Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Albabtain, Reham
    et al.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wondimu, Zenebech
    Lindberg, Tulay
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Investigations of a Possible Chemical Effect of Salvadora persica Chewing Sticks2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 2576548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salvadora persica is commonly used chewing sticks in many parts of the world as an oral hygiene tool. This study measured the amount of benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) released into the mouth and assessed its retention time in saliva. The study also tested if the released amount of BITC could potentially be antibacterial or cytotoxic. Twelve subjects brushed their teeth with fresh Miswak once, twice, and four times. The amount of BITC in the saliva and in the used brushes was quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antibacterial effect of BITC and Miswak essential oil (MEO) was tested against Haemophilus influenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The cytotoxic effect on gingival fibroblasts and keratinocytes was tested using MTT. The highest amount of the active compounds was detected in saliva after using the Miswak tip for once and immediately. It significantly decreased when the Miswak tip was used more than once and thus after 10 min. The growth of the tested bacteria was inhibited by MEO and BITC in a dose dependent manner, P. gingivalis being the most sensitive. MTT assay showed that BITC and MEO were cytotoxic towards gingival fibroblasts while oral keratinocytes showed resistance. This study suggests that the Miswak tip should be cut before each use to ensure the maximum effect.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Uppsala Universtiy.
    Arman, Maria
    Linköping University.
    Backman, Marie
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Flatters, Ursula
    The Vidar Clinic, Järna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University.
    A five-year follow-up of quality of life in women with breast cancer in anthroposophic and conventional care2006In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 523-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complementary and alternative medicine is used by many cancer patients in most parts of the world, and its use is increasing. The aim of the present study was to examine, over 5 years, the perceived quality of life/life satisfaction in two samples of women with breast cancer who were treated with anthroposophic care or conventional medical treatment only. Data from admission, after I year and after 5 years are used for the comparisons. On admission to the study the women in anthroposophic care perceived their quality of life to be lower than that of the women in the conventional treatment group, especially for emotional, cognitive and social functioning and overall quality of life. Sixty women who actively chose treatment with anthroposophic medicine and 60 individually matched women treated with conventional medicine participated. Quality of life was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire. Twenty-six women within anthroposophic care and 31 women within conventional medicine survived the 5 years. Effect size (ES) estimation favored the anthroposophic group in seven of the subscales mostly measuring emotional functioning. The ES for four of the subscales favored the conventional treatment group, mostly concerning physical functioning. After 5 years there were improvements in overall quality of life and in emotional and social functioning compared to admission for the women in anthroposophic care. The improvements took place between admission and 1 year, but not further on. Only minor improvements were found in the matching group.

  • 3.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Vårdalinstitutet Lund, Klinisk neurovetenskap Karolinska Institutet, Omvårdnad Hälsouniversitetet Linköping.
    Johnsson, Anna
    Onkologiska kliniken, Lunds Universitetssjukhus.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Klinisk cancerepidemiologi Karolinska Institutet, Klinisk cancerepidemiologi Sahlgrenska akademin.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    The Nonpenetrating Telescopic Sham Needle may Blind Patients with Different Characteristics and Experiences when Treated by several Therapists.2011In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Little is known which factors influence the blinding in acupuncture studies. Aim. To investigate if blinding variedbetween patients with different characteristics receiving verum or sham acupuncture.

    Methods. We randomised cancer patientsto verum (n = 109) or sham acupuncture (n = 106) with a nonpenetrating telescopic sham needle for nausea. Level of blindingwas compared between different sub-groups of patients using Bang’s blinding index (BI) ranged −1 to 1 (−1 = all state theopposite treatment, 1 = all identify treatment).

    Results. Most patients in the verum (74 of 95; 78%, BI 0.72) and the sham (68 of95; 72%, BI −0.60). acupuncture group believed they had received verum acupuncture. The probability for a patient to believehe/she received verum acupuncture was related to the received needling type (P = .003) and to the patient’s belief in receivedtreatment effects (P = .008). Hospital (P = .425), therapist (P = .434), previous acupuncture experience (P = .578), occurrenceof nausea (P = .157), gender (P = .760), and age (P = .357) did not affect blinding.

