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  • 1.
    Al-Mashhadi, Ammar Nadhom Farman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stenberg, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Karanikas, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Persson, A. Erik G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlstrom, Mattias
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Nils
    Department of Pediatric Surgery, Astrid Lindgren Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Surgical treatment reduces blood pressure in children with unilateral congenital hydronephrosis2015In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 91.e1-91.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Renal disorders can cause hypertension, but less is known about the influence of hydronephrosis on blood pressure. Hydronephrosis due to pelvo-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) is a fairly common condition (incidence in newborns of 0.5-1%). Although hypertensive effects of hydronephrosis have been suggested, this has not been substantiated by prospective studies in humans [1-3]. Experimental studies with PUJO have shown that animals with induced hydronephrosis develop salt-sensitive hypertension, which strongly correlate to the degree of obstruction [4-7]. Moreover, relief of the obstruction normalized blood pressure [8]. In this first prospective study our aim was to study the blood pressure pattern in pediatric patients with hydronephrosis before and after surgical correction of the ureteral obstruction. Specifically, we investigated if preoperative blood pressure is reduced after surgery and if split renal function and renographic excretion curves provide any prognostic information. Patients and methods Twelve patients with unilateral congenital hydronephrosis were included in this prospective study. Ambulatory blood pressure (24 h) was measured preoperatively and six months after surgery. Preoperative evaluations of bilateral renal function by Tc99m-MAG3 scintigraphy, and renography curves, classified according to O'Reilly, were also performed. Results As shown in the summary figure, postoperative systolic (103 +/- 2 mmHg) and diastolic (62 +/- 2 mmHg) blood pressure were significantly lower than those obtained preoperatively (110 +/- 4 and 69 +/- 2 mmHg, respectively), whereas no changes in circadian variation or pulse pressure were observed. Renal functional share of the hydronephrotic kidney ranged from 11 to 55%. There was no correlation between the degree of renal function impairment and the preoperative excretory pattern, or between the preoperative excretory pattern and the blood pressure reduction postoperatively. However, preoperative MAG3 function of the affected kidney correlated with the magnitude of blood pressure change after surgery. Discussion Correction of the obstruction lowered blood pressure, and the reduction in blood pressure appeared to correlate with the degree of renal functional impairment, but not with the excretory pattern. Thus, in the setting of hypertension, it appears that the functional share of the hydronephrotic kidney should be considered an indicator of the need for surgery, whereas the renography curve is less reliable. The strength of the present study is the prospective nature and that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was used. Future longitudinal prolonged follow-up studies are warranted to confirm the present findings, and to understand if a real nephrogenic hypertension with potential necessity of treatment will develop. Conclusion This novel prospective study in patients with congenital hydronephrosis demonstrates a reduction in blood pressure following relief of the obstruction. Based on the present results, we propose that the blood pressure level should also be taken into account when deciding whether to correct hydronephrosis surgically or not.

  • 2. Bauer, Stuart
    et al.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    von Gontard, Alexander
    Hoebeke, Piet
    Bower, Wendy
    Jørgensen, Troels Munch
    Rittig, Søren
    Vande Walle, Johan
    Yeung, C K
    Djurhuus, Jens Christian
    Standardizing terminology in pediatric urology2007In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 163-163Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Cederblad, M.
    et al.
    Neveus, T.
    Ahman, A.
    Österlund Efraimsson, Eva
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Sarkadi, A.
    "Nobody asked us if we needed help": Swedish parents experiences of enuresis2014In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the everyday dilemmas of parents living with a child with nocturnal enuresis and to describe their support needs in relation to healthcare professionals.

    Subjects and methods: The study was conducted in 2011 in Uppsala County, Sweden. Parents of 13 children with enuresis, 10 mothers and three fathers, participated in qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews, which were analysed using systematic text condensation.

    Results: The analysis of the material resulted in six themes: enuresis is socially stigmatising and handicapping; all practices and home remedies are tested; it creates frustration in the family; protecting the child from gossip or teasing; support from healthcare providers would have helped; it's something we just have to live with. Two patterns of coping were identified: the Unworried wet-bed-fixers and the Anxious night-launderers.

    Conclusion: Having a child with enuresis can be stressful for parents, although they tried hard not to blame their child. Because parents can feel reluctant to bring up enuresis themselves, they want child health nurses to routinely raise the issue of bedwetting at the yearly check-up. Parents' information needs included causes of and available treatment options for enuresis as well as access to aids and other support for affected families. .

  • 4.
    Cederblad, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahman, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Österlund Efraimsson, E.
    School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    "Nobody Asked Us if We Needed Help": Swedish parents experiences of enuresis2014In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the everyday dilemmas of parents living with a child with nocturnal enuresis and to describe their support needs in relation to healthcare professionals.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study was conducted in 2011 in Uppsala County, Sweden. Parents of 13 children with enuresis, 10 mothers and three fathers, participated in qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews, which were analysed using systematic text condensation.

    RESULTS: The analysis of the material resulted in six themes: enuresis is socially stigmatising and handicapping; all practices and home remedies are tested; it creates frustration in the family; protecting the child from gossip or teasing; support from healthcare providers would have helped; it's something we just have to live with. Two patterns of coping were identified: the Unworried wet-bed-fixers and the Anxious night-launderers.

    CONCLUSION: Having a child with enuresis can be stressful for parents, although they tried hard not to blame their child. Because parents can feel reluctant to bring up enuresis themselves, they want child health nurses to routinely raise the issue of bedwetting at the yearly check-up. Parents' information needs included causes of and available treatment options for enuresis as well as access to aids and other support for affected families.

  • 5.
    Cederblad, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Engvall, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Infrequent enuresis, the uninvestigated majority: comparisons between children with enuresis of varying severity.2015In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 24.e1-24.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective was to compare children with frequent enuresis (FE) and children with infrequent enuresis (IE) using anamnestic data and variables related to bladder and kidney function. A secondary aim was to look at the group of children who wet their beds every single night, a phenomenon we chose to call constant enuresis (CE).

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The parents recorded the number of wet and dry nights for a period of 14 days, and measured the voided volumes as well as nocturnal urine production for 48 h. History data relevant to bladder and bowel function was also recorded.

    RESULTS: The children could be grouped as follows: IE, n = 14; FE, n = 18; and CE, n = 22. The children with IE were slightly older than the other groups, IE mean 7.57; FE mean 6.22; CE, mean 6.56 (p = 0.004). When comparing the groups in terms of the measured parameters, only one significant difference was found: the FE group had larger average daytime voided volumes, but only when the first morning void was included. The only significantly differing anamnestic variable was previous daytime incontinence, which was more common among the children in the IE group.

    CONCLUSIONS: When comparing children with varying enuresis severity, no major differences regarding bladder function and urine production were found. Furthermore, children with infrequent enuresis tend to be slightly older when they seek medical help.

  • 6.
    Cederblad, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Engvall, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    No effect of basic bladder advice in enuresis: a randomised controlled trial2015In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 153.e1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There are two firstline, evidence-based treatments available for nocturnal enuresis: desmopressin and the enuresis alarm. Prior to use of these therapies, international experts usually recommend that the children also be given basic bladder training during the daytime. The rationale behind this recommendation is that daytime bladder training or urotherapy, is a mainstay in the treatment of daytime incontinence caused by detrusor overactivity. Still, there is, as yet, no firm evidence that daytime bladder training is useful against nocturnal enuresis.

    Aim

    To explore whether basic bladder advice has any effect against nocturnal enuresis.

    Study design

    The study was prospective, randomized, and controlled. The evaluated intervention was bladder advice, given in accordance with ICCS guidelines and focused on regular voiding, sound voiding posture, and sufficient fluid intake. Forty children aged 6 years or more with previously untreated enuresis, but no daytime incontinence, were randomized (20 in each group) to receive either first basic bladder advice for 1 month and then alarm therapy (group A) or just the alarm therapy (group B). Based on power calculations, the minimum number of children required in each treatment arm was 15.

    Results

    The basic bladder advice did not reduce the enuresis frequency in group A (p = 0.089) and the end result after alarm therapy did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.74) (see Table). Only four children in group A had a partial or full response to bladder training, and two of these children relapsed immediately during alarm therapy.

    Discussion

    This was the first study to evaluate, in a prospective, randomized manner, the value of daytime basic bladder training as a treatment of enuresis. It was found that the treatment neither resulted in a significant reduction in the number of wet nights, nor did it improve the success of subsequent alarm therapy.

    Conclusions

    The recommendation that all children with enuresis be given bladder training as a firstline therapy can no longer be supported. Instead, we recommend that treatment of these children start with the enuresis alarm or desmopressin without delay.

  • 7.
    Diamond, Milton
    et al.
    University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine.
    Garland, Jameson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Evidence regarding cosmetic and medically unnecessary surgery on infants2014In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 2-6Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Journal of Pediatric Urology has recently published several articles from the Annecy (France) Working Party on DSD. We question several of the presented findings and recommendations. In two key articles summarizing their review, the authors concluded that identified studies are not representative and suffer from methodological weaknesses, such that they "lack the necessary detail to base further recommendations". In a third article, the Working Party reported that the science supporting early surgery is "scanty", and that "no studies" support the belief that gender variant children require early genital surgery. Nevertheless, the Working Party warned that without long-term research, "if no effort is made, we will be left, in the next generation, to continue making the same judgment, based on 'experience' and 'expert opinion' ". None of the studies cited in the articles support such assertions as we read them. We maintain that reviewed evidence suggests a moratorium on early surgical intervention is imperative for children with differences in sex development, and that the best ethical and scientific considerations require that gender surgery should be delayed until the child can consent. We further present evidence that UN and case law presently under way in the USA support such a moratorium.

  • 8.
    Garland, Jameson
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Diamond, Milton
    John Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii.
    Response to 'Re. Evidence regarding cosmetic and medically unnecessary surgery on infants'2014In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 977-978Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lundmark, Elisabet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stenberg, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Surgery.
    Hägglöf, Bruno
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Div Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Umea, Sweden.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Reboxetine in therapy-resistant enuresis: a randomized, placebo-controlled study2016In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 12, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    A significant minority of children with enuresis do not respond to either desmopressin or the enuresis alarm. Anticholinergics have not proven as successful as expected. The fourth evidence-based treatment, the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, is cardiotoxic when overdosed, which has led to diminished use.

    Aim

    The aim was to determine whether there is a role for the noradrenergic antidepressant reboxetine, as monotherapy or combined with desmopressin, in the treatment of enuresis in children who have not responded to standard therapy, and whether there are side effects involved. We also sought prognostic factors in anamnestic data and in the voiding chart.

    Patients and methods

    The study was a randomized placebo-controlled study with a double-blind cross-over design, in which all patients underwent treatment during three 4-week periods, one with reboxetine 4 mg and placebo, one with reboxetine 4 mg and desmopressin, and one with double placebo treatment. The proportion of wet nights out of 14 was compared before treatment and during the last 2 weeks of each treatment period.

    Results

    Eighteen patients were included. The reduction of wet nights was much better with either reboxetine in monotherapy or in combination with desmopressin than during the placebo period (p = 0.002) ( Figure). However, only one patient achieved complete dryness, this during monotherapy. There were three intermediate responders to monotherapy and five to combination treatment. With reboxetine in monotherapy, six children experienced negative side effects compared with three with combination therapy, and two with placebo. All of these side effects were mild and reversible. Only one patient chose to cease treatment because of side effects. No prognostic factors were found in either the case history or in voiding chart data.

    Discussion

    The present study, the first placebo-controlled trial, confirms that reboxetine is an evidence-based alternative to cardiotoxic antidepressant treatment in therapy-resistant enuresis. The fact that few patients achieved complete dryness may be due to the low dosage used. In our clinical practice we increase the dose to 8 mg when dryness is not achieved with the lower dose. Our experience is that this leaves more children with full response, but the evidence of this has yet to be shown.

    ConclusionReboxetine seems to be an alternative in the treatment of enuretic children who have not responded to standard treatment.

  • 10. Lundmark, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stenberg, Arne
    Hägglöf, Bruno
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Reboxetine in therapy-resistant enuresis: a randomized placebo-controlled study2016In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 397.e1-397.e5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A significant minority of children with enuresis do not respond to either desmopressin or the enuresis alarm. Anticholinergics have not proven as successful as expected. The fourth evidence-based treatment, the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, is cardiotoxic when overdosed, which has led to diminished use. Aim: The aim was to determine whether there is a role for the noradrenergic antidepressant reboxetine, as monotherapy or combined with desmopressin, in the treatment of enuresis in children who have not responded to standard therapy, and whether there are side effects involved. We also sought prognostic factors in anamnestic data and in the voiding chart. Patients and methods: The study was a randomized placebo-controlled study with a double-blind cross-over design, in which all patients underwent treatment during three 4-week periods, one with reboxetine 4 mg and placebo, one with reboxetine 4 mg and desmopressin, and one with double placebo treatment. The proportion of wet nights out of 14 was compared before treatment and during the last 2 weeks of each treatment period. Results: Eighteen patients were included. The reduction of wet nights was much better with either reboxetine in monotherapy or in combination with desmopressin than during the placebo period (p = 0.002) (Figure). However, only one patient achieved complete dryness, this during monotherapy. There were three intermediate responders to monotherapy and five to combination treatment. With reboxetine in monotherapy, six children experienced negative side effects compared with three with combination therapy, and two with placebo. All of these side effects were mild and reversible. Only one patient chose to cease treatment because of side effects. No prognostic factors were found in either the case history or in voiding chart data. Discussion: The present study, the first placebo-controlled trial, confirms that reboxetine is an evidence-based alternative to cardiotoxic antidepressant treatment in therapy-resistant enuresis. The fact that few patients achieved complete dryness may be due to the low dosage used. In our clinical practice we increase the dose to 8 mg when dryness is not achieved with the lower dose. Our experience is that this leaves more children with full response, but the evidence of this has yet to be shown. Conclusion: Reboxetine seems to be an alternative in the treatment of enuretic children who have not responded to standard treatment.

  • 11.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Commentary to 'Adenotonsillectomy improves quality of life in children with nocturnal enuresis and sleep-disordered breathing'.2015In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 11, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ring, Ingrid Jönson
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Publ Dent Hlth Serv, Dept Orthodont, Vretgrand 9A, SE-75322 Uppsala, Region Uppsala, Sweden.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Dept Orthodont, Orebro, Region Orebro C, Sweden..
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Sleep disordered breathing in enuretic children and controls2017In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 620.e1-620.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Nocturnal enuresis and sleep disordered breathing are common childhood problems that are reported to be associated with each other. Sleep disordered breathing is often found in children with upper airway obstruction and, according to some studies, its presence is associated with an increased risk of nocturnal enuresis. Respiration during sleep in children with therapy-resistant enuresis, but no history of snoring or sleep apneas, has previously been investigated, and subclinical signs of disordered respiration were found in this group. However, sleep disordered breathing in enuretic children without a history of snoring or sleep apneas has not been thoroughly studied before.

    Aim: To evaluate sleep disordered breathing in enuretic children and compare them with healthy control children.

    Subjects and methods: Children aged 8-13 years with nocturnal enuresis were included. Exclusion criteria were: daytime incontinence, on-going anti-enuretic treatment, and concomitant urological, endocrinological, nephrological or psychiatric disorders. Twenty children (19 boys and 1 girl) suffering from therapy-resistant nocturnal enuresis, and 21 healthy controls (18 boys and 3 girls) underwent one night of polygraphic sleep registration focused on respiratory variables. The registration included electroencephalography as well as assessment of respiratory movements, nasal airflow and oxygen saturation; it was performed with a portable sleep device at the subjects' homes. In addition to this, OSA 18, a health-related quality of life instrument, was used to evaluate subjective issues related to sleep and breathing.

    Results: The mean apnea hypopnea index values were 0.96 +/- 0.8 for the patient group and 0.46 +/- 0.4 for the control group. The oxygen desaturation index was slightly higher for the children with nocturnal enuresis compared with the healthy controls (P = 0.05). No other differences were found in the respiratory variables. Both groups of children showed low levels of arousals (Summary Table). The enuretic children reported significantly more subjective sleep disturbances and a lower quality of life than their healthy peers.

    Discussion: This was the first controlled study of sleep disordered breathing in children with nocturnal enuresis. One limitation of the study was that some variables were known to be underestimated when scoring polygraphic data. The apnea hypopnea index was such a variable and was indeed lower than in a previous study.

    Conclusion: No major differences in respiration during sleep were found between enuretic children and controls.

