and facilitate their integration into empirical research, formal models, and ultimately policy and governance for sustainability. Our theory selection, framework, and mapping offer a foundation—a “living” platform—upon which future collaborative efforts can build to create a resource for scholars and practitioners working at the intersection of social sciences and natural resource management.

  • 20. Cooke, Benjamin
    et al.
    West, Simon
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Dwelling in the biosphere: exploring an embodied human-environment connection in resilience thinking2016Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 11, nr 5, s. 831-843Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilience has emerged as a prominent paradigm for interpreting and shaping human-environment connections in the context of global environmental change. Resilience emphasizes dynamic spatial and temporal change in social-ecological systems where humans are inextricably interwoven with the environment. While influential, resilience thinking has been critiqued for an under-theorized framing of socio-cultural dynamics. In this paper, we examine how the resilience concepts of planetary boundaries and reconnecting to the biosphere frame human-environment connection in terms of mental representations and biophysical realities. We argue that focusing solely on mental reconnection limits further integration between the social and the ecological, thus countering a foundational commitment in resilience thinking to social-ecological interconnectedness. To address this susceptibility we use Tim Ingold's 'dwelling perspective' to outline an embodied form of human-environment (re)connection. Through dwelling, connections are not solely produced in the mind, but through the ongoing interactivity of mind, body and environment through time. Using this perspective, we position the biosphere as an assemblage that is constantly in the making through the active cohabitation of humans and nonhumans. To illustrate insights that may emerge from this perspective we bring an embodied connection to earth stewardship, given its growing popularity for forging local to global sustainability transformations.

  • 21.
    Dornelles, Andre Zuanazzi
    et al.
    Univ Reading, Sch Biol Sci, Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Hlth & Life Sci Bldg, Reading RG6 6AS, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Henley Business Sch, Dept Real Estate & Planning, Reading, Berks, England..
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Naturresurser och hållbar utveckling. Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Delabre, Izabela
    Birkbeck Univ London, Dept Geog, London, England..
    Denney, J. Michael
    Univ Massachusetts, Ctr Governance & Sustainabil, Boston, MA USA..
    Nunes, Richard J.
    Univ Reading, Henley Business Sch, Dept Real Estate & Planning, Reading, Berks, England..
    Jentsch, Anke
    Univ Bayreuth, Bayreuth Ctr Ecol & Environm Res BayCEER, Disturbance Ecol & Vegetat Dynam, Bayreuth, Germany..
    Nicholas, Kimberly A.
    Lund Univ Ctr Sustainabil Studies LUCSUS, Lund, Sweden..
    Schröter, Matthias
    Leuphana Univ Luneburg, Fac Sustainabil, Social Ecol Syst Inst, Univ Allee 1, D-21335 Luneburg, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Computat Landscape Ecol, Leipzig, Germany..
    Seppelt, Ralf
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Computat Landscape Ecol, Leipzig, Germany.;Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Geosci & Geog, Halle, Saale, Germany.;German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany..
    Settele, Josef
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Conservat Biol, Halle, Germany.;Univ Philippines, Coll Arts & Sci, Inst Biol Sci, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines..
    Shackelford, Nancy
    Univ Colorado, Inst Arctic & Alpine Res, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Standish, Rachel J.
    Murdoch Univ, Environm & Conservat Sci, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Oliver, Tom H.
    Univ Reading, Sch Biol Sci, Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Hlth & Life Sci Bldg, Reading RG6 6AS, Berks, England..
    Transformation archetypes in global food systems2022Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 17, nr 5, s. 1827-1840Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Food systems are primary drivers of human and environmental health, but the understanding of their diverse and dynamic co-transformation remains limited. We use a data-driven approach to disentangle different development pathways of national food systems (i.e. 'transformation archetypes') based on historical, intertwined trends of food system structure (agricultural inputs and outputs and food trade), and social and environmental outcomes (malnutrition, biosphere integrity, and greenhouse gases emissions) for 161 countries, from 1995 to 2015. We found that whilst agricultural total factor productivity has consistently increased globally, a closer analysis suggests a typology of three transformation archetypes across countries: rapidly expansionist, expansionist, and consolidative. Expansionist and rapidly expansionist archetypes increased in agricultural area, synthetic fertilizer use, and gross agricultural output, which was accompanied by malnutrition, environmental pressures, and lasting socioeconomic disadvantages. The lowest rates of change in key structure metrics were found in the consolidative archetype. Across all transformation archetypes, agricultural greenhouse gases emissions, synthetic fertilizer use, and ecological footprint of consumption increased faster than the expansion of agricultural area, and obesity levels increased more rapidly than undernourishment decreased. The persistence of these unsustainable trajectories occurred independently of improvements in productivity. Our results underscore the importance of quantifying the multiple human and environmental dimensions of food systems transformations and can serve as a starting point to identify potential leverage points for sustainability transformations. More attention is thus warranted to alternative development pathways able of delivering equitable benefits to both productivity and to human and environmental health.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 22. Dornelles, André Zuanazzi
    et al.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Delabre, Izabela
    Denney, J. Michael
    Nunes, Richard J.
    Jentsch, Anke
    Nicholas, Kimberly A.
    Schröter, Matthias
    Seppelt, Ralf
    Settele, Josef
    Shackelford, Nancy
    Standish, Rachel J.
    Oliver, Tom H.
    Transformation archetypes in global food systems2022Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 17, nr 5, s. 1827-1840Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Food systems are primary drivers of human and environmental health, but the understanding of their diverse and dynamic co-transformation remains limited. We use a data-driven approach to disentangle different development pathways of national food systems (i.e. ‘transformation archetypes’) based on historical, intertwined trends of food system structure (agricultural inputs and outputs and food trade), and social and environmental outcomes (malnutrition, biosphere integrity, and greenhouse gases emissions) for 161 countries, from 1995 to 2015. We found that whilst agricultural total factor productivity has consistently increased globally, a closer analysis suggests a typology of three transformation archetypes across countries: rapidly expansionist, expansionist, and consolidative. Expansionist and rapidly expansionist archetypes increased in agricultural area, synthetic fertilizer use, and gross agricultural output, which was accompanied by malnutrition, environmental pressures, and lasting socioeconomic disadvantages. The lowest rates of change in key structure metrics were found in the consolidative archetype. Across all transformation archetypes, agricultural greenhouse gases emissions, synthetic fertilizer use, and ecological footprint of consumption increased faster than the expansion of agricultural area, and obesity levels increased more rapidly than undernourishment decreased. The persistence of these unsustainable trajectories occurred independently of improvements in productivity. Our results underscore the importance of quantifying the multiple human and environmental dimensions of food systems transformations and can serve as a starting point to identify potential leverage points for sustainability transformations. More attention is thus warranted to alternative development pathways able of delivering equitable benefits to both productivity and to human and environmental health.