    Conclusions. Blinding was successfullyachieved irrespective of age, gender, acupuncture experience, treatment effect, or in which hospital or by which therapist thepatient received treatment. Patients with higher belief in the effect of the treatment were more likely to believe they had receivedverum acupuncture.

  • 4.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Osher centrum för integrativ medicin, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Institutionen för onkologi-patologi, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, avdelning för onkologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Reduced Need for Rescue Antiemetics and Improved Capacity to Eat in Patients Receiving Acupuncture Compared to Patients Receiving Sham Acupuncture or Standard Care during Radiotherapy.2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2017, article id 5806351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate if consumption of emesis-related care and eating capacity differed between patients receiving verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or standard care only during radiotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomized to verum (n = 100) or sham (n = 100) acupuncture (telescopic blunt sham needle) (median 12 sessions) and registered daily their consumption of antiemetics and eating capacity. A standard care group (n = 62) received standard care only and delivered these data once. Results. More patients in the verum (n = 73 of 89 patients still undergoing radiotherapy; 82%, Relative Risk (RR) 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.50) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 79 of 95; 83%, RR 1.24, CI 1.03-1.52) did not need any antiemetic medications, as compared to the standard care group (n = 42 out of 63; 67%) after receiving 27 Gray dose of radiotherapy. More patients in the verum (n = 50 of 89; 56%, RR 1.78, CI 1.31-2.42) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 58 of 94 answering patients; 62%, RR 1.83, CI 1.20-2.80) were capable of eating as usual, compared to the standard care group (n = 20 of 63; 39%). Conclusion. Patients receiving acupuncture had lower consumption of antiemetics and better eating capacity than patients receiving standard antiemetic care, plausible by nonspecific effects of the extra care during acupuncture.

  • 5. Jia, Wei
    et al.
    Lu, Aiping
    Chan, Kelvin
    Gustafsson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Liu, Ping
    Translational Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine 20142015In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 427508Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Jong, Miek C.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Louis Bolk Inst, Dept Nutr & Hlth, NL-3972 Driebergen, Netherlands.;Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, S-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden.;Natl Informat & Knowledge Ctr Integrat Med NIKIM, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Ilyenko, Lydia
    Russian State Med Univ, Moscow 117997, Russia.
    Kholodova, Irina
    Russian State Med Univ, Moscow 117997, Russia.
    Verwer, Cynthia
    Louis Bolk Inst, Dept Nutr & Hlth, NL-3972 Driebergen, Netherlands.
    Burkart, Julia
    DHU Arzneimittel GmbH & Co KG, Deutsch Homoopathie Union, D-76227 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Weber, Stephan
    Acomed Stat, D-04275 Leipzig, Germany.
    Keller, Thomas
    Acomed Stat, D-04275 Leipzig, Germany.
    Klement, Petra
    DHU Arzneimittel GmbH & Co KG, Deutsch Homoopathie Union, D-76227 Karlsruhe, Germany..
    A Comparative Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial on the Effectiveness, Safety, and Tolerability of a Homeopathic Medicinal Product in Children with Sleep Disorders and Restlessness2016In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 9539030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label, controlled clinical trial was performed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the homeopathic product ZinCyp-3-02 in children with sleep disorders for >= one month compared to glycine. Children <= six years old received either ZinCyp-3-02 (N = 89) or comparator glycine (N = 90). After treatment for 28 days, total sleep-disorder-associated complaints severity scores decreased in both groups from median 7.0 (out of maximum 11.0) points to 2.0 (ZinCyp-3-02) and 4.0 (glycine) points, respectively, with overall higher odds of showing improvement for ZinCyp-3-02 (odds ratio: 4.45 (95% CI: 2.77-7.14), p < 0.0001, POM overall treatment related effect). Absence of individual complaints (time to sleep onset, difficulties maintaining sleep, sleep duration, troubled sleep (somniloquism), physical inactivity after awakening, restlessness for unknown reason, and sleep disorders frequency) at study end were significantly higher with ZinCyp-3-02 (all p values < 0.05). More children with ZinCyp-3-02 were totally free of complaints (p = 0.0258). Treatment effectiveness (p < 0.0001) and satisfaction assessments (p < 0.0001) were more favorable for ZinCyp-3-02. Few nonserious adverse drug reactions were reported (ZinCyp-3-02: N = 2, glycine: N = 1) and both treatments were well tolerated. Treatment with the homeopathic product ZinCyp-3-02 was found to be safe and superior to the comparator glycine in the treatment of sleep disorders in children.

