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  • 1.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Hartmann, Benjamin J.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Inventing a past: Corporate heritage as dialectical relationships of past and present2019In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 229-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this commentary, we focus on invented corporate heritage, where organizations present falsified accounts of a corporate past. The extant corporate heritage literature has highlighted how the time frames of the past, present and future (omni temporality) are merged in those organizations where there is trait constancy. Focusing on invented corporate heritage, we argue that this represents an extreme case of these dialectics, where present and future precede “the past”, or more appropriately “invented past”. Although lacking in authenticity, an invented corporate heritage may still be attractive to consumers since it can construct an aura of authenticity by delivering an enchanting experience to consumers, irrespective of its substantive genuineness. However, such inventions carry considerable risk since they represent a fabrication of the past.

  • 2.
    Caridà, Angela
    et al.
    University ‘Magna Græcia’ of Catanzaro, Italy.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Colurcio, Mario
    University ‘Magna Græcia’ of Catanzaro, Italy.
    Conceptualizing resource integration as an embedded process: Matching, resourcing and valuing2019In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 65-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The strong linkage between the creation of value and the actors’ resource-integrating efforts forces academics and practitioners to understand how value stems from resource integration (RI). This article analyses RI as an embedded process within the wider process of interactive value formation. The study is conceptual in nature and adopts a qualitative research approach and an empirical contextualization strategy. It provides a granular perspective on RI and proposes a framework that depicts RI as a process that shapes and results from a complex service context through a sequence of three phases: matching, resourcing and valuing. The article, particularly the suggested new framework, contributes to the extant literature on RI in service research; it reconceptualizes RI as process per se that is embedded in actors’ value co-creation efforts and offers the opportunity to reflect on this process as a fundamental enabler in value-creating service ecosystems.

  • 3.
    Charitsis, Vassilis
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Skålén, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Fyrberg Yngfalk, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    'Made to Run': Biopolitical marketing and the making of the self-quantified runner2019In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 347-366Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Cova, Bernard
    et al.
    Kedge Business Sch, F-13288 Marseille 9, France..
    Pace, Stefano
    Kedge Business Sch, F-13288 Marseille 9, France..
    Skålén, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Brand volunteering: Value co-creation with unpaid consumers2015In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 465-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through collaborative marketing approaches, companies invite consumers to provide unpaid contributions. Companies commonly do this in the realm of brand communities. The key question this article addresses is how can a company lead consumers to offer unpaid contributions to brands as an act of free will? To answer this question, we develop a framework based on volunteer commitment research to study the actions a company takes to engage consumers in unpaid work for brands. We use this framework to analyse the online collaboration promoted by the carmaker Fiat with its brand community of Alfa Romeo enthusiasts (Alfisti). The research introduces the notion of brand volunteers, that is, brand enthusiasts who are committed to providing unpaid work for the exclusive benefit of the brand. With this notion, the article discusses the possibility of exploiting consumers in value co-creation and the existence of compromises, signifying an agreement between two collaborating parties in which one party (in our case, the consumer) temporarily puts aside possible sources of conflict.

  • 5. Echeverri, Per
    et al.
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Åberg, Annika
    Dealing with customer misbehaviour: Employees’ tactics, practical judgement and implicit knowledge2012In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 427-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much current research fails to provide in-depth explanations as to how and with what resources frontline employees deal with incidents where customers display dysfunctional behaviour. By drawing on theory of implicit knowledge and practical judgement this paper aims to explain this and conceptualize inherent structures and sub-mechanisms, central to service marketing. The analysis is based on in-depth interviews and narratives from four different industries, each representing service provision wherein customer misbehaviour is found to be frequent. The results display linkages between the central dimensions of dealing with customer misbehaviour. When incidents of misbehaviour occur they are met by tactics ranging from routinized action to more analytical and strategic approaches. These tactics are guided by underlying mechanisms in the form of practical judgements based on rules, balanced adjustment or reflection, with the judgements in turn being informed by implicit knowledge based on norms, schemes, or multi-perspective thinking. The study reveals patterns of linkages between these.

  • 6.
    Echeverri, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group.
    Salomonsson, Nicklas
    Borås universitet.
    Åberg, Annika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group.
    Dealing with customer misbehavior: Employees’ tactics, practical judgement and implicit knowledge2012In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 427-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much current research fails to provide in-depth explanations as to how and with what resources frontline employees deal with incidents where customers display dysfunctional behaviour. By drawing on theory of implicit knowledge and practical judgement this paper aims to explain this and conceptualize inherent structures and sub-mechanisms, central to service marketing. The analysis is based on in-depth interviews and narratives from four different industries, each representing service provision wherein customer misbehaviour is found to be frequent. The results display linkages between the central dimensions of dealing with customer misbehaviour. When incidents of misbehaviour occur they are met by tactics ranging from routinized action to more analytical and strategic approaches. These tactics are guided by underlying mechanisms in the form of practical judgements based on rules, balanced adjustment or reflection, with the judgements in turn being informed by implicit knowledge based on norms, schemes, or multi-perspective thinking. The study reveals patterns of linkages between these.