  • 23.
    Eliasson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Transformations towards sustainable food systems: contrasting Swedish practitioner perspectives with the European Commission’s Farm to Fork Strategy2022Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 17, s. 2411-2425Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores features of food system transformations towards sustainability in the Farm to Fork Strategy in relation toperspectives of Swedish food system practitioners. Transformations towards sustainable food systems are essential to achievethe United Nations’ 2030 Agenda and the need for more sustainable food systems has been recognised in the European GreenDeal and its Farm to Fork Strategy. The Swedish ambition to act as a global leader in achieving the 2030 Agenda and theEuropean Commission’s aspiration for Europe to lead global food system transformations offer a critical opportunity to studytransformational processes and agents of change in a high-income region with externalised environmental and sustainabilityimpacts. Drawing on theories of complex systems transformations, this study identifies features of food system transformations,exploring places to intervene and examines the roles, responsibilities, and agency related to these changes. The resultsof this study provide three main conclusions highlighting (i) alignment of high-level policy and the perspectives of nationalpractitioners at the paradigm level, especially concerning how food is valued, which is a crucial first step for transformationalprocesses to come about (ii) a lack of clarity as well as diversity of pathways to transform food systems although commonobjectives are expressed, and (iii) governance mechanisms as enablers for a diversity of transformations. Moreover, theseprocesses must acknowledge the contextual and complex nature of food systems and the level of agency and power of actors.

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    fulltext
  • 24.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Siri, Jose
    Andersson, Erik
    Anderson, Pippin
    Bai, Xuemei
    Das, Pranab Kishore
    Gatere, Tatu
    Gonzalez, Andrew
    Goodness, Julie
    Handel, Steven N.
    Hermansson Török, Ellika
    Kavonic, Jessica
    Kronenberg, Jakub
    Lindgren, Elisabet
    Maddox, David
    Maher, Raymond
    Mbow, Cheikh
    McPhearson, Timon
    Mulligan, Joe
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Strategiska hållbarhetsstudier. Kounkuey Design Initiative, Los Angeles, USA.
    Nordenson, Guy
    Spires, Meggan
    Stenkula, Ulrika
    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko
    Vogel, Coleen
    Urban tinkering2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 6, s. 1549-1564Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are currently experiencing serious, multifaceted impacts from global environmental change, especially climate change, and the degree to which they will need to cope with and adapt to such challenges will continue to increase. A complex systems approach inspired by evolutionary theory can inform strategies for policies and interventions to deal with growing urban vulnerabilities. Such an approach would guide the design of new (and redesign of existing) urban structures, while promoting innovative integration of grey, green and blue infrastructure in service of environmental and health objectives. Moreover, it would contribute to more flexible, effective policies for urban management and the use of urban space. Four decades ago, in a seminal paper in Science, the French evolutionary biologist and philosopher Francois Jacob noted that evolution differs significantly in its characteristic modes of action from processes that are designed and engineered de novo (Jacob in Science 196(4295):1161–1166, 1977). He labeled the evolutionary process “tinkering”, recognizing its foundation in the modification and molding of existing traits and forms, with occasional dramatic shifts in function in the context of changing conditions. This contrasts greatly with conventional engineering and design approaches that apply tailor-made materials and tools to achieve well-defined functions that are specified a priori. We here propose that urban tinkering is the application of evolutionary thinking to urban design, engineering, ecological restoration, management and governance. We define urban tinkering as:

    A mode of operation, encompassing policy, planning and management processes, that seeks to transform the use of existing and design of new urban systems in ways that diversify their functions, anticipate new uses and enhance adaptability, to better meet the social, economic and ecological needs of cities under conditions of deep uncertainty about the future.

    This approach has the potential to substantially complement and augment conventional urban development, replacing predictability, linearity and monofunctional design with anticipation of uncertainty and non-linearity and design for multiple, potentially shifting functions. Urban tinkering can function by promoting a diversity of small-scale urban experiments that, in aggregate, lead to large-scale often playful innovative solutions to the problems of sustainable development. Moreover, the tinkering approach is naturally suited to exploring multi-functional uses and approaches (e.g., bricolage) for new and existing urban structures and policies through collaborative engagement and analysis. It is thus well worth exploring as a means of delivering co-benefits for environment and human health and wellbeing. Indeed, urban tinkering has close ties to systems approaches, which often are recognized as critical to sustainable development. We believe this concept can help forge much-closer, much-needed ties among engineers, architects, evolutionary ecologists, health specialists, and numerous other urban stakeholders in developing innovative, widely beneficial solutions for society and contribute to successful implementation of SDG11 and the New Urban Agenda.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Siri, José
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Anderson, Pippin
    Bai, Xuemei
    Das, Pranab Kishore
    Gatere, Tatu
    Gonzalez, Andrew
    Goodness, Julie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Handel, Steven N.
    Hermansson Török, Ellika
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Kavonic, Jessica
    Kronenberg, Jakub
    Lindgren, Elisabet
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Maddox, David
    Maher, Raymond
    Mbow, Cheikh
    McPhearson, Timon
    Mulligan, Joe
    Nordenson, Guy
    Spires, Meggan
    Stenkula, Ulrika
    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko
    Vogel, Coleen
    Urban tinkering2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 6, s. 1549-1564Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are currently experiencing serious, multifaceted impacts from global environmental change, especially climate change, and the degree to which they will need to cope with and adapt to such challenges will continue to increase. A complex systems approach inspired by evolutionary theory can inform strategies for policies and interventions to deal with growing urban vulnerabilities. Such an approach would guide the design of new (and redesign of existing) urban structures, while promoting innovative integration of grey, green and blue infrastructure in service of environmental and health objectives. Moreover, it would contribute to more flexible, effective policies for urban management and the use of urban space. Four decades ago, in a seminal paper in Science, the French evolutionary biologist and philosopher Francois Jacob noted that evolution differs significantly in its characteristic modes of action from processes that are designed and engineered de novo (Jacob in Science 196(4295):1161-1166, 1977). He labeled the evolutionary process tinkering, recognizing its foundation in the modification and molding of existing traits and forms, with occasional dramatic shifts in function in the context of changing conditions. This contrasts greatly with conventional engineering and design approaches that apply tailor-made materials and tools to achieve well-defined functions that are specified a priori. We here propose that urban tinkering is the application of evolutionary thinking to urban design, engineering, ecological restoration, management and governance. We define urban tinkering as:<disp-quote>A mode of operation, encompassing policy, planning and management processes, that seeks to transform the use of existing and design of new urban systems in ways that diversify their functions, anticipate new uses and enhance adaptability, to better meet the social, economic and ecological needs of cities under conditions of deep uncertainty about the future.</disp-quote>This approach has the potential to substantially complement and augment conventional urban development, replacing predictability, linearity and monofunctional design with anticipation of uncertainty and non-linearity and design for multiple, potentially shifting functions. Urban tinkering can function by promoting a diversity of small-scale urban experiments that, in aggregate, lead to large-scale often playful innovative solutions to the problems of sustainable development. Moreover, the tinkering approach is naturally suited to exploring multi-functional uses and approaches (e.g., bricolage) for new and existing urban structures and policies through collaborative engagement and analysis. It is thus well worth exploring as a means of delivering co-benefits for environment and human health and wellbeing. Indeed, urban tinkering has close ties to systems approaches, which often are recognized as critical to sustainable development. We believe this concept can help forge much-closer, much-needed ties among engineers, architects, evolutionary ecologists, health specialists, and numerous other urban stakeholders in developing innovative, widely beneficial solutions for society and contribute to successful implementation of SDG11 and the New Urban Agenda.