  • 7.
    Kok, Esther T.
    et al.
    Univ Appl Sci, NL-2333 CK Leiden, Netherlands.;Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Ctr Acad Primary Care, Bristol BS8 2PS, Avon, England..
    Jong, Miek C.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Louis Bolk Inst, Dept Healthcare & Nutr, NL-2972 LA Driebergen, Netherlands; Natl Informat & Knowledge Ctr Integrat Med NIKIM, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Gravendeel, Barbara
    Univ Appl Sci, NL-2333 CK Leiden, Netherlands.;Naturalis Biodivers Ctr, NL-2333 CR Leiden, Netherlands..
    Van Leeuwen, Willem B.
    Univ Appl Sci, NL-2333 CK Leiden, Netherlands..
    Baars, Erikw.
    Univ Appl Sci, NL-2333 CK Leiden, Netherlands.;Louis Bolk Inst, Dept Healthcare & Nutr, NL-2972 LA Driebergen, Netherlands..
    Resistance to Antibiotics and Antifungal Medicinal Products: Can Complementary and Alternative Medicine Help Solve the Problem in Common Infection Diseases? The Introduction of a Dutch Research Consortium2015In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 521584Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, rising numbers of deaths and costs associated with this, and the fact that hardly any new antimicrobial drugs have been developed during the last decade have increased the interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapeutic interventions, if proven safe and effective. Observational studies on clinical CAM practices demonstrate positive effects of treatment of infections with CAM therapies (clinical effects, patient satisfaction) in combination with small percentages of antibiotics prescription. However, Cochrane reviews and other studies demonstrate that in most instances the quality of clinical trials on CAM treatment of infections is currently too low to provide sufficient evidence. Therefore a Dutch consortium on (in vitro and clinical) scientific research on CAM and antibiotic resistance has been formed. The aim and objective of the consortium is to establish an enduring partnership and to develop expertise to further develop and investigate safe and effective CAM treatments for infectious diseases of humans (and animals). A first ongoing project on the development of safe and effective biobased CAM antimycotics in women with (recurrent) vaginal candidiasis infection is introduced.

  • 8.
    Köhn, M.
    et al.
    Nora Health Care Centre, Örebro County Council, Nora, Sweden.
    Persson Lundholm, U.
    Nora Health Care Centre, Örebro County Council, Nora, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, I.-L.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences.
    Medical yoga for patients with stress-related symptoms and diagnosis in primary health care: a randomized control trial2013In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 215348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of patients are suffering from stress-related symptoms and diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the medical yoga treatment in patients with stress-related symptoms and diagnoses in primary health care. A randomized controlled study was performed at a primary health care centre in Sweden from March to June, 2011. Patients were randomly allocated to a control group receiving standard care or a yoga group treated with medical yoga for 1 hour, once a week, over a 12-week period in addition to the standard care. A total of 37 men and women, mean age of years were included. General stress level (measured using Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)), burnout (Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ)), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)), insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index (ISI)), pain (visual analogue scale (VAS)), and overall health status (Euro Quality of Life VAS (EQ-VAS)) were measured before and after 12 weeks. Patients assigned to the Yoga group showed significantly greater improvements on measures of general stress level ( ), anxiety ( ), and overall health status ( ) compared to controls. Treatment with medical yoga is effective in reducing levels of stress and anxiety in patients with stress-related symptoms in primary health care.

  • 9.
    Lijuan, Mei
    et al.
    Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
    Qingyue, Chen
    Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
    Ge, Li
    School of Nursing, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou 350122, China.
    Guohua, Zheng
    Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
    Jinxiu, Chen
    Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
    Systematic Review of Chinese Traditional Exercise Baduanjin Modulating the Blood Lipid Metabolism2012In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, p. Article ID 282131-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Baduanjin exercise is considered to be beneficial to modulate the blood lipid metabolism. The purpose of the systematic review was to assess the potential efficacy and safety of Baduanjin exercise. Methods. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, VIP, Chinese Important Conference Papers Database, and Chinese Dissertation Database were searched for all prospective-controlled trials of Baduanjin exercise from their inception to December 31, 2011. Results. A total of 14 studies were included. Comparing with no treatment, Baduanjin exercise significantly reduced the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C in plasma, and elevated plasma HDL-C level for healthy participants, and the pooled MD (95% confidence interval, CI) was −0.58 mmol/L (−0.86, −0.30 mmol/L), −0.22 mmol/L (−0.31, −0.13 mmol/L), −0.35 mmol/L (−0.54, −0.17 mmol/L), 0.13 mmol/L (0.06, 0.21 mmol/L), respectively. Baduanjin exercise also obviously decreased the levels of TG, LDL-C in plasma comparing with no treatment for patients, and the pooled MD (95% CI) was −0.30 mmol/L (−0.40, −0.19 mmol/L), −0.38 mmol/L (−0.63, −0.13 mmol/L), but there was not obvious to decrease plasma TC level or elevate plasma HDL-C level in patients with the pooled MD (95%CI), −0.39 mmol/L (−1.09, 0.31 mmol/L) and 0.22 mmol/L (−0.11, 0.55 mmol/L), respectively. In addition, the obvious advantage was not observed to modulate the blood lipid metabolism in comparing Baduanjin exercise with other exercises, regardless for health participants or patients. Conclusion. Studies indicated that Baduanjin exercise could significantly decrease the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C levels in plasma and elevate plasma HDL-C level for the healthy people. It also was helpful that Baduanjin exercise modulated the blood lipid metabolism for patients. Moreover, the Baduanjin exercise did not have an obvious advantage on modulating the lipid metabolism comparing with other exercises. But the evidence was uncertain because of the small sample size and low-methodological quality

  • 10. Ocheng, Francis
    et al.
    Bwanga, Freddie
    Boström, Elisabeth Almer
    Joloba, Moses
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Yucel-Lindberg, Tulay
    Obua, Celestino
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Essential Oils from Ugandan Medicinal Plants: In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Effects on IL-1 beta-Induced Proinflammatory Mediators by Human Gingival Fibroblasts2016In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 5357689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated cytotoxicity of essential oils from four medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon nardus, and Zanthoxylum chalybeum) on human gingival fibroblasts and their effects on proinflammatory mediators' secretion. Cytotoxicity of essential oils was investigated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Effects of essential oils at subcytotoxicity concentrations on interleukin-(IL-) 6, IL-8, and prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) secretions by gingival fibroblasts treated with IL-1 beta (300 pg/mL) were evaluated by ELISA and EIA. IC50 values of the essential oils ranged from 26 mu g/mL to 50 mu g/mL. Baseline and IL-1 beta-induced secretion of PGE(2) was inhibited by treatment with essential oil from O. gratissimum. Essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus had synergistic effects with IL-1 beta on PGE(2) seceretion. In conclusion, the study suggests that essential oil from O. gratissimum decreases gingival fibroblasts secretion of PGE(2), while essential oils from B. pilosa and C. nardus increase PGE(2) secretion. Essential oil from Z. chalybeum was the most cytotoxic, while oil from C. nardus was the least cytotoxic. Although the clinical significance of these findings remains to be determined, it may be suggested that essential oil from O. gratissimum, applied at subcytotoxicity concentrations, could reduce the participation of gingival fibroblasts in the gingival inflammation and tissue destruction associated with periodontitis.

  • 11. Ocheng, Francis
    et al.
    Bwanga, Freddie
    Joloba, Moses
    Softrata, Abier
    Azeem, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Puetsep, Katrin
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Obua, Celestino
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens2015In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 230832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents.

  • 12.
    Rosen, Annelie
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lekander, Mats
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jensen, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sachs, Lisbeth
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Petrovic, Predrag
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Enblom, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Retracted article: The Effects of Positive or Neutral Communication during Acupuncture for Relaxing Effects: A Sham-Controlled Randomized Trial2016In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2016, p. 11-, article id 3925878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. The link between patient-clinician communication and its effect on clinical outcomes is an important clinical issue that is yet to be elucidated. Objective. Investigating if communication type (positive or neutral) about the expected treatment outcome affected (i) participants(expectations and (ii) short-term relaxation effects in response to genuine or sham acupuncture and investigating if expectations were related to outcome. Methods. Healthy volunteers (n = 243, mean age of 42) were randomized to one treatment with genuine or sham acupuncture. Within groups, participants were randomized to positive or neutral communication, regarding expected treatment effects. Visual Analogue Scales (0-100 millimeters) were used to measure treatment expectations and relaxation, directly before and after treatment. Results. Participants in the positive communication group reported higher treatment expectancy, compared to the neutral communication group (md 12 versus 6 mm, p = 0.002). There was no difference in relaxation effects between acupuncture groups or between communication groups. Participants with high baseline expectancy perceived greater improvement in relaxation, compared to participants with low baseline levels (md 27 versus 15 mm, p = 0.022). Conclusion. Our data highlights the importance of expectations for treatment outcome and demonstrates that expectations can be effectively manipulated using a standardized protocol that in future research may be implemented in clinical trials.

  • 13.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Frisk, Jessica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Acupuncture as Treatment of Hot Flashes and the Possible Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide2012In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2012, no 579321Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, beta-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context.

  • 14.
    Sun, Jia-Qi
    et al.
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Gan-Lin
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yi
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Nan, Nan
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Xu
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Yu, Ming-Wei
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Hong
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Beijing Inst Tradit Chinese Med, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Li, Jin-Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Xiao-Min
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Spatholobus suberectus Column Extract Inhibits Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer via Suppressing ER MAPK PI3K/AKT Pathway2016In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 2934340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Chinese herbal compounds have long been alternatively applied for cancer treatment in China, their treatment effects have not been sufficiently investigated. The Chinese herb Spatholobus suberectus is commonly prescribed to cancer patients. HPLC analysis has shown that the main components of Spatholobus suberectus are flavonoids that can be classified as phytoestrogens, having a structure similar to estrogen. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Spatholobus suberectus column extract (SSCE) on the estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and its possible molecular mechanism. In our study, MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell viability. The results show that SSCE (80, 160, and 320 mu g/ml) significantly decreased the viability of MCF-7 cells. SSCE also triggered apoptosis, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, and inhibited cell migration. A dual-luciferase reporter system showed that SSCE suppressed intranuclear p-ER activity; Western blot analysis confirmed the repressed expression of phosphorylated-ER alpha (p-ER alpha), ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2, AKT, p-AKT, p-mTOR, PI3K, and p-PI3K, indicating that SSCE suppressed the MAPK PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Collectively, our results suggest that SSCE causes apoptosis, an arrest in the G0/G1 phase, and a decrease in migration in ER+ MCF-7 cells via hypoactivity of the ER and suppression of the MAPK PI3K/AKT pathway.

  • 15.
    Sun, Xu
    et al.
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Xing
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China.;Beijing Univ Chinese Med, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China..
    Nian, Jia-Yun
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China.;Beijing Univ Chinese Med, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China..
    Guo, Jiao
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China.;Beijing Univ Chinese Med, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China..
    Yin, Yi
    Henan Coll Tradit Chinese Med, Affiliated Hosp 3, Dept Oncol, Zhengzhou 450000, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Gan-Lin
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Yu, Ming-Wei
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yi
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Xiao-Min
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Guo-Wang
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Lin
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Cheng, Pei-Yu
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Li, Jin-Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Capital Med Univ, Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Dept Oncol, Beijing 100010, Peoples R China..
    Chinese Herbal Medicine as Adjunctive Therapy to Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2016In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 3281968Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been increasingly employed during therapy for breast cancer, but its efficacy remains a matter of debate. This systematic review examined randomized controlled trials to provide a critical evaluation of this treatment. The results demonstrated that the combined use of CHM with chemotherapy may improve the immediate tumor response and reduce chemotherapy-associated adverse events. Our findings highlight the poor quality of Chinese studies, and additional well-designed randomized controlled trials addressing the role of CHM are warranted. The lack of molecular-based evidence for CHM and Zheng has resulted in a limited understanding and acceptance of CHM and traditional Chinese medicine in Western countries. We believe that researchers should immediately explore a CHM-based cure, and CHM should be applied to routine care as soon as conclusive data are available.

  • 16.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Mårtensson, Lena B
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Schytt, Erica
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet.
    Manual and electroacupuncture for labour pain: study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial2012In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 943198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Results from previous studies on acupuncture for labour pain are contradictory and lack important information on methodology. However, studies indicate that acupuncture has a positive effect on women's experiences of labour pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different acupuncture stimulations, manual or electrical stimulation, compared with standard care in the relief of labour pain as the primary outcome. This paper will present in-depth information on the design of the study, following the CONSORT and STRICTA recommendations. Methods. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial based on western medical theories. Nulliparous women with normal pregnancies admitted to the delivery ward after a spontaneous onset of labour were randomly allocated into one of three groups: manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or standard care. Sample size calculation gave 101 women in each group, including a total of 303 women. A Visual Analogue Scale was used for assessing pain every 30 minutes for five hours and thereafter every hour until birth. Questionnaires were distributed before treatment, directly after the birth, and at one day and two months postpartum. Blood samples were collected before and after the first treatment. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01197950.

  • 17.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 13A, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Högskolan Dalarna, 791 88 Falun, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, First Affiliated Hospital, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin 150040, China.
    Schytt, Erica
    Karolinska Inst, Div Reprod Hlth, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden / Ctr Clin Res Dalarna, S-79182 Falun, Sweden / Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 13A, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Nissers väg 3, 791 82 Falun, Sweden.
    Manual and Electroacupuncture for Labour Pain: Study Design of a Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial2012In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, p. Article ID 943198-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Results from previous studies on acupuncture for labour pain are contradictory and lack important information on methodology. However, studies indicate that acupuncture has a positive effect on women's experiences of labour pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different acupuncture stimulations, manual or electrical stimulation, compared with standard care in the relief of labour pain as the primary outcome. This paper will present in-depth information on the design of the study, following the CONSORT and STRICTA recommendations. Methods. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial based on western medical theories. Nulliparous women with normal pregnancies admitted to the delivery ward after a spontaneous onset of labour were randomly allocated into one of three groups: manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or standard care. Sample size calculation gave 101 women in each group, including a total of 303 women. A Visual Analogue Scale was used for assessing pain every 30 minutes for five hours and thereafter every hour until birth. Questionnaires were distributed before treatment, directly after the birth, and at one day and two months postpartum. Blood samples were collected before and after the first treatment. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01197950.

  • 18. Zhang, Chao
    et al.
    Kong, Xiaohong
    Zhou, Hengxing
    Liu, Chang
    Zhao, Xuechao
    Zhou, Xianhu
    Su, Yanhua
    Sharma, Hari Shanker
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Feng, Shiqing
    An Experimental Novel Study: Angelica sinensis Prevents Epidural Fibrosis in Laminectomy Rats via Downregulation of Hydroxyproline, IL-6, and TGF-beta 12013In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, p. 291814-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With laminectomy being widely accepted as the treatment for lumbar disorders, epidural fibrosis (EF) is a common complication for both the patients and the surgeons alike. Currently, EF is thought to cause recurrent postoperative pain after laminectomy or after discectomy. Angelica sinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine which has shown anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and antiproliferative properties. The object of this study was to investigate the effects of Angelica sinensis on the prevention of postlaminectomy EF formation in a rat model. A controlled double-blinded study was conducted in sixty healthy adult Wistar rats that underwent laminectomy at the L1-L2 levels. They were divided randomly into 3 groups according to the treatment method, with 20 in each group: (1) Angelica sinensis treatment group, (2) saline treatment group, and (3) sham group (laminectomy without treatment). All rats were euthanized humanely 4 weeks after laminectomy. The hydroxyproline content, Rydell score, vimentin cells density, fibroblasts density, inflammatory cells density, and inflammatory factors expressions all suggested better results in Angelica sinensis group than the other two groups. Topical application of Angelica sinensis could inhibit fibroblasts proliferation and TGF-beta 1 and IL-6 expressions and prevent epidural scar adhesion in postlaminectomy rat model.

1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf