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  • 1. Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar
    et al.
    Job, Dominique
    Kieselbach, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Barkla, Bronwyn J.
    Chen, Sixue
    Deswal, Renu
    Luethje, Sabine
    Amalraj, Ramesh Sundar
    Tanou, Georgia
    Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser
    Cramer, Rainer
    Weckwerth, Wolfram
    Wienkoop, Stefanie
    Dunn, Michael J.
    Kim, Sun Tae
    Fukao, Yochiro
    Yonekura, Masami
    Zolla, Lello
    Rohila, Jai Singh
    Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon
    Masi, Antonio
    Wang, Tai
    Sarkar, Abhijit
    Agrawal, Raj
    Renaut, Jenny
    Rakwal, Randeep
    INPPO Actions and Recognition as a Driving Force for Progress in Plant Proteomics: Change of Guard, INPPO Update, and Upcoming Activities2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 21, p. 3093-3100Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) is a non-profit organization whose members are scientists involved or interested in plant proteomics. Since the publication of the first INPPO highlights in 2012, continued progress on many of the organization's mandates/goals has been achieved. Two major events are emphasized in this second INPPO highlights. First, the change of guard at the top, passing of the baton from Dominique Job, INPPO founding President to Ganesh Kumar Agrawal as the incoming President. Ganesh K. Agrawal, along with Dominique Job and Randeep Rakwal initiated the INPPO. Second, the most recent INPPO achievements and future targets, mainly the organization of first the INPPO World Congress in 2014, tentatively planned for Hamburg (Germany), are mentioned.

  • 2. Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar
    et al.
    Sarkar, Abhijit
    Agrawal, Raj
    Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser
    Tanou, Georgia
    Dunn, Michael J
    Kieselbach, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Cramer, Rainer
    Wienkoop, Stefanie
    Chen, Sixue
    Rafudeen, Mohammed Suhail
    Deswal, Renu
    Barkla, Bronwyn J
    Weckwerth, Wolfram
    Heazlewood, Joshua L
    Renaut, Jenny
    Job, Dominique
    Chakraborty, Niranjan
    Rakwal, Randeep
    Boosting the Globalization of Plant Proteomics through INPPO: Current Developments and Future Prospects2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) is a non-profit-organization consisting of people who are involved or interested in plant proteomics. INPPO is constantly growing in volume and activity, which is mostly due to the realization among plant proteomics researchers worldwide for the need of such a global platform. Their active participation resulted in the rapid growth within the first year of INPPO's official launch in 2011 via its website (www.inppo.com) and publication of the 'Viewpoint paper' in a special issue of PROTEOMICS (May 2011). Here, we will be highlighting the progress achieved in the year 2011 and the future targets for the year 2012 and onwards. INPPO has achieved a successful administrative structure, the Core Committee (CC; composed of President, Vice-President, and General Secretaries), Executive Council (EC), and General Body (GB) to achieve INPPO objectives. Various committees and subcommittees are in the process of being functionalized via discussion amongst scientists around the globe. INPPO's primary aim to popularize the plant proteomics research in biological sciences has also been recognized by PROTEOMICS where a section dedicated to plant proteomics has been introduced starting January 2012, following the very first issue of this journal devoted to plant proteomics in May 2011. To disseminate organizational activities to the scientific community, INPPO has launched a biannual (in January and July) newsletter entitled 'INPPO Express: News & Views' with the first issue published in January 2012. INPPO is also planning to have several activities in 2012, including programs within the Education Outreach committee in different countries, and the development of research ideas and proposals with priority on crop and horticultural plants, while keeping tight interactions with proteomics programs on model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, and Medicago truncatula. Altogether, the INPPO progress and upcoming activities are because of immense support, dedication, and hard work of all members of the INPPO community, and also due to the wide encouragement and support from the communities (scientific and non-scientific).

  • 3.
    Alexandre, Campos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Apraiz, Itzaso
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    da Fonseca, Rute R
    The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shotgun analysis of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome and mapping the innate immunity elements.2015In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 15, no 23-24, p. 4021-4029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine mussel innate immunity provides protection to pathogen invasion and inflammation.In this regard, the mussel hemolymph takes a main role in the animal innate response.Despite the importance of this body fluid in determining the physiological condition of theanimal, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular and humoralresponses. In this work, we have applied aMS (nano-LC-MS/MS) strategy integrating genomicand transcriptomic data with the aim to: (i) identify the main protein functional groups thatcharacterize hemolymph and (ii) to map the elements of innate immunity in the marine musselMytilus edulis hemolymph proteome. After sample analysis and first protein identificationbased onMS/MS data comparison, proteins with unknown functions were annotated with blastusing public database (nrNCBI) information. Overall 595 hemolymph proteins were identifiedwith high confidence and annotated. These proteins encompass primary cellular metabolicprocesses: energy production and metabolism of biomolecules, as well as processes related tooxidative stress defence, xenobiotic detoxification, drug metabolism, and immune response.A group of proteins was identified with putative immune effector, receptor, and signalingfunctions in M. edulis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001951(http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001951).

  • 4. Asplund, A.
    et al.
    Edqvist, P. -HD.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, F.
    Antibodies for profiling the human proteome-The Human Protein Atlas as a resource for cancer research2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 13, p. 2067-2077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review, we present an update on the progress of the Human Protein Atlas, with an emphasis on strategies for validating immunohistochemistry-based protein expression patterns and on the possibilities to extend the map of protein expression patterns for cancer research projects. The objectives underlying the Human Protein Atlas include (i) the generation of validated antibodies toward a major isoform of all proteins encoded by the human genome, (ii) creating an information database of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, in cells, and in cancer, and (iii) utilizing generated antibodies and protein expression data as tools to identify clinically useful biomarkers. The success of such an effort is dependent on the validity of antibodies as specific binders of intended targets in applications used to map protein expression patterns. The development of strategies to support specific target binding is crucial and remains a challenge as a large fraction of proteins encoded by the human genome is poorly characterized, including the approximately one-third of all proteins lacking evidence of existence. Conceivable methods for validation include the use of paired antibodies, i.e. two independent antibodies targeting different and nonoverlapping epitopes on the same protein as well as comparative analysis of mRNA expression patterns with corresponding proteins.

  • 5.
    Asplund, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Antibodies for profiling the human proteome: The Human Protein Atlas as a resource for cancer research2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 13, p. 2067-2077Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review, we present an update on the progress of the Human Protein Atlas, with an emphasis on strategies for validating immunohistochemistry-based protein expression patterns and on the possibilities to extend the map of protein expression patterns for cancer research projects. The objectives underlying the Human Protein Atlas include (i) the generation of validated antibodies toward a major isoform of all proteins encoded by the human genome, (ii) creating an information database of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, in cells, and in cancer, and (iii) utilizing generated antibodies and protein expression data as tools to identify clinically useful biomarkers. The success of such an effort is dependent on the validity of antibodies as specific binders of intended targets in applications used to map protein expression patterns. The development of strategies to support specific target binding is crucial and remains a challenge as a large fraction of proteins encoded by the human genome is poorly characterized, including the approximately one-third of all proteins lacking evidence of existence. Conceivable methods for validation include the use of paired antibodies, i.e. two independent antibodies targeting different and nonoverlapping epitopes on the same protein as well as comparative analysis of mRNA expression patterns with corresponding proteins.

  • 6. Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    Birgersson, Elin
    Mezger, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Nilsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Nilsson, Peter
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture2016In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1251-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capturebead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond.

  • 7.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mezger, Anja
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture2016In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1251-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond.

  • 8.
    Bendz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Skwark, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Granholm, Viktor
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kall, Lukas
    Royal Institute Technology KTH, Sweden .
    Elofsson, Arne
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Membrane protein shaving with thermolysin can be used to evaluate topology predictors2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1467-1480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topology analysis of membrane proteins can be obtained by enzymatic shaving in combination with MS identification of peptides. Ideally, such analysis could provide quite detailed information about the membrane spanning regions. Here, we examine the ability of some shaving enzymes to provide large-scale analysis of membrane proteome topologies. To compare different shaving enzymes, we first analyzed the detected peptides from two over-expressed proteins. Second, we analyzed the peptides from non-over-expressed Escherichia coli membrane proteins with known structure to evaluate the shaving methods. Finally, the identified peptides were used to test the accuracy of a number of topology predictors. At the end we suggest that the usage of thermolysin, an enzyme working at the natural pH of the cell for membrane shaving, is superior because: (i) we detect a similar number of peptides and proteins using thermolysin and trypsin; (ii) thermolysin shaving can be run at a natural pH and (iii) the incubation time is quite short. (iv) Fewer detected peptides from thermolysin shaving originate from the transmembrane regions. Using thermolysin shaving we can also provide a clear separation between the best and the less accurate topology predictors, indicating that using data from shaving can provide valuable information when developing new topology predictors.

  • 9.
    Bendz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Skwark, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Granholm, Viktor
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Kall, Lukas
    Elofsson, Arne
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Membrane protein shaving with thermolysin can be used to evaluate topology predictors2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1467-1480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topology analysis of membrane proteins can be obtained by enzymatic shaving in combination with MS identification of peptides. Ideally, such analysis could provide quite detailed information about the membrane spanning regions. Here, we examine the ability of some shaving enzymes to provide large-scale analysis of membrane proteome topologies. To compare different shaving enzymes, we first analyzed the detected peptides from two over-expressed proteins. Second, we analyzed the peptides from non-over-expressed Escherichia coli membrane proteins with known structure to evaluate the shaving methods. Finally, the identified peptides were used to test the accuracy of a number of topology predictors. At the end we suggest that the usage of thermolysin, an enzyme working at the natural pH of the cell for membrane shaving, is superior because: (i) we detect a similar number of peptides and proteins using thermolysin and trypsin; (ii) thermolysin shaving can be run at a natural pH and (iii) the incubation time is quite short. (iv) Fewer detected peptides from thermolysin shaving originate from the transmembrane regions. Using thermolysin shaving we can also provide a clear separation between the best and the less accurate topology predictors, indicating that using data from shaving can provide valuable information when developing new topology predictors.

  • 10. Bendz, Maria
    et al.
    Skwark, Marcin
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Granholm, Viktor
    Cristobal, Susana
    Käll, Lukas
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elofsson, Arne
    Membrane protein shaving with thermolysin can be used to evaluate topology predictors2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1467-1480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topology analysis of membrane proteins can be obtained by enzymatic shaving in combination with MS identification of peptides. Ideally, such analysis could provide quite detailed information about the membrane spanning regions. Here, we examine the ability of some shaving enzymes to provide large-scale analysis of membrane proteome topologies. To compare different shaving enzymes, we first analyzed the detected peptides from two over-expressed proteins. Second, we analyzed the peptides from non-over-expressed Escherichia coli membrane proteins with known structure to evaluate the shaving methods. Finally, the identified peptides were used to test the accuracy of a number of topology predictors. At the end we suggest that the usage of thermolysin, an enzyme working at the natural pH of the cell for membrane shaving, is superior because: (i) we detect a similar number of peptides and proteins using thermolysin and trypsin; (ii) thermolysin shaving can be run at a natural pH and (iii) the incubation time is quite short. (iv) Fewer detected peptides from thermolysin shaving originate from the transmembrane regions. Using thermolysin shaving we can also provide a clear separation between the best and the less accurate topology predictors, indicating that using data from shaving can provide valuable information when developing new topology predictors.

  • 11.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Jonasson, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    A whole-genome bioinformatics approach to selection of antigens for systematic antibody generation2008In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 8, no 14, p. 2832-2839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we present an antigen selection strategy based on a whole-genome bioinformatics approach, which is facilitated by an interactive visualization tool displaying protein features from both public resources and in-house generated data. The web-based bioinformatics platform has been designed for selection of multiple, non-overlapping recombinant protein epitope signature tags by display of predicted information relevant for antigens, including domain- and epitope sized sequence similarities to other proteins, transmembrane regions and signal peptides. The visualization tool also displays shared and exclusive protein regions for genes with multiple splice variants. A genome-wide analysis demonstrates that antigens for approximately 80% of the human protein-coding genes can be selected with this strategy.

  • 12.
    Björklund, Asa K
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Light, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hedin, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Elofsson, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Quantitative assessment of the structural bias in protein-protein interaction assays.2008In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 8, no 22, p. 4657-46667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With recent publications of several large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) studies, the realization of the full yeast interaction network is getting closer. Here, we have analysed several yeast protein interaction datasets to understand their strengths and weaknesses. In particular, we investigate the effect of experimental biases on some of the protein properties suggested to be enriched in highly connected proteins. Finally, we use support vector machines (SVM) to assess the contribution of these properties to protein interactivity. We find that protein abundance is the most important factor for detecting interactions in tandem affinity purifications (TAP), while it is of less importance for Yeast Two Hybrid (Y2H) screens. Consequently, sequence conservation and/or essentiality of hubs may be related to their high abundance. Further, proteins with disordered structure are over-represented in Y2H screens and in one, but not the other, large-scale TAP assay. Hence, disordered regions may be important both in transient interactions and interactions in complexes. Finally, a few domain families seem to be responsible for a large part of all interactions. Most importantly, we show that there are method-specific biases in PPI experiments. Thus, care should be taken before drawing strong conclusions based on a single dataset.

  • 13. Campos, Alexandre
    et al.
    Apraiz, Itxaso
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    da Fonseca, Rute R.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Shotgun analysis of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome and mapping the innate immunity elements2015In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 15, no 23-24, p. 4021-4029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine mussel innate immunity provides protection to pathogen invasion and inflammation. In this regard, the mussel hemolymph takes a main role in the animal innate response. Despite the importance of this body fluid in determining the physiological condition of the animal, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular and humoral responses. In this work, we have applied a MS (nano-LC-MS/MS) strategy integrating genomic and transcriptomic data with the aim to: (i) identify the main protein functional groups that characterize hemolymph and (ii) to map the elements of innate immunity in the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome. After sample analysis and first protein identification based on MS/MS data comparison, proteins with unknown functions were annotated with blast using public database (nrNCBI) information. Overall 595 hemolymph proteins were identified with high confidence and annotated. These proteins encompass primary cellular metabolic processes: energy production and metabolism of biomolecules, as well as processes related to oxidative stress defence, xenobiotic detoxification, drug metabolism, and immune response. A group of proteins was identified with putative immune effector, receptor, and signaling functions in M. edulis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001951 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001951).

