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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Carl-Henrik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Håkansson, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Evaluating School Improvement Efforts: Pupils as Silent Result Suppliers, or Audible Improvement Resources?2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 34-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to a perspective of school development, where pupils‟ experiences of the teaching they encounter are regarded as a result of improvement work. In a three-year research collaboration with four nine-year compulsory schools in a large Swedish municipality, researchers have continuously conducted group interviews with different actors, collected relevant documentation and reported their preliminary analyses to the schools. In the light of previous research, the results show that the development areas that have been in focus in the schools have in some cases had an impact on the teaching. However, no homogenous change is evident. Rather, the variation between classrooms, teachers and subjects is great, especially if the pupils‟ perspectives are taken into consideration. The pupils‟ experiences and voices on how the improvement work materialises in the classroom contribute to explaining the connections, or lack of them, between the school and classroom levels. 

  • 2.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tedre, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Can Student Engagement in Online Courses Predict Performance on Online Knowledge Surveys?2017In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between student engagement and academic performance has been widely examined. However, most of these studies have focused on ascertaining the existence of such a relationship on the summative assessment level. By comparing students’ experience points in an online course and students’ scores on online knowledge surveys (KS), this study examined the relationship between student engagement and performance on online KS on the formative assessment level. Knowledge surveys were developed and formatively administered in four sections of an online Integration of ICT in Education course. Using Moodle Feedback Module, knowledge surveys were designed based on three key elements: learning objectives, the course content, and the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy of learning objectives. Using rated multiple choice KS questions, the correlation between students’ scores on KSs and students’ experience points was calculated using SPSS. The results show that students’ confidence levels in ability to answer KS questions increased in some of the course sections and decreased in others.  The student engagement in online course was positively—but weakly—related to student performance on online KS and the strength of this relationship increased as the course unfolded. Our conclusion is that student engagement in online courses would not be an accurate predictor of student performance on online Knowledge surveys right at the beginning of an instructional process.

  • 3.
    Catucci, Ester
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ehrlin, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    A case study on the impact of preschool teachers' habits on children's opportunities for outdoor learning2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 65-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore, through John Dewey's concept of habit, the potentialities and limitations of outdoor activities for children's learning. Previous research has shown that being outdoors is beneficial for children's wellbeing and learning. It has also stressed teachers' attitudes and believes to be important for how beneficial outdoor activity can be. The study was designed as a case study and was conducted with a toddler group of 12 children and three preschool teachers. Data were collected through video filming and field notes. Episodes involving preschool teachers and children during sand play were chosen for in-depth analysis. The main finding shows that the preschool teachers express similar habits among children during sand play, approaching it mainly as baking. This result has implications for preschool teacher students and educators of young children, who are invited to reflect on how shared habits at the local preschool might affect children's learning outdoors, and thus the realisation of the curriculum. 

  • 4.
    Colombage, Ranil Peiris
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    About the challenges in undergraduate research projects: an explorative case study in a Sri Lankan National University2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting research and writing a thesis about it is regarded as a distinctive pedagogy (learning through inquiry) within higher education which brings new challenges to all parties involved. To complete a thesis, students should select a problem, make a systematic plan, implement the plan and, finally, write a report of the process and findings. Students do have a supervisor to guide and support them, but it is the student who plays the key role in the whole research process. The present study is a qualitative, explorative case study to understand the challenges related to research projects within undergraduate management degree programmes in a Sri Lankan national University. Data have been collected using interviews and focus group discussions in six-degree programmes, with around 40 participants in total. The study focuses on identifying problematic areas and creating a general picture of why students’ research projects are not progressing favourably. Six main challenges were identified: student motivation, student-supervisor relationships, skills and knowledge, students’ workload, the structure of the research project course, and resources and ICT tools. These problematic areas are complex and multidimensional. Therefore, further studies are required to truly understand the complex interrelatedness of these areas.

  • 5.
    Diehl, Monika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Olovsson, Tord Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Competence and/or Performance: Assessment and Entrepreneurial Teaching and Learning in Two Swedish Lower Secondary Schools2017In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 135-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial teaching and learning, thus entrepreneurial education corresponds well with formative assessment/assessment for learning. Both are characterised by an approach to education, teaching, and learning, which puts pupils in the centre of their own learning. Learning aims to "go deep" and generate "real learning" where competencies rather than measurable results are the focus. Both entrepreneurial education, and assessment for learning are promoted by the Swedish National Agency for Education. Entrepreneurial education has been inscribed in the national curriculum for Swedish compulsory schools since 2011. The same curriculum and syllabuses also focus on several knowledge requirements, which form the basis for assessing pupils' performances. Thus, the Swedish national curriculum can be said to send two rather disparate messages. This research focuses on lower secondary school and the broad approach of entrepreneurial education and uses Basil Bernstein’s theory of performance and competence models to elaborate on entrepreneurial teaching and learning in relation to assessment. Observations along with interviews with teachers and pupils in two Swedish lower secondary schools provide the empirical basis for the research. The results reveal some differences between the schools but indicate that both teachers and pupils are relating to the prevailing dominance of performance models and thus encounter difficulties when trying to adopt entrepreneurial education and assessment for learning.

  • 6.
    Ehrlin, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Gustafsson, Hans-Olof
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    El sistema as an opportunity for collaboration between school and home: Parents' perspectives on an el sistema-inspired activity2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 36-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to gain an insight into how the parents perceived their own and their children's participation in an El Sistema-inspired programme, and how the parents' participation and commitment should be understood in relation to their importance for their children's schooling. The study is a case study and is based on semi-structured, qualitative research interviews with three parents. The results show the parents do not promote the idea that El Sistema is a programme that creates opportunities for their children to develop their musicality or paves the way for a career as a musician. Instead, the parents are happy that their children have discovered an interest that engages the children and support their personal development. The programme also provide an opportunity for both children and parents to build a social network. In the light of our theoretical point of departure in communities of practice, the result shows that it is possible to understand the El Sistema-inspired programme as helping to reinforce the parents' involvement in school practice. The findings of the study suggest that El Sistema-inspired programmes do not simply promote the interest and commitment of parents in relation to their children's schooling but go further, in that they also promote the children's development and the well-being of the parents themselves. The results show that the El Sistema-inspired programme helps to bring children, parents and school together.

  • 7.
    Ehrlin, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Gustavsson, Hans-Olof
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    El Sistema as an opportunity for collaboration between school and home - parents´perspective on El Sistema-inspired activity2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 36-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Fälth, Linda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Jaensson, Linda
    Mörbylånga Municipality.
    Johansson, Karin
    Hultsfred Municipality.
    Working Memory Training - A Cogmed Intervention2015In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 14, no 02, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of working memory training investigates the impact of intervention with memory training on students' school performance. The training consisted of 25 occasions spread over five weeks. A total of 32 students from the first grade of primary school participated in the study, with 16 students in the intervention and 16 in the control group. Before and after the intervention, all the participants were tested on word decoding skills, reading comprehension, and automated mental arithmetic. The results showed that both groups had improved on all tests after the intervention, but that the intervention group performed significantly better on the word decoding test than the control group. However, this study demonstrated no differences due to memory training with regard to mental arithmetic between the intervention group and the control group. A possible interpretation of the result is that structured memory training is beneficial for students’ reading development.

  • 9.
    Fälth, Linda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Nordström, Thomas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Assessment Support as Part of Teacher Duties in the Subject of Swedish at the Elementary Level2019In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 85-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine and describe the use of a formative assessment support regarding reading instruction in grades 1-3, viewed from a teacher perspective. Sixty-five teachers from all parts of Sweden responded to a questionnaire, who had used the support for at least one year. Of the participant teachers, nine were interviewed for the purpose of performing an in-depth analysis of the questions. The teachers stated that the primary use of the assessment results was to identify students in need of extra support, as a basis for performance appraisals, as well as for further lesson planning. Formative assessment was, on the one hand, described as a concrete practical method and, on the other hand, as an attitude. The results also indicate a feeling of frustration that, notwithstanding the current deeper insight into what every student needs, the teaching still proceeds on some middle-ground path or level.

  • 10.
    Gidlund, Ulrika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ attitudes towards including students with emotional and behavioural difficulties in mainstream school: A systematic research synthesis2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 45-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research reviews on teachers'attitudes towards inclusive education have shown that students'types of special educational needs influences teachers'attitudes; these reviews have also indicated that, in terms of the inclusion of various groups, teachers are most negative about including students with behavioural problems. This article is a review of the research on teachers'attitudes towards inclusion with regard to students who have special educational needs. It specifically identifies evidence regarding teachers'attitudes towards the inclusion of students with emotional and behavioural difficulty (EBD). For this review, 15 studies, measuring teachers'attitudes from 15 countries, met the inclusion criteria. The results of this synthesis confirmed that most teachers hold negative attitudes towards the inclusion of students with EBD; however, this was not true in all countries. The results also highlight specific explanations for why teachers hold negative attitudes towards including students with EBD in their classrooms. The implication of this synthesis is that teachers feel that their prerequisites for successfully including students with EBD are not being met; this impracticability is most impactful when the teachers nevertheless try to include these students. 

  • 11.
    Hedlin, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Self-Evident, Excessive or Opposed: Student Teachers’ Associations with ‘Gender Equality’2016In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a qualitative study undertaken in a Swedish teacher education setting. The aim is to obtain data that can be helpful for teacher educators planning their teaching about gender equality policy. The assumptions which the students base their pre-understandings on are in focus. The empirical material consists of 105 student teachers’ descriptions of their associations with the term ‘gender equality’ [jämställdhet]. In the material, three competing discourses are found. One discourse is the discourse of the fair gender equality. Within this discourse, gender equality seems to be quite an uncomplicated issue. Gender equality is, or should be, something natural. A second discourse is the discourse of the exaggerated gender equality, linking gender equality to conflicts, aggression and excessive demands. A third discourse is the discourse of the opposed gender equality. Within this discourse, gender equality is described as a contested issue met with resistance and hostility. Being able to identify and examine these competing discourses may work as a first step in identifying assumptions that students hold about gender equality and gender issues.

  • 12.
    Ivarsson, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    What’s in it for me? - Peer observation of teaching: Experiences from a primary school in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peer observations of teaching, POT, is a model for developing teachers to reflect on their teaching practice and discuss their ideas with colleagues. This article contributes to the knowledge of how peer observation of teaching can be used in a primary school as a model to develop teachers’ teaching practices, and highlights the challenges throughout the process. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection and analyzed by a qualitative content analysis with a deductive approach. The results of the study confirm that peer observation of teaching is, in fact, a useful model for metacognitive improvement of teaching and learning for teachers, provided that some necessary conditions are met, for example transparency in the planning of the process, inclusion of teachers in the decision-making process, and training in the process of providing and receiving feedback.

  • 13.
    Jepson Wigg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ehrlin, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Systematic quality development: A demand at odds with the everyday complexity of teachers' work?2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 194-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to analyse the conditions experienced by teachers and other school staff members in their work with systematic quality development within the everyday complexity of work at school. The method consists of research circles, a form of researcher-led discussion, together with teachers, principals and other school staff, held at the schools. The research circles are part of a research- and development programme concerning newly arrived pupils, in collaboration with an institute and a municipality in Sweden. The focus of the research circles is to identify areas in need of development, make tacit knowledge visible and promote knowledge development. During the course of the programme, a number of obstacles to development work arose, which led us to an analysis of the recurring problems and demands of systematic quality development. The analysis points to the different rhythms of fast-paced everyday work on the one hand, and slow-paced development work on the other. In conclusion, we emphasise the need for time for reflection, organisational structures that support development, and finally the need to develop competence in reflective practices regarding development, an addition to the competence in reflective practice on teaching, in which the staff are already skilled.

  • 14.
    Lindqvist, Per
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Nordänger, Ulla Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    "Separating the wheat from the chaff" - failures in the practice based parts of swedish teacher education2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 83-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present case study is part of a larger project where the overall ambition is to understand how an organization, through its way of arguing for the failures in student teaching, at the same time constitutes what is accepted as sufficient teacher quality. The article examines the students short comings from the supervisors and teacher educators perspectives. The analysis shows that the indicators of failure include passivity and rigidity, lack of posture, social timing and selfawareness. The indicators can be categorized into two groups of failures, "those that are of too light weight" and "those carrying some weight". Critical for the categorization was the time for the discovery of the short comings as well as the assessors' experiences of hope for development. The result is then set in relation to the on-going discussion in Sweden about the possibility of introducing an aptitude test before admission to teacher education.

  • 15.
    Malm, Birgitte
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    "It's All about Relationships": Enhancing Authentic Learning Processes in Teacher Education2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the significance and consequences of enhancing authentic learning processes within undergraduate teacher education are discussed, inspired by American (liberal arts) contemporary practices. Liberal education can be defined as a higher education that is a cultivation of the whole human being for the functions of citizenship and life in general. In essence, a successful liberal arts programme will be characterized by close student-faculty relationships, small classes, excellent teaching, individual instruction, empathetic advising and personal attention. Nineteen faculty members at a liberal arts college were interviewed about their understanding and experiences of what a liberal arts education entails, how they perceive of the relationship between teaching and research and what in their daily work motivates them. Sentiments expressed included over-commitment and a heavy workload, as well as professional autonomy, meaningful engagement and profound caring and concern for students. Results emphasize the need to reflect on how undergraduate programmes should or need to be constructed and implemented - taking into account the importance of dialogue, feedback and reflection - if the aim is to create competent democratic citizens to be scholars and leaders of the future. 

  • 16.
    Malm, Birgitte
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    "We Need to Give the Profession Something that No One Else Can": Swedish Student Teachers' Perceptions and Experiences of their Preschool Teacher Training Programme2017In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research points towards preschool and qualitative pedagogical relationships as being determined and formed by a close link between care and teaching. An Early Childhood Education should lead not only towards the acquisition of knowledge within specific areas but should also enhance the  personal development of student teachers. New and creative competences need to be developed to cope with increasingly complex, changing and diversified learning environments. The crucial questions are: How well does contemporary Teacher Education prepare student teachers for their future role? Do students feel that their teacher-training programme has sufficiently prepared them for their profession? This study comprises Swedish student teachers’ perceptions and experiences of their Early Childhood Education. Data is based on 181 written evaluations by final year student teachers. Results are discussed using a theoretical framework based on the sociological concept of an “educational contract” comprising three different levels of negotiation: students’ education and their current workforce; students and their teacher training programme; students, teachers and learning in any given educational situation

  • 17.
    Ottander, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Wilhelmsson, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Lidestav, Gun
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Teachers' intentions for outdoor learning: a characterisation of teachers' objectives and actions2015In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 208-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine nine Swedish teachers´intentions and educational objectives for outdoor learning, and how these educational objectives are implemented in outdoor activities. Further, the alignment between teachers´predifined objectives and the kinds of knowledge and cognitive processes reflected in the outdoor activities are investigated. The data sources consists of semi-structured interviews and observations. The intervirw transcripts were analysed using Haldéns theory of  intentional analysis to identify teachers' intentions when locating learning outdoors. Teachers´ objectives in the cognitive domain were further analysed by Bloom´s revised taxonomy. The teachers use a diverse set of outdoor activities. Our findings include a typology of four orientations: one that values affective and social objectives and promote activities to understand factual knowledge, another orientation focuses on activities intended to gain procedural knowledge and emphasizes application of practical tasks. The other two teaching orientations primarily focuses on cognitive objectives, partly to reinforce conceptual knowledge, partly to deepen understandings or improve strategies to enhance meta-cognitive knowledge. The degree of alignment between intended objectives and performed activity is higher among teachers promoting affective and social goals as well as meta-cognitive and analytical understanding, than teachers who use outdoor activities to mainly reinforce conceptual knowledge. The study shows that there is a range of possible learning goals in outdoor education and teachers are guieded by what they value and how they percive learning.

  • 18.
    Randevåg, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Boström, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Completing studies in alternative ways in adult education. ‘Who has told me that I cannot ...?’2019In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 165-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every fourth young adult in Sweden leaves upper secondary school without complete grades (Statistiska Centralbyrån, 2017). These young adults without a diploma are at risk of being marginalized (Hugo, 2007; Lundahl et al. 2015). Therefore, all attempts to support these students’ needs using alternative methods to help them complete their studies are of great importance for both society and the individuals. With this study, we aim to shed light on how participants with different functional variations and overall unfavourable school experiences in a project-based alternative study program in upper secondary education perceive the factors of success. Moreover, we want to understand the project’s outcome based on contextual factors. To do this, we use an abductive content analysis of project documents, field notes, and interviews with five students. Our analysis follows three steps. Firstly, we identify three major themes expressed by the participants as success factors concerning ways to attend and complete their secondary education. Secondly, we identify how contextual factors can explain the project’s outcome. Finally, we draw conclusions on how motivation theory, motivation strategies, and factors in the learning environment can explain the project’s outcome. The overall conclusions are (a) students in this target group need to participate in negotiations concerning their adaptation in their studies, (b) a symmetrical interpersonal relationship between teachers and students is a necessity, and (c) beneficial learning environments are essential for these students’ learning. 

  • 19.
    Zimmerman Nilsson, Marie-Helene
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    From Pedagogical Knowledge to Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Development in Mentor and Student-Teacher Group Conversations2019In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 233-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study focuses on mentor group conversation meetings with primary student-teachers, demonstrating how student-teachers ́ reflections on classroom experiences might influence their understanding of the complicated relationship between teaching, subject matter content and the context. The aim is to study how mentors ́ and student-teachers ́ reflections affect (or not) the student-teachers ́ development of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The theoretical framework derives from a sociocultural perspective, emphasising the collective character of teaching and learning. The empirical material consists of video documented mentor group conversations during one semester within an academic school context. Findings show development of PCK, highlighting a transition from pedagogical knowledge and contextual knowledge, to a blending of subject matter knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and contextual knowledge. This blending only occurred when the student teachers reflected on their teaching. Findings demonstrate the need to systematically explore student-teacher reflections of their teaching in practice to discern how different knowledge bases integrate into PCK. ©2019 The authors and IJLTER.ORG. All rights reserved.

  • 20.
    Åhslund, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Boström, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ Perceptions of Gender Differences: What about Boys and Girls in the Classroom?2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 28-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe how primary school teachers perceive differences in behaviour and learning between boys and girls in relation to their teaching and methods. A quantitative approach was used in this study, and the analysis was built on descriptive statistics and bivariate correlations. The results show that the teachers had a positive view of their teaching. However, they generally had low expectations of the boys. The teachers also perceived that they made a great effort to adapt the teaching according to the students' prerequisites and needs. Individual work was a frequently used teaching method, although this was perceived as unfavorable for the boys’ learning. The boys’ behaviours were perceived as negative for learning, the boys were described as dependent, idle, and unmotivated. Negative characteristics might affect the teachers’ expectations of high learning outcomes, and may ultimately affect the boys’ school performances. The result of this study emphasizes the importance of that teachers reflect on their teaching methods in relation to boys, and girls’ prerequisites in the classroom.

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