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  • 1.
    Abramson, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    FEMTOSECOND IMAGING Motion picture of short pulses2011In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 389-390Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Agåker, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
    Andersson, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
    Englund, J.C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
    Rausch, Joachim
    Giessen University.
    Rubensson, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
    Nordgren, Joseph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and condensed matter physics.
    Spectroscopy in the vacuum-ultraviolet2011In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 5, p. 248-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Barty, Anton
    et al.
    Caleman, Carl
    Aquila, Andrew
    Timneanu, Nicusor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Lomb, Lukas
    White, Thomas A.
    Andreasson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Arnlund, David
    Bajt, Sasa
    Barends, Thomas R. M.
    Barthelmess, Miriam
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Bostedt, Christoph
    Bozek, John D.
    Coffee, Ryan
    Coppola, Nicola
    Davidsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    DePonte, Daniel P.
    Doak, R. Bruce
    Ekeberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Elser, Veit
    Epp, Sascha W.
    Erk, Benjamin
    Fleckenstein, Holger
    Foucar, Lutz
    Fromme, Petra
    Graafsma, Heinz
    Gumprecht, Lars
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Hampton, Christina Y.
    Hartmann, Robert
    Hartmann, Andreas
    Hauser, Guenter
    Hirsemann, Helmut
    Holl, Peter
    Hunter, Mark S.
    Johansson, Linda
    Kassemeyer, Stephan
    Kimmel, Nils
    Kirian, Richard A.
    Liang, Mengning
    Maia, Filipe R. N. C.
    Malmerberg, Erik
    Marchesini, Stefano
    Martin, Andrew V.
    Nass, Karol
    Neutze, Richard
    Reich, Christian
    Rolles, Daniel
    Rudek, Benedikt
    Rudenko, Artem
    Scott, Howard
    Schlichting, Ilme
    Schulz, Joachim
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Shoeman, Robert L.
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Soltau, Heike
    Spence, John C. H.
    Stellato, Francesco
    Stern, Stephan
    Strueder, Lothar
    Ullrich, Joachim
    Wang, X.
    Weidenspointner, Georg
    Weierstall, Uwe
    Wunderer, Cornelia B.
    Chapman, Henry N.
    Self-terminating diffraction gates femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallography measurements2012In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray free-electron lasers have enabled new approaches to the structural determination of protein crystals that are too small or radiation-sensitive for conventional analysis(1). For sufficiently short pulses, diffraction is collected before significant changes occur to the sample, and it has been predicted that pulses as short as 10 fs may be required to acquire atomic-resolution structural information(1-4). Here, we describe a mechanism unique to ultrafast, ultra-intense X-ray experiments that allows structural information to be collected from crystalline samples using high radiation doses without the requirement for the pulse to terminate before the onset of sample damage. Instead, the diffracted X-rays are gated by a rapid loss of crystalline periodicity, producing apparent pulse lengths significantly shorter than the duration of the incident pulse. The shortest apparent pulse lengths occur at the highest resolution, and our measurements indicate that current X-ray free-electron laser technology(5) should enable structural determination from submicrometre protein crystals with atomic resolution.

  • 4.
    Freitag, Marina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne .
    Teuscher, Joel
    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne .
    Saygili, Yasemin
    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne .
    Zhang, Xiaoyu
    East China Univ Sci & Technol.
    Giordano, Fabrizio
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne.
    Liska, Paul
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne.
    Hua, Jianli
    East China Univ Sci & Technol.
    Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne.
    Moser, Jacques-E.
    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne .
    Grätzel, Michael
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne.
    Dye-sensitized solar cells for efficient power generation under ambient lighting2017In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 372-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar cells that operate efficiently under indoor lighting are of great practical interest as they can serve as electric power sources for portable electronics and devices for wireless sensor networks or the Internet of Things. Here, we demonstrate a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) that achieves very high power-conversion efficiencies (PCEs) under ambient light conditions. Our photosystem combines two judiciously designed sensitizers, coded D35 and XY1, with the copper complex Cu(II/I)(tmby) as a redox shuttle (tmby, 4,4', 6,6'-tetramethyl-2,2'-bipyridine), and features a high open-circuit photovoltage of 1.1 V. The DSC achieves an external quantum efficiency for photocurrent generation that exceeds 90% across the whole visible domain from 400 to 650 nm, and achieves power outputs of 15.6 and 88.5 mu W cm(-2) at 200 and 1,000 lux, respectively, under illumination from a model Osram 930 warm-white fluorescent light tube. This translates into a PCE of 28.9%.

  • 5.
    Gorkhover, Tais
    et al.
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atomare Phys, Berlin, Germany.;SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA.;SLAC Natl Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Ulmer, Anatoli
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atomare Phys, Berlin, Germany..
    Ferguson, Ken
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA.;SLAC Natl Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Bucher, Max
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atomare Phys, Berlin, Germany.;SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA.;Argonne Natl Lab, Chem Sci & Engn Div, Lemont, IL USA..
    Maia, Filipe R. N. C.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden.;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, NERSC, Berkeley, CA USA..
    Bielecki, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden.;European XFEL GmbH, Schenefeld, Germany..
    Ekeberg, Tomas
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    Hantke, Max F.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Daurer, Benedikt J.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nettelblad, Carl
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Div Sci Comp, Dept Informat Technol, Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Andreasson, Jakob
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden.;Czech Acad Sci, Inst Phys, ELI Beamlines, Prague, Czech Republic.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Phys, Condensed Matter Phys, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Barty, Anton
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    Bruza, Petr
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Phys, ELI Beamlines, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Carron, Sebastian
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA..
    Hasse, Dirk
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Krzywinski, Jacek
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA..
    Larsson, Daniel S. D.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Morgan, Andrew
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    Muhlig, Kerstin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mueller, Maria
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atomare Phys, Berlin, Germany..
    Okamoto, Kenta
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Pietrini, Alberto
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Rupp, Daniela
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atomare Phys, Berlin, Germany..
    Sauppe, Mario
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atomare Phys, Berlin, Germany..
    van der Schot, Gijs
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Seibert, Marvin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Svenda, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Swiggers, Michelle
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA..
    Timneanu, Nicusor
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Westphal, Daniel
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Williams, Garth
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA.;Brookhaven Natl Lab, NSLS 2, Upton, NY 11973 USA..
    Zani, Alessandro
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Chapman, Henry N.
    DESY, Ctr Free Electron Laser Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    Faigel, Gyula
    Inst Solid State Phys & Opt, Wigner RCP, Budapest, Hungary..
    Moeller, Thomas
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atomare Phys, Berlin, Germany..
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Lab Mol Biophys, Uppsala, Sweden.;European XFEL GmbH, Schenefeld, Germany.;Czech Acad Sci, Inst Phys, ELI Beamlines, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Bostedt, Christoph
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford, CA 94025 USA.;SLAC Natl Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA.;Argonne Natl Lab, Chem Sci & Engn Div, Lemont, IL USA.;Northwestern Univ, Dept Phys, Evanston, IL 60208 USA..
    Femtosecond X-ray Fourier holography imaging of free-flying nanoparticles2018In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 150-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrafast X-ray imaging on individual fragile specimens such as aerosols(1), metastable particles(2), superfluid quantum systems(3) and live biospecimens(4) provides high-resolution information that is inaccessible with conventional imaging techniques. Coherent X-ray diffractive imaging, however, suffers from intrinsic loss of phase, and therefore structure recovery is often complicated and not always uniquely defined(4,5). Here, we introduce the method of in-flight holography, where we use nanoclusters as reference X-ray scatterers to encode relative phase information into diffraction patterns of a virus. The resulting hologram contains an unambiguous three-dimensional map of a virus and two nanoclusters with the highest lateral resolution so far achieved via single shot X-ray holography. Our approach unlocks the benefits of holography for ultrafast X-ray imaging of nanoscale, non-periodic systems and paves the way to direct observation of complex electron dynamics down to the attosecond timescale.

  • 6. Gorkhover, Tais
    et al.
    Ulmer, Anatoli
    Ferguson, Ken
    Bucher, Max
    Maia, Filipe R. N. C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Bielecki, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Ekeberg, Tomas
    Hantke, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Daurer, Benedikt J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Nettelblad, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andreasson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Barty, Anton
    Bruza, Petr
    Carron, Sebastian
    Hasse, Dirk
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Krzywinski, Jacek
    Larsson, Daniel S. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Morgan, Andrew
    Mühlig, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Müller, Maria
    Okamoto, Kenta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Pietrini, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Rupp, Daniela
    Sauppe, Mario
    van der Schot, Gijs
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Seibert, Marvin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Svenda, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Swiggers, Michelle
    Timneanu, Nicusor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Westphal, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Williams, Garth
    Zani, Alessandro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Chapman, Henry N.
    Faigel, Gyula
    Möller, Thomas
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Bostedt, Christoph
    Femtosecond X-ray Fourier holography imaging of free-flying nanoparticles2018In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 12, p. 150-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Hamel, Deny R.
    et al.
    Shalm, Lynden K.
    Hübel, Hannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Miller, Aaron J.
    Marsili, Francesco
    Verma, Varun B.
    Mirin, Richard P.
    Nam, SaeWoo
    Resch, Kevin J.
    Jennewein, Thomas
    Direct generation of three-photon polarization entanglement2014In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 8, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-classical states of light are of fundamental importance for emerging quantum technologies. All optics experiments producing multi-qubit entangled states have until now relied on outcome post-selection, a procedure where only the measurement results corresponding to the desired state are considered. This method severely limits the usefulness of the resulting entangled states. Here, we show the direct production of polarization-entangled photon triplets by cascading two entangled downconversion processes. Detecting the triplets with high-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors allows us to fully characterize them through quantum state tomography. We use our three-photon entangled state to demonstrate the ability to herald Bell states, a task that was not possible with previous three-photon states, and test local realism by violating the Mermin and Svetlichny inequalities. These results represent a significant breakthrough for entangled multi-photon state production by eliminating the constraints of outcome post-selection, providing a novel resource for optical quantum information processing.

  • 8.
    Hantke, Max F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Hasse, Dirk
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Maia, Filipe R. N. C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Ekeberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    John, Katja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Svenda, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Loh, N. Duane
    Martin, Andrew V.
    Timneanu, Nicusor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Larsson, Daniel S.D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Gijs, van der Schot
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Carlsson, Gunilla H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Ingelman, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Andreasson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Westphal, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Liang, Mengning
    Stellato, Francesco
    DePonte, Daniel P.
    Hartmann, Robert
    Kimmel, Nils
    Kirian, Richard A.
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Mühlig, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Schorb, Sebastian
    Ferguson, Ken
    Bostedt, Christoph
    Carron, Sebastian
    Bozek, John D.
    Rolles, Daniel
    Rudenko, Artem
    Epp, Sascha
    Chapman, Henry N.
    Barty, Anton
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Andersson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser2014In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 943-949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We overcome two of the most daunting challenges in single-particle diffractive imaging: collecting many high-quality diffraction patterns on a small amount of sample and separating components from mixed samples. We demonstrate this on carboxysomes, which are polyhedral cell organelles that vary in size and facilitate up to 40% of Earth's carbon fixation. A new aerosol sample-injector allowed us to record 70,000 low-noise diffraction patterns in 12 min with the Linac Coherent Light Source running at 120 Hz. We separate different structures directly from the diffraction data and show that the size distribution is preserved during sample delivery. We automate phase retrieval and avoid reconstruction artefacts caused by missing modes. We attain the highest-resolution reconstructions on the smallest single biological objects imaged with an X-ray laser to date. These advances lay the foundations for accurate, high-throughput structure determination by flash-diffractive imaging and offer a means to study structure and structural heterogeneity in biology and elsewhere.

  • 9. Hickstein, Daniel D.
    et al.
    Dollar, Franklin J.
    Grychtol, Patrik
    Ellis, Jennifer L.
    Knut, Ronny
    Hernández-García, Carlos
    Zusin, Dmitriy
    Gentry, Christian
    Shaw, Justin M.
    Fan, Tingting
    Dorney, Kevin M.
    Becker, Andreas
    Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka
    Kapteyn, Henry C.
    Murnane, Margaret M.
    Durfee, Charles G.
    Non-collinear generation of angularly isolated circularly polarized high harmonics2015In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 743-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We generate angularly isolated beams of circularly polarized extreme ultraviolet light through the first implementation of non-collinear high harmonic generation with circularly polarized driving lasers. This non-collinear technique offers numerous advantages over previous methods, including the generation of higher photon energies, the separation of the harmonics from the pump beam, the production of both left and right circularly polarized harmonics at the same wavelength and the capability of separating the harmonics without using a spectrometer. To confirm the circular polarization of the beams and to demonstrate the practicality of this new light source, we measure the magnetic circular dichroism of a 20 nm iron film. Furthermore, we explain the mechanisms of non-collinear high harmonic generation using analytical descriptions in both the photon and wave models. Advanced numerical simulations indicate that this non-collinear mixing enables the generation of isolated attosecond pulses with circular polarization.

  • 10.
    Jenkins, Amelia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Canalias, Carlota
    KTH.
    Pasiskevicius, Valdas
    KTH.
    Who needs mirrors?2007In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 1, no 8, p. 484-484Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. Kfir, Ofer
    et al.
    Grychtol, Patrik
    Turgut, Emrah
    Knut, Ronny
    Zusin, Dmitriy
    Popmintchev, Dimitar
    Popmintchev, Tenio
    Nembach, Hans
    Shaw, Justin M.
    Fleischer, Avner
    Kapteyn, Henry
    Murnane, Margaret
    Cohen, Oren
    Generation of bright phase-matched circularly-polarized extreme ultraviolet high harmonics2015In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circularly-polarized extreme ultraviolet and X-ray radiation is useful for analysing the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of materials. To date, such radiation has only been available at large-scale X-ray facilities such as synchrotrons. Here, we demonstrate the first bright, phase-matched, extreme ultraviolet circularly-polarized high harmonics source. The harmonics are emitted when bi-chromatic counter-rotating circularly-polarized laser pulses field-ionize a gas in a hollow-core waveguide. We use this new light source for magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the M-shell absorption edges of Co. We show that phase-matching of circularly-polarized harmonics is unique and robust, producing a photon flux comparable to linearly polarized high harmonic sources. This work represents a critical advance towards the development of table-top systems for element-specific imaging and spectroscopy of multiple elements simultaneously in magnetic and other chiral media with very high spatial and temporal resolution.

  • 12. Liu, Xiao-Jing
    et al.
    Miao, Quan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology. Shandong University of Science and Technology, China .
    Gel'mukhanov, Faris
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology. Synchrotron SOLEIL, France .
    Patanen, Minna
    Travnikova, Oksana
    Nicolas, Christophe
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Ueda, Kiyoshi
    Miron, Catalin
    Einstein-Bohr recoiling double-slit gedanken experiment performed at the molecular level2015In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 120-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Double-slit experiments illustrate the quintessential proof for wave-particle complementarity. If information is missing about which slit the particle has traversed, the particle, behaving as a wave, passes simultaneously through both slits. This wave-like behaviour and corresponding interference is absent if 'which-slit' information exists. The essence of Einstein-Bohr's debate about wave-particle duality was whether the momentum transfer between a particle and a recoiling slit could mark the path, thus destroying the interference. To measure the recoil of a slit, the slits should move independently. We showcase a materialization of this recoiling double-slit gedanken experiment by resonant X-ray photoemission from molecular oxygen for geometries near equilibrium (coupled slits) and in a dissociative state far away from equilibrium (decoupled slits). Interference is observed in the former case, while the electron momentum transfer quenches the interference in the latter case owing to Doppler labelling of the counter-propagating atomic slits, in full agreement with Bohr's complementarity.

  • 13.
    Oppeneer, Peter. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Materials Optics: Lighting Up Antiferromagnets2017In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 74-76Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Weak coupling of light to the microscopic magnetic order in antiferromagnetic materials makes their optical characterization notoriously difficult. Now, a table-top magneto-optical technique has been developed for detecting the vector direction of antiparallel-aligned magnetic moments in a metallic antiferromagnet

  • 14.
    Seifert, T.
    et al.
    Fritz Haber Inst Max Planck Soc, Dept Phys Chem, D-14195 Berlin, Germany..
    Jaiswal, S.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.;Singulus Technol AG, D-63796 Kahl Am Main, Germany..
    Martens, U.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Phys, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany..
    Hannegan, J.
    Univ Maryland Baltimore Cty, Dept Phys, Baltimore, MD 21250 USA..
    Braun, L.
    Fritz Haber Inst Max Planck Soc, Dept Phys Chem, D-14195 Berlin, Germany..
    Maldonado, Pablo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Freimuth, F.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Peter Grunberg Inst, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Adv Simulat, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;JARA, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Kronenberg, A.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, D-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Henrizi, J.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, D-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Radu, I.
    Tech Univ Berlin, Inst Opt & Atom Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat & Energie, D-12489 Berlin, Germany..
    Beaurepaire, E.
    Inst Phys & Chim Mat Strasbourg, F-67200 Strasbourg, France..
    Mokrousov, Y.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Peter Grunberg Inst, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Adv Simulat, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;JARA, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Oppeneer, Peter M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Jourdan, M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, D-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Jakob, G.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, D-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Turchinovich, D.
    Max Planck Inst Polymer Res, D-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Hayden, L. M.
    Wolf, M.
    Fritz Haber Inst Max Planck Soc, Dept Phys Chem, D-14195 Berlin, Germany..
    Muenzenberg, M.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Phys, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany..
    Klaeui, M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, D-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Kampfrath, T.
    Fritz Haber Inst Max Planck Soc, Dept Phys Chem, D-14195 Berlin, Germany..
    Efficient metallic spintronic emitters of ultrabroadband terahertz radiation2016In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 483-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terahertz electromagnetic radiation is extremely useful for numerous applications, including imaging and spectroscopy. It is thus highly desirable to have an efficient table-top emitter covering the 1-30 THz window that is driven by a low-cost, low-power femtosecond laser oscillator. So far, all solid-state emitters solely exploit physics related to the electron charge and deliver emission spectra with substantial gaps. Here, we take advantage of the electron spin to realize a conceptually new terahertz source that relies on three tailored fundamental spintronic and photonic phenomena in magnetic metal multilayers: ultrafast photoinduced spin currents, the inverse spin-Hall effect and a broadband Fabry-Perot resonance. Guided by an analytical model, this spintronic route offers unique possibilities for systematic optimization. We find that a 5.8-nm-thick W/CoFeB/Pt trilayer generates ultrashort pulses fully covering the 1-30 THz range. Our novel source outperforms laser-oscillator-driven emitters such as ZnTe(110) crystals in terms of bandwidth, terahertz field amplitude, flexibility, scalability and cost.

  • 15. Shapiro, David A.
    et al.
    Yu, Young-Sang
    Tyliszczak, Tolek
    Cabana, Jordi
    Celestre, Rich
    Chao, Weilun
    Kaznatcheev, Konstantin
    David, KilcoyneA. L.
    Maia, Filipe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Marchesini, Stefano
    Meng, Y. Shirley
    Warwick, Tony
    Yang, Lee Lisheng
    Padmore, Howard A.
    Chemical composition mapping with nanometre resolution by soft X-ray microscopy2014In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 765-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic and bond orientation contrast1, 2, 3, 4, 5. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the X-ray optics6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Here, using soft X-ray ptychography, we demonstrate the highest-resolution X-ray microscopy ever achieved by imaging 5 nm structures. We quantify the performance of our microscope and apply the method to the study of delithiation in a nanoplate of LiFePO4, a material of broad interest in electrochemical energy storage11, 12. We calculate chemical component distributions using the full complex refractive index and demonstrate enhanced contrast, which elucidates a strong correlation between structural defects and chemical phase propagation. The ability to visualize the coupling of the kinetics of a phase transformation with the mechanical consequences is critical to designing materials with ultimate durability.

  • 16.
    Wang, Nana
    et al.
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Cheng, Lu
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Ge, Rui
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Shuting
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Miao, Yanfeng
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Zou, Wei
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Yi, Chang
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Yan
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yu
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Rong
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Wei, Yingqiang
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Guo, Qiang
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Ke, You
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Maotao
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Jin, Yizheng
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yang
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Ding, Qingqing
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Di, Dawei
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Yang, Le
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Xing, Guichuan
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Tian, He
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Jin, Chuanhong
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Friend, Richard H.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Wang, Jianpu
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China.
    Huang, Wei
    Nanjing Technical University of NanjingTech, Peoples R China; Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommun, Peoples R China; Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommun, Peoples R China.
    Perovskite light-emitting diodes based on solution-processed self-organized multiple quantum wells2016In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 699-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organometal halide perovskites can be processed from solutions at low temperatures to form crystalline direct-bandgap semiconductors with promising optoelectronic properties(1-5). However, the efficiency of their electroluminescence is limited by non-radiative recombination, which is associated with defects and leakage current due to incomplete surface coverage(6-9). Here we demonstrate a solution-processed perovskite light-emitting diode (LED) based on self-organized multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with excellent film morphologies. The MQW-based LED exhibits a very high external quantum efficiency of up to 11.7%, good stability and exceptional highpower performance with an energy conversion efficiency of 5.5% at a current density of 100 mA cm(-2). This outstanding performance arises because the lower bandgap regions that generate electroluminescence are effectively confined by perovskite MQWs with higher energy gaps, resulting in very efficient radiative decay. Surprisingly, there is no evidence that the large interfacial areas between different bandgap regions cause luminescence quenching.

  • 17. Wenz, J.
    et al.
    Döpp, A.
    Khrennikov, K.
    Schindler, S.
    Gilljohann, M. F.
    Ding, H.
    Götzfried, J.
    Buck, A.
    Xu, J.
    Heigoldt, M.
    Helml, W.
    Veisz, Laszlo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany.
    Karsch, S.
    Dual-energy electron beams from a compact laser-driven accelerator2019In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 13, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrafast pump–probe experiments open the possibility to track fundamental material behaviour, such as changes in electronic configuration, in real time. To date, most of these experiments are performed using an electron or a high-energy photon beam that is synchronized to an infrared laser pulse. Entirely new opportunities can be explored if not only a single, but multiple synchronized, ultrashort, high-energy beams are used. However, this requires advanced radiation sources that are capable of producing dual-energy electron beams, for example. Here, we demonstrate simultaneous generation of twin-electron beams from a single compact laser wakefield accelerator. The energy of each beam can be individually adjusted over a wide range and our analysis shows that the bunch lengths and their delay inherently amount to femtoseconds. Our proof-of-concept results demonstrate an elegant way to perform multi-beam experiments in the future on a laboratory scale.

  • 18.
    Xu, Weidong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Hu, Qi
    Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Bai, Sai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bao, Chunxiong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. International Collaborative Laboratory of 2D Materials for Optoelectronics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
    Miao, Yanfeng
    Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Yuan, Zhongcheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Borzda, Tetiana
    Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milan, Italy.
    Barker, Alex J.
    Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milan, Italy.
    Tyukalova, Elizaveta
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, Singapore.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kawecki, Maciej
    Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa, Dubendorf, Switzerland / Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Wang, Heyong
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yan, Zhibo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shi, Xiaobo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Wenjing
    International Collaborative Laboratory of 2D Materials for Optoelectronics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
    Duchamp, Martial
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, Singapore.
    Liu, Jun-Ming
    Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Petrozza, Annamaria
    Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Milan, Italy.
    Wang, Jianpu
    Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China.
    Liu, Li-Min
    Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, China / chool of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing, China .
    Huang, Wei
    ey Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE) and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing, China / Shaanxi Institute of Flexible Electronics (SIFE), Northwestern Polytechnical University (NPU), Xi’an, China.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rational molecular passivation for high-performance perovskite light-emitting diodes2019In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major efficiency limit for solution-processed perovskite optoelectronic devices, for example light-emitting diodes, is trap-mediated non-radiative losses. Defect passivation using organic molecules has been identified as an attractive approach to tackle this issue. However, implementation of this approach has been hindered by a lack of deep understanding of how the molecular structures influence the effectiveness of passivation. We show that the so far largely ignored hydrogen bonds play a critical role in affecting the passivation. By weakening the hydrogen bonding between the passivating functional moieties and the organic cation featuring in the perovskite, we significantly enhance the interaction with defect sites and minimize non-radiative recombination losses. Consequently, we achieve exceptionally high-performance near-infrared perovskite light-emitting diodes with a record external quantum efficiency of 21.6%. In addition, our passivated perovskite light-emitting diodes maintain a high external quantum efficiency of 20.1% and a wall-plug efficiency of 11.0% at a high current density of 200 mA cm−2, making them more attractive than the most efficient organic and quantum-dot light-emitting diodes at high excitations.

  • 19. Yang, H.
    et al.
    Zhao, D.
    Chuwongin, S.
    Seo, J. -H
    Yang, W.
    Shuai, Y.
    Berggren, Jesper
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Hammar, Mattias
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Ma, Z.
    Zhou, W.
    Transfer-printed stacked nanomembrane lasers on silicon2012In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 6, no 9, p. 615-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The realization of silicon-based light sources has been the subject of a major research and development effort worldwide. Such sources may help make integrated photonic and electronic circuitry more cost-effective, with higher performance and greater energy efficiency. The hybrid approach, in which silicon is integrated with a III-V gain medium, is an attractive route in the development of silicon lasers because of its potential for high efficiency. Hybrid lasers with good performance have been reported that are fabricated by direct growth or direct wafer-bonding of the gain medium to silicon. Here, we report a membrane reflector surface-emitting laser on silicon that is based on multilayer semiconductor nanomembrane stacking and a stamp-assisted transfer-printing process. The optically pumped laser consists of a transferred III-V InGaAsP quantum-well heterostructure as the gain medium, which is sandwiched between two thin, single-layer silicon photonic-crystal Fano resonance membrane reflectors. We also demonstrate high-finesse single-or multiwavelength vertical laser cavities.

  • 20.
    Zhao, Baodan
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Bai, Sai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Oxford, England.
    Kim, Vincent
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Lamboll, Robin
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Shivanna, Ravichandran
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Auras, Florian
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Richter, Johannes M.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Yang, Le
    Univ Cambridge, England; ASTAR, Singapore.
    Dai, Linjie
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Alsari, Mejd
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    She, Xiao-Jian
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Liang, Lusheng
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Jiangbin
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Lilliu, Samuele
    Univ Sheffield, England; UAE Ctr Crystallog, U Arab Emirates.
    Gao, Peng
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Snaith, Henry J.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Wang, Jianpu
    Nanjing Tech Univ, Peoples R China.
    Greenham, Neil C.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Friend, Richard H.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Di, Dawei
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    High-efficiency perovskite-polymer bulk heterostructure light-emitting diodes2018In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 783-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite-based optoelectronic devices are gaining much attention owing to their remarkable performance and low processing cost, particularly for solar cells. However, for perovskite light-emitting diodes, non-radiative charge recombination has limited the electroluminescence efficiency. Here we demonstrate perovskite-polymer bulk heterostructure light-emitting diodes exhibiting external quantum efficiencies of up to 20.1% (at current densities of 0.1-1 mA cm(-2)). The light-emitting diode emissive layer comprises quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional (2D/3D) perovskites and an insulating polymer. Photogenerated excitations migrate from quasi-2D to lower-energy sites within 1 ps, followed by radiative bimolecular recombination in the 3D regions. From near-unity external photoluminescence quantum efficiencies and transient kinetics of the emissive layer with and without charge-transport contacts, we find non-radiative recombination pathways to be effectively eliminated, consistent with optical models giving near 100% internal quantum efficiencies. Although the device brightness and stability (T-50 = 46 h in air at peak external quantum efficiency) require further improvement, our results indicate the significant potential of perovskite-based photon sources.

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