  • 14. Colgrave, Michelle L.
    et al.
    Xi, Li
    Lehnert, Sigrid A.
    Flatscher-Bader, Traute
    Wadensten, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Nilsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Andrén, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Wijffels, Gene
    Neuropeptide profiling of the bovine hypothalamus: Thermal stabilization is an effective tool in inhibiting post-mortem degradation2011In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 1264-1276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypothalamus is the central regulatory region of the brain that links the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland. It synthesizes and secretes neuropeptide hormones, which in turn act to stimulate or inhibit the secretion of pituitary hormones. We have undertaken a detailed MS investigation of the peptides present in the bovine hypothalamus by adapting a novel heat stabilization methodology, which improved peptide discovery to direct our studies into the molecular mechanisms involved in bovine reproduction. The untreated samples contained large numbers of protein degradation products that interfered with the analysis of the neuropeptides. In the thermally stabilized samples, we were able to identify many more neuropeptides that are known to be expressed in the bovine hypothalamus. Furthermore, we have characterized a range of post-translational modifications that indicate the presence of processed intact mature neuropeptides in the stabilized tissue samples, whereas we detected many trimmed or truncated peptides resulting from post-mortem degradation in the untreated tissue samples. Altogether, using an optimized workflow, we were able to identify 140 candidate neuropeptides. We also nominate six new candidate neuropeptides derived from proSAAS, secretogranin-2 and proTRH.

  • 15.
    Dezfouli, Mahya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vickovic, Sanja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Magnetic bead assisted labeling of antibodies at nanogram scale2014In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 14-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are currently several initiatives that aim to produce binding reagents for proteome-wide analysis. To enable protein detection, visualization, and target quantification, covalent coupling of reporter molecules to antibodies is essential. However, current labeling protocols recommend considerable amount of antibodies, require antibody purity and are not designed for automation. Given that small amounts of antibodies are often sufficient for downstream analysis, we developed a labeling protocol that combines purification and modification of antibodies at submicrogram quantities. With the support of magnetic microspheres, automated labeling of antibodies in parallel using biotin or fluorescent dyes was achieved.

  • 16.
    Dezfouli, Mahya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vickovic, Sanja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Parallel barcoding of antibodies for DNA-assisted proteomics2014In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 14, no 21-22, p. 2432-2436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA-assisted proteomics technologies enable ultra-sensitive measurements in multiplex format using DNA-barcoded affinity reagents. Although numerous antibodies are available, nowadays targeting nearly the complete human proteome, the majority is not accessible at the quantity, concentration, or purity recommended for most bio-conjugation protocols. Here, we introduce a magnetic bead-assisted DNA-barcoding approach, applicable for several antibodies in parallel, as well as reducing required reagents quantities up to a thousand-fold. The success of DNA-barcoding and retained functionality of antibodies were demonstrated in sandwich immunoassays and standard quantitative Immuno-PCR assays. Specific DNA-barcoding of antibodies for multiplex applications was presented on suspension bead arrays with read-out on a massively parallel sequencing platform in a procedure denoted Immuno-Sequencing. Conclusively, human plasma samples were analyzed to indicate the functionality of barcoded antibodies in intended proteomics applications.

  • 17.
    Dubrovska, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Efficient enrichment of intact phosphorylated proteins by modified immobilized metal-affinity chromatography2005In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 5, no 18, p. 4678-4683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphoproteome studies are hampered by the lack of methods which allow a comprehensive and fast analysis of intact phosphoproteins. Here we describe an immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based technique for the enrichment of phosphorylated proteins, which allows recovery of up to 90% of phosphoproteins. This technique is compatible with 2-DE and can be applied to cultured cells and tissues.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lengqvist, Johan
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hedlund, Joel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics .
    Uhlen, Kristina
    GE Healthcare Biosci AB.
    Orre, Lukas M
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Bjellqvist, Bengt
    GE Healthcare Biosci AB.
    Persson, Bengt
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lehtio, Janne
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Jakobsson , Per-Johan
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Quantitative membrane proteomics applying narrow range peptide isoelectric focusing for studies of small cell lung cancer resistance mechanisms2008In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 8, no 15, p. 3008-3018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug resistance is often associated with upregulation of membrane-associated drug-efflux systems, and thus global membrane proteomics methods are valuable tools in the search for novel components of drug resistance phenotypes. Herein we have compared the microsomal proteome from the lung cancer cell line H69 and its isogenic Doxorubicin-resistant subcell line H69AR. The method used includes microsome preparation, iTRAQ labeling followed by narrow range peptide IEF in an immobilized pH-gradient (IPG-IEF) and LC-MS/MS analysis. We demonstrate that the microsomal preparation and iTRAQ labeling is reproducible regarding protein content and composition. The rationale using narrow range peptide IPG-IEF separation is demonstrated by its ability to: (i) lowering the complexity of the sample by two-thirds while keeping high proteome coverage (96%), (ii) providing high separation efficiency, and (iii) allowing for peptide validation and possibly identifications of post-transcriptional modifications. After analyzing one-fifth of the IEF fractions (effective pH range of 4.0-4.5), a total of 3704 proteins were identified, among which 527 were predicted to be membrane proteins. One of the proteins found to be differentially expressed was Serca 2, a calcium pump located in the ER membrane that potentially could result in changes of apoptotic response toward Doxorubicin.

  • 19. Fagerberg, Linn
    et al.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    von Heijne, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Berglund, Lisa
    Prediction of the human membrane proteome2010In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 1141-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane proteins are key molecules in the cell, and are important targets for pharmaceutical drugs. Few three-dimensional structures of membrane proteins have been obtained, which makes computational prediction of membrane proteins crucial for studies of these key molecules. Here, seven membrane protein topology prediction methods based on different underlying algorithms, such as hidden Markov models, neural networks and support vector machines, have been used for analysis of the protein sequences from the 21 416 annotated genes in the human genome. The number of genes coding for a protein with predicted cc-helical transmembrane region(s) ranged from 5508 to 7651, depending on the method used. Based on a majority decision method, we estimate 5539 human genes to code for membrane proteins, corresponding to approximately 26% of the human protein-coding genes. The largest fraction of these proteins has only one predicted transmembrane region, but there are also many proteins with seven predicted transmembrane regions, including the G-protein coupled receptors. A visualization tool displaying the topologies suggested by the eight prediction methods, for all predicted membrane proteins, is available on the public Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org).

  • 20.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    von Heijne, Gunnar
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Prediction of the human membrane proteome2010In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 1141-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane proteins are key molecules in the cell, and are important targets for pharmaceutical drugs. Few three-dimensional structures of membrane proteins have been obtained, which makes computational prediction of membrane proteins crucial for studies of these key molecules. Here, seven membrane protein topology prediction methods based on different underlying algorithms, such as hidden Markov models, neural networks and support vector machines, have been used for analysis of the protein sequences from the 21 416 annotated genes in the human genome. The number of genes coding for a protein with predicted cc-helical transmembrane region(s) ranged from 5508 to 7651, depending on the method used. Based on a majority decision method, we estimate 5539 human genes to code for membrane proteins, corresponding to approximately 26% of the human protein-coding genes. The largest fraction of these proteins has only one predicted transmembrane region, but there are also many proteins with seven predicted transmembrane regions, including the G-protein coupled receptors. A visualization tool displaying the topologies suggested by the eight prediction methods, for all predicted membrane proteins, is available on the public Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org).

  • 21.
    Feuk-Lagerstedt, E
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Movitz, C
    Pellmé, S
    Dahlgren, C
    Karlsson, A
    Lipid raft protecome of the human neutrophil azurophil granule.2007In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 194-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detergent-resistant membrane domains (DRMs) are present in the membranes of azurophil granules in human neutrophils (Feuk-Lagerstedt et al., J. Leukoc. Biol. 2002, 72, 970). Using a proteomic approach, we have now identified 106 proteins in a DRM preparation from these granule membranes. Among these proteins were the lipid raft structural proteins flotillin-1 and -2, cytoskeletal proteins such as actin, vimentin and tubulin, and membrane fusion promoting proteins like annexins and dysferlin. Our results suggest that the azurophil granule membrane, in similarity to the plasma membrane, is an elaborate structure that takes part in intracellular signaling and functions other than the mere delivery of bactericidal effector molecules to the phagosome.

  • 22.
    Fristedt, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wasilewska, Wioleta
    Warsaw University, Poland .
    Romanowska, Elzbieta
    Warsaw University, Poland .
    Vener, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Differential phosphorylation of thylakoid proteins in mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts from maize plants grown under low or high light2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 18, p. 2852-2861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In C4 plants, such as maize, the photosynthetic apparatus is partitioned over two cell types called mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS), which have different structure and specialization of the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes. We characterized protein phosphorylation in thylakoids of the two cell types from maize grown under either low or high light. Western blotting with phosphothreonine antibodies and ProQ phosphostaining detected light-dependent changes in the protein phosphorylation patterns. LC-MS/MS with alternating CID and electron transfer dissociation sequencing of peptide ions mapped 15 protein phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylated D2, CP29, CP26, Lhcb2 proteins, and ATPsynthase were found only in M membranes. A previously unknown phosphorylation site was mapped in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from the BS cells. Phosphorylation stoichiometry was calculated from the ratios of normalized ion currents for phosphorylated to nonphosphorylated peptide pairs from the D1, D2, CP43, and PbsH proteins of photosystem II (PSII). Every PSII in M thylakoids contained on average 1.5 +/- 0.1 or 2.3 +/- 0.2 phosphoryl groups in plants grown under either low or high light, while in BS membranes the corresponding numbers were 0.25 +/- 0.1 or 0.7 +/- 0.2, respectively. It is suggested that the phosphorylation level, as well as turnover of PSII depend on the structure of thylakoids.

  • 23.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Newly identified proteins in human nasal lavage fluid from non-smokers and smokers using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting2002In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human nasal lavage fluids (NLFs) were analyzed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and proteins were identified with peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desoption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. In some cases, the identification was verified by analysis of post-source decay fragmentation spectra. Many of the identified proteins were new forms or fragments of previously found proteins (e.g. albumin, lactoferrin, cystatin, calgranulin, von Ebners gland protein and palate lung nasal epithelium clone), while others were proteins that have previously been indicated by 2-DE image matching or immunoblots (e.g. apolipoprotein AI, lysozyme C, and Clara cell secretory protein). Some new proteins, not shown before in 2-DE patterns of NLF were also found, e.g. mammaglobin B, 2-microglobulin and immunoglobulin J chain. Of the identified NLF proteins many appear to be involved in inflammatory and immune responses. A study was therefore conducted to investigate if the levels of these proteins were changed in smokers compared to nonsmokers. It was found that NLF from smokers contained decreased levels of Clara cell secretory protein, and increased proportions of a truncated variant of lipocortin-1, three acidic forms of α1-antitrypsin, and one phosphorylated form of cystatin S. Furthermore, NLF from smokers contained increased proportions of a new variant of palate lung nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC), a recently identified airway irritation marker. The results demonstrate that 2-DE of NLF may be used to assess alterations of proteins or post-translationally modified proteins in smokers. Clara cell secretory protein (CC 16, CC 10) and lipocortin-1 are two anti-inflammatory, phospholipase A2 inhibitory proteins, and α1-antitrypsin and cystatin S are two proteinase inhibitors. Changed levels of these proteins may therefore be of importance to the airway inflammation caused by smoking. The results also support the notion that PLUNC is involved in inflammatory responses in the upper airways.

  • 24.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mapping of proteins in human saliva using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting2003In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 1003-1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human saliva contains a large number of proteins that can be used for diagnosis and are of great potential in clinical and epidemiological research. The aim of this work was to map the proteins in saliva by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and to identify abundant proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting using trypsin cleavage and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis. One hundred proteins were identified representing 20 different identities according to accession numbers. Abundant proteins expressed in different forms were: α-amylase, immunoglobulin A, prolactin-inducible protein, zinc-α2-glycoprotein and cystatins (S, SA, D and SN). Other proteins found were interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, von Ebner’s gland protein (lipocalin-1) and calgranulin A and B (S100A8 and A9). Furthermore, apolipoprotein A-I, β2-microglobulin, glutathione S-transferase P and fatty acid-binding protein were also identified. Our results show that human saliva contains a large number of proteins that are involved in inflammatory and immune responses. The 2-DE protein map constructed opens the possibility to investigate protein changes associated with disease processes.

  • 25.
    Granholm, Viktor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kall, Lukas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Quality assessments of peptide-spectrum matches in shotgun proteomics2011In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 1086-1093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The peptide identification process in shotgun proteomics is most frequently solved with search engines. Such search engines assign scores that reflect similarity between the measured fragmentation spectrum and the theoretical spectra of the peptides of a given database. However, the scores from most search engines do not have a direct statistical interpretation. To understand and make use of the significance of peptide identifications, one must thus be familiar with some statistical concepts. Here, we discuss different statistical scores used to show the confidence of an identification and a set of methods to estimate these scores. We also describe the variance of statistical scores and imperfections of scoring functions of peptide-spectrum matches.

  • 26. Granholm, Viktor
    et al.
    Käll, Lukas
    Quality assessments of peptide-spectrum matches in shotgun proteomics2011In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 1086-1093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The peptide identification process in shotgun proteomics is most frequently solved with search engines. Such search engines assign scores that reflect similarity between the measured fragmentation spectrum and the theoretical spectra of the peptides of a given database. However, the scores from most search engines do not have a direct statistical interpretation. To understand and make use of the significance of peptide identifications, one must thus be familiar with some statistical concepts. Here, we discuss different statistical scores used to show the confidence of an identification and a set of methods to estimate these scores. We also describe the variance of statistical scores and imperfections of scoring functions of peptide-spectrum matches.

  • 27. Hansen, Terkel
    et al.
    Albers, Michael
    Abt. Chemische Biologie, Max-Planck-Institut für molekulare Physiologie.
    Hedberg, Christian
    Sickmann, Albert
    Adenylylation, MS, and proteomics-Introducing a "new" modification to bottom-up proteomics2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 955-963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the addition of a 5'-adenosine phosphodiester group to proteins, called adenylylation, has been known for decades, the possibility that adenylylation could be a molecular switch in cellular signaling pathways has emerged recently. The distinct mass shift upon adenylation of threonine or tyrosine residues renders it a good target for MS detection and identification; however, the fragmentation of adenylylated peptides derived from proteolytic digestion of adenylylated proteins has not yet been systematically investigated. Here, we demonstrate that adenylylated peptides show loss of parts of the adenosine monophosphate (AMP) upon different fragmentation techniques. As expected, causing the least fragmentation of the AMP group, electron transfer dissociation yields less complicated spectra. In contrast, CID and higher energy collision (HCD) fragmentation caused AMP to fragment, generating characteristic ions that could be utilized in the specific identification of adenylylated peptides. The characteristic ions and losses upon CID and higher energy collision fragmentation from the AMP group turned out to be highly dependent on which amino acid was adenylylated, with different reporter ions for adenylylated threonine and tyrosine. We also investigated how adenylylation is best incorporated into search engines, exemplified by Mascot and showed that it is possible to identify adenylylation by search engines.

  • 28.
    Hassel, Sylke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Eichner, Annegret
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Yakymovych, Mariya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Knaus, Petra
    Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Proteins associated with type II bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR-II) and identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry2004In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 1346-1358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are polypeptide growth factors that regulate cell differentiation and proliferation. BMPs bind to type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors to initiate intracellular signalling. BMPR-II is the type II receptor, its mutations lead to hereditary pulmonary hypertension, and knockout of Bmpr-II results in early embryonic lethality. To identify novel interacting proteins and explore signalling pathways that can be initiated by BMPR-II, we performed glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays with BMPR-II protein constructs fused to GST and extracts of mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. We generated three constructs which contain different parts of the cytoplasmic region of BMPR-II: full-length cytoplasmic part of BMPR-II, only the kinase domain, or only the C-terminal tail of BMPR-II. Proteins which formed complexes with these BMPR-II constructs were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-D GE), and specifically interacting proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). We identified 33 interacting proteins; 11 proteins interacted with the C-terminal tail of BMPR-II, 4 with full-length BMPR-II, and 18 with a short form of the receptor with a deleted tail. Fourteen proteins have assigned functions in various signalling processes, suggesting links of BMP signalling to regulation of MAP kinase pathway, apoptosis, transcription, PKCss, and PKA. Five of the identified proteins are components of the cytoskeleton, and four are enzymes involved in metabolism, e.g., processing of estrogens or lipids. We confirmed interaction of PKC beta and CtBP with BMPR-II using immunodetection. We showed that the C-terminal tail of BMPR-II provides binding sites for a number of regulatory proteins that may initiate Smad-independent signalling.

  • 29. Havlasová, Jana
    et al.
    Hernychová, Lenka
    Brychta, Martin
    Hubálek, Martin
    Lenco, Jurai
    Larsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Margaretha
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mats
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kročová, Zulana
    Stulík, Jiri
    Macela, Aks
    Proteomic analysis of anti-Franciselia tularensis LVS antibody response in murine model of tularemia2005In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 2090-2103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain infection of mice has been established as an experimental model of tularemia that is suitable for studies of immune mechanisms against the intracellular pathogen. In this study, the model was used to explore immunogenic repertoire of F. tularensis with the aim of identifying new molecules able to activate the host immune system, potential bacterial markers with vaccine, and diagnostic applications. Immunoproteomic approach based on the combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry was applied. Globally, 36 different proteins were identified, which strongly reacted with sera from experimentally infected mice, including several putative virulence markers of intracellular pathogens as nucleoside diphosphate kinase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, RNA-binding protein Hfq, and molecular chaperone ClpB. Of them, 27 proteins are described for the first time as immunorelevant Francisella proteins. When comparing murine immunoproteome of F. tularensis with our previous data from human patients, 25 of the total of 50 identified murine sera immunoreactive spots were recognized by human sera collected from patients suffering from tularemia, as well. Immune sera from two Lps gene congenic strains of mice, C3H/HeN (Lpsn) and C3H/HeJ (Lpsd), represented murine immunoproteome in this study. The spectrum of immunoreactive spots detected by two-dimensional immunoblotting varied throughout the course of infection depending on murine strain. Nevertheless, the antibody patterns of the two strains showed significant homogeneity in being directed against almost identical subset of antigens.

  • 30. Hjerno, K
    et al.
    Alm, R
    Canback, B
    Matthiesen, R
    Trajkovski, K
    Björk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Roepstorff, Peter
    Emanuelsson, Cecilia
    Down-regulation of the strawberry Bet v 1-homologous allergen in concert with the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway in colorless strawberry mutant2006In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 1574-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteomic screening of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) yielded a 58% success rate in protein identification in spite of the fact that no genomic sequence is available for this species. This was achieved by a combination of MALDI-MS/MS de novo sequencing of double-derivatized peptides and indel-tolerant searching against local protein databases built on both EST and full-length nucleotide sequences. The amino acid sequence of a strawberry allergen, homologous to the well-known major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, was partially determined. This strawberry allergen, named Fra a 1 according to the nomenclature for allergen proteins, showed sequence identity of 54 and 77%, respectively, with corresponding allergens from birch and apple. Differential expression, as evaluated by 2-D DIGE, occurred in 10% of protein spots when red strawberries were compared to a colorless (white) strawberry mutant. White strawberries, known to be tolerated by individuals affected by allergy, were found to be virtually free from the strawberry allergen. Also several enzymes in the pathway for biosynthesis of flavonoids, to which the red color pelargonidin belongs, were down-regulated. This approach to assess differential protein expression without access to genomic sequence information can also be applied to other crop plants and phenotypic traits

  • 31. Hummel, Maureen
    et al.
    Cordewener, Jan H. G.
    de Groot, Joost C. M.
    Smeekens, Sjef
    America, Antoine H. P.
    Hanson, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dynamic protein composition of Arabidopsis thaliana cytosolic ribosomes in response to sucrose feeding as revealed by label free MSE proteomics2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 1024-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytosolic ribosomes are among the largest multisubunit cellular complexes. Arabidopsis thaliana ribosomes consist of 79 different ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) that each are encoded by two to six (paralogous) genes. It is unknown whether the paralogs are incorporated into the ribosome and whether the relative incorporation of r-protein paralogs varies in response to environmental cues. Immunopurified ribosomes were isolated from A. thaliana rosette leaves fed with sucrose. Trypsin digested samples were analyzed by qTOF-LC-MS using both MSE and classical MS/MS. Peptide features obtained by using these two methods were identified using MASCOT and Proteinlynx Global Server searching the theoretical sequences of A. thaliana proteins. The A. thaliana genome encodes 237 r-proteins and 69% of these were identified with proteotypic peptides for most of the identified proteins. These r-proteins were identified with average protein sequence coverage of 32% observed by MSE. Interestingly, the analysis shows that the abundance of r-protein paralogs in the ribosome changes in response to sucrose feeding. This is particularly evident for paralogous RPS3aA, RPS5A, RPL8B, and RACK1 proteins. These results show that protein synthesis in the A. thaliana cytosol involves a heterogeneous ribosomal population. The implications of these findings in the regulation of translation are discussed.

  • 32.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khademi, M.
    Olsson, T.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Antibody-based profiling of cerebrospinal fluid within multiple sclerosis2013In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 13, no 15, p. 2256-2267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody suspension bead arrays have proven to enable multiplexed and high-throughput protein profiling in unfractionated plasma and serum samples through a direct labeling approach. We here describe the development and application of an assay for protein profiling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While setting up the assay, systematic intensity differences between sample groups were observed that reflected inherent sample specific total protein amounts. Supplementing the labeling reaction with BSA and IgG diminished these differences without impairing the apparent sensitivity of the assay. We also assessed the effects of heat treatment on the analysis of CSF proteins and applied the assay to profile 43 selected proteins by 101 antibodies in 339 CSF samples from a multiple sclerosis (MS) cohort. Two proteins, GAP43 and SERPINA3 were found to have a discriminating potential with altered intensity levels between sample groups. GAP43 was detected at significantly lower levels in secondary progressive MS compared to early stages of MS and the control group of other neurological diseases. SERPINA3 instead was detected at higher levels in all MS patients compared to controls. The developed assay procedure now offers new possibilities for broad-scale protein profiling of CSF within neurological disorders.

