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  • 1. Almqvist, Cecilia Ferm
    et al.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music Education. Luleå Tekniska Högskola.
    Ekberg, Niclas
    Luleå Tekniska Högskola.
    Spotify as a case of musical Bildung2021In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 89-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berthén, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Backman Bister, Anna
    Lindberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Musikundervisning för grundsärskolan? – en forskningsöversikt2022In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 3, p. 21-50Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music Education in Special School – a Research ReviewThe aim for this article was to contribute with a research review of international research on music education for children and youth (6–15 years old) with intellectual disabilities (ID). In Sweden, these students are usually educated within grundsärskolan, a special school. A configurative review was conducted, based on 26 articles. Thematic analysis was used and related to the objectives for music education. The main findings are presented in three themes: Attitudes and approaches, Teaching and learning, Critical studies for empowerment. These are discussed in relation to cultural historical theory, and the concept musical becoming.

  • 3.
    de Boise, Sam
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Gender Issues in Scandinavian Music Education: From Stereotypes to Multiple Possibilities2023In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 4, p. 35-41Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is a review of Gender Issues in Scandinavian Education: From Stereotypes to Multiple Possibilities (Silje Valde Onsrud, Hilde Synnøve Blix and Ingeborg Lunde Vestad, editors) by Sam de Boise (School of Music, Theatre and Art, Örebro University, Sweden).

  • 4.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Towards the attainment of mindful bodily relations in music education2021In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 114-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies of female guitar students in upper secondary school ensemble education suggest that girls behave, and are encouraged to behave, in more immanent ways than boys. They seem to receive less encouragement to stretch their bodies and become full musical human beings. Instead they become the second musical sex. During the course of my work with the problem of how to create space for girls playing the electric guitar in educational settings, I have continually found myself wondering how to create educational spaces and relations in ways that let all pupils, independent of sex, realize ideas, transcend as musical bodies, and become what they already are. If teachers and pupils are interrelated bodies, teachers must be aware of how they use their bodies when it comes to creating space for all pupils to develop and stretch out their bodies. The actions of the music teacher, as a musical body, must be balanced in relation to the other musical bodies in the room, as well as to physical preconditions, goals, visions, and expectations of the students. In this article, I want to delve into the subject of bodily interaction, teachers’ responsibilities, and questions of intentional educational bodily relations. The aim is to share my close reading of Young’s philosophical thinking regarding gender structures and especially female comportment, motility, and spatiality, and develop a set of prerequisites for intentional bodily (music) educational relations. With a starting point in research-based inspiration and motivation for conducting the current philosophical investigation, I share my close reading of Young’s theories regarding female situated bodies. Continually I relate to excerpts from two interviews with female guitar students, exemplifying musical body-relational experiences. Finally I share and reflect upon a developed thinking about mindful bodily (music) educational relations.

  • 5.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Education.
    Hentschel, Linn
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Cultivating ambiguities within higher music education: preparation for singers’ professional societal participation in opera conservatory and music theatre programs2024In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 5, p. 23-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research has stated the need for conservatory education to prepare aspiring musicians more thoroughly for a dynamic and changing society. A project that challenges the conservatory tradition is Sammankonst (TogetherArt) where students at a musical theatre program at folk high school level collaborate with intellectually disabled adults. Based on a phenomenological way of thinking, this article aims to describe and analyze the education of aspiring musicians for professional participation in society based on an analysis of experiences among conservatory students, music theater students and their teachers. Interviews were made with six conservatory students, 15 musical theatre students, and two teachers. The results show ambiguities when it comes to what voice students should be prepared for and how the choice of preparations influence the view of singing and musicians’ quality competence.

  • 6.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Stockholms musikpedagogiska institut, Sverige.
    Ekberg, Niclas
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Sverige.
    Spotify as a Case of Musical Bildung2021In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 89-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the meaning and function of streaming media as a potential facilitator of musical Bildung. Taking the affordances of streaming media technologies as a starting point, the article thus focuses on the formative and cultivating dimensions a music streaming service such as Spotify might offer. The specific aim of this article is to describe and analyse how musical Bildung may evolve within a Spotify context from a user perspective. To address the aim from the point of view of music education, Spotify users’ activities and experiences of streaming media interactions were accessed, inspired by internet-related ethnography. Stimulated recall interviews, focusing on the participants’ experiences as well as their actual use of Spotify’s streaming service, were conducted, recorded, and transcribed. The generated material was subjected to co-operative hermeneutic content analysis. The results illuminate how Bildung evolves in users’ encounters with the service and with art mediated via Spotify. Relevant topics occurring in the human-art-technology relationship of Bildung from a Heideggerian perspective were Being-possible, the ability-to-be, and Spotify as the Other. In sum, it can be stated that Bildung evolves when Spotify exceeds the thingness of the Other, becoming a work of art in itself, throwing the user into Being.

  • 7.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Ekberg, Niclas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Spotify as a case of musical Bildung2021In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 89-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the meaning and function of streaming media as a potential facilitator of musical Bildung. Taking the affordances of streaming media technologies as a starting point, the article thus focuses on the formative and cultivating dimensions a music streaming service such as Spotify might offer. The specific aim of this article is to describe and analyse how musical Bildung may evolve within a Spotify context from a user perspective. To address the aim from the point of view of music education, Spotify users’ activities and experiences of streaming media interactions were accessed, inspired by internet-related ethnography. Stimulated recall interviews, focusing on the participants’ experiences as well as their actual use of Spotify’s streaming service, were conducted, recorded, and transcribed. The generated material was subjected to co-operative hermeneutic content analysis. The results illuminate how Bildung evolves in users’ encounters with the service and with art mediated via Spotify. Relevant topics occurring in the human-art-technology relationship of Bildung from a Heideggerian perspective were Being-possible, the ability-to-be, and Spotify as the Other. In sum, it can be stated that Bildung evolves when Spotify exceeds the thingness of the Other, becoming a work of art in itself, throwing the user into Being.

  • 8.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    The conditions for learning musical interpretation in one-to-one piano tuition in higher music education2020In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 103-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that one-to-one teaching in higher music education in Western classical music typically favours technical over interpretive aspects of musicianship, and imitation of the teacher's rather than the student's explorative interpretation. The aim of the present study is to investigate students' and teachers' understandings of how musical interpretation of Western classical music is learned in this context. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with six piano students and four teachers in Sweden were conducted and hermeneutically analysed using haiku poems and poetical condensations. The analysis found that the conditions for learning musical interpretation centred upon students achieving a high level of autonomy, as affected by three key aspects of teaching and learning: (1) the student’s and the teacher's understandings of what musical interpretation is, (2) the student's experience of freedom of interpretation as acknowledged by the teacher, and (3) (expectations of) the student's explorative approach. As none of these aspects were reported as being explicitly addressed during lessons, there might be a need for both teachers and students to verbalise them more clearly to support piano students' development.

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    The conditions for learning musical interpretation in one-to-one piano tuition in higher music education
  • 9.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    The conditions for learning musical interpretation in one-to-one piano tuition in higher music education2020In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 103-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that one-to-one teaching in higher music education in Western classical music typically favours technical over interpretive aspects of musicianship, and imitation of the teacher's rather than the student's explorative interpretation. The aim of the present study is to investigate students' and teachers' understandings of how musical interpretation of Western classical music is learned in this context. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with six piano students and four teachers in Sweden were conducted and hermeneutically analysed using haiku poems and poetical condensations. The analysis found that the conditions for learning musical interpretation centred upon students achieving a high level of autonomy, as affected by three key aspects of teaching and learning: (1) the student’s and the teacher's understandings of what musical interpretation is, (2) the student's experience of freedom of interpretation as acknowledged by the teacher, and (3) (expectations of) the student's explorative approach. As none of these aspects were reported as being explicitly addressed during lessons, there might be a need for both teachers and students to verbalise them more clearly to support piano students' development.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 10.
    Jeppsson, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Music teachers’ perspectives on their chances to disrupt cultural and social reproduction in the Swedish Community Schools of Music and Arts2020In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 58-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sheds light on music teachers’ perspectives on their chances to disrupt cultural and social reproduction in music education in the Swedish Community Schools of Music and Arts (kulturskolor, sing. kulturskola). Focus group conversations were carried out involving 18 teachers at five such schools. As a point of departure, the analysis of the conversations applied the theoretical perspective of Bourdieu with an emphasis on the concepts explicit versus implicit pedagogy and Bernstein’s corresponding concepts visible and invisible pedagogy. The analysis discusses explicit versus implicit assumptions interwoven in the teachers’ accounts of their efforts. The teachers describe it as difficult to challenge social structures. Based on marketing efforts vis-á-vis families from immigrant backgrounds, the teachers point to differing understandings of the significance of participation in the programmes. The teachers’ descriptions point to opportunities that stem from efforts to facilitate children taking part in music education in cooperation with compulsory schools, teaching practice habits and more general behaviours, and initiatives to reach parents and children from immigrant backgrounds with information. The descriptions show explicit as well as implicit components, often in terms of implicit assumptions embedded in an explicit framing. Reflection upon implicit assumptions is suggested as a means to develop more radical strategies to disrupt cultural and social reproduction in the Swedish kulturskolor.

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    Music teachers’ perspectives on their chances to disrupt cultural and social reproduction in the Swedish CommunityCecilia Jeppsson Schools of Music and Arts
  • 11.
    Jeppsson, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Music teachers’ perspectives on their chances to disrupt cultural and social reproduction in the Swedish Community Schools of Music and Arts2020In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 58-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sheds light on music teachers’ perspectives on their chances to disrupt cultural and social reproduction in music education in the Swedish Community Schools of Music and Arts (kulturskolor, sing. kulturskola). Focus group conversations were carried out involving 18 teachers at five such schools. As a point of departure, the analysis of the conversations applied the theoretical perspective of Bourdieu with an emphasis on the concepts explicit versus implicit pedagogy and Bernstein’s corresponding concepts visible and invisible pedagogy. The analysis discusses explicit versus implicit assumptions interwoven in the teachers’ accounts of their efforts. The teachers describe it as difficult to challenge social structures. Based on marketing efforts vis-á-vis families from immigrant backgrounds, the teachers point to differing understandings of the significance of participation in the programmes. The teachers’ descriptions point to opportunities that stem from efforts to facilitate children taking part in music education in cooperation with compulsory schools, teaching practice habits and more general behaviours, and initiatives to reach parents and children from immigrant backgrounds with information. The descriptions show explicit as well as implicit components,

    often in terms of implicit assumptions embedded in an explicit framing. Reflection upon implicit assumptions is suggested as a means to develop more radical strategies to disrupt cultural and social reproduction in the Swedish kulturskolor.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Larsson, Christina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Georgii-Hemming, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Improvisation i musikundervisningen: tre lärares didaktiska förhållningssätt2020In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 81-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws on interviews with three music teachers. It is part of a larger study that explores improvisation in general music education in the Swedish school year 4. The article focuses teachers’ pedagogical approaches to improvisation and how this effect the teaching.

    This study reveals that music teachers incorporate improvisation in their teaching. They do, however, lack a professional language in order to reflect on content, methods, aim and purpose of improvisation in education. 

    Through thematic analysis, we demonstrate that pedagogical points of departure and attitudes are implicitly present in the teachers’ practices and have implications for their educational orientation. Three diverse but overlapping educational orientations are discerned: a process-oriented, a subjectoriented and a Bildung-oriented. The educational orientations are reflected in these teachers’ approaches to improvisation and are related to pedagogical choices of activities, how activities are conducted and to what aim.

  • 13.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sandberg Jurström, Ragnhild
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies (from 2013).
    Zandén, Olle
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Care as technology for exclusion: Power operating in jurors’ talk about admission tests to Swedish music teacher education2021In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 58-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore and problematise admission tests to specialist music teacher education in Sweden from a governing perspective, where higher music education is considered a discursive practice. It illustrates how power operates in legitimating the tests. The study uses stimulated recall in jury members’ talk about assessing applicants for music teacher education programmes, and uses Foucault’s concept of governmentality to reveal entrance tests as something regarded as generally good for all. This operating discourse is built on governmental rationality and processes that make it possible to reach conclusions about the applicants’ personalities and prospects for learning and developing in the future. Through care as technology of power, failing applicants are excluded from becoming music teachers and at the same time they are rescued from struggling in the future. The results are discussed in relation to issues of democratic music education, ethics and requirements for widened access to higher music education.

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    fulltext
  • 14.
    Thorgersen, Ketil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. Stockholms musikpedagogiska institut, Sweden.
    Music education as manipulation - a proposal for playing2020In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 151-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important feature of music is its ability to affect people in unpredictable and deep ways. Music has therefore been used to oppress and (mis)lead people by dictatorships, religious leaders and supermarkets amongst others, and to help lure people into acting in ways that are beneficial for the manipulators. Such forms of ethically dubious musical manipulation happen because of the sublime potential of music to do something to people, and in such a way that they have few ways to defend themselves against it. Thus, the power of music is also the reason people seek out the unforeseen affects and effects in their encounters with the arts. Building on a theory of aesthetic communication, and seeking support from Deleuze and Guattari (1994), Dewey (2005) and Spinoza (Spinoza & Lagerberg, 2001), the aim of this article is to propose the term manipulation as a tool in music education or as a vehicle for teachers and researchers to help frame activities in music education as meaningful for aesthetic communication. I argue that manipulation is a necessary component of all art and aesthetic communication, that, despite its usual negative connotations, manipulation is an act that can be used for good or bad purposes, and that music education has a duty to educate pupils in artistic manipulation. Manipulation is considered action, and as such, it is argued that it can take on any value from good to bad depending on the intentions and effects it causes. This article invites a discussion of possible ways of designing music education that revolve around tinkering with aesthetic communication, and wherein desirable manipulation plays a vital role, and outcomes-based curricula are replaced with an alternative more compatible with the arts.

  • 15. Zimmerman Nilsson, Marie-Helene
    et al.
    Kerin, Marita
    Trinity College, Dublin (IRL).
    Interdisciplinary co-teaching in higher education: Comparing results from music-drama and music-physics partnerships in Sweden and Ireland2022In: Nordic Research in Music Education, E-ISSN 2703-8041, Vol. 3, p. 75-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies exist on the impact of interdisciplinary co-teaching in Higher Music Education. The aim of the present study is to compare and analyse the findings from two pioneer interdisciplinary co-teaching studies involving music/drama and music/physics co-teaching partnerships, conducted independently in Sweden and Ireland. Elements of Vygotskian scholarship informed the theoretical framework and a reflexive and thematic analytic methodology was employed. Four themes emerged similar to those from interdisciplinary scholarship in diverse disciplines. These include: a heightened awareness of subject synergies, problem solving as a catalyst for creativity, new/deeper insights into collaboration and expanded professional identity. In conclusion, didactical implications are addressed, related to potential challenges.

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    fulltext
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