Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Almeida, Juan Pablo
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rosenstock, Nicholas P.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Forsmark, Benjamin
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Bergh, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Wallander, Håkan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ectomycorrhizal community composition and function in a spruce forest transitioning between nitrogen and phosphorus limitation2019In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 40, p. 20-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrogen is the main limiting nutrient in boreal ecosystems, but studies in southwest Sweden suggest that certain forests approach phosphorus (P) limitation driven by nitrogen (N) deposition. We added N, P or N + P to a Norway spruce forest in this region, to push the system to N or P limitation. Tree growth and needle nutrient concentrations indicated that the trees are P limited. EMF biomass was reduced only by N + P additions. Soil EMF communities responded more strongly to P than to N. Addition of apatite to ingrowth meshbags altered EMF community composition and enhanced the abundance of Imleria badia in the control and N plots, but not when P was added. The ecological significance of this species is discussed. Effects on tree growth, needle chemistry, and EMF communities indicate a dynamic interaction between EMF fungi and the nutrient status of trees and soils. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Dept Chem, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan.
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Terenius, Olle
    Nordlander, Goran
    Nordenhem, Henrik
    Nagahama, Kazuhiro
    Norin, Emil
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Borg Karlsson, Anna Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    A fungal metabolite masks the host plant odor for the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis)2015In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 13, p. 103-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pine weevil is one of the most important pest insects of conifer reforestation areas in Europe. Female pine weevils cover their eggs with chewed bark and feces (frass) resulting in avoidance behavior of feeding conspecifics towards egg laying sites. It has been suggested that microorganisms present in the frass may be responsible for producing deterrent compounds for the pine weevil. The fungi Ophiostoma canum, O. pluriannulatum, and yeast Debaryomyces hansenii were isolated from aseptically collected pine-weevil frass. The isolated fungi were cultured on weevil frass broth and their volatiles were collected by SPME and identified by GC MS. D. hansenii produced methyl salicylate (MeS) as a major compound, whereas, in addition, O. canum and O. pluriannulatum produced 6-protoilludene. In a multi-choice lab bioassay, MeS strongly reduced pine weevil's attraction to the Pinus sylvestris volatiles. Thus, a fungal metabolite was found that strongly affects the pine weevil host-odor search. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Bergfur, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friberg, Nikolai
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Trade-offs between fungal and bacterial respiration along gradients in temperature, nutrients and substrata: Experiments with stream derived microbial communities2012In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the effects of temperature, nutrients and substrata on microbial respiration rates. Leaves of alder and oak were incubated in a natural stream. Leaf discs were incubated in antibiotics to manipulate the ratio of fungi to bacteria with three treatments: antifungal, antibacterial, and combined antifungal and antibacterial treatment in addition to controls. Discs were subsequently incubated in different nutrient set-ups and temperature regimes. Significant effects of temperature, nutrients, microbial treatment and leaf type on respiration rates were found. However, temperature did not significantly add to the effect of eutrophication on microbial respiration rates. A stronger effect of temperature on fungal mediated respiration than on bacterial mediated respiration was found. In streams where leaf litter constitutes the main energy source, fungi constitute the dominant microbial decomposer. Our results indicate that increased temperature due to global warming might have serious implications for ecosystem functioning when leaf litter constitutes the main energy source.

  • 4.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edman, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Holm, Svante
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Jonsson, Bengt Gunnar
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Effect of heat on interspecific competition in saprotrophic wood fungi2014In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 11, p. 100-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some boreal wood fungi that are associated with forest fire or open dry habitats have an increased resistance to heat in comparison to species associated with a less specific distribution or species found in mesic forests. We hypothesize that extreme temperature-stress experienced during fires will favor species adapted to heat and, ultimately, the composition of species inhabiting logs in such habitats will change. Competitiveness after temperature stress was examined in three fire-associated species – Dichomitus squalens, Gloeophyllum sepiarium and Phlebiopsis gigantea – and three non fire-associated species – Ischnoderma benzoinum, Phellinus pini and Fomitopsis pinicola. There was a difference between the fire-associated species and the non fire-associated species with respect to competitive strength after heat stress. All fire-associated species had an advantage after heat treatment, colonizing a larger volume of wood than any non-fire-associated competitor. Our findings suggest that increased heat tolerance of mycelia can exert a competitive balance shift after forest fire. It shows that a system governed by forest fire will be dominance controlled under certain conditions. Furthermore, from a management perspective, during a prescribed burning, certain species already present in the ecosystem will be favored if the fire is not allowed to totally consume the substrates.

  • 5. Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure
    et al.
    Massot, Marie
    Toigo, Maude
    Fort, Tania
    Kaya, Ayse Gulden Aday
    Boberg, Johanna
    Braun, Uwe
    Capdevielle, Xavier
    Cech, Thomas
    Chandelier, Anne
    Christova, Petya
    Corcobado, Tamara
    Dogmus, Tugba
    Dutech, Cyril
    Fabreguettes, Olivier
    d'Arcier, Julie Faivre
    Gross, Andrin
    Jung, Marilia Horta
    Iturritxa, Eugenia
    Jung, Thomas
    Junker, Corina
    Kiss, Levente
    Kostov, Kaloyan
    Lehtijarvi, Asko
    Lyubenova, Aneta
    Marcais, Benoit
    Oliva, Jonas
    Oskay, Funda
    Pastircak, Martin
    Pastircakova, Katarina
    Piou, Dominique
    Saint-Jean, Gilles
    Sallafranque, Arnaud
    Slavov, Slavtcho
    Stenlid, Jan
    Talgo, Venche
    Takamatsu, Susumu
    Tack, Ayco J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    From leaf to continent: The multi-scale distribution of an invasive cryptic pathogen complex on oak2018In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 36, p. 39-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial distribution and niche differentiation of three closely related species (Erysiphe alphitoides, Erysiphe quercicola and Erysiphe hypophylla) causing oak powdery mildew was studied at scales ranging from the European continent, where they are invasive, to a single leaf. While E. alphitoides was dominant at all scales, E. quercicola and E. hypophylla had restricted geographic, stand and leaf distributions. The large-scale distributions were likely explained by climatic factors and species environmental tolerances, with E. quercicola being more frequent in warmer climates and E. hypophylla in colder climates. The extensive sampling and molecular analyses revealed the cryptic invasion of E. quercicola in nine countries from which it had not previously been recorded. The presence of the three species was also strongly affected by host factors, such as oak species and developmental stage. Segregation patterns between Erysiphe species were observed at the leaf scale, between and within leaf surfaces, suggesting competitive effects.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Amanda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Gauslaa, Yngvar
    Palmqvist, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ekström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Esseen, Per-Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Morphology drives water storage traits in the globally widespreadlichen genus Usnea2018In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 35, p. 51-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Links between lichen morphology, internal/external water storage and distribution patterns are poorly known. We compared mass- (WC, % H2O) and area-based (WHC, mg H2O cm−2) hydration traits in seven pendent or shrubby Usnea species from oceanic to continental climates. All species held more external than internal water. Internal WHC and WC increased with specific thallus mass (STM, mg cm−2), while external WC decreased. Shrubby species had higher STM and total WHC than pendent ones. The continental Usnea hirta (shrubby) had the highest total and external storage; the suboceanic Usnea longissima (pendent) had the lowest internal storage. Morphology drives hydration traits and explains distributions of some Usnea species, but such traits did not distinguish oceanic from widespread species. Shrubby species maximize water storage and thus prolong hydration after rainfall events and/or hydration by dew. The low internal WHC in pendent species is likely an adaptation to frequent hydration in humid air.

  • 7.
    Esseen, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Olsson, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Coxson, Darwyn
    Gauslaa, Yngvar
    Morphology influences water storage in hair lichens from boreal forest canopies2015In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 18, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hair lichens (Alectoria, Bryoria, Usnea) with high surface-area-to-mass ratios rapidly trap moisture. By photography and scanning we examined how internal water storage depended on morphological traits in five species. Specific thallus mass (STM, mg DM cm(-2)) and water holding capacity (WHC, mg H2O cm(-2)) after shaking and blotting a fully hydrated thallus increased with thallus area. STM was approximate to 50% higher in Alectoria and Usnea thalli than in Bryoria. WHC was highest in Alectoria while percent water content of freshly blotted thalli was lowest in Usnea. Thallus area overlap ratio (TAO), assessing branch density of the thallus, was highest in the two thinnest Bryoria; lower in the thicker Usnea. Within species, hair lichens increased their water storage by increasing branch density rather than branch diameter. The taxonomically related genera Alectoria and Bryoria shared water storage characteristics, and differed from Usnea. Hair lichens in lower canopies have among the lowest water storage capacity reported in lichens. 

  • 8.
    Esseen, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rönnqvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Gauslaa, Y.
    Coxson, D. S.
    Externally held water: a key factor for hair lichens in boreal forest canopies2017In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 30, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lichens hold water inside (internal pool) and outside their body (external pool). Yet, external pool size is not known in hair lichens dominating boreal forest canopies. Here we quantify morphological traits and internal/external water in two widespread Bryoria species along Picea abies canopy-height gradients: Bryoria fuscescens at 5-20 m and Bryoria capillaris at 15-20 m. Dry mass and specific thallus mass (STM) of intact B. fuscescens increased with height, while STM of individual branches did not. Maximum water holding capacity (mg H2O cm-2) increased with height, but did not differ between the species. Bryoria had much larger external (79-84% of total) than internal water pools, trapping water by dense clusters of thin, overlapping branches. They thus increase water storage in boreal forest canopies and influence hydrology. High external water storage extends hydration periods and improves lichen performance in upper canopies, and thereby contributes to the success of these hair lichens. 

  • 9.
    Fransson, Petra
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala BioCtr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Alexandra
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala BioCtr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Norström, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Umeå Univ, Dept Chem, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bent, Elizabeth
    Univ Guelph, Sch Environm Sci, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Ectomycorrhizal exudates and pre-exposure to elevated CO2 affects soil bacterial growth and community structure2016In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 20, p. 211-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi produce low molecular weight organic compounds, supporting diverse microbial communities. To link mycorrhizal root exudation directly to bacterial responses, we used Scots pine exudates with (Suillus variegatus and Piloderma fallax) and without mycorrhiza as substrata for forest soil bacteria. Bacterial growth and vitality was monitored, and community composition determined using TRFLP, cloning and sequencing. We investigated if the amount of organic acids in exudates explained bacterial growth, and whether bacterial communities were influenced by pre-exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2. We demonstrated functional differences in bacterial growth rates related to CO2. There was a shift in the bacterial community (e.g. Burkholderia sp. and gamma-proteobacteria) toward organisms better able to rapidly utilize exudates when pine microcosms were pre-exposed to elevated CO2. Soil bacteria from all treatments tended to grow more abundantly and rapidly in exudates from Pilo derma -colonized seedlings, suggesting that the organic acids and/or unidentified compounds present supported greater growth.

  • 10. Fransson, Petra
    et al.
    Andersson, Alexandra
    Norström, Sara
    Department of Natural Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Bylund, Dan
    Bent, Elizabeth
    Ectomycorrhizal exudates and pre-exposure to elevated CO2 affects soil bacterial growth and community structure2016In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 20, p. 211-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi produce low molecular weight organic compounds, supporting diverse microbial communities. To link mycorrhizal root exudation directly to bacterial responses, we used Scots pine exudates with (Suillus variegatus and Piloderma fallax) and without mycorrhiza as substrata for forest soil bacteria. Bacterial growth and vitality was monitored, and community composition determined using TRFLP, cloning and sequencing. We investigated if the amount of organic acids in exudates explained bacterial growth, and whether bacterial communities were influenced by pre-exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2. We demonstrated functional differences in bacterial growth rates related to CO2. There was a shift in the bacterial community (e.g. Burkholderia sp. and gamma-proteobacteria) toward organisms better able to rapidly utilize exudates when pine microcosms were pre-exposed to elevated CO2. Soil bacteria from all treatments tended to grow more abundantly and rapidly in exudates from Pilo derma -colonized seedlings, suggesting that the organic acids and/or unidentified compounds present supported greater growth.