  • 26.
    Enqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Against the current: rewiring rigidity trap dynamics in urban water governance through civic engagement2016Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 11, nr 6, s. 919-933Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how the agency of local residents can affect persistent and unsustainable practices in urban water supply governance. Using a case study from Bangalore, India, we analyze a social-ecological trap which developed after a shift to external water provision paired with rapid urbanization. The reluctance of forsaking initial investments in infrastructure and competence, and the subsequent loss of the local network of lakes built for harvesting rainwater, reinforced dependence on external sources while undermining groundwater levels in the city. These feedbacks made water scarcity a structurally persistent feature of Bangalore. This situation started to change when local residents recently started organizing to preserve and restore Bangalore's lakes. By entering collaborative management agreements with municipal authorities, these lake groups have restored and established effective protection of five lakes. Through a case study of this civic engagement we show that the lake restorations have the potential to counteract trap mechanisms by restoring ecological functions, and by reducing water scarcity as groundwater levels rise and authorities are relieved from maintenance and monitoring tasks. Importantly, these lake groups have also created opportunities for over a dozen similar groups to form across the city. This demonstrates that social movements can be an important source of change in social-ecological traps.

  • 27.
    Enqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    van Oyen, Wessel
    Sustainable water tariffs and inequality in post-drought Cape Town: exploring perceptions of fairness2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, nr 2, s. 891-905Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Fair allocation of diminishing natural resources is increasingly central to sustainability. This includes the allocation of costs related to providing access, such as dams, pipes and pumps delivering clean water. Water tariffs are often designed to both recover these costs, meet social needs of water services to the poor, and incentivise conservation in dry times. However, strained public finances, prolonged droughts and economic inequality can undermine these goals and force prioritisations that many see as unfair. This happened in Cape Town, South Africa, during its 2015–2018 water crisis. This study investigates what residents in three different socioeconomic contexts view as fair water tariffs 1 year after the crisis. Using Q method, we describe five distinct perspectives on fairness: ‘the Insurer’, ‘the Individualist’, ’the Bureaucrat’, ‘the Humanitarian’, and ‘the Prepper’. These, we argue, can help distinguish between different ideas of what fairness implies, and what is required to promote it. We exemplify this by examining how viewpoints might have been shaped by specific communities’ experiences during and after the apartheid state’s discriminatory segregation policies. Using distributive, procedural and interactional interpretations of fairness, we discuss how the complex layers of poverty, inequality, mistrust, privilege and discrimination might produce different experiences and ideas of who should pay for and benefit from water services. Using these insights, we also reflect on the merits of tariffs that emphasise cost recovery and resource conservation over social needs, and the risks this poses for growing informal settlements in climate-stressed cities of the global South.

  • 28.
    Garcia, Nicolas Acosta
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Boyd, Eric
    Univ Durham, Dept Anthropol, Durham, England..
    Gillette, Maris Boyd
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rask, Nanna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Saldert, Hannah
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Singleton, Benedict Esmond
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS).
    Disagreeing well in an unparadigmatic field: a response to Bodin (2021)2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, nr 2, s. 1049-1052Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent opinion article, sustainability researcher orjan Bodin claims that a shift leftward in sustainability science has rendered certain topics and research methods taboo, thus inhibiting the field's ability to contribute to achieving Agenda 2030. In this response, we problematise Bodin's framing of sustainability science, arguing he has misrepresented the field as "normal" rather than acknowledging its unparadigmatic character. It is precisely the unparadigmatic character of sustainability sciences (plural emphasised) that allows the field to begin addressing the wicked problems of our time. The question is then how to "disagree well" and assure quality in this unparadigmatic field.

  • 29. Gasparatos, Alexandros
    et al.
    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Fukushi, Kensuke
    Nagao, Masafumi
    Swanepoel, Frans
    Swilling, Mark
    Trotter, Douglas
    von Blottnitz, Harro
    Sustainability science for meeting Africa's challenges: setting the stage2017Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 12, nr 5, s. 635-640Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 30. Green, Jonathan M. H.
    et al.
    Cranston, Gemma R.
    Sutherland, William J.
    Tranter, Hannah R.
    Bell, Sarah J.
    Benton, Tim G.
    Blixt, Eva
    Bowe, Colm
    Broadley, Sarah
    Brown, Andrew
    Brown, Chris
    Burns, Neil
    Butler, David
    Collins, Hannah
    Crowley, Helen
    DeKoszmovszky, Justin
    Firbank, Les G.
    Fulford, Brett
    Gardner, Toby A.
    Hails, Rosemary S.
    Halvorson, Sharla
    Jack, Michael
    Kerrison, Ben
    Koh, Lenny S. C.
    Lang, Steven C.
    McKenzie, Emily J.
    Monsivais, Pablo
    O'Riordan, Timothy
    Osborn, Jeremy
    Oswald, Stephen
    Price Thomas, Emma
    Raffaelli, David
    Reyers, Belinda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Srai, Jagjit S.
    Strassburg, Bernardo B. N.
    Webster, David
    Welters, Ruth
    Whiteman, Gail
    Wilsdon, James
    Vira, Bhaskar
    Research priorities for managing the impacts and dependencies of business upon food, energy, water and the environment2017Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 12, nr 2, s. 319-331Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Delivering access to sufficient food, energy and water resources to ensure human wellbeing is a major concern for governments worldwide. However, it is crucial to account for the 'nexus' of interactions between these natural resources and the consequent implications for human wellbeing. The private sector has a critical role in driving positive change towards more sustainable nexus management and could reap considerable benefits from collaboration with researchers to devise solutions to some of the foremost sustainability challenges of today. Yet opportunities are missed because the private sector is rarely involved in the formulation of deliverable research priorities. We convened senior research scientists and influential business leaders to collaboratively identify the top forty questions that, if answered, would best help companies understand and manage their food-energy-water-environment nexus dependencies and impacts. Codification of the top order nexus themes highlighted research priorities around development of pragmatic yet credible tools that allow businesses to incorporate nexus interactions into their decision-making; demonstration of the business case for more sustainable nexus management; identification of the most effective levers for behaviour change; and understanding incentives or circumstances that allow individuals and businesses to take a leadership stance. Greater investment in the complex but productive relations between the private sector and research community will create deeper and more meaningful collaboration and cooperation.

  • 31. Haga, Chihiro
    et al.
    Maeda, Marimi
    Hotta, Wataru
    Matsui, Takanori
    Nakaoka, Masahiro
    Morimoto, Junko
    Shibata, Hideaki
    Hashimoto, Shizuka
    Saito, Osamu
    Okayasu, Sana
    Kim, HyeJin
    Peterson, Garry
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Modeling desirable futures at local scale by combining the nature futures framework and multi-objective optimization2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Envisioning positive scenarios that recognize the multiple values of nature is fundamental for designing transformative changes in local socio-ecological systems. This study developed a protocol with three specifications for operationalizing the Nature Futures Framework (NFF) in a landscape scenario analysis using a multi-objective optimization framework composed of: (1) exploring nature-positive futures, (2) seeking alternative pathways for targets satisfying visions of plural values, and (3) screening key direct drivers to achieve the targets. This research conducted a case study of a rural landscape in northeastern Japan. First, 110 strategies of landscape management options were simulated from 2015 to 2100 using a forest landscape model, LANDIS-II. The simulation developed a data frame of four integrated indicators of the NFF values for each year and strategy. Second, nature-positive strategies were screened using the common values. Pareto optimal strategies were then identified to obtain equally good solutions. Finally, the key response options to achieve good nature-positive futures were identified using decision tree analysis. Our protocol identified (1) multiple, but few nature-positive and Pareto optimal strategies that satisfied NFF visions, (2) nature-positive, but not Pareto optimal strategies, and (3) non-nature-positive strategies. In most Pareto optimal strategies, the maximized value perspectives changed over time. Our protocol also identified key response options to achieve three different NFF value perspectives in the case study area: (1) clear or selective cutting in forestry and (2) solar PV installation on abandoned pastureland in agriculture and energy sectors. We discussed the implication for local landscape management, localizing NFF narratives to develop future scenarios and modeling practice of NFF. The protocol does not depend on a specific model and indicator. Thus, our scalable protocol can be applied to scenarios and model practices in any region to support envisioning plausible, feasible, and positive futures, and designing future stakeholder collaboration.

  • 32.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Giusti, Matteo
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Goodness, Julie
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Hamann, Maike
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Masterson, Vanessa A.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Meacham, Megan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Merrie, Andrew
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Ospina, Daniel
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm.
    Schill, Caroline
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm.
    Sinare, Hanna
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    The undisciplinary journey: early-career perspectives in sustainability science2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 1, s. 191-204Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The establishment of interdisciplinary Master’s and PhD programs in sustainability science is opening up an exciting arena filled with opportunities for early-career scholars to address pressing sustainability challenges. However, embarking upon an interdisciplinary endeavor as an early-career scholar poses a unique set of challenges: to develop an individual scientific identity and a strong and specific methodological skill-set, while at the same time gaining the ability to understand and communicate between different epistemologies. Here, we explore the challenges and opportunities that emerge from a new kind of interdisciplinary journey, which we describe as ‘undisciplinary.’ Undisciplinary describes (1) the space or condition of early-career researchers with early interdisciplinary backgrounds, (2) the process of the journey, and (3) the orientation which aids scholars to address the complex nature of today’s sustainability challenges. The undisciplinary journey is an iterative and reflexive process of balancing methodological groundedness and epistemological agility to engage in rigorous sustainability science. The paper draws upon insights from a collective journey of broad discussion, reflection, and learning, including a survey on educational backgrounds of different generations of sustainability scholars, participatory forum theater, and a panel discussion at the Resilience 2014 conference (Montpellier, France). Based on the results from this diversity of methods, we suggest that there is now a new and distinct generation of sustainability scholars that start their careers with interdisciplinary training, as opposed to only engaging in interdisciplinary research once strong disciplinary foundations have been built. We further identify methodological groundedness and epistemological agility as guiding competencies to become capable sustainability scientists and discuss the implications of an undisciplinary journey in the current institutional context of universities and research centers. In this paper, we propose a simple framework to help early-career sustainability scholars and well-established scientists successfully navigate what can sometimes be an uncomfortable space in education and research, with the ultimate aim of producing and engaging in rigorous and impactful sustainability science.

  • 33.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Giusti, Matteo
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Goodness, Julie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hamann, Maike
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Masterson, Vanessa A.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Meacham, Megan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Merrie, Andrew
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ospina, Daniel
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Schill, Caroline
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Sinare, Hanna
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The undisciplinary journey: early-career perspectives in sustainability science2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 1, s. 191-204Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The establishment of interdisciplinary Master’s and PhD programs in sustainability science is opening up an exciting arena filled with opportunities for early-career scholars to address pressing sustainability challenges. However, embarking upon an interdisciplinary endeavor as an early-career scholar poses a unique set of challenges: to develop an individual scientific identity and a strong and specific methodological skill-set, while at the same time gaining the ability to understand and communicate between different epistemologies. Here, we explore the challenges and opportunities that emerge from a new kind of interdisciplinary journey, which we describe as ‘undisciplinary.’ Undisciplinary describes (1) the space or condition of early-career researchers with early interdisciplinary backgrounds, (2) the process of the journey, and (3) the orientation which aids scholars to address the complex nature of today’s sustainability challenges. The undisciplinary journey is an iterative and reflexive process of balancing methodological groundedness and epistemological agility to engage in rigorous sustainability science. The paper draws upon insights from a collective journey of broad discussion, reflection, and learning, including a survey on educational backgrounds of different generations of sustainability scholars, participatory forum theater, and a panel discussion at the Resilience 2014 conference (Montpellier, France). Based on the results from this diversity of methods, we suggest that there is now a new and distinct generation of sustainability scholars that start their careers with interdisciplinary training, as opposed to only engaging in interdisciplinary research once strong disciplinary foundations have been built. We further identify methodological groundedness and epistemological agility as guiding competencies to become capable sustainability scientists and discuss the implications of an undisciplinary journey in the current institutional context of universities and research centers. In this paper, we propose a simple framework to help early-career sustainability scholars and well-established scientists successfully navigate what can sometimes be an uncomfortable space in education and research, with the ultimate aim of producing and engaging in rigorous and impactful sustainability science.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Hakkarainen, Viola
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Natural Resources Institute Finland, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    On the other end of research: exploring community-level knowledge exchanges in small-scale fisheries in Zanzibar2020Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 15, nr 1, s. 281-295Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability science has increasingly adopted more action-oriented approaches in an attempt to mobilise and implement a broad knowledge base to sustain human wellbeing and promote sustainable development. There is an increasing recognition of the importance of knowledge exchange (KE) between scientists and end users of research for enhancing social, environmental and economic impacts of research. Here, we explore the process of KE through close observation of two cases of KE between external PhD researchers and local actors in small-scale fisheries at the community level in Zanzibar, Tanzania. First, we address context by examining perceptions of research held by actors at community level and patterns of interactions and flows of benefits between external researchers and local actors including fisheries managers, local research institute as well as fishers and traders. Second, we unpack experiences of actors engaged in the cases of KE. The study draws attention to KE processes in the Global South and actors outside decision-making processes in fisheries management. The study concludes that as KE is a complex and dynamic process and that (i) history and relationships between actors shape the outcomes of KE, (ii) KE includes more than knowledge-based processes and outcomes because multiple incentives of different actors shape KE and how it is experiences and (iii) knowledge-based outcomes of KE are complex and unpredictable as different actors create their own meaning from shared information. The results exemplify the inevitably complex and unpredictable nature of KE processes and their outcomes, and provide insight into how KE can contribute to science–society relationships.

  • 35. Hara, Yuji
    et al.
    McPhearson, Timon
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The New School, USA; Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, USA.
    Sampei, Yuki
    McGrath, Brian
    Assessing urban agriculture potential: a comparative study of Osaka, Japan and New York city, United States2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 4, s. 937-952Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined urban agricultural production potential in New York city (NYC) in the United States and Osaka in Japan in a comparative study not only due to their similarities in population and region size but also differences in historical geographies and urban formation processes. We utilized available high-resolution land-use-and land-cover data to map and empirically compare size, land use, and spatial patterns of sites of current urban agriculture as well as land areas with potential for expanding urban agriculture. By linking current vegetable production data, and potential future urban agriculture land with per capita vegetable consumption data, we were able to estimate the total potential population that could be supported by locally produced vegetables. Our results showed that by scaling up current vegetable production in existing NYC community gardens, potential agricultural productivity on other underutilized or vacant land was 0.26 kg/m(2)/year for NYC. For Osaka, existing rice and dry fields could produce in comparison 0.54 and 0.74 kg/m(2)/year, respectively. By combining potential urban and peri-urban vegetable production measures with estimated needed vegetable caloric intake per person per year, we show that the current vegetable production levels in Osaka can feed approximately 0.50 million people. However, if the region maximizes existing underused speculative dry fields, urban and peri-urban agriculture could feed approximately 3.4 million people per year. In NYC, current vegetable production in community gardens is estimated to feed only 1700 people per year. However, if NYC maximized all available urban vacant lots and other open spaces, potential vegetable production could provide food annually for 0.55 million people. We discuss how though both community gardens in NYC and remaining rice and dry fields in Osaka have been out of formal city planning with clear land-use definition in zoning, these agricultural practices have nonetheless emerged as important sources of local food production and nutrition on the one hand, and sites of social benefit on the other.

  • 36. Harmáčková, Zuzana V.
    et al.
    Blättler, Linda
    Aguiar, Ana Paula D.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. National Institute for Space Research (INPE), Brazil.
    Daněk, Jan
    Krpec, Petr
    Vačkářová, Davina
    Linking multiple values of nature with future impacts: value-based participatory scenario development for sustainable landscape governance2022Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 849-864Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Reaching sustainable and just futures for people and nature requires tackling complex social-ecological challenges across multiple scales, from local to global. Pathways towards such futures are largely driven by people's decisions and actions, underpinned by multiple types of motivations and values. Thus, understanding the link between potential futures and the values underpinning them represents a key question of current sustainability research, recently embraced by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). Particularly the understanding of causal chains leading from values to futures across different contexts and scales is vital to identify which sustainability pathways to collectively pursue. In this study, we build on a transdisciplinary knowledge co-creation process in an array of local case studies in protected areas in the Czechia (Central Europe). We apply the Life Framework of Values and the Three Horizons framework in an innovative value-based participatory scenario building process to explore the relationships between (1) multiple types of values, (2) actions taken by different types of stakeholders, and (3) their potential impacts on nature, nature's contributions to people (including ecosystem services) and good quality of life. The resulting local-scale value-based pathways show the complex relationship between multiple types of values for nature and potential future trajectories. Finally, we reflect on the utility of value-based participatory scenario planning as a means to strengthen sustainable governance. We highlight that if participatory deliberation of values is to support decision-making processes, its design needs to carefully reflect local context and institutional set-up.

  • 37.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013).
    Complexity is no excuse: Introduction of a research model for turning sustainable development from theory into practice2019Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 14, nr 3, s. 733-749Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An overarching research model is introduced here that can support research for turning sustainable development (SD) from theory into practice. The model describes how existing and future theories, and empirical knowledge related to SD can be utilised to establish explicit linkages—steps—between fundamental SD principles and specific studied practices. The research model is intended to support planning, design and communication of a range of research endeavours such as individual studies, larger projects and research programmes. It internalises a number of insights from the current stock of SD literature such as explicitly linking local solutions to general SD principles, the need to embrace complexity and to use theory, the need for interdisciplinarity, and acknowledging SD as both substance and process. The model and its utilisation are explained and illustrated here by reference to a research example from river basin planning. The model is a critical and constructive attempt to establish structure and strategy in relation to the overwhelming complexity of the sustainability challenge—a challenge which urgently calls for reflective and effective research approaches.

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    fulltext
  • 38.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Morrison, Tiffany
    Moore, Michele-Lee
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Challenges for environmental governance: policy issue interdependencies might not lead to collaboration2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 219-234Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy actors address complex environmental problems by engaging in multiple and often interdependent policy issues. Policy issue interdependencies imply that efforts by actors to address separate policy issues can either reinforce (‘win–win’) or counteract (‘trade-off’) each other. Thus, if interdependent issues are managed in isolation instead of being coordinated, the most effective and well-balanced solution to the underlying problem might never be realised. This study asks if reinforcing and counteracting interdependencies have different impacts on perception and collaboration. Our empirical study of collaborative water governance in the Norrström basin, Sweden, shows that policy actors often avoid collaborating when the policy issues exhibit reinforcing interdependencies. Our evidence indicates a perceived infeasibility of acting on reinforcing interdependencies. We also find that actors do not consider counteracting interdependencies (‘trade-offs’) at all when they engage in collaboration. Further, even though actors were aware of counteracting and reinforcing interdependencies, our analyses suggest they might be less aware of the former. These findings illustrate that actors either avoid each other due to policy issue interdependencies or, at best, ignore existing interdependencies when engaging in collaboration. Our study highlights the importance of problem perception in accomplishing integrated solutions to complex environmental problems, and of how understandings of different types of interdependencies shape collaboration in environmental governance. 

  • 39.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2b, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Morrison, Tiffany
    James Cook Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia..
    Moore, Michele-Lee
    Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2b, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2b, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Challenges for environmental governance: policy issue interdependencies might not lead to collaboration2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 219-234Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy actors address complex environmental problems by engaging in multiple and often interdependent policy issues. Policy issue interdependencies imply that efforts by actors to address separate policy issues can either reinforce ('win-win') or counteract ('trade-off') each other. Thus, if interdependent issues are managed in isolation instead of being coordinated, the most effective and well-balanced solution to the underlying problem might never be realised. This study asks if reinforcing and counteracting interdependencies have different impacts on perception and collaboration. Our empirical study of collaborative water governance in the Norrstrom basin, Sweden, shows that policy actors often avoid collaborating when the policy issues exhibit reinforcing interdependencies. Our evidence indicates a perceived infeasibility of acting on reinforcing interdependencies. We also find that actors do not consider counteracting interdependencies ('trade-offs') at all when they engage in collaboration. Further, even though actors were aware of counteracting and reinforcing interdependencies, our analyses suggest they might be less aware of the former. These findings illustrate that actors either avoid each other due to policy issue interdependencies or, at best, ignore existing interdependencies when engaging in collaboration. Our study highlights the importance of problem perception in accomplishing integrated solutions to complex environmental problems, and of how understandings of different types of interdependencies shape collaboration in environmental governance.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 40.
    Henriksson, Patrik J. G.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. WorldFish, Malaysia.
    Rico, Andreu
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Klinger, Dane H.
    Buschmann, Alejandro H.
    Saksida, Sonja
    Chadag, Mohan V.
    Zhang, Wenbo
    Unpacking factors influencing antimicrobial use in global aquaculture and their implication for management: a review from a systems perspective2018Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, nr 4, s. 1105-1120Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Global seafood provides almost 20% of all animal protein in diets, and aquaculture is, despite weakening trends, the fastest growing food sector worldwide. Recent increases in production have largely been achieved through intensification of existing farming systems, resulting in higher risks of disease outbreaks. This has led to increased use of antimicrobials (AMs) and consequent antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in many farming sectors, which may compromise the treatment of bacterial infections in the aquaculture species itself and increase the risks of AMR in humans through zoonotic diseases or through the transfer of AMR genes to human bacteria. Multiple stakeholders have, as a result, criticized the aquaculture industry, resulting in consequent regulations in some countries. AM use in aquaculture differs from that in livestock farming due to aquaculture's greater diversity of species and farming systems, alternative means of AM application, and less consolidated farming practices in many regions. This, together with less research on AM use in aquaculture in general, suggests that large data gaps persist with regards to its overall use, breakdowns by species and system, and how AMs become distributed in, and impact on, the overall social-ecological systems in which they are embedded. This paper identifies the main factors (and challenges) behind application rates, which enables discussion of mitigation pathways. From a set of identified key mechanisms for AM usage, six proximate factors are identified: vulnerability to bacterial disease, AM access, disease diagnostic capacity, AMR, target markets and food safety regulations, and certification. Building upon these can enable local governments to reduce AM use through farmer training, spatial planning, assistance with disease identification, and stricter regulations. National governments and international organizations could, in turn, assist with disease-free juveniles and vaccines, enforce rigid monitoring of the quantity and quality of AMs used by farmers and the AM residues in the farmed species and in the environment, and promote measures to reduce potential human health risks associated with AMR.