  • 33.
    Häussler, Ragna S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bendes, Annika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, 9010, Norway.
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dale, Matilda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Uhlèn, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Hørsholm, 2970, Denmark.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    Atlas Antibodies AB, Bromma, 168 69, Sweden.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systematic Development of Sandwich Immunoassays for the Plasma Secretome2019In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, article id 1900008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma proteome offers a clinically useful window into human health. Recent advances from highly multiplexed assays now call for appropriate pipelines to validate individual candidates. Here, a workflow is developed to build dual binder sandwich immunoassays (SIA) and for proteins predicted to be secreted into plasma. Utilizing suspension bead arrays, ≈1800 unique antibody pairs are first screened against 209 proteins with recombinant proteins as well as EDTA plasma. Employing 624 unique antibodies, dilution-dependent curves in plasma and concentration-dependent curves of full-length proteins for 102 (49%) of the targets are obtained. For 22 protein assays, the longitudinal, interindividual, and technical performance is determined in a set of plasma samples collected from 18 healthy subjects every third month over 1 year. Finally, 14 of these assays are compared with with SIAs composed of other binders, proximity extension assays, and affinity-free targeted mass spectrometry. The workflow provides a multiplexed approach to screen for SIA pairs that suggests using at least three antibodies per target. This design is applicable for a wider range of targets of the plasma proteome, and the assays can be applied for discovery but also to validate emerging candidates derived from other platforms.

  • 34.
    Iwahana, Hiroyuki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Yakymovych, Ihor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Dubrovska, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Glycoproteome profiling of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) signaling: Nonglycosylated cell death-inducing DFF-like effector A inhibits TGF beta 1-dependent apoptosis2006In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 6168-6180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) is a potent regulator of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. TGFbeta binds to specific serine/threonine kinase receptors, which leads to activation of Smad-dependent and Smad-independent signaling pathways. O-Glycosylation is a dynamic PTM which has been observed in many regulatory proteins, but has not been studied in the context of TGFbeta signaling. To explore the effect of TGFbeta1 on protein O-glycosylation in human breast epithelial cells, we performed analyses of proteins which were affinity purified with Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA). HPA lectin allowed enrichment of proteins containing GalNAc and GlcNAc linked to serine and threonine residues. Using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-MS, we identified 21 HPA-precipitated proteins, which were affected by treatment of cells with TGFbeta1. Among these proteins, regulators of cell survival, apoptosis, trafficking, and RNA processing were identified. We found that TGFbeta1 inhibited the appearance of cell death-inducing DFF-like effector A (CIDE-A) in 2-D gels with HPA-precipitated proteins. CIDE-A is a cell death activator which promotes DNA fragmentation. We observed that TGFbeta1 did not affect expression of CIDE-A, but inhibited its glycosylation. We found that deglycosylation of CIDE-A correlated with enhanced nuclear export of the protein, and that high level of nonglycosylated CIDE-A inhibited TGFbeta1-dependent cell death. Thus, inhibition of the glycosylation of CIDE-A may be a mechanism to protect cells from apoptosis.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Carolina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Samskog, Jenny
    Sundström, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Wadensten, Henrik
    Björkesten, Lennart
    Flensburg, John
    Differential expression analysis of Escherichia coli proteins using a novel software for relative quantitation of LC-MS/MS data2006In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 6, no 16, p. 4475-4485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of changes in protein levels between samples derived from cells representing different biological conditions is a key to the understanding of cellular function. There are two main methods available that allow both for global scanning for significantly varying proteins and targeted profiling of proteins of interest. One method is based on 2-D gel electrophoresis and image analysis of labelled proteins. The other method is based on LC-MS/MS analysis of either unlabelled peptides or peptides derived from isotopically labelled proteins or peptides. In this study, the non-labelling approach was used involving a new software, DeCydei (TM) S Differential Analysis Software (DeCyder MS) intended for automated detection and relative quantitation of unlabelled peptides in LC-MS/MS data. Total protein extracts of E. coli strains expressing varying levels of dihydrofolate reductase and integron integrase were digested with trypsin and analyzed using a nanoscale liquid chromatography system, Ettan (TM) MDLC, online connected to an LTQ (TM) linear ion-trap mass spectrometer fitted with a nanospray interface. Acquired NIS data were subjected to DeCyder NIS analysis where 2-D representations of the peptide patterns from individual LC-MS/MS analyses were matched and compared. This approach to unlabelled quantitative analysis of the E. coli proteome resulted in relative protein abundances that were in good agreement with results obtained from traditional methods for measuring protein levels.

  • 36.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    The 6th HUPO Antibody Initiative (HAI) workshop: Sharing data about affinity reagents and other recent developments2010In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 2066-2068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Human Antibody Initiative (HAI) aims to promote and facilitate the use of antibodies for proteomics research. The 6th workshop for the HUPO Antibody Initiative (HAI) held in September 2009 was co-chaired by Michael Snyder and Mathias Uhlen and discussed several aspects of antibody production, their validation, and attempts to standardise this process, in particular, when subsequently described in the literature. An update on the progress of the Human Protein Atlas was also presented to the attendees.

  • 37.
    Kampf, Caroline
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    Fagerberg, Linn
    Hallstrom, Bjorn M.
    Danielsson, Angelika
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nielsen, Jens
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Defining the human gallbladder proteome by transcriptomics and affinity proteomics2014In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 14, no 21-22, p. 2498-2507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global protein analysis of human gallbladder tissue is vital for identification of molecular regulators and effectors of its physiological activity. Here, we employed a genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis in 28 human tissues to identify the genes overrepresented in the gallbladder and complemented it with antibody-based immunohistochemistry in 48 human tissues. We characterized human gallbladder proteins and identified 140 gallbladder-specific proteins with an elevated expression in the gallbladder as compared to the other analyzed tissues. Five genes were categorized as enriched, with at least fivefold higher levels in gallbladder, 60 genes were categorized as group enriched with elevated transcript levels in gallbladder shared with at least one other tissue and 75 genes were categorized as enhanced with higher expression than the average expression in other tissues. We explored the localization of the genes within the gallbladder through cell-type specific antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of the genes through immunofluorescent-based profiling. Finally, we revealed the biological processes and metabolic functions carried out by these genes through the use of GO, KEGG Pathway, and HMR2.0 that is compilation of the human metabolic reactions. We demonstrated the results of the combined analysis of the transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

  • 38. Kampf, Caroline
    et al.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Angelika
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Defining the human gallbladder proteome by transcriptomics and affinity proteomics2014In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 14, no 21-22, p. 2498-2507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global protein analysis of human gallbladder tissue is vital for identification of molecular regulators and effectors of its physiological activity. Here, we employed a genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis in 28 human tissues to identify the genes overrepresented in the gallbladder and complemented it with antibody-based immunohistochemistry in 48 human tissues. We characterized human gallbladder proteins and identified 140 gallbladder-specific proteins with an elevated expression in the gallbladder as compared to the other analyzed tissues. Five genes were categorized as enriched, with at least fivefold higher levels in gallbladder, 60 genes were categorized as group enriched with elevated transcript levels in gallbladder shared with at least one other tissue and 75 genes were categorized as enhanced with higher expression than the average expression in other tissues. We explored the localization of the genes within the gallbladder through cell-type specific antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of the genes through immunofluorescent-based profiling. Finally, we revealed the biological processes and metabolic functions carried out by these genes through the use of GO, KEGG Pathway, and HMR2.0 that is compilation of the human metabolic reactions. We demonstrated the results of the combined analysis of the transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

  • 39.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bayat, Narges
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Proteomic Analysis of Endothelial Cells Exposed to Ultrasmall Nanoparticles Reveals Disruption in Paracellular and Transcellular Transport2019In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 1800228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large interactive surfaces of nanoparticles (NPs) increase the opportunities to develop NPs for vascular targeting. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cells exposed to NPs reveals the cellular response and turns the focus into the impairment of the endothelial permeability. Here, quantitative proteomics and transcriptome sequencing are combined to evaluate the effects of exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of TiO2-USNPs and TiO2-NPs on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells react to preserve the semi-permeable properties that are essential for vascular tissue fluid homeostasis, vascular development, and angiogenesis. The main impact of the exposure was alteration of functional complexes involved in cell adhesion, vesicular transport, and cytoskeletal structure. Those are the core cellular structures that are linked to the permeability and the integrity of the endothelial tissue. Moreover, the extracellular proteins uptake along wih the NPs into the endothelial cells escape the lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings improve the understanding of the interaction of NPs with endothelial cell. The effects of the studied NPs modulating cell-cell adhesion and vesicular transport can help to evaluate the distribution of NPs via intravenous administration.

  • 40. Kuruvilla, Jacob
    et al.
    Bayat, Narges
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Proteomic Analysis of Endothelial Cells Exposed to Ultrasmall Nanoparticles Reveals Disruption in Paracellular and Transcellular Transport2019In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 1800228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large interactive surfaces of nanoparticles (NPs) increase the opportunities to develop NPs for vascular targeting. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cells exposed to NPs reveals the cellular response and turns the focus into the impairment of the endothelial permeability. Here, quantitative proteomics and transcriptome sequencing are combined to evaluate the effects of exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of TiO2-USNPs and TiO2-NPs on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells react to preserve the semi-permeable properties that are essential for vascular tissue fluid homeostasis, vascular development, and angiogenesis. The main impact of the exposure was alteration of functional complexes involved in cell adhesion, vesicular transport, and cytoskeletal structure. Those are the core cellular structures that are linked to the permeability and the integrity of the endothelial tissue. Moreover, the extracellular proteins uptake along wih the NPs into the endothelial cells escape the lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings improve the understanding of the interaction of NPs with endothelial cell. The effects of the studied NPs modulating cell-cell adhesion and vesicular transport can help to evaluate the distribution of NPs via intravenous administration.

  • 41. Lal, S.
    et al.
    Nguyen, L.
    Tezone, R.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Odeberg, J.
    Li, A.
    dos Remedios, C.
    Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure2016In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure.

  • 42.
    Lal, Sean
    et al.
    Univ Sydney, Bosch Inst, Sydney Med Sch, Dept Anat & Histol, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Nguyen, Lisa
    Univ Sydney, Bosch Inst, Sydney Med Sch, Dept Anat & Histol, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Tezone, Rhenan
    Univ Sydney, Bosch Inst, Sydney Med Sch, Dept Anat & Histol, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Ponten, Fredrik
    KTH, Sch Biotechnol, Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prote,Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Odeberg, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Li, Amy
    Univ Sydney, Bosch Inst, Sydney Med Sch, Dept Anat & Histol, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    dos Remedios, Cristobal
    Univ Sydney, Bosch Inst, Sydney Med Sch, Dept Anat & Histol, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure2016In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 16, no 17, p. 2319-2326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure.

  • 43.
    Larsericsdotter, Helén
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Jansson, Ö.
    Biacore AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhukov, A.
    Biacore AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Areskoug, D.
    Biacore AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Oscarsson, Sven
    Mälardalen University.
    Buijs, J.
    Biacore AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Optimizing the surface plasmon resonance/mass spectrometry interface for functional proteomics applications: How to avoid and utilize nonspecific adsorption2006In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 2355-2364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A great challenge in functional or interaction proteomics is to map protein networks and establish a functional relationship between expressed proteins and their effects on cellular processes. These cellular processes can be studied by characterizing binding partners to a "bait" protein against a complex background of other molecules present in cells, tissues, or biological fluids. This so-called ligand fishing process can be performed by combining surface plasmon resonance biosensors with MS. This combination generates a unique and automated method to quantify and characterize biomolecular interactions, and identify the interaction partners. A general problem in chip-based affinity separation systems is the large surface-to-volume ratio of the fluidic system. Extreme care, therefore, is required to avoid nonspecific adsorption, resulting in losses of the target protein and carry-over during the affinity purification process, which may lead to unwanted signals in the final MS analysis and a reduction in sensitivity. In this study, carry-over of protein and low-molecular weight substances has been investigated systematically and cleaning strategies are presented. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that by the introduction of colloidal particles as a capturing and transporting agent, the recovery yield of the affinity-purified ligand could be improved nearly twofold.

  • 44.
    Levander, F.
    et al.
    Department of Protein Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rögnvaldsson, Thorsteinn
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Samuelsson, J.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    James, P.
    Department of Protein Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Automated methods for improved protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting2004In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 2594-2601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to maximize protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting noise peaks must be removed from spectra and recalibration is often required. The preprocessing of the spectra before database searching is essential but is time-consuming. Nevertheless, the optimal database search parameters often vary over a batch of samples. For high-throughput protein identification, these factors should be set automatically, with no or little human intervention. In the present work automated batch filtering and recalibration using a statistical filter is described. The filter is combined with multiple data searches that are performed automatically. We show that, using several hundred protein digests, protein identification rates could be more than doubled, compared to standard database searching. Furthermore, automated large-scale in-gel digestion of proteins with endoproteinase LysC, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis, followed by subsequent trypsin digestion and MALDI-TOF analysis were performed. Several proteins could be identified only after digestion with one of the enzymes, and some less significant protein identifications were confirmed after digestion with the other enzyme. The results indicate that identification of especially small and low-abundance proteins could be significantly improved after sequential digestions with two enzymes.

  • 45. Lexander, Helena
    et al.
    Franzén, Bo
    Hirschberg, Daniel
    Becker, Susanne
    Hellström, Magnus
    Bergman, Tomas
    Jörnvall, Hans
    Auer, Gert
    Egevad, Lars
    Differential protein expression in anatomical zones of the prostate.2005In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 5, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prostate has three anatomical zones: the peripheral (PZ), the transition (TZ), and the central (CZ) zone. It is proposed that the CZ may be of mesodermal origin, whereas the other two are of endodermal origin. Proteome patterns in the zones were characterized to test for differences. Cells were scraped from macroscopically normal areas of PZ, TZ, and CZ in radical prostatectomy specimens. After exclusion of samples with cancer or prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, 18 cases remained for analysis. Cells were collected in a medium with protease inhibitors, and the protein material was prepared for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The proteins in spots that differed quantitatively between regions were identified via mass spectrometric fingerprinting of tryptic fragments and selected tandem mass spectrometry sequence analysis. Ten proteins with significant zonal differential expression were identified, eight with underexpression in the CZ versus the PZ and the TZ (arginase II, ATP synthase, cytokeratin 8, lamin A/C, peroxiredoxin 4, protein disulfide isomerase A3, tropomyosin, and vimentin), and two with overexpression in the CZ (peroxiredoxin 2 and creatine kinase B). The PZ and TZ, although differing in terms of incidence of cancer and hyperplasia, have epithelium with highly similar major protein expression profiles. However, the protein profile of the CZ differs from that of the other regions, suggesting functional differences.

  • 46. Lexander, Helena
    et al.
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Palmberg, Carina
    Auer, Gert
    Hellström, Magnus
    Franzén, Bo
    Jörnvall, Hans
    Egevad, Lars
    Evaluation of two sample preparation methods for prostate proteome analysis2006In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 6, no 13, p. 3918-3925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For laboratory techniques that require well-preserved proteins, such as 2-DE, fresh tissue must be harvested and processed as fast as possible to avoid proteolytic degradation. We describe a modified method for harvesting tissue from radical prostatectomy specimens for proteome analysis and compare it with the standard technique. Cells were scraped from cut surfaces of 11 prostate specimens. A fraction of the material was smeared on a glass slide and Giemsa stained for morphological control. The sample was collected in a medium with protease inhibitors, and the protein material was prepared for 2-DE. Filtering and Percoll centrifugation were omitted. Sample locations were noted on a specimen map. From the same area, a tissue block was harvested for comparison. The block was processed with the conventional technique including mechanical disintegration, filtering and Percoll centrifugation. Quality measures of 2-DE were similar with both methods. With the scrape sampling technique, control smears showed abundant epithelial cells and a cleaner background and processing was faster than with tissue block sampling. For proteomic analysis, the scrape sample technique has several advantages over the tissue block method.

  • 47. Lexander, Helena
    et al.
    Palmberg, Carina
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Auer, Gert
    Hellström, Magnus
    Franzén, Bo
    Jörnvall, Hans
    Egevad, Lars
    Correlation of protein expression, Gleason score and DNA ploidy in prostate cancer2006In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 6, no 15, p. 4370-4380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prognosis of prostate cancer correlates with tumor differentiation. Gleason score and DNA ploidy are two prognostic factors that correlate with prognosis. We analyzed differences in protein expression in prostate cancer of high and low aggressiveness according to these measures. From 35 prostatectomy specimens, 29 cancer samples and 10 benign samples were harvested by scraping cells from cut surfaces. DNA ploidy was assessed by image cytometry. Protein preparations from cell suspensions were examined by 2-DE. Protein spots that differed quantitatively between sample groups were identified by MS fingerprinting of tryptic fragments and MS/MS sequence analysis. We found 39 protein spots with expression levels that were raised or lowered in correlation with Gleason score and/or DNA ploidy pattern (31 overexpressed in high-malignant cancer, 8 underexpressed). Of these, 30 were identified by MS. Among overexpressed proteins were heat-shock, structural and membrane proteins and enzymes involved in gene silencing, protein synthesis/degradation, mitochondrial protein import (metaxin 2), detoxification (GST-pi) and energy metabolism. Stroma-associated proteins were generally underexpressed. The protein expression of prostate cancer correlates with tumor differentiation. Potential prognostic markers may be found among proteins that are differentially expressed and the clinical value of these should be validated.

  • 48. Li, Amy
    et al.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    dos Remedios, Cristobal G.
    The interactome of LIM domain proteins: The contributions of LIM domain proteins to heart failure and heart development2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 203-225Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LIM domain proteins all contain at least one double zinc-finger motif. They belong to a large family and here we review those expressed mainly in mammalian hearts, but particularly in cardiomyocytes. These proteins contain between one and five LIM domains and usually these proteins contain other domains that have specific functions such as actin-binding, kinases and nuclear translocation motifs. While several recent reviews have summarised the importance of individual LIM domain proteins, this is the first review of its kind to cover all LIMs associated with the heart. Here we examine 33 LIM proteins (including three that bind to, but do not themselves contain, LIM domains) that are implicated in either the development of the heart, heart disorders and failure, or both. Our analysis is consistent with the view that cardiac LIM domain proteins form multiple extensive networks of multi-protein complexes within the myocardium. This multiplicity of binding partners probably protects the heart as it is challenged to maintain cardiac output, until the imbalance reaches a turning point that results in failure. We believe that the complexity of LIM interactions is properly described by the term LIM interactome.

  • 49.
    Lindén, Mårten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Lind, Sara Bergström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Mayrhofer, Corina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Segersten, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Lyutvinskiy, Yaroslav
    Zubarev, Roman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Proteomic analysis of urinary biomarker candidates for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 135-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonmuscle invasive tumors of the bladder often recur and thereby bladder cancer patients need regular re-examinations which are invasive, unpleasant, and expensive. A noninvasive and less expensive method, e.g. a urine dipstick test, for monitoring recurrence would thus be advantageous. In this study, the complementary techniques mass spectrometry (MS) and Western blotting (WB)/dot blot (DB) were used to screen the urine samples from bladder cancer patients. High resolving MS was used to analyze and quantify the urinary proteome and 29 proteins had a significantly higher abundance (p<0.05) in bladder cancer samples compared with control urine samples. The increased abundance found in urine from bladder cancer patients compared with controls was confirmed with Western blot for four selected proteins; fibrinogen β chain precursor, apolipoprotein E, α-1-antitrypsin, and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein 1. Dot blot analysis of an independent urine sample set pointed out fibrinogen β chain and α-1-antitrypsin as most interesting biomarkers having sensitivity and specificity values in the range of 66-85%. Exploring the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) also revealed that bladder cancer tumors are the likely source of these proteins. They have the potential of being useful in diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and thus may improve the treatment of bladder tumors, especially nonmuscle invasive tumors.

  • 50.
    Lomnytska, Marta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Transforming growth factor-beta1-regulated proteins in human endothelial cells identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry2004In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 995-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) is a potent regulator of angiogenesis affecting proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells. The effect of TGFbeta on endothelial cells depends on the origin of the cells and on the experimental conditions. Global analysis of TGFbeta signalling is expected to unveil mechanisms of this variability and identify novel targets of the growth factor. Here, we report proteome profiling of human microvascular endothelial cells obtained from dermis, which were treated with TGFbeta1 and compared to nontreated cells. We identified 54 proteins affected by TGFbeta1 using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. Thirteen of the identified proteins are involved in various signalling processes. Seven proteins are involved in cytoskeleton rearrangements and six are involved in regulation of metabolism. Ten proteins were identical to predicted hypothetical proteins with no assigned functions. In agreement with the effect of TGFbeta1 on components of the cytoskeleton, TGFbeta1 induces actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. TGFbeta1 also affected expression of E2F6, p57Kip2, G(q)alpha, hnRNP A1 and myosin light chain proteins as shown by immunoblotting. Down-regulation of the transcriptional repressor E2F6 by TGFbeta1 correlated with a weak growth-inhibitory activity of TGFbeta1 on HMVEC-d cells. Twenty-five of the identified proteins have not previously been described as being regulated by TGFbeta1, providing new insights into TGFbeta1 signalling in endothelial cells.

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