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  • 1.
    Aaberg, Oddveig Reiersdal
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Husebo, Sissel Iren Eikeland
    University of Stavanger, Norway; Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Ballangrud, Randi
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions in Team questionnaire: Psychometric testing of the Norwegian version, and hospital healthcare personnel perceptions across hospital units2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 642-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To translate "The Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions in Team" questionnaire (CSACD-T) into Norwegian and test it for psychometric properties. The further aim was to describe and compare healthcare personnel's collaboration and satisfaction about team decision-making (TDM) across hospital units. Design A cross-sectional study. Methods The questionnaire was translated into Norwegian. A total of 247 healthcare personnel at two hospitals responded to the questionnaire. An explorative factor analysis was performed to test the factor structure of the questionnaire, while a Cronbach's alpha analysis was used to test for internal consistency. A one-way ANOVA analysis and a Kruskal-Wallis test were applied to test for differences between hospital units. Results The results demonstrate that the Norwegian version of the CSACD-T has promising psychometric properties regarding construct validity and internal consistency. The mean score of the CSACD-T was significantly higher in the maternity ward group than in the emergency room group.

  • 2.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Skills Center.
    Fjordkvist, Erika
    Departments of Orthopedics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Struggling to be seen and understood as a person: chronic back pain patients’ experiences of encounters in healthcare: an interview study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1047-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how patients with chronic back pain experience encounters with health care. Persons with chronic back pain are a stigmatized group often treated based on stereotypes, which may lead to misunderstandings and create frustrated patients and healthcare personnel. Few studies have examined the generic aspects of quality of care in this context.

    Design: A descriptive design with a qualitative approach was used.

    Methods: Nine individual interviews were conducted with chronic back pain patients after admission to an orthopaedic hospital ward. Data were analysed using content analysis.

    Results: The patients’ experiences of healthcare encounters can be described by the theme “Struggling to be seen and understood as a person,” comprising the categories “Lack of access and trust to care",“A desire to be taken care of and listened to” and “Own strength to handle healthcare situations.”

  • 3.
    Andersen-Hollekim, Tone E.
    et al.
    More & Romsdal Hosp Trust, Alesund, Norway; Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Trondheim, Norway.
    Kvangarsnes, Marit
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Alesund, Norway; More & Romsdal Hosp Trust, Alesund, Norway.
    Landstad, Bodil J.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Nord Trondelag Hosp Trust, Levanger Hosp, Levanger, Norway.
    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A.
    More & Romsdal Hosp Trust, Alesund, Norway; Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Trondheim, Norway; Univ Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Hunter Med Res Inst, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Hole, Torstein
    More & Romsdal Hosp Trust, Alesund, Norway; Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Trondheim, Norway.
    Patient participation in the clinical pathway: Nurses' perceptions of adults' involvement in haemodialysis2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 574-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To develop knowledge of nurses' perceptions of participation for patients treated with haemodialysis and their next of kin.

    Design: A qualitative study with a hermeneutic approach.

    Methods: The data were collected in 2015 through focus groups with 13 nurses in Central Norway.

    Results: The nurses reported that patient participation ranging from non-involvement to shared decision-making was related to whether dialysis was initiated as acute or scheduled. The restrictions required in chronic haemodialysis limited participation. The next of kin were not involved. The nurses highlighted interventions on both the individual and system levels to strengthen participation.

    Conclusion: Dialysis units should develop strategies for participation related to individual needs and design treatment in cooperation with patients and their families, ensuring involvement early in the clinical pathway. Further research is needed on issues related to next of kin, including their desired level of involvement.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Dellkvist, Helen
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Johansson, Ulrika Bernow
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health. Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden.;Karlskrona Municipal, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care: An interview study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe relatives' experiences of sharing a written life story about a close family member with dementia who has moved to residential care. Design An explorative descriptive qualitative design was used. Methods The data were collected using semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of eight relatives and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Results Results show that creating and sharing the life story of a close family member could help relatives handle grief and stress. It was perceived as an important, yet difficult, task to ensure that the close family member got good quality care. The creation of a meaningful life story takes time and requires cooperation with family members and other significant people.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Vestman, Caroline
    Primary Health Care Center, Gullspång, Sweden.
    Kjellsdotter, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Experiences of specially trained personnel of group education for patients with type 2 diabetes: A lifeworld approach2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 635-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:To describe how the group education process for people with type 2 diabetes is experienced by diabetes nurses and dietitians who support the patients’ learning, in a primary care setting.

    Design:The project took place at two primary care settings in the south of Sweden.

    Methods:Data collected from focus‐group interviews and reflection notes were subjected to phenomenological analysis.

    Results:The specially trained personnel experienced that group education made it possible for the patients to learn through reflection concerning their own and others’ experiences. Furthermore, group education entailed increased knowledge for the trained personnel. When the patients were challenged to make changes in their lives with the illness, the personnel experienced that both patients and personnel supported each other. The study concludes that the trained personnel person‐centred approach, with help of the didactic model, get tools to support patients learning.

  • 6.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

  • 7.
    Annika, Lindh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Theander, Kersti
    Centre for Clinical Research, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Arne, Mats
    Centre for Clinical Research, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy & Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lundh, Lena
    Academic Primary Health Care Centre, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, NVS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandelowsky, Hanna
    Academic Primary Health Care Centre, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, NVS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ställberg, Björn
    dDepartment of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Zakrisson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Errors in inhaler use related to devices and to inhalation technique among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary health care2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1519-1527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe inhaler use in primary health care patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to categorize these patients into those making errors related to devices, those making errors related to inhalation technique and those making errors related to both.