  • 7.
    Echeverri, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Skålén, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Co-creation and co-destruction:: A practice-theory based study of interactive value formation2011In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 351-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an empirical study of public transport, this paper studies interactive value formation at the provider—customer interface, from a practice—theory perspective. In contrast to the bulk of previous research, it argues that interactive value formation is not only associated with value co-creation but also with value co-destruction. In addition, the paper also identifies five interaction value practices — informing, greeting, delivering, charging, and helping — and theorizes how interactive value formation takes place as well as how value is intersubjectively assessed by actors at the provider—customer interface. Furthermore, the paper also distinguishes between four types of interactive value formation praxis corresponding with four subject positions which practitioners step into when engaging in interactive value formation.

  • 8.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    McHugh, Patricia
    Windahl, Charlotta
    Institutional logics matter when coordinating resource integration2014In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 291-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource integration has become an important concept in marketing literature. However, little is known about the systemic nature of resource integration and the ways the activities of resource integrators are coordinated and adjusted to each other. Therefore, we claim that institutions are the coordinating link that have impact on value cocreation efforts and are the reference base for customers’ value assessment. When conceptualizing the systemic nature of resource integration, we include the regulative, normative, and cognitive institutions and institutional logics. This article provides a framework and a structure for identifying and analyzing the influence of institutional logics on resource integration in service systems.                  

  • 9.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael
    Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    University College Inland, Elverum, Norway.
    McHugh, Patricia
    National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    The University of Auckland Business School, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Institutional logics matter when coordinating resource integration2014In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 291-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource integration has become an important concept in marketing literature. However, little is known about the systemic nature of resource integration and the ways the activities of resource integrators are coordinated and adjusted to each other. Therefore, we claim that institutions are the coordinating link that have impact on value cocreation efforts and are the reference base for customers’ value assessment. When conceptualizing the systemic nature of resource integration, we include the regulative, normative, and cognitive institutions and institutional logics. This article provides a framework and a structure for identifying and analyzing the influence of institutional logics on resource integration in service systems.                  

  • 10.
    Findsrud, Rolf Gunnar
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Motivation: The missing driver for theorizing about resource integration2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 493-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource integration is vital to value co-creation. However, most research focuses on competencies as enablers of resource integration and the social aspects that guide them. Based on a literature review of resource integration and motivation theories, this article proposes including motivation as a driver of resource integration and integrating concepts from motivation theories into the resource integration process. This approach extends the understanding and conceptualization of actors’ resource integration processes, such that motivation determines the direction, intensity, and persistence of effort. When they engage in behavioral and cognitive activities, actors interact with resources, which informs the actors and influences their competences and motivation. Accordingly, motivation is central for a clear understanding of the psychological mechanisms of resource integration processes, as motivation expands the explanatory power of sociological factors by including intensity and persistence.

  • 11. Giovanardi, Massimo
    et al.
    Lucarelli, Andrea
    Pasquinelli, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Towards brand ecology: An analytical semiotic framework for interpreting the emergence of place brands2013In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 365-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brand-management philosophy has recently expanded to include public and spatial contexts producing a cacophony of logos, slogans and events all aimed at promoting and marketing places. Yet, there is still a lack of understanding about how the brand-management philosophy changes when moving into and across places and in which way places change when affected by this way of thinking. Through a multi-site ethnography of three Italian territories, this paper applies a semiotic framework (based on the constructs of syntax, semantics and pragmatics) to interpret the interweaving of procedures, mechanisms and symbols that underpin the emergence of place brands. The enquiry reveals that each place brand is characterised by a specific level of integration (symbiosis') between functional and representational dimensions. By recognising this interrelatedness through an ecological perspective that focuses on the connections among all the constituents of a place, the concept of brand ecology is offered to unpack the complexity of place brands and to reconsider the relationship between place branding and place marketing approaches.

  • 12.
    Giovanardi, Massimo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Lucarelli, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Pasquinelli, Cecilia
    Towards brand ecology: An analytical semiotic framework for interpreting the emergence of place brands2013In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 365-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brand-management philosophy has recently expanded to include public and spatial contexts producing a cacophony of logos, slogans and events all aimed at promoting and marketing places. Yet, there is still a lack of understanding about how the brand management philosophy changes when moving into and across places and in which way places change when affected by this way of thinking. Through a multi-site ethnography of three Italian territories, this paper applies a semiotic framework (based on the constructs  of syntax, semantics and pragmatics) to interpret the interweaving of procedures, mechanisms and symbols that underpin the emergence of place brands. The enquiry reveals that each place brand is characterised by a specific level of integration (‘symbiosis’) between functional and representational dimensions. By recognising this interrelatedness through an ecological perspective that focuses on the connections among all the constituents of a place, the concept of brand ecology is offered to unpack the complexity of place brands and to reconsider the relationship between place branding and place marketing approaches.

  • 13.
    Gummesson, Evert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Are Current Research Approaches in Marketing Leading Us Astray?2001In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 27-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Gummesson, Evert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Implementing the marketing concept: from service and value to lean consumption2006In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 291-293Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Gummesson, Evert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Relationship marketing: It all happens here and now!2003In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 167-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hakala, Henri
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Nummelin, Laura
    University of Turku.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa.
    Online brand community practices and the construction of brand legitimacy2017In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 537-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary marketers build online brand communities to communicate with the organization’s social surroundings, yet there is a lack of understanding of how brand legitimization unfolds in these platforms. To understand how legitimacy is constructed and contested every day, the current study adopts a practice-theoretical lens and discourse analysis to investigate two online communities. The contribution of the study is twofold: First, the insights from the discursive praxis, online community posts, comments and reactions illustrate the connections between multiple levels of legitimization discourse. Second, this study builds a theoretical framework for legitimization practice. Individual perceptions, judgements of the texts and actions on them in the online community intertwine with the organizational and societal context shaping the legitimacy of the brand in the community and beyond. This practice supports or challenges the brand as an institution and may legitimize or delegitimize the brand.

  • 17.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Andéhn, Mikael
    Bradshaw, Alan
    Against the implicit politics of service-dominant logic2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 101-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few recent topics in marketing have met such immediate popularity and critique as Vargo and Lusch's service-dominant logic (SDL). While many have criticized SDL scholarship for a lack of cultural sophistication, coherence, and relevance, it has nevertheless maintained and expanded its own distinct stream of ideas. Recently, Vargo and Lusch have proposed that SDL could be extended into a theory of society. We criticize this notion by contrasting their views on commodity value with Marxist and post-Marxist literatures, finding SDL ill-equipped to understand consumer culture, but also continuing to propagate simplistic and misguided views of value in commodity markets. We conclude by challenging SDL's suitability as candidate for all-encompassing social theorizing because of its tacit neoliberalism.

  • 18.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Murray, Jeff B.
    University of Arkansas, USA.
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tikkanen, Henrikki
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Seduced by "fakes": Producing the excessive interplay of authentic/counterfeit from a Baudrillardian perspective2019In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, article id UNSP 1470593119870214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Authenticity has often been considered to be a key theme in contemporary consumer culture. One of its manifestations is how branded market offerings can maintain authentic meanings, especially in a market increasingly saturated with counterfeit substitutes. By following a Baudrillardian perspective, we focus on fashion objects in the "branded luxury" category to problematize the sanctity of the authentic/counterfeit distinction. We argue that marketing literature generally attempts to normatively maintain and impose the distinction in ways that obscure the complexities of this conceptual interplay. We posit that instead of normative accounts that attempt to sanctify the extant orders of global capitalist markets, literature on luxury consumption should instead recognize the excess of meaning in the semiotic interplay of commodified authentic/counterfeit meanings. Any view of morality in luxury consumption should thus recognize "ambivalence" and "seduction" as its intensive qualities.

  • 19.
    Kjellberg, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Helgesson, Claes-Fredrik
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    On the nature of markets and their practices2007In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 137-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a conceptual model of markets as constituted by practice. Drawing on recent sociological research on the performativity of market theories, the article stresses the need to take seriously the role of ideas in the making of markets. Since extant studies of performativity focus on the role of economics in shaping markets, it is argued that marketing as an academic discipline is a particularly apt partner in expanding this endeavour. The conceptual model presents markets as the ongoing results of three interlinked types of practices: normalizing practices serving to establish normative objectives; representational practices serving to depict markets and/or how they work; and exchange practices serving to realize individual economic exchanges. The links between these practices, which are conceived as translations, are elaborated upon using a number of empirical studies. Finally, the model is used to illustrate differences in how markets are being continuously realized. This highlights the lack of studies on performativity in markets constituted by configurations of market practices in which marketing theories and techniques are likely to be important.

  • 20.
    Laamanen, Mikko
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics, Finland .
    Skålén, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Collective-conflictual value co-creation: A strategic action field approach2015In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 381-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the theory of strategic action fields, this article explores a collective–conflictual perspective on value co-creation. Following recent developments and calls for research with a holistic outlook, we review streams of research that discuss both collective and discordant elements in social relations and subsequently relate this to value co-creation. We outline a conceptual framework for value co-creation, focusing on collective action that includes various actors, interactions, practices, and outcomes. This article pioneers the underdeveloped collective–conflictual perspective on value co-creation. Our framework enables empirical research in value co-creation that accounts for multiple actors nested in fields of collective action.

  • 21. Mamali, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Nuttall, Peter
    Shankar, Avi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Formalizing consumer tribes: Towards a theorization of consumer-constructed organizations2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 521-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marketing theory on consumer tribes explores how these ephemeral collectives can grow into more formal, organizational systems that become subject to the various demands of the market. But how tribal doctrines endure in communities that are formalizing their market engagement remains under-theorized. To address this, we draw from literature on hybrid organizations and ethnographic data from an art-house cinema tribe that is formalizing its operations into what we conceptualize as a 'consumer-constructed organization' (CCO). We theorize CCOs as dynamic, hybrid organizational forms that balance the doctrines and characteristics of consumer tribes with their role as market actors. In addition to introducing CCOs as a theoretical and empirical point of reference in consumer research literature, we contribute by theorizing the ongoing tensions that unravel as tribal doctrines persevere or dissipate in the face of market demands and organizational formalization.

  • 22.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Hartmann, Benjamin Julien
    Emotion and practice: Mothering, cooking, and teleoaffective episodes2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 371-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While emotions are a central facet of consumer culture, relatively little is known about how they are tied to the embodied and tacit aspects of everyday living. This article explores how practices organize emotions and vice versa. Pairing Schatzki's teleoaffective structure with emotions understood as intensities that are deeply inscribed in the structural blueprints of practices, we propose that the organization of emotions and practices is recursive and based on three teleoaffective episodes: anticipating, actualizing, and assessing. To illustrate this, we present an analysis of empirical material from an ethnographic study on mothering. The practice-emotion link we unfold contributes to understanding the operation of emotions in consumer culture by specifying how practices and emotions are co-constitutive. This offers novel insights into the embodied and routinized nature of emotions, illuminates the connection between practices and individuals, and highlights the role of emotions in practice change.

  • 23.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Know your customer: Client captivation and the epistemics of market research2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Market research requires both making knowledge and maintaining client relationships. This article inquires into how this feature of commissioned knowledge is dealt with by a group of market researchers. Reception determines the value of the knowledge produced, prompting producers to both prepare informative content and ensure that it lands well with the recipient. Therefore, the nature and dispositions of clients and how their reception can be shaped are integral to the making of knowledge. The article explores an ethnographic case of how market researchers attempt to appeal to and shape the dispositions of their clients throughout the research process. Drawing on means of capture as a metaphor, I show how market researchers frame working with clients as a straightforward issue despite conflicting definitions of just who the client is and what it means to help them.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Know your customer: Client captivation and the epistemics of market research2019In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 149-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Market research requires both making knowledge and maintaining client relationships. This article inquires into how this feature of commissioned knowledge is dealt with by a group of market researchers. Reception determines the value of the knowledge produced, prompting producers to both prepare informative content and ensure that it lands well with the recipient. Therefore, the nature and dispositions of clients and how their reception can be shaped are integral to the making of knowledge. The article explores an ethnographic case of how market researchers attempt to appeal to and shape the dispositions of their clients throughout the research process. Drawing on means of capture as a metaphor, I show how market researchers frame working with clients as a straightforward issue despite conflicting definitions of just who the client is and what it means to help them.

  • 25.
    Peters, Linda
    et al.
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    Löbler, Helge
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Brodie, Roderick J.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Breidbach, Christoph F.
    University of California, Merced, USA.
    Hollebeek, Linda D.
    Waikato University, New Zealand.
    Smith, Sandra D.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Varey, Richard J.
    Waikato University, New Zealand.
    Theorizing about resource integration through service-dominant logic2014In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource integration, as it relates to value creation, has recently been a key aspect of thediscussions about service-dominant (S-D) logic. However, the majority of research pays relativelylittle explicit attention to the process of theorizing and the epistomological and ontologicalassumptions upon which the theorizing process is based. This article addresses these issues. Theprocesses that relate to theorizing and developing strong theory are discussed. We then examinehow to conceptualize ‘resources’ and ‘resource integration’ following differing ontological andepistemological assumptions that guide the theorizing process. Research recommendations to helpnavigate through the finer details underlying the theorizing process and to advance a general theoryof resource integration are developed.