  • 13.
    Vivier, Pierre-Hugues
    et al.
    Hop Prive Estuaire, Radiol, Ramsay Gen Sante, Le Havre, France;Univ Hosp Charles Nicolle, Pediat Radiol, Rouen, France.
    Augdal, Thomas A.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Pediat Radiol, Tromso, Norway..
    Avni, Fred E.
    Lille Univ Hosp, Jeanne de Flandre Hosp, Pediat Radiol, Lille, France..
    Bacchetta, Justine
    Hop Femme Mere Enfant, Pediat Nephrol, Bron, France..
    Beetz, Rolf
    Univ Med Clin, Ctr Paediat & Adolescent Med, Pediat Nephrol, Mainz, Germany..
    Bjerre, Anna K.
    Natl Hosp Norway, Oslo Univ Hosp, Pediat Nephrol, Oslo, Norway..
    Blickman, Johan
    Golisano Childrens Hosp, Pediat Radiol, Rochester, NY USA..
    Cochat, Pierre
    Hop Femme Mere Enfant, Pediat Nephrol, Bron, France..
    Coppo, Rosana
    Regina Margherita Hosp, Pediat Nephrol, Turin, Italy..
    Damasio, Beatrice
    Ist Giannina Gaslini, Pediat Radiol, Genoa, Italy..
    Darge, Kassa
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Pediat Radiol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    El-Ghoneimi, Alaa
    Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Hosp Robert Debre, AP HP, Pediat Surg & Urol, Paris, France..
    Hoebeke, Piet
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Urol, Ghent, Belgium..
    Läckgren, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Leclair, Marc-David
    Children Univ Hosp, Pediat Surg & Urol, Nantes, France..
    Lobo, Maria-Luisa
    Univ Hosp, Hosp Santa Maria, Radiol, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Manzoni, Gianantonio
    Osped Maggiore Policlin, Fdn IRCCS Ca Granda, Pediat Urol, Milan, Italy..
    Marks, Stephen D.
    Great Ormond St Hosp Children NHS Fdn Trust, Paediat Nephrol, London, England..
    Mattioli, Girolamo
    Dinogmi Univ Genova, Pediat Surg & Urol, Gaslini Inst, Genoa, Italy..
    Mentzel, Hans-Joachim
    Univ Hosp Jena, Pediat Radiol, Diagnost & Intervent Radiol, Jena, Germany..
    Mouriquand, Pierre
    Hosp Civils Lyon, Hop Mere Enfant, Pediat Urol, Lyon 1, France.;Claude Bernard Univ, Lyon 1, France..
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Ntoulia, Aikaterini
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Pediat Radiol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Kings Coll Hosp London, Paediat Radiol, London, England..
    Ording-Muller, Lil-Sofie
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Paediat Radiol, Oslo, Norway..
    Oswald, Josef
    Hosp Sisters Char, Pediat Urol, Linz, Austria..
    Papadopoulou, Frederica
    Ioannina Univ, Radiol, Ioannina, Greece..
    Porcellini, Gabriella
    Regina Margherita Hosp, Pediat Nephrol, Turin, Italy..
    Ring, Ekkehard
    Univ Hosp LKH Graz, Dept Pediat, Graz, Austria..
    Rösch, Wolfgang
    Univ Med Ctr Regensburg, Pediat Urol, Regensburg, Germany..
    Teixeira, Ana F.
    Ctr Hosp Sao Joao, Pediat Nephrol, Oporto, Portugal..
    Riccabona, Michael
    Univ Hosp LKH Graz, Pediat Radiol, Graz, Austria..
    Standardization of pediatric uroradiological terms: A multidisciplinary European glossary2017In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 641-650Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To promote the standardization of nephro-uroradiological terms used in children, the European Society of Pediatric Radiology uroradiology taskforce wrote a detailed glossary. This work has been subsequently submitted to European experts in pediatric urology and nephrology for discussion and acceptance to improve the quality of radiological reports and communication among different clinicians involved in pediatric urology and nephrology.

  • 14.
    Wide, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Glad Mattsson, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Renal preservation in children with neurogenic bladder-sphincter dysfunction followed in a national program2012In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, ISSN 1477-5131, E-ISSN 1873-4898, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Neurogenic bladder-sphincter dysfunction (NBSD) constitutes the major reason for morbidity in children with spina bifida. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for renal damage in children with NBSD followed according to the Swedish national guidelines. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Records and cystometries from 6 to 16 years (median 11) follow up of 41 consecutive children born 1993-2003 with NBSD were evaluated. The children were divided into a high pressure group (baseline pressure above 30 cmH(2)O at maximal clean intermittent catheterization volume in at least two cystometries) and a low pressure group. Most children (34/41) were followed from birth. RESULTS: Although renal scarring on DMSA-scintigraphy was found in 5/41 children, all but one had normal renal function. Two already had renal scars on entering the follow-up program at age 2.5 and 3 years. Renal scarring was more frequent in the high pressure group (P < 0.01). Most children with renal scars (4/5) had a combination of low compliant bladder and insufficient compliance with treatment and follow up. CONCLUSION: High baseline pressure is confirmed as a risk factor that, in combination with complex social issues, creates a demanding situation for families and professionals. A structured early follow up with treatment compliance effectively prevents renal damage.

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