  • 11. Ivarsson, M.
    et al.
    Bengtson, S.
    Neubeck, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    The igneous oceanic crust - Earth's largest fungal habitat?2016In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 20, p. 249-255Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years the igneous oceanic crust has been recognized as a substantial microbial habitat and a scientific frontier within Geology, Biology, and Oceanography. A few successful metagenomic investigations have indicated the presence of Archaea and Bacteria, but also fungi in the subseafloor igneous crust. A comprehensive fossil record supports the presence of fungi in these deep environments and provides means of investigating the fungal presence that complements metagenomic methods. Considering the vast volume of the oceanic crust and that it is the largest aquifer on Earth, we put forward that it is the largest fungal habitat on the planet. This review aims to introduce a yet unexplored fungal habitat in an environment considered extreme from a biological perspective. We present the current knowledge of fungal abundance and diversity and discuss the ecological role of fungi in the igneous oceanic crust.

  • 12.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Neubeck, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Stockholm University.
    The igneous oceanic crust – Earth’s largest fungal habitat?2016In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 20, p. 249-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years the igneous oceanic crust has been recognized as a substantial microbial habitat and a scientific frontier within Geology, Biology, and Oceanography. A few successful metagenomic investigations have indicated the presence of Archaea and Bacteria, but also fungi in the subseafloor igneous crust. A comprehensive fossil record supports the presence of fungi in these deep environments and provides means of investigating the fungal presence that complements metagenomic methods. Considering the vast volume of the oceanic crust and that it is the largest aquifer on Earth, we put forward that it is the largest fungal habitat on the planet. This review aims to introduce a yet unexplored fungal habitat in an environment considered extreme from a biological perspective. We present the current knowledge of fungal abundance and diversity and discuss the ecological role of fungi in the igneous oceanic crust.

  • 13. Jabiol, Jeremy
    et al.
    Bruder, Andreas
    Gessner, Mark O.
    Makkonen, Marika
    Mckie, Brendan G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Aquatic Sciences & Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Peeters, Edwin T. H. M.
    Vos, Veronique C. A.
    Chauvet, Eric
    Diversity patterns of leaf-associated aquatic hyphomycetes along a broad latitudinal gradient2013In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 439-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information about the global distribution of aquatic hyphomycetes is scarce, despite the primary importance of these fungi in stream ecosystem functioning. In particular, the relationship between their diversity and latitude remains unclear, due to a lack of coordinated surveys across broad latitudinal ranges. This study is a first report on latitudinal patterns of aquatic hyphomycete diversity associated with native leaf-litter species in five streams located along a gradient extending from the subarctic to the tropics. Exposure of leaf litter in mesh bags of three different mesh sizes facilitated assessing the effects of including or excluding different size-classes of litter-consuming invertebrates. Aquatic hyphomycete evenness was notably constant across all sites, whereas species richness and diversity, expressed as the Hill number, reached a maximum at mid-latitudes (Mediterranean and temperate streams). These latitudinal patterns were consistent across litter species, despite a notable influence of litter identity on fungal communities at the local scale. As a result, the bell-shaped distribution of species richness and Hill diversity deviated markedly from the latitudinal patterns of most other groups of organisms. Differences in the body-size distribution of invertebrate communities colonizing the leaves had no effect on aquatic hyphomycete species richness, Hill diversity or evenness, but invertebrates could still influence fungal communities by depleting litter, an effect that was not captured by the design of our experiment. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  • 14. Kjöller, Rasmus
    et al.
    Olsrud, Maria
    Michelsen, Anders
    Co-existing ericaceous plant species in a subarctic mire community share fungal root endophytes2010In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, culture-independent identification tools have widened our knowledge of fungi colonizing ericaceous roots including ericoid mycorrhizal fungi. One focal interest has been to identify fungi, which simultaneously can establish ericoid and ectomycorrhiza, while knowledge about the fungal composition in roots of co-existing ericaceous plants is scarce. In the present paper, the fungal community in roots of four ericaceous plant species, Empetrum hermaphroditum, Andromeda polifolia, Vaccinium uliginosum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea which often dominate subarctic heaths and mires, was studied. From each of these plants, in each of five plots, clone libraries were established using fungal specific ITS-PCR followed by cloning, PCR–RFLP and sequencing. The clone libraries were dominated by potential ericoid mycorrhizal fungi, particularly Rhizoscyphus ericae, fungi belonging to the Sebacinales group B, and Capronia-like fungi. Additionally, the results showed that while ericaceous plant species growing within the same 15 × 15 cm blocks shared a common fungal community, plots just 2-€“3 m away harboured a significantly different fungal community. The possible functional implications of co-existing ericaceous plants being interlinked by a common mycelial network are discussed.

  • 15.
    Kohout, Petr
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia.;Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Bot, CZ-25243 Pruhonice, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Sci, Dept Expt Plant Biol, CZ-12801 Prague 2, Czech Republic..
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Polme, Sergei
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia..
    Tedersoo, Leho
    Univ Tartu, Nat Hist Museum, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia..
    Elevation, space and host plant species structure Ericaceae root-associated fungal communities in Papua New Guinea2017In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 30, p. 112-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study aimed to identify significant predictors (spatial distance, elevation, host plant taxonomy) which shape the structure of endophytic fungal (ENDF) and putative ericoid mycorrhizal (ErMF) communities associated with roots of Ericaceae in Papua New Guinea. Roots of five Ericaceae together with one non-Ericaceae species were sampled at an experimental site and one common Ericaceae species was chosen for sampling along an elevation gradient. ENDF and putative ErMF communities were determined using the 454-sequencing approach. ENDF as well as putative ErMF communities were affected by interacting host plant. While the putative ErMF community was structured by host plants at the genus level, the ENDF community was affected by host plant subfamily level. Composition of ENDF as well as putative ErMF communities were affected by elevation. Non-Ericaceae plant species (Hypericum sp.) harbored similar communities of ENDF as well as putative ErMF as Ericaceae plants. Our study provides a first insight into ErMF and ENDF community ecology of Ericaceae in Papua New Guinea.

  • 16. Lindner, Daniel L.
    et al.
    Vasaitis, Rimvydas
    Kubartova, Ariana
    Allmer, Johan
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Banik, Mark T.
    Stenlid, Jan
    Initial fungal colonizer affects mass loss and fungal community development in Picea abies logs 6 yr after inoculation2011In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 449-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Picea abies logs were inoculated with Resinicium bicolor, Fomitopsis pinicola or left un-inoculated and placed in an old-growth boreal forest. Mass loss and fungal community data were collected after 6 yr to test whether simplification of the fungal community via inoculation affects mass loss and fungal community development. Three techniques were used to survey communities: (1) observation of fruiting structures; (2) culturing on media; and (3) cloning and sequencing of ITS rDNA. Fruit body surveys detected the smallest number of species (18, 3.8 per log), DNA-based methods detected the most species (72, 31.7 per log), and culturing detected an intermediate number (23, 7.2 per log). Initial colonizer affected community development and inoculation with F. pinicola led to significantly greater mass loss. Relationships among fungal community composition, community richness and mass loss are complex and further work is needed to determine whether simplification of fungal communities affects carbon sequestration in forests.