    Design: Observational study. Methods COPD nurses used a checklist to assess the use of inhalers by patients with spirometry-verified COPD (N = 183) from primary healthcare centres. The STROBE checklist has been used.

    Results: The mean age of the patients was 71 (SD 9) years. Almost half of them (45%) made at least one error; of these, 50% made errors related to devices, 31% made errors related to inhalation technique and 19% made errors related both to devices and to inhalation technique.

  • 8.
    Backman, Tess
    et al.
    Ambulance Care, Mora, Sweden.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Borg, Ronja
    Västerås Hospital, Region of Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Ambulance nurses' experiences of deciding a patient does not require ambulance care2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 783-789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe ambulance nurses’ experience of deciding a patient does not require ambulance care.

    Design:An inductive, empirical study with a qualitative approach.Methods: Data collection was conducted through semi‐structured interviews, and collected data were analysed with qualitative manifest content analysis. Data were collected during the spring 2017, and eight ambulance nurses participated.Results:The findings are presented in one main category, which is “Not very ill but a difficult decision” with totally three subcategories. The ambulance nurse's experi‐ence of making the assessment when the patient has no need for ambulance care is like walking the balance of slack line. This means that the assessment can be both easy and very difficult but something that definitely requires experience, knowledge and dedication.

  • 9.
    Bazzi, May
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    Gothenburg University.
    Hellström, Mikael
    Gothenburg University and Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ahlberg, Karin
    Gothenburg University.
    Lundgren, Solveig M
    Gothenburg University.
    Team composition and staff roles in a hybrid operating room: A prospective study using video observations.2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1245-1253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate team composition and staff roles in a hybrid operating room during endovascular aortic repairs.

    Design: Quantitative descriptive design.

    Methods: Nine endovascular aortic repairs procedures were video-recorded between December 2014 and September 2015. The data analysis involved examining the work process, number of people in the room and categories of staff and their involvement in the procedure.

    Results: The procedures were divided into four phases. The hybrid operating room was most crowded in phase 3 when the skin wound was open. Some staff categories were in the room for the entire procedure even if they were not actively involved. The largest number of people simultaneously in the room was 14.

  • 10.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodø, Norway.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Health Care Science/ Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Health Care Science/ Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway .
    The theory of a co-creative process in advanced palliative home care nursing encounters: A qualitative deductive approach over time2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    The aim of this study was to test the theoretical conceptualization of the co‐creative process in home care nursing encounters over time.

    Method and design

    This was a multiple case study with a deductive analysis of qualitative data over time, using interviews and observations collected from three cases.

    Results

    The co‐creative process was complex and contained main, sub‐ and micro‐processes. Time was important and valuable, giving the patient and relatives space to adjust the process to their own pace. Some processes were worked on more intensively in accordance with the patients’ and relatives’ needs, and these are considered the main‐process. The further developed theory of the co‐creative process and its main, sub‐ and microprocesses can be understood as a concretization of how good nursing care can be performed within caring relationships in the context of advanced palliative home care.

  • 11.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodø, Norway.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Health Care Science/Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Health Care Science/Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gjøvik, Norway.
    The theory of a co-creative process in advanced palliative home care nursing encounters: A qualitative deductive approach over time2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to test the theoretical conceptualization of the co-creative process in home care nursing encounters over time.

    Method and design: This was a multiple case study with a deductive analysis of qualitative data over time, using interviews and observations collected from three cases.

    Results: The co-creative process was complex and contained main, sub- and micro-processes. Time was important and valuable, giving the patient and relatives space to adjust the process to their own pace. Some processes were worked on more intensively in accordance with the patients' and relatives' needs, and these are considered the main-process. The further developed theory of the co-creative process and its main, sub- and microprocesses can be understood as a concretization of how good nursing care can be performed within caring relationships in the context of advanced palliative home care.

  • 12.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To obtain an understanding of operating theatre nurses' experiences of responsibility for patient care and safety in perioperative practice. Design: A hermeneutic design were used. Method: Data were collected during 2012 from 15 operating theatre nurses who participated in individual interviews. The text was analyzed by hermeneutical text interpretation. Findings: The texts revealed two main themes: A formal external responsibility and personal ethical value. Responsibility that the patient was not exposed to risks, protecting the patient's body, systematically planning and organizing work in the surgical team. The personal ethical value meant confirming the patient as a person, caring for the patient and preserving the patient's dignity. A new understanding emerged that the operating theatre nurse always have the patient in mind.

  • 13.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Operating theatre nurses' self-reported clinical competence in perioperative practice: A mixed method study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1510-1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During many years the operating theatre nurse's clinical competence has been describing in relation to patient safety, but the nursing care of the patient remains unclear. Therefore, we want in this study to investigate the relationship between background factors of operating theatre nurses self-rated clinical competence and describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence in perioperative nursing.Methods: A cross-sectional study with a mixed method approach was chosen. The instrument Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of Clinical Core Competence was used for self-rating operating theatre nurses' clinical competence in perioperative nursing, and an open-ended question was added to describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence. In total, 1057 operating theatre nurses in Sweden were asked to participate, and 303 responded (28 %). They had different educational backgrounds and professional experiences, and were employed in universities or central/regional and district hospitals.Results: Academic degree, professional experience and place of employment were significant for the development of the operating theatre nurses' clinical competence. Academic degree appeared to affect operating theatre nurse leadership and cooperation, as well as how consultations took place with other professions about patient care. Being employed at a university hospital had a positive effect on professional development and critical thinking.Conclusions:  An academic degree influenced the operating theatre nurses' ability to act in complex situations, and along with professional experience strengthened the nurses' ability to use different problem-solving strategies and face the consequences of decisions made. Scientific knowledge and interprofessional learning and competence development in medical technologies should supplement nursing care for the development of clinical competence.

  • 14.
    Bokberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Behm, Lina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Evaluating person-centredness for frail older persons in nursing homes before and after implementing a palliative care intervention2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To evaluate person-centeredness in nursing homes from the perspective of frail older persons, before and after implementing an educational intervention about palliative care. Design A crossover design. Methods Forty-four older persons living in nursing homes were interviewed. A convergent mixed-method was used to analyse data. Results The older persons expressed feelings of unsafety related to shortcomings in staff. These shortcomings implied that the responsibilities of everyday activities and making the residents' existence more bearable were transferred to the next of kin. The dropout rate related to death and not enough energy was considerably high (51%) even though one of the inclusion criteria was to have enough energy to manage a 1-hr interview. This result supports previous research describing the difficulties in retaining older persons in research and indicated that the dose of the intervention was not sufficient to improve person-centred care.

  • 15.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Patient participation, a prequisite for care: A grounded theory study of healthcare professionals’ perceptions of what participation means in a paediatric care context2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore healthcare professionals’ perceptions of what patient participation means in a paediatric care context.

    Design

    A qualitative explorative design with grounded theory.

    Methods

    Fifteen healthcare professionals who worked in paediatric care settings were either interviewed or asked open-ended questions in a survey, during December 2015–May 2016. Grounded theory was used as a method.

    Results

    The study results provide a theoretical conceptualization of what patient participation meant for healthcare professionals in paediatric care and how participation was enabled. The core category “participation a prerequisite for care” emerged as the main finding explaining the concept as ethical, practical and integrated in the care givers way of working. However, the concept was implicit in the organization. Four additional categories illustrated the healthcare professionals’ different strategies used to enhance patient participation; “meeting each child where the child is,” “building a relationship with the child,” “showing respect for each individual child” and “making the most of the moment.” © 2017 The Authors. Nursing Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 16.
    Carlsund, Åsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Living With Type 1 Diabetes As Experienced By Young Adults2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 418-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. A person’s long-term illness influences many aspects of daily living, for the person affected as well as the family. Living with Type 1 Diabetes in young adulthood raises numerous challenges and concerns.

    Design. This study has a qualitative design.

    Methods. Semi-structured interviews were performed with 12 young adults living with Type 1 Diabetes. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results. The analysis revealed contradictory ways of handling the illness, as is illuminated in four categories: Handling the situation, dealing with others, lack motivation and relation to healthcare. Daily life for young adults with Type 1 Diabetes is filled with demanding tasks such as self-administration of insulin, blood glucose tests, and monitoring carb intake to manage blood glucose levels.

  • 17.
    Christiansen, Line
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Lindberg, Catharina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Health.
    Health-related quality of life and related factors among a sample of older people with cognitive impairment2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 849-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study aimed to identify factors affecting health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of older adults with cognitive impairment and to describe the association of these factors with different components of HRQoL. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used. Methods: Data were collected from 247 individuals aged 60 years and older from a Swedish longitudinal cohort study. The Short-Form Health Survey-12 (SF-12) and EuroQol (EQ-5D) were used to assess HRQoL. The data were analysed using descriptive and comparative statistics. Results: The present study identified several factors that influenced HRQoL of older adults with cognitive impairment. The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the following factors were associated with physical and mental HRQoL: dependency in activities of daily living (ADL), receiving informal care and feelings of loneliness and pain. © 2019 The Authors. Nursing Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 18.
    Danielsson, Lena
    et al.
    Vastmanlands Sjukhus, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Lundstrom, Marie-Louise
    Vastmanlands Sjukhus, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Anaesthetizing children-From a nurse anaesthetist's perspective-A qualitative study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe nurse anaesthetists' experiences of encountering and caring for children in connection to anaesthesia. Design: Qualitative design. Methods: Sixteen written narratives based on eight nurse anaesthetists' experiences of meeting children was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The overarching theme was: "anaesthetizing children is a complex caring situation, including interactions with the child and parents as well as ensuring patient safety, affected by the perioperative team and organizational prerequisites". The nurses stated that in their interaction with the family, their goal was to ensure that children and parents felt secure and calm. "Striving to work in confidence" underlined the team and organizational influences. Encountering children involves more than knowledge about technical equipment, procedures and drugs. Knowledge about children's development and fears and parents' needs are essential for an optimal caring situation. Organizations need to realize that extra time, skills and resources are needed to safely anaesthetize children.

  • 19.
    Danielsson, Lena
    et al.
    Vastmanlands Sjukhus, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Lundström, Marie-Louise
    Vastmanlands Sjukhus, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden..
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Anaesthetizing children-From a nurse anaesthetist's perspective-A qualitative study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe nurse anaesthetists' experiences of encountering and caring for children in connection to anaesthesia.

    Design: Qualitative design.

    Methods: Sixteen written narratives based on eight nurse anaesthetists' experiences of meeting children was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The overarching theme was: "anaesthetizing children is a complex caring situation, including interactions with the child and parents as well as ensuring patient safety, affected by the perioperative team and organizational prerequisites". The nurses stated that in their interaction with the family, their goal was to ensure that children and parents felt secure and calm. "Striving to work in confidence" underlined the team and organizational influences. Encountering children involves more than knowledge about technical equipment, procedures and drugs. Knowledge about children's development and fears and parents' needs are essential for an optimal caring situation. Organizations need to realize that extra time, skills and resources are needed to safely anaesthetize children.

  • 20.
    Elf, Marie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Chalmers Univ Technol.
    Anåker, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Marcheschi, Elizabeth
    Sigurjonsson, Asgeir
    Ulrich, Roger S.
    The built environment and its impact on health outcomes and experiences of patients, significant others and staff-A protocol for a systematic review2020In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim This review will identify, evaluate and synthesize the literature related to evidence-based design of healthcare environments and to identify impacts of the built environment on the outcomes and experiences of patients, significant others and staff. Design A mixed-method systematic review of literature 2010-2018. Methods Database searches for evidence in peer-reviewed journals will be conducted electronically using CINAHL, Medline, SCOPUS and Web of Science. , full-text screening and data extraction will be completed independently by the reviewers. Quality assessment will follow Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Social Services Assessment. Results This review will offer knowledge for informed decisions about the design of the healthcare environment. The review is comprehensive, includes a large volume of literature various research designs and will highlight the knowledge gap in evidence-based design and provide a breadth of knowledge about the built environments and its impact on health and well-being.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Jansson, Sofie
    Municipal Home Care, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Ulrika
    Psychiatric Clinic Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    To feel emotional concern: A qualitative interview study to explore telephone nurses’ experiences of difficult calls2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 842-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe telenurses’ experiences of difficult calls.

    Design: A qualitative approach with a descriptive design was used to gain a deeper understanding of the telenurses’ experiences.

    Methods: The data were collected in spring 2017 through semi-structured interviews with 19 telenurses at call centres and primary healthcare centres and were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Becoming emotionally concerned is central to the telenurse’s experiences of difficult calls. Difficult calls are accompanied by feelings such as inadequacy, uncertainty and anxiety, which can be described as emotional tension. Emotional tension refers to situations when the caller’s expressed emotions were conveyed to the telenurses and altered their state of mind. The telenurses stated that difficult calls that cause them to become anxious remain in their thoughts and go through their minds repeatedly, making a deep impression.

  • 22.
    Golsäter, Marie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore how school nurses perceive their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness.

    Design: An explorative inductive qualitative design.

    Method: The study is based on interviews with 16 school nurses. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The main category, “Contribute in making the school a safe place for the child”, reveals how the school nurses try to contribute to making the school a safe place for a child when his/her parent has a serious physical illness. They support children through individual support, as well as at an overall level in the school health team to make the school, as an organization, a safe place. Routines and collaboration to recognize the child when his/her parent has become ill is described as crucial to accomplishing this assignment

  • 23.
    Golsäter, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore how school nurses perceive their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness.

    Design: An explorative inductive qualitative design.

    Method: The study is based on interviews with 16 school nurses. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The main category, “Contribute in making the school a safe place for the child”, reveals how the school nurses try to contribute to making the school a safe place for a child when his/her parent has a serious physical illness. They support children through individual support, as well as at an overall level in the school health team to make the school, as an organization, a safe place. Routines and collaboration to recognize the child when his/her parent has become ill is described as crucial to accomplishing this assignment

  • 24.
    Golsäter, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Child Health Care and Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Barnhälsovården, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wigert, Helena
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dealing with adolescents' recurrent pain problems in school health care—Swedish school nurses' view2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1626-1633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore school nurses' strategies for supporting adolescents with recurrent pain.

    Design: An explorative inductive qualitative design.

    Method: Twenty-one Swedish school nurses were interviewed, and the interviews were subjected to content analysis.

    Results: The findings show that the nurses are aware that recurrent pain problems are common among the adolescents. In their attempt to support these adolescents, the nurses describe how they are striving in attempts to acquire an understanding of the adolescents' situation, to understand the cause of the pain problem and to devise strategies that can be used to help the adolescents handle the situation. 

  • 25.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Vaxjo, Sweden..
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Establishing a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden: A case study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 210-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The study aims to describe the establishment of a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden. Design: A descriptive qualitative study. Methods: A descriptive case study based on a review of 14 public documents and individual interviews with two experts in the area, analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results: This study found that shared language, preservation of customs and habits and collaboration between the representatives of the municipality, Finnish-speaking migrant associations and staff at the nursing home influenced the development of the culturally specific nursing home for older Finnish-speaking people intended to avoid loneliness, isolation and misunderstandings among older Finnish-speaking. Collaboration between healthcare service for older persons and minority people resulted in an optimal culturally specific nursing home, simultaneously encountering the majority culture. Nursing and healthcare services need to be aware of positive effects of collaboration with stakeholders to achieve optimal culturally specific nursing homes.

  • 26.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences Department of Health and Caring Sciences Linnaeus University Växjö Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Establishing a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden: A case study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 210-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to describe the establishment of a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden.

  • 27.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University;Uppsala University.
    Establishing a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden: a case study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 210-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The study aims to describe the establishment of a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden.

    Design

    A descriptive qualitative study.

    Methods

    A descriptive case study based on a review of 14 public documents and individual interviews with two experts in the area, analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    This study found that shared language, preservation of customs and habits and collaboration between the representatives of the municipality, Finnish-speaking migrant associations and staff at the nursing home influenced the development of the culturally specific nursing home for older Finnish-speaking people intended to avoid loneliness, isolation and misunderstandings among older Finnish-speaking. Collaboration between healthcare service for older persons and minority people resulted in an optimal culturally specific nursing home, simultaneously encountering the majority culture. Nursing and healthcare services need to be aware of positive effects of collaboration with stakeholders to achieve optimal culturally specific nursing homes.

  • 28. Harris, Sansha J.
    et al.
    Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D. E.
    Gee, Melanie
    Hampshaw, Susan M.
    Lindgren, Lenita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Haywood, Annette
    Interpersonal touch interventions for patients in intensive care: A design-oriented realist review2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 216-235Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To develop a theoretical framework to inform the design of interpersonal touch interventions intended to reduce stress in adult intensive care unit patients.

    Design: Realist review with an intervention design-oriented approach.

    Methods: We searched CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Web of Science and grey literature sources without date restrictions. Subject experts suggested additional articles. Evidence synthesis drew on diverse sources of literature and was conducted iteratively with theory testing. We consulted stakeholders to focus the review. We performed systematic searches to corroborate our developing theoretical framework.

    Results: We present a theoretical framework based around six intervention construction principles. Theory testing provided some evidence in favour of treatment repetition, dynamic over static touch and lightening sedation. A lack of empirical evidence was identified for construction principles relating to intensity and positive/negative evaluation of emotional experience, moderate pressure touch for sedated patients and intervention delivery by relatives versus healthcare practitioners.

  • 29.
    Hedlund, Asa
    et al.
    Univ Gavle, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    Nordstrom, Tina
    Univ Gavle, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden.
    New insights and access to resources change the perspective on life among persons with long-term illness-An interview study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1580-1588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim was to describe individuals' experiences of living with long-term illness.

    Methods

    A qualitative approach with a descriptive design was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 persons (50-80 years). They were also asked to self-rate their perceptions of their current health status and confidence in their ability to cope with everyday life.

    Results

    One main theme was identified: new insights and access to resources change the perspective on life. Personal characteristics and support from others were advantageous in finding ways to deal with limitations related to the illness. Most of the persons experienced a changed approach to life, in that they now valued life more than they had before. However, some persons also experienced lost values and found it difficult to accept medications. The persons rated their current health status as slightly above average, but their confidence in their ability to cope with everyday life as high.

  • 30.
    Hedlund, Åsa
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Nordström, Tina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    New insights and access to resources change the perspective on life among persons with long-term illness - An interview study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 580-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to describe individuals’ experiences of living with long-term illness.

    Methods: A qualitative approach with a descriptive design was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 persons (50–80 years). They were also asked to self-rate their perceptions of their current health status and confidence in their ability to cope with everyday life.

    Results: One main theme was identified: new insights and access to resources change the perspective on life. Personal characteristics and support from others were advantageous in finding ways to deal with limitations related to the illness. Most of the persons experienced a changed approach to life, in that they now valued life more than they had before. However, some persons also experienced lost values and found it difficult to accept medications. The persons rated their current health status as slightly above average, but their confidence in their ability to cope with everyday life as high.

  • 31.
    Hedén, Lena E
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare, Uppsala University.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Pediatric Oncology, Uppsala University.
    Children's self‐reports of fear and pain levels during needle procedures2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 376-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The objective was to determine the levels of and potential relationships be‐ tween, procedure‐related fear and pain in children.

    Design: Clinical based cross‐sectional.

    Methods: Ninety children aged between 7–18 years were included consecutively and self‐reported levels of pain and fear on a 0–100 mm visual analogue scales (VAS) when undergoing routine needle insertion into a subcutaneously implanted intrave‐ nous port following topical anaesthesia.

    Results: The needle‐related fear level was reported to be as high as the needle‐re‐ lated pain level (mean VAS: 14 mm and 12 mm, respectively, N = 90). With fear as the dependent variable, age and pain were significantly associated and explained 16% of the variance. With pain as the dependent variable, fear was significantly associated and explained 11% of the variance. A post hoc analysis indicated that younger chil‐ dren reported their fear levels to be higher than their pain levels.

  • 32.
    Hedén, Lena
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Sciences, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås.
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Children’s self-reports of fear and pain levels during needle procedures2020In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 376-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The objective was to determine the levels of and potential relationships between, procedure‐related fear and pain in children.

    Design

    Clinical based cross‐sectional.

    Methods

    Ninety children aged between 7–18 years were included consecutively and self‐reported levels of pain and fear on a 0–100 mm visual analogue scales (VAS) when undergoing routine needle insertion into a subcutaneously implanted intravenous port following topical anaesthesia.

    Results

    The needle‐related fear level was reported to be as high as the needle‐related pain level (mean VAS: 14 mm and 12 mm, respectively, N = 90). With fear as the dependent variable, age and pain were significantly associated and explained 16% of the variance. With pain as the dependent variable, fear was significantly associated and explained 11% of the variance. A post hoc analysis indicated that younger children reported their fear levels to be higher than their pain levels.

  • 33. Hellstadius, Ylva
    et al.
    Malmström, Marlene
    Lagergren, Pernilla
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Wikman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Reflecting a crisis reaction: Narratives from patients with oesophageal cancer about the first 6 months after diagnosis and surgery.2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1471-1480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe patients' experiences of emotional adaption following treatment for oesophageal cancer from diagnosis to 6 months after surgery.

    Design: A qualitative interview study using an inductive approach was carried out.

    Methods: Participants were recruited from two university hospitals in Sweden. Ten patients who had been operated for oesophageal cancer with curative intent 6 months earlier and consented to participate in the study were included. Patients who had a disease recurrence were not eligible for inclusion. Participants were interviewed with a semi-structured interview approach. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: One overarching theme was identified; Experiencing a crisis reaction, which comprised three key categories; (a) From emotionally numb to feeling quite alright; (b) From a focus on cure to reflections about a whole new life; and (c) From a severe treatment to suffering an emaciated, non-compliant body, derived from 14 distinct sub-categories.

    Conclusion: This study highlights the process of emotional adaptation following oesophageal cancer surgery that patients describe when reflecting back on the first 6 months postoperatively pointing to a crisis reaction in this early postoperative period.

  • 34.
    Hemberg, Jessica
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi, Vasa, Finland.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Caring from the heart as belonging: —The basis for mediating compassion2020In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, article id 2019:00:1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Informal coercion, that is, situations where caregivers use subtle coercive measures to impose their will on patients, is common in adult psychiatric inpatient care. It has been described as ‘a necessary evil’, confronting nurses with an ethical dilemma where they need to balance between a wish to do good, and the risk of violating patients’ dignity and autonomy.

    Aim:

    To describe nurses’ experiences of being involved in informal coercion in adult psychiatric inpatient care.

    Research design:

    The study has a qualitative, inductive design.

    Participants and research context:

    Semi-structured interviews with 10 Swedish psychiatric nurses were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Ethical considerations:

    The study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. In line with the Swedish Ethical Review Act, it was also subject to ethical procedures at the university.

    Findings:

    Four domains comprise informal coercion as a process over time. These domains contain 11 categories focusing on different experiences involved in the process: Striving to connect, involving others, adjusting to the caring culture, dealing with laws, justifying coercion, waiting for the patient, persuading the patient, negotiating with the patient, using professional power, scrutinizing one’s actions and learning together.

    Discussion:

    Informal coercion is associated with moral stress as nurses might find themselves torn between a wish to do good for the patient, general practices and ‘house rules’ in the caring culture. In addition, nurses need to be aware of the asymmetry of the caring relationship, in order to avoid compliance becoming a consequence of patients subordinating to nurse power, rather than a result of mutual understanding. Reflections are thus necessary through the process to promote mutual learning and to avoid violations of patients’ dignity and autonomy.

    Conclusion:

    If there is a need for coercion, that is, if the coercion is found to be an ‘unpleasant good’, rather than ‘necessary evil’ considering the consequences for the patient, it should be subject to reflecting and learning together with the patient

  • 35.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Saaristo, Panu
    The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Geneva, Switzerland.
    von Strauss, Eva
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Nurses’ experiences of health concerns, teamwork, leadership and knowledge transfer during an Ebola outbreak in West Africa2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 824-833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Saaristo, Panu
    The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Geneva, Switzerland.
    von Strauss, Eva
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen, Sweden.
    Nurses’ experiences of health concerns, teamwork, leadership and knowledge transfer during an Ebola outbreak in West Africa2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 824-833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Holmlund, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindmark, Krister
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sandberg, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Health‐related quality of life in patients with heart failure eligible for treatment with sacubitril–valsartan2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe and compare self‐reported health‐related quality of life between younger and older patients with severe heart failure eligible for treatment with sacubitril–valsartan and to explore the association between health‐related quality of life and age, NYHA classification, systolic blood pressure and NT‐proBNP level.

    Design: Cross‐sectional study.

    Methods: A total of 59 patients, eligible for treatment with sacubitril–valsartan were consecutively included and divided into a younger (≤75 years) and older group (>75 years). Health‐related quality of life was assessed using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire and the EuroQol 5‐dimensions. Data were collected between June 2016 and January 2018. The STROBE checklist was used.

    Results: There were no differences in overall health‐related quality of life between the age groups. The older patients reported lower scores in two domains measured with the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, namely self‐efficacy (67.0 SD 22.1 vs. 78.8 SD 19.7) and physical limitation (75.6 SD 19.0 vs. 86.3 SD 14.4). Higher NYHA class was independently associated with lower Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Overall Summary Score.

  • 38.
    Hägglund, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Department of Medicine-Geriatric, Skellefteå County Hospital, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    A mixed methods study of Tai Chi exercise for patients with chronic heart failure aged 70 years and older2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 176-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    This study aimed to evaluate Tai Chi group training among patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) aged 70 years and older.

    Background

    Physical activity is recommended for CHF treatment. Tai Chi is found to be beneficial to different patient groups, although few studies focus on older patients with CHF.

    Design

    A mixed methods study. Participants were randomly assigned to Tai Chi training twice a week for 16 weeks (= 25) or control (= 20). Quantitative data were collected at baseline, at the end of the training period and 6 months after training, assessing self-rated fatigue and quality of life, natriuretic peptides and physical performance. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with participants (= 10) in the Tai Chi training group.

    Results

    No statistical differences between the Tai Chi training group and the control group in quality of life or natriuretic peptides was found. After 16 weeks, the training group tended to rate more reduced activity and the control group rated more mental fatigue. Participants in the training group rated increased general fatigue at follow-up compared with baseline. Qualitative interviews showed that Tai Chi training was experienced as a new, feasible and meaningful activity. The importance of the leader and the group was emphasized. Improvements in balance were mentioned and there was no physical discomfort.

    Conclusion

    Tai Chi was experienced as a feasible and meaningful form of physical exercise for patients with CHF aged over 70 years despite lack of achieved health improvement. Further investigations, using feasibility and meaningfulness as outcome variables seems to be useful.

  • 39. Håkansson Eklund, Jakob
    et al.
    Holmström, Inger K
    Ollén Lindqvist, Anna
    Sundler, Annelie J
    Hochwälder, Jacek
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Empathy levels among nursing students: a comparative cross-sectional study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 983-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Empathy is a crucial component of the nurse-patient relationship, but knowledge is lacking as to when empathy develops during nursing education. The aim of the present study was to compare empathy levels at different stages of undergraduate nursing education and different master's nursing programmes.

    Design: The design was a comparative cross-sectional study.

    Methods: A total of 329 participants in Sweden, comprised of nursing students in their second and sixth semesters in an undergraduate nursing programme as well as master's nursing students, rated their own empathy using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy.

    Results: Students in their sixth semester in an undergraduate nursing programme expressed more empathy than did students in their second semester and master's nursing students. Among the five master's programmes, public-health nursing students expressed the most empathy and intensive-care nursing students the least.

  • 40.
    Håkansson Eklund, Jakob
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Ollén Lindqvist, Anna
    Mälardalen University.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hochwälder, Jacek
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Empathy levels among nursing students: A comparative cross-sectional study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 983-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Empathy is a crucial component of the nurse–patient relationship, but knowledge is lacking as to when empathy develops during nursing education. The aim of the present study was to compare empathy levels at different stages of undergraduate nursing education and different master's nursing programmes. Design: The design was a comparative cross-sectional study. Methods: A total of 329 participants in Sweden, comprised of nursing students in their second and sixth semesters in an undergraduate nursing programme as well as master's nursing students, rated their own empathy using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy. Results: Students in their sixth semester in an undergraduate nursing programme expressed more empathy than did students in their second semester and master's nursing students. Among the five master's programmes, public-health nursing students expressed the most empathy and intensive-care nursing students the least. 

  • 41.
    Håkansson Eklund, Jakob
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Anna Ollén
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelle J.
    Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden.
    Hochwälder, Jacek
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Marmstål Hammer, Lena
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth Care & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Empathy levels among nursing students: A comparative cross-sectional study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 983-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Empathy is a crucial component of the nurse-patient relationship, but knowledge is lacking as to when empathy develops during nursing education. The aim of the present study was to compare empathy levels at different stages of undergraduate nursing education and different master's nursing programmes.

    Design: The design was a comparative cross-sectional study.

    Methods: A total of 329 participants in Sweden, comprised of nursing students in their second and sixth semesters in an undergraduate nursing programme as well as master's nursing students, rated their own empathy using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy.

    Results: Students in their sixth semester in an undergraduate nursing programme expressed more empathy than did students in their second semester and master's nursing students. Among the five master's programmes, public-health nursing students expressed the most empathy and intensive-care nursing students the least.

  • 42.
    Jobe, Ingela
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Lindberg, Birgitta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Nordmark, Sofi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care. Health Department, Norrbotten Region, Luleå.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    The care‐planning conference: Exploring aspects of person-centered interactions2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 120-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to describe the care-planning conference from the participants' and researchers' perspectives, focusing on exploring aspects of person-centred interactions.

    Design

    A single-instrumental, qualitative case study design was used describing a care-planning conference taking place in the home of an older woman and her daughter.

    Methods

    Data collection consisted of observation and digital recording of the care-planning conference and individual interviews with all the participants before and after the conference. Data were analysed in several phases: first, a narrative description followed by a general description and, thereafter, qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The findings revealed that the care-planning conference conducted had no clear purpose and did not fulfil all parts of the planning process. Three themes emerged related to aspects of person-centred interactions. The theme “expectations meet reality” showed different expectations, and participants could not really connect during the conference. The theme “navigate without a map” revealed health professionals' lack of knowledge about the care-planning process. The theme “lose the forest for the trees” described that the conference was conducted only as part of the health professionals' duties. Management and healthcare professionals cannot automatically assume that they are delivering person-centred care. Healthcare professionals need to be sensitive to the context, use the knowledge and tools available and continuously evaluate and reassess the work carried out.

  • 43. Karlberg Traav, Malin
    et al.
    Forsman, Henrietta
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    First line nurse managers' experiences of opportunities and obstacles to support evidence-based nursing2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 634-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim was to explore first line nurse managers’ experiences of opportunities and obstacles to support evidence‐based nursing.

    Design

    A qualitative study with a phenomenographical approach.

    Method

    Data were collected through focus group interviews with 15 first line nurse managers’ in four settings.

    Results

    The results are presented in four categories of description headed: Manage the everyday work vs. evidence‐based nursing; Uncertainties about evidence‐based nursing and nursing research; Time as a reality, as an approach; and Shaping awareness—towards an active approach to evidence‐based nursing. The overarching category of description has been formulated as follows: The internal relation—how active leadership influences evidence‐based nursing. The outcome space is presented as: The individual path—how to make vision and reality become a working entity around evidence‐based nursing.

  • 44.
    Karlberg-Traav, Malin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Health Care Science, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsman, Henrietta
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Department of Health Care Science, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    First line nurse managers' experience of opportunities and obstacles to support evidence-based nursing2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 634-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to explore first line nurse managers’ experiences of opportunities and obstacles to support evidence‐based nursing.

    Design: A qualitative study with a phenomenographical approach.

    Method: Data were collected through focus group interviews with 15 first line nurse managers’ in four settings.

    Results: The results are presented in four categories of description headed: Manage the everyday work vs. evidence‐based nursing; Uncertainties about evidence‐based nursing and nursing research; Time as a reality, as an approach; and Shaping awareness—towards an active approach to evidence‐based nursing. The overarching category of description has been formulated as follows: The internal relation—how active leadership influences evidence‐based nursing. The outcome space is presented as: The individual path—how to make vision and reality become a working entity around evidence‐based nursing.

  • 45.
    Kirsebom, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Hedström, Mariann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Transfer of nursing home residents to emergency departments: organizational differences between nursing homes with high vs. low transfer rates2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore possible factors in the organization of nursing homes that could be related to differences in the rate of transfer of residents from nursing homes to emergency department.

    Design: Explorative.

    Method: In a single municipality, qualitative and quantitative data were collected from documents and through semi-structured interviews with 11 RNs from five nursing homes identified as having the highest vs. six identified as having the lowest transfer rates to emergency department. Data were analysed by non-parametric tests and basic content analysis.

    Results: All nursing homes in the highest transfer rate group and one in the lowest transfer rate group were run by private for-profit providers. Compared with the low group, the high group had fewer updated advance care plans and the RNs interviewed had less work experience in care of older people and less training in care of persons with dementia. There was no difference in nursing home size or staff/resident ratio. The RNs described similar possibilities to provide palliative care, medical equipment and perceived medical support from GPs.

  • 46.
    Kirsebom, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Hedström, Mariann
    Uppsala University.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala University.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University.
    Transfer of nursing home residents to emergency departments: organizational differences between nursing homes with high vs. low transfer rates2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore possible factors in the organization of nursing homes that could be related to differences in the rate of transfer of residents from nursing homes to emergency department.

    Design: Explorative.

    Method: In a single municipality, qualitative and quantitative data were collected from documents and through semi-structured interviews with 11 RNs from five nursing homes identified as having the highest vs. six identified as having the lowest transfer rates to emergency department. Data were analysed by non-parametric tests and basic content analysis.

    Results: All nursing homes in the highest transfer rate group and one in the lowest transfer rate group were run by private for-profit providers. Compared with the low group, the high group had fewer updated advance care plans and the RNs interviewed had less work experience in care of older people and less training in care of persons with dementia. There was no difference in nursing home size or staff/resident ratio. The RNs described similar possibilities to provide palliative care, medical equipment and perceived medical support from GPs.

  • 47.
    Kraft, Mia
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Kästel, Anne
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Rydholm Hedman, Ann-Marie
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Global Nursing: a literature review in the field of education and practice2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 122-133Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Lannerstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Family Med & Prevent Med Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala Univ, Family Med & Prevent Med Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Hlth Serv Res Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala Univ, Hlth Serv Res Sect, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gaining role clarity in working with sick leave questions-Registered Nurses' experiences of an educational intervention2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe how a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine was experienced by Registered Nurses and what changes it brought to their work with sick leave questions in telephone nursing. Design Qualitative explorative interview study. Methods Interviews with 12 purposively sampled Registered Nurses were conducted and analysed using manifest content analysis. Results The intervention increased Registered Nurses' knowledge of the sick leave process and changed their work habits as they now have more of the skills needed to handle sick leave questions. In this way, they gained role clarity in their work with sick leave questions. The new knowledge included rules and regulations, actors' roles and patients' experiences. Learning from peers, reflecting and having the opportunity to ask questions were also described as increasing their knowledge. The skills following the participation were described as knowing what to say and do and knowing where to turn for support.

  • 49.
    Larsson, Christina
    et al.
    Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wågstrom, Ulrika
    Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Normann, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Univ Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Parents experiences of discharge readiness from a Swedish neonatal intensive care unit2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how parents experienced the support at, and preparation for discharge from, the NICU and how they experienced the first time at home. Design: A qualitative design with quantitative elements was applied. Methods: A questionnaire study. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis with quantitative elements. Results: The majority of included parents felt adequately prepared for going home and sufficiently supported during the first period home. Negative experiences were related to lack of time for preparation, lack of support and information, especially about the infant's food intake, breastfeeding, and tube feeding, and lack of follow-up counselling post discharge. This study supports that parents who are closely involved in their infant's care at the NICU, and who stay with the infant at the NICU around the clock, are well prepared for the transition to home.

  • 50.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    James, Inger
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Patient participation in municipal elderly care from the perspective of nurses and occupational therapists2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1171-1179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how nurses and occupational therapists in municipal care of older people define and implement patient participation in their daily work.

    Design: This study had a cross-sectional design. Data were collected using an online questionnaire.

    Methods: The questionnaire had both closed and open-ended questions. One-hundred and fourteen nurses and occupational therapists responded. Data were analysed with descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.

    Results: Two main themes were identified as follows: "The professionals' perspective at the centre - Patient participation to enhance compliance" and "The patients' perspective at the centre - Patient participation as an ongoing process." The themes covered a continuum. On one extreme, patient participation was equated with making the patient comply with what the professionals wanted to do. On the other extreme, all power was transferred to the patient. The first theme was restricted to the decision-making process. The second theme covered the entire care or, rehabilitation, process.

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