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  • 1.
    Andersson, Bodil T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Radiographers' self-assessed level and use of competencies: a national survey2012In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 635-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe radiographers' self-assessed level and use of competencies as well as how sociodemographic and situational factors are associated with these competencies, particularly related to work experience.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional design was employed. Radiographers (n = 406) completed the self-administered 28-item questionnaire encompassing two dimensions: 'Nurse-initiated care' and 'Technical and radiographic processes'. The level of competencies was rated on a 10-point scale and the frequency of use on a 6-point scale.

    RESULTS: Most competencies received high ratings both in terms of level and frequency of use. In 'Nurse-initiated care' the competency 'Adequately informing the patient' was rated the highest, while 'Identifying and encountering the patient in a state of shock' and 'Participating in quality improvement regarding patient safety and care' received the lowest ratings. In 'Technical and radiographic processes' the highest rated competencies were 'Adapting the examination to the patient's prerequisites and needs' and 'Producing accurate and correct images'. The lowest frequency of use was 'Preliminary assessment of images'.

    CONCLUSION: The main findings underline the radiographers' high competency in both 'Nurse-initiated care' and 'Technical and radiographic processes'. The lower rated competencies emphasise the importance of continuous professional education and quality improvement.

    MAIN MESSAGES :

    • Assessing radiographers' clinical competencies is fundamental for ensuring professional standards.

    • Most competencies received high ratings both in the nursing and in the radiographic dimensions.

    • The highest rated competencies focussed on information and adaptability to the patients needs.

    • The lowest rated competencies focussed on encountering the patient in shock and image assessments.

    • Age, years in present position and work place only explained a relatively small part of competency.

  • 2.
    deSouza, Nandita M.
    et al.
    Cancer Res UK Imaging Ctr, England; Royal Marsden Hosp, England.
    Achten, Eric
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Alberich-Bayarri, Angel
    QUIBIM SL Fe Hlth Res Inst, Spain.
    Bamberg, Fabian
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Boellaard, Ronald
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Clement, Olivier
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France.
    Fournier, Laure
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France.
    Gallagher, Ferdia
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Golay, Xavier
    UCL Inst Neurol, England.
    Heussel, Claus Peter
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Jackson, Edward F.
    Univ Wisconsin, WI USA.
    Manniesing, Rashindra
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Mayerhofer, Marius E.
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Neri, Emanuele
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    OConnor, James
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Oguz, Kader Karli
    Hacettepe Univ Hosp, Turkey.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Smits, Marion
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    van Beek, Edwin J. R.
    Queens Med Res Inst, Scotland.
    Zech, Christoph J.
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Validated imaging biomarkers as decision-making tools in clinical trials and routine practice: current status and recommendations from the EIBALL* subcommittee of the European Society of Radiology (ESR)2019In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 10, no 1, article id UNSP 87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observer-driven pattern recognition is the standard for interpretation of medical images. To achieve global parity in interpretation, semi-quantitative scoring systems have been developed based on observer assessments; these are widely used in scoring coronary artery disease, the arthritides and neurological conditions and for indicating the likelihood of malignancy. However, in an era of machine learning and artificial intelligence, it is increasingly desirable that we extract quantitative biomarkers from medical images that inform on disease detection, characterisation, monitoring and assessment of response to treatment. Quantitation has the potential to provide objective decision-support tools in the management pathway of patients. Despite this, the quantitative potential of imaging remains under-exploited because of variability of the measurement, lack of harmonised systems for data acquisition and analysis, and crucially, a paucity of evidence on how such quantitation potentially affects clinical decision-making and patient outcome. This article reviews the current evidence for the use of semi-quantitative and quantitative biomarkers in clinical settings at various stages of the disease pathway including diagnosis, staging and prognosis, as well as predicting and detecting treatment response. It critically appraises current practice and sets out recommendations for using imaging objectively to drive patient management decisions.

  • 3. Falk Delgado, Anna
    et al.
    Van Westen, Danielle
    Nilsson, Markus
    Knutsson, Linda
    Sundgren, Pia C
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Falk Delgado, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Diagnostic value of alternative techniques to gadolinium-based contrast agents in MR neuroimaging: a comprehensive overview2019In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 84Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) increase lesion detection and improve disease characterization for many cerebral pathologies investigated with MRI. These agents, introduced in the late 1980s, are in wide use today. However, some non-ionic linear GBCAs have been associated with the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with kidney failure. Gadolinium deposition has also been found in deep brain structures, although it is of unclear clinical relevance. Hence, new guidelines from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine advocate cautious use of GBCA in clinical and research practice. Some linear GBCAs were restricted from use by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2017.

    This review focuses on non-contrast-enhanced MRI techniques that can serve as alternatives for the use of GBCAs. Clinical studies on the diagnostic performance of non-contrast-enhanced as well as contrast-enhanced MRI methods, both well established and newly proposed, were included. Advantages and disadvantages together with the diagnostic performance of each method are detailed. Non-contrast-enhanced MRIs discussed in this review are arterial spin labeling (ASL), time of flight (TOF), phase contrast (PC), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), and amide proton transfer (APT) imaging.

    Ten common diseases were identified for which studies reported comparisons of non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. These specific diseases include primary brain tumors, metastases, abscess, multiple sclerosis, and vascular conditions such as aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, arteriovenous fistula, intracranial carotid artery occlusive disease, hemorrhagic, and ischemic stroke.

    In general, non-contrast-enhanced techniques showed comparable diagnostic performance to contrast-enhanced MRI for specific diagnostic questions. However, some diagnoses still require contrast-enhanced imaging for a complete examination.

  • 4. Gatidis, Sergios
    et al.
    Beyer, Thomas
    Becker, Minerva
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Nikolaou, Konstantin
    Cyran, Clemens
    Pfannenberg, Christina
    State of affairs of hybrid imaging in Europe: two multi-national surveys from 20172019In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess the current state of hybrid imaging in Europe with respect to operations, reading and reporting, as well as qualification and training.

    Methods: The first survey (LOCAL) was sent to the heads of the departments of radiology and nuclear medicine in Europe in 2017, including 15 questions regarding the organisation of hybrid imaging operations, reporting strategies for PET/CT and the existence of relevant training programmes. The second survey (NATIONAL) consisted of 10 questions and was directed to the national ministries of health of 37 European countries addressing combined training options in radiology and nuclear medicine.

    Results: In the LOCAL survey, 61 valid responses from 26 European countries were received. In almost half of the institutions, hybrid imaging was performed within a single department, mainly in nuclear medicine departments (31%). In half of the centres (51%), PET/CT reports were performed jointly, while in 20% of the centres, reporting was performed by nuclear medicine physicians. Radiologists were responsible for presenting hybrid imaging results in clinical boards in 34% of responding sites. Integrated hybrid imaging training was available in 41% sites. In the NATIONAL survey, responses from 34 countries were received and demonstrated a heterogeneous landscape of official training possibilities in radiology and nuclear medicine with limited opportunities for additional qualifications in hybrid imaging.

    Conclusions: The results of these surveys demonstrate a notable heterogeneity in the current practice of hybrid imaging throughout Europe. This heterogeneity exists despite the general consensus that strong professional cooperation is required in order to ensure high clinical quality and to strengthen the clinical role of hybrid imaging.

  • 5.
    Geijer, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Geijer, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Radiology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Added value of double reading in diagnostic radiology, a systematic review2018In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 287-301Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Double reading in diagnostic radiology can find discrepancies in the original report, but a systematic program of double reading is resource consuming. There are conflicting opinions on the value of double reading. The purpose of the current study was to perform a systematic review on the value of double reading.

    METHODS: A systematic review was performed to find studies calculating the rate of misses and overcalls with the aim of establishing the added value of double reading by human observers.

    RESULTS: The literature search resulted in 1610 hits. After abstract and full-text reading, 46 articles were selected for analysis. The rate of discrepancy varied from 0.4 to 22% depending on study setting. Double reading by a sub-specialist, in general, led to high rates of changed reports.

