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  • 1. Andersson, Lars Gustaf
    et al.
    Sundholm, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    The cultural practice of minor cinema archiving: The case of immigrant filmmakers in Sweden2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 79-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to present the archival practice behind two extensive research projects that we have worked on during the last decade: the Stockholm Film Workshop and minor immigrant filmmaking in Sweden. Archive has become a general catchword in today’s academia that encompasses several practices of collecting, storing, distributing and displaying. We will stress in particular – partly against the idealism of digital activism – that the archive is a locus of power. The struggle for archival acknowledgement is a question of how to establish an archival artefact, an object that may be stored and repeated, and thus to affirm it as something that cannot be disregarded. This is a practice in the way that theory also constitutes a practice: a way of intervening that is case sensitive and that constantly cuts across those four principles that Giovanna Fossati famously coined as ‘film as original’, ‘film as art’, ‘film as dispositif’ and ‘film as state of the art’.

  • 2.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The press cutting, film studies and the digital age2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 149-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unlike the scrapbook, the humble press cutting has never quite broken the surface in the theoretical and methodological discourses of historiography, whether for film or other kinds of histories. In today's radically changed archive-scape where old volumes of printed media are digitized by the shelf-load, the blessings and curses of the curated collection may rapidly fade from short-term memory. At the same time, this novel sense of distance towards them can prove useful for discussing the impact of the collections' provenance and bias. In tracing the press-cuttings collection in Swedish press discourse during the twentieth century, the article argues that its meaning has shifted over time, most clearly signalling status, progress and knowledge optimism in the 1940s to 1960s. Lastly, the article maps the discourse and history of cuttings at the Swedish Film Institute and suggests that the press-cutting archive is now more interesting in its entirety as collection than by virtue of its individual scraps and pieces.

  • 3.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    'Mom might have a job (or be socializing too much!)': 'The right to love', children’s sexuality and parenthood2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having been unavailable for many years, the Swedish film Rätten att älska (‘The right to love’) was restored by the Swedish Film Institute in 2013 and made accessible for research. In many ways a typical example of the sex education film genre of its time, the film is simultaneously unusual because it deals with children’s sexuality. This article explores and discusses the representation of children in the film in relation to how it connects to issues of parenthood.

  • 4.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    'Mom might have a job (or be socializing too much!)': 'The right to love', children’s sexuality and parenthood2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having been unavailable for many years, the Swedish film Rätten att älska (‘The right to love’) was restored by the Swedish Film Institute in 2013 and made accessible for research. In many ways a typical example of the sex education film genre of its time, the film is simultaneously unusual because it deals with children’s sexuality. This article explores and discusses the representation of children in the film in relation to how it connects to issues of parenthood.

  • 5.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Uppsala University.
    Realism or 'grotesque cliches'?: Jan Halldoff's The Corridor and the Swedish debate on abortion in the 1960s2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish filmmaker Jan Halldoff's fiction film Korridoren (The Corridor) premiered in 1968 to a mainly positive Swedish reception. Shot at Karolinska Hospital and criticizing the Swedish healthcare system, the film became much debated and can furthermore be seen as a turning point in Swedish film history regarding the portrayal of medical institutions and professionals. In this article, the film and its reception are analysed in relation to the Swedish debate on abortion at the time. While the film is clearly critical of Swedish welfare society, the way it depicts abortion is more conservative. Highlighting this as well as the role of actual medical professionals in the film, the article demonstrates how the film relates to representations of abortion in the past and discusses connections between the film industry and medicine at this historical moment.

  • 6.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Uppsala Univ, Dept Hist Sci & Ideas, Uppsala, Sweden;Linnaeus Univ, Film Studies, Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Realism or 'grotesque cliches'?: Jan Halldoff's The Corridor and the Swedish debate on abortion in the 1960s2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish filmmaker Jan Halldoff's fiction film Korridoren (The Corridor) premiered in 1968 to a mainly positive Swedish reception. Shot at Karolinska Hospital and criticizing the Swedish healthcare system, the film became much debated and can furthermore be seen as a turning point in Swedish film history regarding the portrayal of medical institutions and professionals. In this article, the film and its reception are analysed in relation to the Swedish debate on abortion at the time. While the film is clearly critical of Swedish welfare society, the way it depicts abortion is more conservative. Highlighting this as well as the role of actual medical professionals in the film, the article demonstrates how the film relates to representations of abortion in the past and discusses connections between the film industry and medicine at this historical moment.

  • 7.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    Lund University.
    "This Is a Dirty Movie": Taxi Driver and "Swedish Sin"2011In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines a well-known sequence in Martin Scorsese’s 1976 film Taxi Driver in which the main character Travis Bickle takes his date Betsy to the movies and convinces her to see a Swedish sex education film. The article analyses the representation of Swedish cinema and Swedish sexuality in Taxi Driver, but also discusses the short sequence from a Swedish perspective, revealing a contemporary popular Swedish misconception about it. For this purpose, the sequence as well as the subsequent Swedish interpretation of it are contextualized and considered in relation to the widespread notion of ‘Swedish sin’.

  • 8.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    Lund University.
    "This Is a Dirty Movie": Taxi Driver and "Swedish Sin"2011In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines a well-known sequence in Martin Scorsese’s 1976 film Taxi Driver in which the main character Travis Bickle takes his date Betsy to the movies and convinces her to see a Swedish sex education film. The article analyses the representation of Swedish cinema and Swedish sexuality in Taxi Driver, but also discusses the short sequence from a Swedish perspective, revealing a contemporary popular Swedish misconception about it. For this purpose, the sequence as well as the subsequent Swedish interpretation of it are contextualized and considered in relation to the widespread notion of ‘Swedish sin’.

  • 9.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Brauerhoch, Annette
    Holmlund, Chris
    Editorial2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 75-80Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Björklund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Brauerhoch, Annette
    Holmlund, Chris
    Editorial2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 75-80Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bruhn, Jørgen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Gjelsvik, Anne
    NTNU Trondheim.
    “Jan Troell’s Fleeting Still Moments”2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the role of photography in the Swedish auteur Jan Troell's film Maria Larssons eviga ögonblick/Everlasting Moments (2008) in the light of different perspectives on medium specificity, photography and adaptation. We argue that Jan Troell, by way of cinema, discusses key characteristics and functions of photography. In so doing, the film, in addition to telling the tale of a historical female photographer, raises a number of questions concerning media theory, media ontology and history. We introduce the term 'fleeting still moments' in order to account for Troell's particular cinematic strategy, negotiating movement and stills. Accordingly, the central questions in our study are as follows: what are the differences and similarities between cinema and photography? And to what degree can the differences be framed within the traditional divide between cinema's movement and photography's stillness?

  • 12.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    ‘A fragment of the world’: An interview with Petra Bauer2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 189-193Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University ; Hamburg University, Germany.
    The language of the complex image: Roy Anderssons's political aesthetics2010In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 83-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from the opening scene of Roy Andersson’s 1991 short Härlig är jorden/World of Glory, the article gives an overview of the director’s political aesthetics outlined in his book Vår tids rädsla för allvar. Through the use of static long shots, stylization and the condensation of time and space Andersson attempts to activate reflection upon existential questions such as solidarity and the individual’s responsibility. In this scene from World of Glory Andersson links these ideas with a critique of Swedish passivity during the Holocaust.

  • 14.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    The Face of AIDS Film Archive and cultural memories of the future: an interview with Staffan Hildebrand2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 131-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University.
    A film of her own: Home movies, the archive and Ingrid Bergman. An interview with Stig Björkman and Dominika Daubenbüchel2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 183-188Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16. Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    A film of her own: Home movies, the archive and Ingrid Bergman: An interview with Stig Björkman and Dominika Daubenbüchel2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 183-188Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17. Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Scandinavian cinema 
culture and archival 
practices: Collecting, curating and accessing moving image histories2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 75-78Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University.
    Scandinavian cinema 
culture and archival 
practices: Collecting, curating and accessing moving image histories2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 75-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Gustafsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. The Swedish Film Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasse Ekman at MoMA2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 211-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    The introduction of bibliotherapy and its theoretical transformation to audio-visual media2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 53-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bibliotherapy constitutes a broad concept that can be described as the use of literature to promote human health. This article discusses the possibilities and implications of transferring the theoretical framework of bibliotherapy to audio-visual circumstances.

  • 21.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    The tradition of Christmas Day and Boxing Day Film Premieres in Sweden, 1913-20122013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 259-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the 100-year-old Swedish tradition of special film premieres on Christmas Day and Boxing Day.

  • 22.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Hjort, Mette
    Hong Kong Baptist University, People's Republic of China.
    Editorial2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Sexual violence, good taste and the education of the cinema audience: Gender and censorship in 1920s Sweden2018In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 215-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article makes use of records in the archive of Sweden’s National Board of Film Censorship for a discussion of the censorship of visual representations of sex and violence in films by women directors during the 1920s. From the perspective that Swedish film censorship was utilized to educate and control Swedish cinema audiences, not least concerning taste, the question is posed: how did gender and nationality play a role in the assessment of taste? Focusing on three case studies, namely Karin Swanström’s Kalle Utter (1925), Dorothy Arzner’s Manhattan Cocktail (1928) and Olga Preobrazhenskaya’s The Women of Ryazan (1927) and comparing censorship records with reviews in the daily press, the article demonstrates how nation played a role in the assessment of taste and the decisions to cut these films. The analyses also reveal that the censoring of sexual violence had a tendency to diminish acts such as rape and forced kissing in a narrative as well as on a moral level.

  • 24. Hedling, Olof
    et al.
    Snickars, Pelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Film Studies anno 2013: A Bird’s Eye View2014In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 35-41Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short subject assessing the current state of the academic field of film studies as practiced at sites of higher learning in Sweden is based on experiences and knowledge the co-authors gained as members of a national committee to evaluate the ‘academic quality’ of programmes from a comparative point of view

  • 25. Hongisto, Ilona
    et al.
    Wahlberg, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Guest Editorial2016In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 77-80Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Jernudd, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Christmas satire on Swedish television: Christopher's Christmas mission2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 253-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The short subject argues that the short animated film, Sagan om Karl-Bertil Jonssons julafton/Christopher's Christmas Mission, which is screened annually on Swedish public service television to the delight of around a million spectators, offers sharp satire criticizing lingering class inequalities in the 1970s, despite decades of Social Democratic rule.

  • 27.
    Karlsson, Helena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Ruben Östlund's Play (2011): Race and Segregation in 'good' liberal Sweden.2014In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Koivunen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Authorial self-fashioning in Jörn Donner’s Portraits of Women2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his films of the late 1960s and the early 1970s, Jörn Donner, a Swedish-speaking Finnish author, critic and film director, employed his body and popular media image as a contemporary celebrity for narrative and marketing purposes. Focusing on the film Naisenkuvia/Portraits of Women (1970), a metanarrative about the alliance of art cinema and pornography in the 1960s and a parody of Donner’s public persona, this article investigates Donner’s ‘authoring practices’ and gestures of authorial ‘self-projection’ amidst the mediatized sexual revolution of the 1960s. Portraits of Women reveals Donner's appropriation and analysis of a newly sexualized public sphere, but the film also reads as a crisis point. While capitalizing on his public persona by casting himself as the male lead, Donner was forced to acknowledge that self-fashioning in the sphere of public sex escapes authorial control.

  • 29.
    Koivunen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Talking heads, imagined communities: steam of Life and the affective politics of intimate documentary2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a cycle of new Finnish documentaries, male confessional talk abounds. Beyond the successful Miesten vuoro/Steam of Life (Joonas Berghäll and Mika Hotakainen, 2010), several recent documentaries propose to give voice to ordinary Finnish men who reveal their true feelings to other men. In this article, Steam of Life is discussed as a case of intimate documentary, drawing on both the political aesthetics of feminist documentary and the transnational, late modern rhetoric of confession.Employing the complex affective legacies of the talking head, the film engages in performative politics of gender and nation. It mobilizes a discourse on the nation as a male network, and importantly evokes nation as a sentimental community, a community based on feeling. In so doing, however, it de-individualizes the speaking subjects. While purporting to give voice to the male protagonists, the film makes them anonymous soldiers of the nation, thereby denying them their own voices.

  • 30.
    Koskinen, Maaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Multiple Adaptation Processes: The case of Alexander Ahndoril's "The Director" and its predecessors in feature film, television documentary and popular print media2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the novel by Alexander Ahndoril, Regissören/The Director (2006/2008), partially adapts Ingmar Bergman’s film Nattvardsgästerna/The Communicants (1963). It is less well known that the novel also adapts a television documentary about the shoot of The Communicants made in 1962 for Swedish public television by Vilgot Sjöman. In Ahndoril’s novel, then, the transfer moves from Bergman’s film and Sjöman’s documentary to the novel, in contrast to conventional adaptation practice, which moves in the opposite direction. Furthermore, besides moving images, other media have been adapted in Ahndoril’s novel, for example, feature stories in Swedish women’s magazines on Bergman and then-wife Käbi Laretei’s domestic life. Finally, Bergman’s journals have also been adapted, not from the original source text, however, but as represented in academic publications. In sum, Ahndoril’s novel is the result of a multiple adaptation process, involving not only moving images in the form of an art-film feature and a television documentary, but also still photography, popular print media and an academic publication. As such the novel also points towards a broader cultural adaptation process.

  • 31.
    Koskinen, Maaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Multiple Adaptation Processes: the case of Alexander Ahndoril's "The Director" and its predecessors in feature film, television documentary and popular print media2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the novel by Alexander Ahndoril, Regissören/The Director (2006/2008), partially adapts Ingmar Bergman’s film Nattvardsgästerna/The Communicants (1963). It is less well known that the novel also adapts a television documentary about the shoot of The Communicants made in 1962 for Swedish public television by Vilgot Sjöman. In Ahndoril’s novel, then, the transfer moves from Bergman’s film and Sjöman’s documentary to the novel, in contrast to conventional adaptation practice, which moves in the opposite direction. Furthermore, besides moving images, other media have been adapted in Ahndoril’s novel, for example, feature stories in Swedish women’s magazines on Bergman and then-wife Käbi Laretei’s domestic life. Finally, Bergman’s journals have also been adapted, not from the original source text, however, but as represented in academic publications. In sum, Ahndoril’s novel is the result of a multiple adaptation process, involving not only moving images in the form of an art-film feature and a television documentary, but also still photography, popular print media and an academic publication. As such the novel also points towards a broader cultural adaptation process.

  • 32.
    Koskinen, Maaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Time, memory and actors: Representation of ageing in recent Swedish feature film2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 89-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As has been noted in scholarship across various disciplines, issues of age and ageing have attracted much interest in recent years. In film production as well, ageing character actors have entered centre stage, in both popular films (for instance the Hotel Marigold films) and existential dramas (for instance Lucky, with 90-year-old Harry Dean Stanton in his last role). However, little has been written on Swedish film production in this regard. This article attempts to demonstrate, through an empirical overview, that interest in age and ageing has increased in feature film during the last two decades, not only internationally but more specifically in Swedish film. This article also strives to hypothesize, drawing on the area of memory studies, that the mere representation of ageing bodies and identities by well-known actors may inspire positive affective experiences related to memory, and that such representations, accumulatively across time, may be beneficial to health.

  • 33.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Ingmar Bergman, Swedish sexploitation and early Swedish porn2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses intertextual relations between Ingmar Bergman films and four films from the Swedish history of late 1960s and 1970s sexploitation and pornography. Although Bergman played a significant role in the liberalization of film censorship in Sweden in the 1960s and was known for the beautiful actresses of his films, that he demonstrably inspired film-makers operating in what is usually regarded as the complete opposite of art cinema is not so widely known. In the films Jag – en oskuld/Inga (1968), Thriller – en grym film/Thriller – A Cruel Picture (1974), Justine och Juliette/Justine and Juliette (1975) and Fäbodjäntan/Come Blow the Horn (1978) there are several intertextual relations, both deliberate allusions and more implicit and unintended connections. These relations may have an impact on how we regard both the role of Bergman and the directors of sexually explicit films in the particular context of Sweden in the 1960s and 1970s.

  • 34.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Stockholm University.
    Ingmar Bergman, Swedish sexploitation and early Swedish porn2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses intertextual relations between Ingmar Bergman films and four films from the Swedish history of late 1960s and 1970s sexploitation and pornography. Although Bergman played a significant role in the liberalization of film censorship in Sweden in the 1960s and was known for the beautiful actresses of his films, that he demonstrably inspired film-makers operating in what is usually regarded as the complete opposite of art cinema is not so widely known. In the films Jag – en oskuld/Inga (1968), Thriller – en grym film/Thriller – A Cruel Picture (1974), Justine och Juliette/Justine and Juliette (1975) and Fäbodjäntan/Come Blow the Horn (1978) there are several intertextual relations, both deliberate allusions and more implicit and unintended connections. These relations may have an impact on how we regard both the role of Bergman and the directors of sexually explicit films in the particular context of Sweden in the 1960s and 1970s

  • 35.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Stockholm University.
    Joe Sarno and historiography: some thoughts on The Sarnos: A Life in Dirty Movies2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent Swedish documentary The Sarnos: A Life in Dirty Movies (Eriksson, 2013) evokes questions about historiography and nationality. This article discusses the documentary's focus on Joe Sarno's reluctance to do hardcore, on his wife, Peggy, as well as the couple's relationship to Sweden.

  • 36.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Joe Sarno and Historiography: Some Thoughts on The Sarnos: A Life in Dirty Movies2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent Swedish documentary The Sarnos: A Life in Dirty Movies (Eriksson, 2013) evokes questions about historiography and nationality. This article discusses the documentary's focus on Joe Sarno's reluctance to do hardcore, on his wife, Peggy, as well as the couple's relationship to Sweden.

  • 37.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Using health as an argument: The Swedish porn debate 2013-182019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 111-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short subject delineates the current Swedish debate about pornography's harmful effects on children as a public health problem and situates it in a discursive and socio-geographical context. It describes how the arguments of the Swedish debate align with those of an international anti-porn discourse and cautions against normative assignations of sexual practices as 'healthy' or 'unhealthy'.

  • 38.
    Larsson, Mariah
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Rossholm, Anna Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Documenting the present, processing the past, shaping future memory: The Face of AIDS Film Archive2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Face of AIDS Film Archive consists of documentation of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, shot all over the world beginning in 1988 by Swedish filmmaker and journalist Staffan Hildebrand. In this article, the archive’s particular characteristic of process is discussed and examined through four different perspectives: first, as an ongoing documentation of HIV/AIDS in the contemporaneous moments when it was filmed; second, as a commission of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm; third, as the product of a director with a strong personal vision and authorial presence; and finally, as an expression of Hildebrand’s self-defined AIDS activism.

  • 39.
    Ljuslinder, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Empowering images or preserved stereotypes: representations of disability in contemporary film comedies2014In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, ISSN 2042-7891, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 267-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, disability in comedy has taken the form of joking at the expense of disabled persons. In modern times, it is first and foremost through media that the public is exposed to representations of disability, and media is considered societys most far-reaching (re)producer of cultural values. This degrading ridicule in combination with the pervasiveness of media has made disability and humour a controversial combination. Through discourse analysis this article analyses three contemporary mainstream cinema comedies about disability with the overall aim to contribute to enhanced knowledge of how different articulations promote or challenge hegemonic presumptions about disability. The analysis shows that empowering images and stereotypes of disability exist simultaneously as competing discourses in media representations. The conclusion is that aware decisions about how to represent disability are indispensable for film-makers due to the major role of media in forming public perceptions.

  • 40.
    Noheden, Kristoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Hypnotic ecology: Environmental melancholia in Lars von Trier’s films2018In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 135-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Lars von Trier’s The Element of Crime (1984), Antichrist (2009) and Melancholia (2011) from the perspective of ecological theories that seek to go beyond the green ecological paradigm. The three films depict the environment as fraught with a sense of unease, bound up with a melancholia that may be caused by either too little or too much intimacy with the non-human. The article shows that Trier’s despair and irony, anchored in a modernist distrust of reason, may be attuned to the conditions of the Anthropocene. Examining Trier’s allusions to pre-modern forms of knowledge reveals that his depictions of hypnosis and depression evoke privileged forms of knowledge that extend the environmental disaster to cosmic proportions. Turning to notions of dark ecology, the article argues that Trier’s black sensibility holds the seeds of a positive ecological awareness of interconnectedness and interdependence of humans with the surrounding world.

  • 41.
    Norén, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Snickars, Pelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Distant reading the history of Swedish film politics in 4500 governmental SOU reports2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 155-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using computational methods, digitized collections and archives can today be scrutinized in their entirety. By distant reading and topic modeling one particular collection – 4500 digitized Swedish Governmental Official Reports (SOU) from 1922 to 1991 – this article gives a new archival perspective of the history of Swedish film politics and policy-making. We examine different probabilistic topics related to film (and media) that the algorithm within the topic modeling software Mallet extracted from the immense text corpora of all these Official Reports. Topic modeling is a computational method to study themes in texts by accentuating words that tend to co-occur and together create different topics. Basically, it is a research tool for the discovery of hidden semantic structures, exploring a collection through the underlying topics that run through it. Hence, our article captures a number of film discourses and trends within the SOU material. In conclusion, we argue that topic modeling should be recognized as a method and research aid for gathering an overview of a major material; as a way to pose new and unforeseen research questions; and as a kind of computational support that makes it possible to apprehend major patterns more or less impossible to detect through a traditional archival investigation.