  • 41.
    Jerneck, Anne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Olsson, Lennart
    Lund University.
    Ness, Barry
    Lund University.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Lund University.
    Baier, Matthias
    Lund University.
    Clark, Eric
    Lund University.
    Hickler, Thomas
    Biodivers and Climate Research Centre BiK F.
    Hornborg, Alf
    Lund University.
    Kronsell, Annica
    Lund University.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Persson, Johannes
    Lund University.
    Structuring sustainability science2011Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 6, nr 1, s. 69-82Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It is urgent in science and society to address climate change and other sustainability challenges such as biodiversity loss, deforestation, depletion of marine fish stocks, global ill-health, land degradation, land use change and water scarcity. Sustainability science (SS) is an attempt to bridge the natural and social sciences for seeking creative solutions to these complex challenges. In this article, we propose a research agenda that advances the methodological and theoretical understanding of what SS can be, how it can be pursued and what it can contribute. The key focus is on knowledge structuring. For that purpose, we designed a generic research platform organised as a three-dimensional matrix comprising three components: core themes (scientific understanding, sustainability goals, sustainability pathways); cross-cutting critical and problem- solving approaches; and any combination of the sustainability challenges above. As an example, we insert four sustainability challenges into the matrix (biodiversity loss, climate change, land use changes, water scarcity). Based on the matrix with the four challenges, we discuss three issues for advancing theory and methodology in SS: how new synergies across natural and social sciences can be created; how integrated theories for understanding and responding to complex sustainability issues can be developed; and how theories and concepts in economics, gender studies, geography, political science and sociology can be applied in SS. The generic research platform serves to structure and create new knowledge in SS and is a tool for exploring any set of sustainability challenges. The combined critical and problem- solving approach is essential.

  • 42.
    Jiménez-Aceituno, Amanda
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Norström, Albert
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Wong, Grace Y.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Downing, Andrea S.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Local lens for SDG implementation: lessons from bottom-up approaches in Africa2020Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 729-743Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Anthropocene presents a set of interlinked sustainability challenges for humanity. The United Nations 2030 Agenda has identified 17 specific Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a way to confront these challenges. However, local initiatives have long been addressing issues connected to these goals in a myriad of diverse and innovative ways. We present a new approach to assess how local initiatives contribute to achieving the SDGs. We analyse how many, and how frequently, different SDGs and targets are addressed in a set of African initiatives. We consider goals and targets addressed by the same initiative as interacting between them. Then, we cluster the SDGs based on the combinations of goals and targets addressed by the initiatives and explore how SDGs differ in how local initiatives engage with them. We identify 5 main groups: SDGs addressed by broad-scope projects, SDGs addressed by specific projects, SDGs as means of implementation, cross-cutting SDGs and underrepresented SDGs. Goal 11 (sustainable cities & communities) is not clustered with any other goal. Finally, we explore the nuances of these groups and discuss the implications and relevance for the SDG framework to consider bottom-up approaches. Efforts to monitor the success on implementing the SDGs in local contexts should be reinforced and consider the different patterns initiatives follow to address the goals. Additionally, achieving the goals of the 2030 Agenda will require diversity and alignment of bottom-up and top-down approaches.

  • 43.
    Johansson, Nils
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Hållbar utveckling, miljövetenskap och teknik, Strategiska hållbarhetsstudier.
    Recycling warning! Reconfiguring the toxic politics of a circular economy2022Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambition to retain products and materials for as long as possible in a circular economy may dilute, disperse and accumulate hazardous substances. However, in addition to exemptions for circulated products, the regulatory regime targets only a small percentage of all hazardous substances. This emerging problem is just one of many examples why the focus needs to shift from the win–win potential of a circular economy towards a reflexive consideration of tensions, trade-offs and policy conflicts between increased circulation and other topical issues, such as, in this case, reduced dispersion of hazardous substances.

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  • 44.
    Karlsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Mattsson, Marie
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Business modelling in farm-based biogas production: towards network-level business models and stakeholder business cases for sustainability2019Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 1071-1090Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Farm-based biogas production is a promising renewable energy technology with the potential for creating sustainable economic, environmental, and social value. However, Swedish farmers engaged in this activity struggle to turn a profit because of high-investment costs and severe price competition with fossil fuels. One way to address this situation is to re-organize the activity by innovating the business model (BM) towards sustainability. In this study, a team of researchers took an action research approach that proposed solutions for the financial difficulties at a farm cooperative that intended to develop its farm-based biogas production. Two participatory workshops (including researchers, producers, students, and consultants) were conducted using the sustainable business-modelling tool called the Flourishing Business Canvas (FBC). Based on the 215 ideas developed in the workshops, five sustainable BM prototypes were created. These five prototypes form the basis of an approach for initiating the development of a network-level BM for sustainability that highlights its superiority over a single-firm BM. The network-level BM’s main advantage in the farm-based biogas context is its strong focus on stakeholder collaboration that supports the development of a stakeholder business case for sustainability. Overall, this study highlights the usefulness of the network concept in the practice of sustainable BM development. Collaborative business modelling for developing network-level BMs that address environmental and social problems for and with stakeholders can be an effective way to increase long-term financial profit and promote the growth of a firm, a network, or an industry. © 2018 The Author(s)

  • 45. Kenter, Jasper O.
    et al.
    Rodríguez-Morales, Jorge E.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Environment Institute. Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekonomisk historia och internationella relationer.
    Thankappan, Samarthia
    Loving the mess: navigating diversity and conflict in social values for sustainability2019Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 1439-1461Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concludes a special feature of Sustainability Science that explores a broad range of social value theoretical traditions, such as religious studies, social psychology, indigenous knowledge, economics, sociology, and philosophy. We introduce a novel transdisciplinary conceptual framework that revolves around concepts of ‘lenses’ and ‘tensions’ to help navigate value diversity. First, we consider the notion of lenses: perspectives on value and valuation along diverse dimensions that describe what values focus on, how their sociality is envisioned, and what epistemic and procedural assumptions are made. We characterise fourteen of such dimensions. This provides a foundation for exploration of seven areas of tension, between: (1) the values of individuals vs collectives; (2) values as discrete and held vs embedded and constructed; (3) value as static or changeable; (4) valuation as descriptive vs normative and transformative; (5) social vs relational values; (6) different rationalities and their relation to value integration; (7) degrees of acknowledgment of the role of power in navigating value conflicts. In doing so, we embrace the ‘mess’ of diversity, yet also provide a framework to organise this mess and support and encourage active transdisciplinary collaboration. We identify key research areas where such collaborations can be harnessed for sustainability transformation. Here it is crucial to understand how certain social value lenses are privileged over others and build capacity in decision-making for understanding and drawing on multiple value, epistemic and procedural lenses.

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  • 46. Kok, Marcel T. J.
    et al.
    Kok, Kasper
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hill, Rosemary
    Agard, John
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Biodiversity and ecosystem services require IPBES to take novel approach to scenarios2017Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 177-181Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    What does the future hold for the world's ecosystems and benefits that people obtain from them? While the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) has identified the development of scenarios as a key to helping decision makers identify potential impacts of different policy options, it currently lacks a long-term scenario strategy. IPBES will decide how it will approach scenarios at its plenary meeting on 22-28 February 2016, in Kuala Lumpur. IPBES now needs to decide whether it should create new scenarios that better explore ecosystem services and biodiversity dynamics. For IPBES to capture the social-ecological dynamics of biodiversity and ecosystem services, it is essential to engage with the great diversity of local contexts, while also including the global tele-coupling among local places. We present and compare three alternative scenario strategies that IPBES could use and then suggest a bottom-up, cross-scale scenario strategy to improve the policy relevance of future IPBES assessments. We propose five concrete steps as part of an effective, long term scenario development process for IPBES in cooperation with the scientific community.

  • 47. Kramer, Lilith
    et al.
    Teurlincx, Sven
    Rashleigh, Brenda
    Janssen, Annette B. G.
    Janse, Jan H.
    Brauman, Kate A.
    Földesi, Csaba
    van Wijk, Dianneke
    de Senerpont Domis, Lisette N.
    Patil, Sopan D.
    Rashidi, Parinaz
    Hamel, Perrine
    Rising, James
    Mooij, Wolf M.
    Kuiper, Jan J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    New paths for modelling freshwater nature futures2023Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Freshwater ecosystems are exceptionally rich in biodiversity and provide essential benefits to people. Yet they are disproportionately threatened compared to terrestrial and marine systems and remain underrepresented in the scenarios and models used for global environmental assessments. The Nature Futures Framework (NFF) has recently been proposed to advance the contribution of scenarios and models for environmental assessments. This framework places the diverse relationships between people and nature at its core, identifying three value perspectives as points of departure: Nature for Nature, Nature for Society, and Nature as Culture. We explore how the NFF may be implemented for improved assessment of freshwater ecosystems. First, we outline how the NFF and its main value perspectives can be translated to freshwater systems and explore what desirable freshwater futures would look like from each of the above perspectives. Second, we review scenario strategies and current models to examine how freshwater modelling can be linked to the NFF in terms of its aims and outcomes. In doing so, we also identify which aspects of the NFF framework are not yet captured in current freshwater models and suggest possible ways to bridge them. Our analysis provides future directions for a more holistic freshwater model and scenario development and demonstrates how society can benefit from freshwater modelling efforts that are integrated with the value-perspectives of the NFF.

  • 48.
    Krampe, Florian
    Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ownership and inequalities: exploring UNEP’s Environmental Cooperation for Peacebuilding Program2021Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 16, s. 1159-1172Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of ownership—that is, who is included and excluded from policy processes—has become one of the most pressing issues in the global discourse on peace and conflict. While research shows that the inclusion of domestic actors is critical to success, broader international processes often neglect these actors. Focused on environmental peacebuilding—the sustainable management of natural resources in post-conflict settings—as an emerging area, this article employs qualitative content analysis (QCA) to study four core reports of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)’s Environmental Cooperation for Peacebuilding Programme (2008–2015). The results reveal that the framing of environmental peacebuilding in these documents contributes to power inequalities being reinforced. The reports’ language suggests that, overall, UNEP favors international ownership of environmental peacebuilding. By contrast, local actors—both state and non-state—appear to be considered a risk in the context of natural resource management. This article discusses the implications of this lack of inclusion for peacebuilding practice.

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  • 49. Kronenberg, Jakub
    et al.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. North-West University, South Africa.
    Integrating social values with other value dimensions: parallel use vs. combination vs. full integration2019Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 1283-1295Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to link different valuation methods, especially beyond disciplinary realms, has been discussed at least since the 1990s, and recently it has gained special attention. In the present contribution to this debate, we analyse the prospects for integrating different valuation methods representing three areas of disciplinary knowledge or value dimensions: social, monetary and ecological. We present a framework building on two key factors deciding the integration potential: logical commensurability of values, and technical compatibility of valuation methods. Using this framework, we analyse the integration potential in the case of social and monetary, and social and ecological valuation methods, along with the relevant empirical examples. Our conceptualization of social values refers principally to contextual values and value indicators. Our analysis shows that there is untapped potential for co-developing methods specifically to obtain more specific, integrated results. If full integration is not meaningful, the combination of different valuation methods can still support the analysis and interpretation of those methods' results. At the very least, parallel use of the different valuation methods produces a more comprehensive picture than using any of those methods alone. In conclusion, integrated valuation gives a nuanced picture of what is valued, but even parallel use of valuation methods is useful in highlighting the different perspectives on what is valuable and why.

  • 50. Lam, David P. M.
    et al.
    Jiménez Aceituno, Amanda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Leuphana University Lüneburg, Germany.
    Lara, Leonie Guerrero
    Sellberg, My M.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Norström, Albert V.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Moore, Michele-Lee
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Victoria, Canada.
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Amplifying actions for food system transformation: insights from the Stockholm region2022Ingår i: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 17, nr 6, s. 2379-2395Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Food is essential to people and is one of the main ways in which people are connected to the world’s ecosystems. However, food systems often cause ecosystem degradation and produce ill-health, which has generated increasing calls to transform food systems to be more sustainable. The Swedish food system is currently undergoing substantial change. A varied set of local actors have created alternative sustainability initiatives that enact new ways of doing, thinking, and organizing. These actors can increase the transformative impact of their initiatives through multiple actions and a variety of amplification processes. We analyzed the actions adopted by 29 food initiatives active in the Stockholm region using information available online. We conducted 11 interviews to better understand the amplification processes of speeding up (i.e., accelerating impact), scaling up (i.e., influencing higher institutional levels), and scaling deep (i.e., changing values and mind-sets). Our results indicated that the initiatives mainly seek to stabilize and grow their impact while changing the awareness, values, and mind-sets of people concerning the food they consume (scaling deep). However, these approaches raise new questions about whether these actions subvert or reinforce current unsustainable and inequitable system dynamics. We suggest there are distinct steps that local and regional governments could take to support these local actors via collaborations with coordinated forms of initiatives, and fostering changes at the municipality level, but these steps require ongoing, adaptive approaches given the highly complex nature of transformative change and the risks of reinforcing current system dynamics. 

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