    CONCLUSIONS: The systematic review found rather low discrepancy rates. The benefit of double reading must be balanced by the considerable number of working hours a systematic double-reading scheme requires. A more profitable scheme might be to use systematic double reading for selected, high-risk examination types. A second conclusion is that there seems to be a value of sub-specialisation for increased report quality. A consequent implementation of this would have far-reaching organisational effects.

    KEY POINTS: • In double reading, two or more radiologists read the same images. • A systematic literature review was performed. • The discrepancy rates varied from 0.4 to 22% in various studies. • Double reading by sub-specialists found high discrepancy rates.

  • 6.
    Romanos Zapata, Romina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Danfors, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Differential diagnosis of therapy-related changes and recurrent intracranial tumours using perfusion MRI and methionine PET2014In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 5, no Suppl 1, p. S239-, article id B-0485Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Torkzad, Michael R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Norén, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Stereology: a novel technique for rapid assessment of liver volume2012In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 387-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The purpose of this study was to test the stereology method using several grid sizes for measuring liver volume and to find which grid provides an accurate estimate of liver volume.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    Liver volume was measured by volumetry in 41 sets of liver MRI. MRI was performed before and after different weight-reducing regimens. Grids of 3, 4, 5, and 6 cm were used to measure liver volume on different occasions by stereology. The liver volume and the changes in volume before and after treatment were compared between stereology and volumetry.

    RESULTS:

    There was no significant difference in measurements between stereology methods and volumetry (p > 0.05). The mean differences in liver volume between stereology based on 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-cm grids and volumetry were 37, 3, 132, and 23 mL, respectively, and the differences in measurement of liver volume change were 21, 2, 19, and 76 mL, respectively. The mean time required for measurement by stereology was 59-190 s.

    CONCLUSION:

    Stereology employing 3- and 4-cm grids can rapidly provide accurate results for measuring liver volume and changes in liver volume.

    MAIN MESSAGES:

    • Statistical methods can be used for measuring area/volume in radiology.

    • Measuring liver volume by stereology by 4-cm grids can be done in less than two minutes.

    • Follow-up of liver volume is highly accurate with stereological methods.

  • 8.
    Torkzad, Michael R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Påhlman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in rectal cancer: a comprehensive review2010In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 245-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has established itself as the primary method for local staging in patients with rectal cancer. This is due to several factors, most importantly because of the ability to assess the status of circumferential resection margin. There are several newer developments being introduced continuously, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and imaging with 3 T. Assessment of loco-regional lymph nodes has also been investigated extensively using different approaches, but more work needs to be done. Finally, evaluation of tumours during or after preoperative treatment is becoming an everyday reality. All these new aspects prompt a review of the most recent advances and opinions. In this review, a comprehensive overview of the current status of MRI in the loco-regional assessment and management of rectal cancer is presented. The findings on MRI and their accuracy are reviewed based on the most up-to-date evidence. Optimisation of MRI acquisition and relevant regional anatomy are also presented, based on published literature and our own experience.

  • 9. Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    et al.
    Westman, Eric
    van Westen, Danielle
    Wallin, Anders
    Shams, Sara
    Cavallin, Lena
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Imaging biomarkers of dementia: recommended visual rating scales with teaching cases2017In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diagnostic work up of dementia may benefit from structured reporting of CT and/or MRI and the use of standardised visual rating scales. We advocate a more widespread use of standardised scales as part of the workflow in clinical and research evaluation of dementia. We propose routine clinical use of rating scales for medial temporal atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy (GCA) and white matter hyperintensities (WMH). These scales can be used for evaluation of both CT and MRI and are efficient in routine imaging assessment in dementia, and may improve the accuracy of diagnosis. Our review provides detailed imaging examples of rating increments in each of these scales and a separate teaching file. The radiologist should relate visual ratings to the clinical assessment and other biomarkers to assist the clinician in the diagnostic decision.

    TEACHING POINTS: • Clinical dementia diagnostics would benefit from structured radiological reporting. • Standardised rating scales should be used in dementia assessment. • It is important to relate imaging findings to the clinically suspected diagnosis.

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