  • 17.
    Malacrinò, Antonino
    et al.
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy; Universita of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Campolo, Orlando
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Laudani, Francesca
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Palmeri, Vincenzo
    University of Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Molecular analysis of the fungal microbiome associated with the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae2015In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 18, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A molecular approach was used to investigate the fungal microbiome associated with Bactrocera oleae a major key pest of Olea europea, using the ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) as barcode gene. Amplicons were cloned and a representative number of sequenced fragments were used as barcode genes for the identification of fungi. The analysis of the detected sequence types (STs) enabled the identification of a total of 34 phylotypes which were associated with 10 fungal species, 3 species complexes and 8 genera. Three phylotypes remained unresolved within the order Saccharomycetales and the phylum Ascomycota because of the lack of closely related sequences in GenBank. Cladosporium was the most abundantly detected genus, followed by Alternaria and Aureobasidium, well-known components of olive sooty moulds. Interestingly, Colletotrichum sp. and other fungal plant pathogens were also detected, leading to potential new insights into heir epidemiology. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Malacrinó, Antonino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Rassati, Davide
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    University of Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Mehzabin, Rupa
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Battisti, Andrea
    University of Padua, Italy.
    Palmeri, Vincenzo
    University of Mediterranea Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Fungal communities associated with bark and ambrosia beetles trapped at international harbours2017In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 28, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera; Scolytinae) establish trophic relationships with fungi, which could be also agents of plant diseases. Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston) and Xyleborinus saxesenii (Ratzeburg) are two species of Palaearctic origin that have been introduced in several countries around the world. Here, we investigated their associated fungal communities using individuals trapped at harbours in their native range, without strictly focusing on nutritional symbionts. Targeting the ITS2 region of the fungal rDNA through pyrosequencing, we retrieved taxa known to be agents of plant diseases, taxa never previously reported associated with these beetle species, and sequence clusters not linked to any known fungus. These findings underline that surveillance at harbours should be extended to the fungi associated with trapped bark and ambrosia beetles, taking into account their role as potential vectors of plant pathogens. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Ottosson, Elisabet
    et al.
    Uppsala Biocenter, Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Nordén, Jenni
    Microbial Evolution Research Group, Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Dahlberg, Anders
    Uppsala Biocenter, Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Edman, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Jönsson, Mari
    Swedish Species Information Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Larsson, Karl-Henrik
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Olsson, Jörgen
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Penttillä, Reijo
    Finnish Forest Research Institute, Finland.
    Stenlid, Jan
    Uppsala Biocenter, Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Ovaskainen, Otso
    Metapopulation Research Group, Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Species associations during the succession of wood-inhabiting fungal communities2014In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 11, p. 17-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied fungal succession in decaying wood by compiling time-series data of fruit body observations. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of a primary species affects the probability of a succeeding species occurring later on the same log. Significant associations were detected for 15 species pairs; these were consistent with earlier findings on cooccurrence patterns in single time surveys. We used enrichment analysis to test if species with particular life-history attributes were more often associated with the occurrence of a succeeding species, or vice versa. White rot fungi and fungi abundant as mycelia were more often associated with the occurrence of succeeding species, compared to brown rot fungi and species with low mycelial abundance. Our results indicate that certain primary species cause priority effects and non-random co-occurrence patterns in the field. These successional patterns are likely to be connected both with substrate modification and species interactions.

  • 20. Randriamanana, Tendry R.
    et al.
    Nissinen, Katri
    Ovaskainen, Anu
    Lavola, Anu
    Peltola, Heli
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta
    Does fungal endophyte inoculation affect the responses of aspen seedlings to carbon dioxide enrichment?2018In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 33, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endophytes are microorganisms that live inside plants without causing visible symptoms, at least during some parts of their life cycle. We studied, for the first time, the combined effects of CO2 enrichment (700 ppm) and fungal endophyte inoculation on the growth, the concentrations of low-molecular weight phenolics, and condensed tannins of aspen (Populus tremula) seedlings. As expected, we found that the endophyte strain we inoculated was neutral to plant growth and was able to bypass major plant defences. In addition, CO2 enrichment alone boosted plant growth, but had only minor effects on plant phenolics. Neither did it affect the plant-endophyte relationship. Based on our findings, we suggest that the successful and asymptomatic colonization of endophytes that we found in aspen might be due to the endophytes' special attributes enabling them to thrive inside plant tissues and to avoid or counteract the plant's chemical defences.

  • 21.
    Urbina, Hector
    et al.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.
    Schuster, Jack
    Universidad del Valle de Guatemala.
    Blackwell, Meredith
    Louisiana State University.
    The gut of Guatemalan passalid beetles: A habitat colonized by cellobiose- and xylose-fermenting yeasts2013In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 339-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gut of insects is a productive environment for discovering undescribed species of yeasts, and the gut of wood-feeding insects of several families is especially rich in yeasts that carry out the fermentation of cellobiose and xylose. Passalid beetles (Passalidae, Coleoptera) live in dead wood that they ingest as their primary food source. We report the isolation, molecular identification and physiological characterization of 771 yeast cultures isolated from the gut of 16 species of passalids collected in nine localities in Guatemala. Ascomycete yeasts were present in the gut of every passalid studied, and the xylose-fermenting (X-F) yeasts Scheffersomyces shehatae and Scheffersomyces stipitis were the most abundant taxa isolated. The gut of the beetles also contained undescribed cellobiose-fermenting and X-F species in the Lodderomyces,Scheffersomyces and Spathaspora, and undescribed species in Sugiyamaella clades as well as rare yeast species in the Phaffomyces and Spencermartinsiella clades. Basidiomycete yeasts in the generaCryptococcus and Trichosporon were also common. The yeast species richness was influenced by the host species and the substrate, and gut-inhabiting yeasts have the ability to survive the differing physiological conditions of several gut compartments.

  • 22.
    Zhao, Tao
    et al.
    Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Kandasamy, Dineshkumar
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
    Krokene, Paal
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Ås, Norway.
    Chen, Jingyuan
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
    Gershenzon, Jonathan
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
    Hammerbacher, Almuth
    Department of Zoology and Entomology, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Fungal associates of the tree-killing bark beetle, Ips typographus, vary in virulence, ability to degrade conifer phenolics and influence bark beetle tunning behavior2019In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 38, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bark beetle Ips typographus carries numerous fungi that could be assisting the beetle in colonizing live Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees. Phenolic defenses in spruce phloem are degraded by the beetle's major tree-killing fungus Endoconidiophora polonica, but it is unknown if other beetle associates can also catabolize these compounds. We compared the ability of five fungi commonly associated with I. typographus to degrade phenolic compounds in Norway spruce phloem. Grosmannia penicillata and Grosmannia europhioides were able to degrade stilbenes and flavonoids faster than E. polonica and grow on minimal growth medium with spruce bark constituents as the only nutrients. Furthermore, beetles avoided medium amended with phenolics but marginally preferred medium colonized by fungi. Taken together our results show that different bark beetle-associated fungi have complementary roles in degrading host metabolites and thus might improve this insect's persistence in well defended host tissues.

  • 23.
    Zhao, Tao
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Kandasamy, Dineshkumar
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany.
    Krokene, Paal
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Norway.
    Chen, Jingyuan
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany.
    Gershenzon, Jonathan
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Germany.
    Hammerbacher, Almuth
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Fungal associates of the tree-killing bark beetle, Ips typographus, vary in virulence, ability to degree conifer phenolics and influence bark beetle behavior2019In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 38, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bark beetle Ips typographus carries numerous fungi that could be assisting the beetle in colonizing live Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees. Phenolic defenses in spruce phloem are degraded by the beetle’s major tree-killing fungus Endoconidiophora polonica, but it is unknown if other beetle associates can also catabolize tree defenses. We compared the ability of five fungi commonly associated with I. typographus to degrade phenolic compounds in Norway spruce phloem. In addition to E. polonica, Grosmannia penicillata and G. europhioides were also able to degrade stilbenes and flavonoids and grow on minimal growth medium with spruce bark constituents as the only nutrients. Although beetles avoided medium amended with phenolics, they preferred medium colonized by E. polonica and O. bicolor with intermediate phenolic degradation ability, over medium colonized by the Grosmannia species, which had the highest degradation ability of the tested species, underlining the complexity of beetle-fungus interactions.

1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf