Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ajalloueian, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, DTU Food, Nanobio Sci Res Grp, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Lemon, Greg
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Chronakis, Ioannis S.
    Tech Univ Denmark, DTU Food, Nanobio Sci Res Grp, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Fossum, Magdalena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, CMM 02, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat Surg, Sect Urol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bladder biomechanics and the use of scaffolds for regenerative medicine in the urinary bladder2018In: Nature reviews. Urology, ISSN 1759-4812, E-ISSN 1759-4820, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 155-174Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urinary bladder is a complex organ with the primary functions of storing urine under low and stable pressure and micturition. Many clinical conditions can cause poor bladder compliance, reduced capacity, and incontinence, requiring bladder augmentation or use of regenerative techniques and scaffolds. To replicate an organ that is under frequent mechanical loading and unloading, special attention towards fulfilling its biomechanical requirements is necessary. Several biological and synthetic scaffolds are available, with various characteristics that qualify them for use in bladder regeneration in vitro and in vivo, including in the treatment of clinical conditions. The biomechanical properties of the native bladder can be investigated using a range of mechanical tests for standardized assessments, as well as mathematical and computational bladder biomechanics. Despite a large body of research into tissue engineering of the bladder wall, some features of the native bladder and the scaffolds used to mimic it need further elucidation. Collection of comparable reference data from different animal models would be a helpful tool for researchers and will enable comparison of different scaffolds in order to optimize characteristics before entering preclinical and clinical trials.

  • 2.
    Hedlund, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Gratzke, Christian
    University of Munich, Germany.
    The endocannabinoid system - a target for the treatment of LUTS?2016In: Nature reviews. Urology, ISSN 1759-4812, E-ISSN 1759-4820, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 463-470Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common in all age groups and both sexes, resulting in tremendous personal suffering and a substantial burden to society. Antimuscarinic drugs are the mainstay of symptom management in patients with LUTS, although their clinical utility is limited by the high prevalence of adverse effects, which often limit patients long-term adherence to these agents. Data from controversial studies in the 1990s revealed the positive effects of marijuana-based compounds on LUTS, and sparked an interest in the possibility of treating bladder disorders with cannabis. Increased understanding of cannabinoid receptor pharmacology and the discovery of endogenous ligands of these receptors has prompted debate and further research into the clinical utility of exogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists relative to the unwanted psychotropic effects of these agents. Currently, the endocannabinoid system is considered as a potential drug target for pharmacological management of LUTS, with a more favourable adverse event profile than antimuscarinic agents.

  • 3.
    Lotan, Yair
    et al.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Bivalacqua, Trinity J.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, James Buchanan Brady Urol Inst, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Downs, Tracy
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Urol, Madison, WI USA.
    Huang, William
    Jones, Jeffrey
    Michael E DeBakey VA Med Ctr, Genitourinary Surg Sect, Houston, TX USA.
    Kamat, Ashish M.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Urol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Konety, Badrinath
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Urol, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    McKiernan, James
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Urol, New York, NY USA.
    O'Donnell, Michael
    Univ Iowa, Dept Urol, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Patel, Sanjay
    Univ Oklahoma, Dept Urol, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Pohar, Kamal
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Urol, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Resnick, Matthew
    Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Urol Surg, Nashville, TX USA.
    Sankin, Alexander
    Montefiore Med Ctr, Dept Urol, New York, NY USA.
    Smith, Angela
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Urol, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA.
    Steinberg, Gary
    Univ Chicago, Dept Urol, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Trabulsi, Edouard
    Thomas Jefferson Univ, Sidney Kimmel Med Coll, Dept Urol, Philadelphia, PA 19107 USA.
    Woods, Michael
    Loyola Univ, Dept Urol, Chicago, IL 60611 USA.
    Daneshmand, Siamak
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Urol, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Blue light flexible cystoscopy with hexaminolevulinate in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: review of the clinical evidence and consensus statement on optimal use in the USA - update 20182019In: Nature reviews. Urology, ISSN 1759-4812, E-ISSN 1759-4820, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 377-386Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blue light cystoscopy (BLC) with hexaminolevulinate (HAL) during transurethral resection of bladder cancer improves detection of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and reduces recurrence rates. Flexible BLC was approved by the FDA in 2018 for use in the surveillance setting and was demonstrated to improve detection. Results of a phase III prospective multicentre study of blue light flexible cystoscopy (BLFC) in surveillance of intermediate-risk and high-risk NMIBC showed that 20.6% of malignancies were identified only by BLFC. Improved detection rates in the surveillance setting are anticipated to lead to improved clinical outcomes by reducing future recurrences and earlier identification of tumours that are unresponsive to therapy. Thus, BLFC has a role in surveillance cystoscopy, and determining which patients will benefit from BLFC and optimal and cost-effective ways of incorporating this technology into surveillance cystoscopy must be developed.

  • 4. Unemo, Magnus
    et al.
    Jensen, Jorgen S
    Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Antimicrobial-resistant sexually transmitted infections: gonorrhoea and Mycoplasma genitalium.2017In: Nature reviews. Urology, ISSN 1759-4812, E-ISSN 1759-4820, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 139-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major concern worldwide and already compromises treatment effectiveness and control of several bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Mycoplasma genitalium are evolving into so-called superbugs that can become resistant, both in vitro and clinically, to essentially all antimicrobials available for treatment, causing exceedingly difficult-to-treat or untreatable STIs and threatening global public health. Widespread AMR in these bacteria is likely to persist and even worsen in the future, owing to the high number of infections, widespread and uncontrolled use of antimicrobials, limited surveillance of AMR and clinical failures, as well as the extraordinary capacity of these bacteria to develop AMR. This development would not only result in an increased prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae and M. genitalium infections but also in a considerably increasing number of severe complications affecting reproductive health. To combat this threat, clinicians need to be aware of the current guidelines on diagnostic procedures, recommended treatment regimens, as well as therapeutic options for multidrug-resistant bacteria. AMR testing needs to be more frequently performed, inform treatment decisions and elucidate how AMRs compromise treatment effectiveness, guiding research for effective future therapies.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf