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  • 1.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Örebro, Sweden.
    Helgesson, Jens
    Örebro universitet, Örebro, Sweden.
    Idrottsundervisning och maskulinitetens hegemoni: Genus och inflytande i gymnasieskolans ämne ”Idrott och hälsa”2017In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 8, p. 197-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish upper secondary school and its physical education (PE) should, according to the Lgy11 (the 2011 curriculum of upper secondary school in Sweden), raise aware- ness about and challenge stereotypes of masculinity and femininity. Previous research, however, has concluded that there is an upholding of traditional, hegemonic masculinity ideals through PE. The purpose of this article is to highlight how gender and power influence the outcome of a just education. Theoretical inspiration is taken from Irish Marion Young’s and Raewyn Connell’s work on gender and hegemonic masculinity, and the method involves interviews with PE teachers and observations of PE classes. Dance, ball games, competition, socializing violence, performance of heterosexual norms are identified as key points, which are discussed in terms of norms and power linked to men and masculinity ideals. The results show that the making of masculinity is constantly oc- curring in PE, both in active elements but also during “inactive” breaks. Although strong ideals linked to men and masculinity were identified, there were usually also alternative representations. In other words, the educational gender practices were not identified as unambiguous, but rather as ambiguous and contradictory. However, most respondents showed decided views on how boys and girls naturally “are” in certain ways, which con- ditions a counter-stereotypical approach to education. 

  • 2.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Between Performance and Beauty: Towards a sociological understanding of trajectories to drug use in a gym and bodybuilding context.2013In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 4, p. 69-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emanating from an ethnographic study of Swedish bodybuilders, this article aims to present a sociological understanding of various circumstances influencing the decision to begin taking performance-enhancing drugs. Theoretically, the research builds upon a constructionist approach, in which actors’ identity claims, the way they describe themselves and their group affiliation, are understood both as individual stories of identity construction and as discursive statements. The result shows that the willingness to perform, to focus on the body’s function, is a paradigmatic narrative being expressed throughout. As such, this performance oriented lifestyle can be related to traditional values saluted within organised sports and also understood as a fairly stable part of a hegemonic masculine construction. However, the results also show how the performance logic is entwined with a strong zest for bodily aesthetics. In the article, this cultural ambiguity is used as an analytical window through which one can see how different understandings of gender, health and doping continuously are socially negotiated in relation to contemporary fitness culture and public health organisations in Swedish society. By analysing doping trajectories in this way the article suggests that drug using practises could be understood as an activity performed along a continuum of cultural and societal (over-)conformity, rather than actions representing societal abnormality.

  • 3.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    From exercise to "exertainment": Body techniques and body philosophies within a differentiated fitness culture2015In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 6, p. 27-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on two highly influential body techniques used in contemporary gym and fitness culture, namely bodybuilding and group fitness activities. The paper presents detailed self-portraits of two highly esteemed and well-known individuals representing each of these spheres of exercise. Both body techniques have their roots in physical culture. However, whereas bodybuilding goes back to the historical roots of European physical culture developed during the 19th century, Les Mills group fitness activities are a more recent phenomenon, with roots in aerobics and in the fitness culture developed during the 1960s. The case stories are read as both portraits of individuals and histories of two different forms of body techniques and philosophies of the body, and the analysis suggests that the narratives are to be understood in relation to historical changes in how society is organised and what this implies in terms of national and global demands for specific bodies.

  • 4.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Routes and roots to knowing in Shaun White’s snowboarding road trip: A mycorrhizaic approach to multisensory emplaced learning in exergames2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 251-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores learning during game-play of a snowboarding video game intrigued by questions raised in the wake of the increasing mediatisation and digitisation of learning. Correspondingly, we answer to calls for more suitable metaphors for learning to cater for the entangled learning processes that changes related to the increase of digital media may infer. Using a short term sensory ethnography approach, we elaborate on the idea of multisensory emplaced learning and propose an organic metaphor – mycorrhiza – to both methodology and learning. Mycorrhiza refers to a symbiotic relationship between fungi and roots of plants in its environment where fungi are the visible effects of the mycorrhiza. The metaphor provides a way to start to unpack sensory, visual and embodied aspects of learning in the complexities of the digital age. By elaborating on the mycorrhizaic concepts fungus, soil, growth, mycelia and symbiosis we show three interrelated ways of moving through this game: (i) a social and cultural route, (ii) a competitive route, and (iii) an experiential route. With help of the metaphor we discern the symbiotic relations between what appeared in our empirical material as visual and other human and non-human aspects of emplacement.

  • 5.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Routes and roots to knowing in Shaun White’s snowboarding road trip: A mycorrhizaic approach to multisensory emplaced learning in exergames2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 251-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores learning during game-play of a snowboarding video game intrigued by questions raised in the wake of the increasing mediatisation and digitisation of learning. Correspondingly, we answer to calls for more suitable metaphors for learning to cater for the entangled learning processes that changes related to the increase of digital media may infer. Using a short term sensory ethnography approach, we elaborate on the idea of multisensory emplaced learning and propose an organic metaphor – mycorrhiza – to both methodology and learning. Mycorrhiza refers to a symbiotic relationship between fungi and roots of plants in its environment where fungi are the visible effects of the mycorrhiza. The metaphor provides a way to start to unpack sensory, visual and embodied aspects of learning in the complexities of the digital age. By elaborating on the mycorrhizaic concepts fungus, soil, growth, mycelia and symbiosis we show three interrelated ways of moving through this game: (i) a social and cultural route, (ii) a competitive route, and (iii) an experiential route. With help of the metaphor we discern the symbiotic relations between what appeared in our empirical material as visual and other human and non-human aspects of emplacement.

  • 6.
    Ekholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Research on Sport as a Means of Crime Prevention in a Swedish Welfare Context: A Literature Review2013In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 4, p. 91-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews Swedish research literature on sport as a means to realize social objectives related to crime prevention, contextualized by international literature on the subject. The article examines how Swedish research on sport as a means of crime prevention can be understood in light of international research regarding research questions, theoretical approaches, and content. Utilizing content analysis with inductive category development, the article describes current Swedish and international research, identifies certain characteristics in Swedish research, as well as underlying assumptions. Besides a thorough description acknowledging discrepancies between scientific knowledge in literature and a common sense notion in society about sport as a means of crime prevention, the article highlights five results. First, Swedish research shows great similarities with international research regarding content. Second, previous research is greatly concerned with empirically driven approaches. Third, Swedish research is nonexplicit in terms of crime prevention as a social objective and considers social objectives a potential effect of, rather than a premise for, sport practices. Fourth, Swedish research is focused on primary and secondary prevention. Fifth, there is general lack of Swedish research on sport as a means of crime prevention. In conclusion, the article considers future possible directions in research with respect to characteristics in the traditionally upheld Swedish welfare state regime.

  • 7.
    Enoksen, Eystein
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Fahlström, Per Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Johansen, Bjørn Tore
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Hageskog, Carl-Axel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Christensen, Jens B
    University of Aarhus, Denmark.
    Høigaard, Rune
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Perceptions of leadership behavior and the relation­ship to athletes among Scandinavian coaches2014In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 5, p. 131-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the perceptions of leadership behavior and coach–athlete relationship in Scandinavian coaches. A secondary purpose was to investigate if differences in national sport education, level of coaching and coaching experiences in individual or team sport have an influence on leadership behavior and coach–athlete relationships. One hundred and forty nine coaches at international level or national top level from Denmark, Norway and Sweden participated in this study (134 male and 15 female). The methods of investigation were Chelladurai’s Leadership scale of sport (LSS) (Chelladurai & Saleh, 1980) and Jowett’s coach–athlete relationship perspective (Jowett & Wyllemann, 2006). The results showed that the most frequent self-reported behavioral components between the described coach–athlete relationship subscales and preferred leadership behavior among Scandinavian top-level coaches were training and instructions, positive feedback and democratic behavior, respectively. The study also revealed a positive coach–athlete relationship between (1) commitment and training and instruction, (2) positive feedback and social support, and (3) between complementarities and training and instruction behavior. A significant difference was found between top coaches in Denmark and Sweden on commitment and complementarity, and more experienced coaches used significantly more training and instruction and social support in their coaching than did less experienced coaches. Coaches in team sports reported more autocratic behavior and less democratic behavior than coaches in individual sports.

  • 8.
    Graffman-Sahlberg, Marie
    et al.
    Katedralskolan, Uppsala.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Learning health in Swedish physical education: A critical case study of students’ encounters with physical fitness and health as a learning object2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, p. 227-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interfaces between health, physical education and schooling have a long history. Critical questions are being raised about the enforcement of learning a particular health practice in school physical education (PE). The present study departures from a practice-based research project evaluating a pedagogical model. The aim of the case study was to explore upper secondary students' learning and understandings of a specific learning object, aerobic fitness and how this influences health, after participating in a period of a longer lab work in the context of Swedish physical education. A phenomenographic approach was used when analyzing the students' written reports to identify and distinguish the variations of learning outcomes and understandings that emerged. Expectations of physical performance created tensions, and even conflicts, between the student-centred assignments and existing traditions within the field of physical education. The findings underscore the risk of neoliberal logics underpinning health education in the learning culture of PE. Further studies are needed where teaching methods/models and student learning are paid attention to in order to move away from teaching to be healthy towards students learning about health and make sense of themselves as healthy. This may offer new educational perspectives.

  • 9.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ideellt arbete och föreningsdemokrati: Det demokratiska ledarskapets krav och utmaningar i IF Stoor – en fallstudie2018In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 9, p. 45-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study, decision-making processes in the sport club ‘IF Stoor’ are analysed with a focus on so called voluntary “key actors” and their involvement in formal and informal decision-making processes. The aim of the study is to provide knowledge about how eleven key actors in a large sport club like IF Stoor – with approximately 3,000 members, many organisational levels but relatively few members involved in the formal decision-making bodies – acted and handled democratic claims and at the same time tried to secure the voluntary based sport production. The analysis shows that the key actors were involved continually in the club’s two parallel decision-making processes. There were formal decision-making bodies with statutes-directed processes which strengthened the club’s organization and economy. There were also informal, spatially indefinite and practice-driven decision-making processes that existed parallel with the formal ones. The informal decision-making processes, which had participatory qualities, involved a large part of the club’s about 150 leaders. This applied in particular to the coordinators of the club’s 10 sport sections – here labelled as key actors – who acted and functioned as organisational “nodes” in the decision-making processes. These coordinators, but also many other categories of members – especially leaders and athletes (and supportive relatives) – represented, in accordance with Ahrne & Papakosta’s organisational theory, ‘resources’, who occasionally engaged in participatory democratic discussions, negotiations and decisions. A conclusion drawn from this case study is that when informal decision-making processes are included in the analyses, a relatively large number of the club 150 leaders were involved in collective decision-making

  • 10.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Sport Sciences Center.
    The Artistocratic Taste for Sport among Swedish Sport Researchers2017In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 8, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cultural-scientific capital of sports researchers turns them into important arbiters of what is to count as a legitimate understanding of modern sport, and what is to be considered good and bad in sport. Drawing on the extensive work of Swedish sports researchers in social sciences and humanities between 1970 and 2010, the aim of this paper is to present a succinct view of how modern sport is portrayed in this intellectual milieu. The aim is to find out what its ascribed characteristics and essential values are, and then to contextualize this understanding socially and historically. The theoretical point of departure is the French cultural sociologist Pierre Bourdieu's writings on social classes and their different tastes for sport. Bourdieu's views on upper-class cultural fractions, which in his view includes university teachers and researchers, and their aristocratic attitude towards physical activity is of particular interest. This attitude includes a general distaste for win-at-all-cost – 'serious' – competitions, and a specific distaste for sports with a pronounced element of bodily contact such as boxing and football (soccer). According to the analysis presented here, this has also become the mainstream attitude among contemporary sport researchers in Sweden. The competition-critical discourse that is pronounced among Swedish researchers has one root in the general left-wing critique of the competitive market society prevalent in the 1970s, and another in specifically pedagogical ideas which claim that playful learning processes are always the most efficacious.

  • 11.
    Håman, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The framing of orthorexia nervosa in Swedish daily newspapers: A longitudinal qualitative content analysis2016In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 7, p. 27-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored and elucidated how orthorexia is framed in Swedish daily newspapers with a focus on characteristics of orthorexia. Key questions include: 1) how do the newspaper articles connect exercise with orthorexia? and 2) what trends in depicting exercise in relation to orthorexia do the newspaper articles represent over time? The method used was a longitudinal qualitative content analysis guided by the framing theory. We analyzed 166 articles published between 1998 and 2013. Our analysis revealed that orthorexia originally was framed as an eating disorder and subsequently included unhealthy exercise. Two trend shifts could be identified: in 2004, exercise was added as an element and in 2013 extreme exercise trends were described to influence the increase of orthorexia. The findings indicate that Swedish newspapers extend Bratman’s definition and depict orthorexia indiscriminately to describe a range of different behavioral characteristics. These results are discussed in terms of the idea of “healthism” and general health trends in society.

  • 12.
    Håman, Linn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The framing of orthorexia nervosa in Swedish daily newspapers: A longitudinal qualitative content analysis2016In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 7, p. 27-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored and elucidated how orthorexia is framed in Swedish daily newspapers with a focus on characteristics of orthorexia. Key questions include: 1) how do the newspaper articles connect exercise with orthorexia? and 2) what trends in depicting exercise in relation to orthorexia do the newspaper articles represent over time? The method used was a longitudinal qualitative content analysis guided by the framing theory. We analyzed 166 articles published between 1998 and 2013. Our analysis revealed that orthorexia originally was framed as an eating disorder and subsequently included unhealthy exercise. Two trend shifts could be identified: in 2004, exercise was added as an element and in 2013 extreme exercise trends were described to influence the increase of orthorexia. The findings indicate that Swedish newspapers extend Bratman’s definition and depict orthorexia indiscriminately to describe a range of different behavioral characteristics. These results are discussed in terms of the idea of “healthism” and general health trends in society.

  • 13.
    Karlefors, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Searching for the ‘How’: Teaching methods in Swedish physical education2018In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, focus in educational research – as well as in policy – seems to have shifted from teaching to learning. As a result of this, we know little about what different teaching methods are used in the subject, and how. The purpose of this article is to explore how different teaching methods are used in Swedish secondary physical education. Video recorded physical education lessons in eight Swedish secondary schools were used to identify different teaching methods. Kirk’s (1996) elaboration of the Spectrum of teaching styles formed the basis of the analysis. In subsequent interviews, teachers (8) and students (24) were asked questions about teaching and learning in the subject. All of the five methods that Kirk (1996) outlined were identified in the lessons, but they were very unevenly used. The task-based method was the most frequent one, while the guided discovery method was hardly used at all. The impression was that the teachers did not seriously consider the selection of methods in relation to objective, content and group of students. The students, for their part, described a situation where they were often left to their own devices regarding what they were supposed to learn. Based on the analysis, we argue that teachers need guidance to improve and develop their deliberate use of teaching methods in general, and especially student-centred methods. This is necessary if the goals of the subject are to be achievable for all students. We conclude that the marginal focus on teaching methods in physical education is not related to a parallel increase of the interest in student learning in the subject. On the contrary, the low interest in the use of different teaching methods seems rather to be related to a low interest in what students are to learn in the subject.

  • 14.
    Kilger, Magnus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    From hard work to grit: On the discursive formation of talent2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 29-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the long historical interest for the selection of young talented children in sports. This seemingly everlasting search for talents and the quest for the especially gifted is followed by the practice of trying to find and select the right individuals. This paper elucidates historical representations of talent and talent selection in a series of professional sports literature in Sweden during the 1930s, 1980s, 1990s and 2010s.

    Drawing on a discourse analytic approach, it illustrates the historical understanding of selection and how such practices produce formations of legitimacy. The study shows how certain historical elements reoccur in contemporary selection discourse and how specific actions are transformed into personal characteristics. These selection processes construct a rationale for a legitimate selection and illustrate how talent selection is based on historically specific assumptions, normative and moral statements and activities connected to a specific discursive formation. This insight can underlines that talent selection cannot be understood as essential skills identified through observation, tests or interviews. It is rather to be understood as a discursive repertoire responding to a specific historical legitimacy.

  • 15.
    Lundgren, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ridtränares multimodala kommunikation.: Multimodality in dressage training2017In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 8, p. 67-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates interaction during equestrian dressage trainings, focusing on the trainer’s communication with horse and rider. The study is based on interaction analyses of 15 video recorded training sessions, as well as analyses of interviews and field notes. The results reveal a wide variety of non-verbal communication modalities deployed by trainers sharing their practical expertise with the athletes. Equestrian trainers use activity specific onomatopoetic constructions, paralinguistic resources such as rhythm, pace and prosody, as well as a number of embodied resources where they use the space of the riding arena and various communicative configurations of their own body and the co-present bodies of horse and rider to represent the horse, the rider and/or the equipage as a whole.

    The study is a part of a larger project about equitation as a communicative and didactic practice, aiming at making the practical, embodied knowledge that riding and equestrian training rests on explicit, thus enabling reflection and discussion among both practitioners and researchers of communication and equestrianism.

  • 16.
    Renström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Karp, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Sport for adults: Using frame factor theory to investigate the significance of local sports instructors for a new Sport for All programme in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 9, p. 87-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, Sport for All includes increasing adults’ physical activity levels. Drawing on frame factor theory, this article examined the establishment of a sports programme offering recreational and fitness activities for adults within the Swedish Sports Confederation. Data from eight interviews with local sports instructors were analysed to investigate the content of activities for adults and how and why the instructors carried out these activities. The main finding is that sports as fitness and recreation activities for adults are carried out by the instructors within three patterns: participatory, mediation, and continuous. There is a ‘logic of enabling’ that emerges from these patterns: the instructors strive to make it possible for adults to practise sport for fitness and recreational purposes through a range of adjustments. However, the cues for the instructors regarding how to carry out a practice for adults are vague. The results also show that these groups for adults will only be offered as long as the resources for the traditional elite groups and groups for children and youth are not at risk.

  • 17.
    Romar, Jan-Erik
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Henriksson, John
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Ketomäki, Kent
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Hastie, Peter
    Auburn University, USA.
    Teachers’ Learning Experiences with the Sport Education Model in Physical Education2016In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 7, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport Education is proposed as an instructional model addressing concerns regarding traditional approaches to teaching physical education. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the reflective accounts of cohort of in-service physical education teachers after learning about, and teaching, a season of Sport Education. Four female elementary and middle school physical education teachers participated in a professional development course organized by the university and the course focused on implementing instructional models. Data were gathered from interviews with the teachers and analyzed using inductive constant comparison. The teachers reported that the Sport Education model required more planning and preparation than traditional teaching and that they were more supervising and helping than teaching. All teachers adjusted the Sport Education model according to their own understanding, the context and the group. All teachers perceived that the students were actively engaged, cooperated and learned new skills. The study showed that regular physical education teachers can through professional development effectively implement a novel curriculum model.

  • 18.
    Sjöblom, Paul
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Vem är det som styr egentligen? Svensk kommunal idrottspolitik 1985–2017: en fallstudie av Stockholms stad2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 51-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Who's in charge?

    Sport policies in Swedish municipalities 1985–2017 – a case study of Stockholm city

    The aim of this study is to analyse the distribution of public sport resources throughout time on the local level – and its consequences. In focus is the concept of governance, namely the stakeholder's capacity to affect to such extent that long-term effects are achieved. The method used is a case study of Stockholm city, the capital municipality in Sweden, where the material consists of meeting minutes and decision protocols from the public sports authority, contemporary literature and recorded and transcribed interviews with representatives of politics and public administration. The analytical approach starts within historical and political science-theories and research on governing. Three forms of governing are scrutinized: hierarchic governing, discursive governing and interactive governing. The investigated period is 1985-2017. It is a period with significant upheavals in the Swedish society, especially regarding the development of sports and public administration. The survey of the governing forms and practices indicates, that alot of different types have been used for a long time working parallel as a complement to each other rather than succeeding (replacing) each other. Primary results regarding the accomplished sport politics, are in the first place that the allowance of public funds to sports has increased during the 2000s. Secondly that the resources are mainly distributed in mainly the same ways (channels) as before and that there are mainly the same physical activities, organizations and social groups as previously which are favoured – while others in comparison are disadvantaged. This is a fact in spite of that the politicians sincequite a long time are fully aware of which groups have been neglected when it comes to physical activities, what kind of new desires citizens have today, and that there are many new initiatives time and again to bring about a change. The conclusion reads that the structural elements economy, tradition and culture have influenced the shaping of sports policy after 1985 more than individual stakeholders and their articulated interests and expressed values.

  • 19.
    Stark, Tobias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Från “lappjävel” till ”the King”: Börje Salming, NHL, och den svenska modellen2017In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 8, p. 163-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här artikeln handlar om tidigare Toronto Maple Leafs- och Team Sweden-stjärnan Börje Salming och hans roll som banbrytare för migrationen av svenska ishockeyspelare till den nordamerikanska hockeyligan NHL. På ett övergripande plan är syftet att belysa omvandlingen av den svenska (idrotts-) modellen kring millennieskiftet 2000. Utifrån ett omfattande arkivmaterial och mediekällor – inklusive föreningsprotokoll, tidningar, självbiografiska betraktelser och intervjuer – hävdas att Salmings enastående NHL-karriär inte bara banade väg för generationer av hans landsmän genom att punktera den nordamerikanska myten att skandinaviska spelare var mjuka och ömtåliga – en allmän uppfattning – men också bidrog till att omvandla den svenska nationalidentiteten och den hegemoniska ishockeymaskuliniteten. Teoretiskt bygger artikeln på medieforskaren Garry Whannels arbeten om mediesportstjärnor, och begreppet stardom som ”a form of social production in which the professional ideologies and production practices of the media aim to win and hold our attention by linking sporting achievement and personality in ways which have resonance in popular common sense”.

  • 20.
    Söderström, Tor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Brusvik, Peter
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lund, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Factors underlying competitive success in youth football: A study of the Swedish national U15 football talent system2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 139-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of Sweden’s 24 football districts analyses whether contextual factors

    (number of players, number of elite teams, and number of elite players on each

    district team) influence the district teams’ relative age effect (RAE) and the way

    in which contextual factors and RAE correlate with the U15 teams’ competitive

    success. The analysis is based on register data on district players (4,516 girls

    and 4,501 boys, all 15 years old) who attended an annual elite football camp:

    birthdate, the total number of players aged 15, club membership, senior elite

    clubs, proportion of elite players on the district teams, and match outcomes.

    Based on the birthdates of the players born between 2001 and 2012, a relative

    age index was constructed for each district. The results showed a relative age

    effect (RAE) for the selected district players (boys and girls) compared to the

    general 15-year-old football population; however, birthdate only affected the

    competitive success of the boys’ district teams. The analysis points out that

    contextual factors such as the number of football players and the presence of elite

    clubs are important to consider in order to understand how RAE is produced

    and its relationship to the success of winning matches for boys’ district teams.

  • 21.
    Söderström, Tor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Brusvik, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lund, Stefan
    Department of Education and Teachers’ Practice, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Factors underlying competitive successin youth football: A study of the Swedish national U15 football talent system2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 10, p. 139-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of Sweden’s 24 football districts analyses whether contextual factors (number of players, number of elite teams, and number of elite players on each district team) influence the district teams’ relative age effect (RAE) and the way in which contextual factors and RAE correlate with the U15 teams’ competitive success. The analysis is based on register data on district players (4,516 girls and 4,501 boys, all 15 years old) who attended an annual elite football camp: birthdate, the total number of players aged 15, club membership, senior elite clubs, proportion of elite players on the district teams, and match outcomes. Based on the birthdates of the players born between 2001 and 2012, a relative age index was constructed for each district. The results showed a relative age effect (RAE) for the selected district players (boys and girls) compared to the general 15-year-old football population; however, birthdate only affected the competitive success of the boys’ district teams. The analysis points out that contextual factors such as the number of football players and the presence of elite clubs are important to consider in order to understand how RAE is produced and its relationship to the success of winning matches for boys’ district teams.

  • 22.
    Zuiderveld, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism. Stockholms universitet.
    Sex, Football and the Media: The case of South Africa and the World Cup 20102013In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 4, p. 25-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how gender interplays with the news agenda during a very large scale event, in a country still undergoing political transition and where journalism plays a significant role in the nation-building process. The present study brings new knowledge to this area by examining the news agendas in South Africa on a specific gender-related issue: the rights of sex workers and trafficking victims, concerning men and children as well, but women in particular. This issue is often debated in connection with global sports events such as the World Cup. Drawing on interviews with media practitioners and on discourse analysis, the purpose of this study was to examine the news discourse on sex labour and trafficking and the connection with the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The findings suggest that the media discourse during the event was permeated with the rhetoric of nation-building. The combination of sport, media, and nationalism in a country in transition resulted in the ‘symbolic annihilation’ (Tuchman, 1978b) of a specific gender issue.

1 - 22 of 22
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