  • 42.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    ‘Asta’s ink: The Stockholm letters2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers a condensed account of Asta Nielsen's interaction with the Swedish National Censorship Board in 1911 after the banning of her film In dem großen Augenblick/The Great Moment for screening in Sweden. Her strategy, publishing open letters and inviting representatives from the press to non-public screenings, set the standard for other film companies dissatisfied with the slew of bans issued by the Board. A Nielsen letter to young movie fans, published in facsimile in a Swedish fan magazine in 1920, is translated to illustrate a different type of press interaction a decade later.

  • 43.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Stiller at first: A footnote2014In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 5-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article disentangles the confusion surrounding the production order of Mauritz Stiller’s film activities during his first months at AB Svenska Biografteatern (Svenska bio)/Swedish Biograph in 1912. Drawing on items from the extensive Stockholm press scene, it can be demonstrated that Stiller’s first film production indeed was the one that was first publicly screened, Mor och dotter/‘Mother and Daughter’ (1912) featuring Stiller, Anna Norrie and Lilly Jacobsson. The article also sheds light on Stiller’s role in Stockholm bohemian circles as local film production was ushered in.

  • 44.
    Rossholm, Anna Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Ingmar Bergman’s Screenwriting2014In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Via a combination of screenwriting theory and theories on literary manuscripts, this article approaches Ingmar Bergman’s screenwriting as process, from notebooks to script drafts and finished screenplays. It particularly emphasizes the playful dimensions in the early stages of the screenwriting process and the way the writing negotiates fiction and reality.

  • 45.
    Rozenkrantz, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Expanded epistemologies: Animation meets live action in contemporary Swedish documentary film2016In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short subject studies configurations of animation and live action in contemporary Swedish documentary film. While digitization has challenged the indexical images verifying function, animation has been elevated to the level of legitimate document. The epistemological boundaries of documentary film have consequently been expanded, and now include the inner worlds of social subjects. In Gomd (Hidden) (Heilborn and Aronowitsch, 2002), animation and live action are repeatedly juxtaposed in order to visualize a refugee childs experienced Otherness. In Still Born (Sandzen, 2014), ultrasound footage is fused with digital film and animation to manifest the merging perspectives of a mourning mother and her aborted child.

  • 46.
    Snickars, Pelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Remarks on a failed film archival project2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 63-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This brief article assesses an ongoing infrastructural research project focusing on filmarkivet.se, a website devoted to historical Swedish non-fiction film. As a collaboration between film researchers and film heritage institutions, the project has to date failed to overcome conflicting archival interests. Film scholars in general need open online archives and contextual resourses, while some heritage institutions seek to give access solely to a curated filmic past. While cooperation between the heritage sector and scholars is regularly envisioned as being mutually beneficial, it also faces difficulties that need to be addressed and overcome.

  • 47.
    Soila, Tytti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Reflections in the mirror of melancholia: On the narrative and male heritage in Napapiirin sankarit/Lapland Odyssey (Karukoski, 2010)2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 87-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article argues that Dome Karukoski’s Napapiirin sankarit/Lapland Odyssey (2010) inflects the journey narrative with irony and melancholy to reflect critically but comically on Finnish models of masculinity.

  • 48.
    Sorensen, Lars-Martin
    et al.
    The Danish Film Institute.
    Sundholm, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Editorial: Special Issue: Scandinavian Film and World War II2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 197-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    'When to push stop or play': The Swedish reception of Ruben Östlund's Play (2011)2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an overview of the polemics surrounding the politics of representation in Ruben Östlund's film Play (2011). It contextualizes the media debate, which focused on the film's depiction of black children, and analyses its significance within the context of Swedish contemporary film culture and criticism.

  • 50.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Retrieving Harry Schein from the archive: An interview with Maud Nycander, Jannike Åhlund and Kersti Grunditz Brennan2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 177-181Article in journal (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 61
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