  • 26.
    Skålén, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Transforming from Goods to Service Dominant Logic2016In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 101-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a framework of the transformation from the goods-dominant (G-D) to the service-dominant (S-D) logic in firms based on a case study of a bank. Drawing from institutional logic and practice theory, the article also contributes by discussing how the transformation from the G-D to the S-D logic takes place by means of the enactment of value creation practices and how such transformations are driven by institutional entrepreneurs and by conflicts between institutional logics. In addition, the article argues that the studied transformation is interwoven with changes in the professional identities of employees. Managerial implications include how managers may draw on the presented framework to transform their firm and its employees.

  • 27.
    Skålén, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Transforming from the goods to the service-dominant logic2016In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 101-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a framework of the transformation from the goods-dominant (G-D) to the service-dominant (S-D) logic in firms based on a case study of a bank. Drawing from institutional logic and practice theory, the article also contributes by discussing how the transformation from the G-D to the S-D logic takes place by means of the enactment of value creation practices and how such transformations are driven by institutional entrepreneurs and by conflicts between institutional logics. In addition, the article argues that the studied transformation is interwoven with changes in the professional identities of employees. Managerial implications

    include how managers may draw on the presented framework to transform their firm and its

    employees.

  • 28.
    Strannegård, Lars
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Salzer-Mörling, Miriam
    Stockholms universitet.
    Ain’t misbehavin’: consumption in a moralized brandscape2007In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 407-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can one explain the phenomenon that a consumer is able to protestagainst worker exploitation in the third world outside a Nike outlet and a day laterwalk in and buy a pair of shoes from the same outlet? In this article we try to conceptualizehow consumers handle the expressive and functional aspects of brands in amoralized brandscape. By introducing the idea of ‘de-coupling’, we suggest that boththe production and the consumption of brands rest on a logic where the functional andexpressive values are separated from one and another. This implies that consumptionis not merely an expressive activity operating on the sign level, but rather that consumptionmust be understood as an intricate play where the relationship betweenbrand image and buying behaviour needs to be further explored.

  • 29.
    Tähtinen, Jaana
    et al.
    Univ Turku, Pori, Finland; Turku Sch Econ Pori, Pori, Finland.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Conceptually confused, but on a field level? A method for conceptual analysis and its application2019In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 533-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article develops and applies a conceptual analysis method (CAM). The CAM is a critical reflection on multiple definitions and descriptions of concepts and terms all used to refer to a phenomenon or the experiences of it. The method particularly helps researchers working in emerging research fields to discover any conceptual confusion and elucidate multiple terms and concepts. We demonstrate the utility of the CAM by discovering conceptual confusion on an example field: business relationship uncoupling, and elucidating its terms and concepts. This article adds to the discussion on the importance of conscious conceptual language for theory development, on the level of a research field.

  • 30. Venkatesh, Alladi
    et al.
    Digerfeldt-Mansson, Theresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Brunel, Frederic F.
    Chen, Steven
    Design orientation: a grounded theory analysis of design thinking and action2012In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 289-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of design thinking or 'design as a state-of-mind' and its articulation through design orientation implies that true innovation is a company-wide phenomenon and cannot be left to single individuals as a marginalized function within a company. Many innovative companies try to integrate technical performance with an aesthetic vision - which is not to be confused with style - as the driving force of the organization. Based on our findings and analysis, we put forward theoretical propositions that cover various aspects of design orientation.

  • 31.
    Wiid, Ria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Stanley Grant, Philip
    Mills, Adam J.
    Pitt, Leyland F.
    No joke: Understanding public sentiment toward selling and salespeople through cartoon analysis2016In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 171-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unflattering representations of salesmanship in mass media exist in abundance. In order to gauge the depiction of selling in mass media, this article explores the nature and public perceptions of salesmanship using editorial cartoons. A theory of cartooning suggests that editorial cartoons reflect public sentiment toward events and issues and therefore provide a useful way of measuring and tracking such sentiment over time. The criteria of narrative, location, binary struggle, normative transference, and metaphor were used as a framework to analyze 286 cartoons over a 30-year period from 1983 to 2013. The results suggest that while representations of the characteristics and behaviors of salespeople shifted very little across time periods, changes in public perceptions of seller-buyer conflict, the role of the customer, and selling techniques were observed, thus indicating that cartoons are sensitive enough to measure the portrayal of selling.

  • 32.
    Yakhlef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Customer experience within retail environments: An embodied, spatial approach2015In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 545-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the literature on customer experience within retail environments spontaneously invokes the sensuous, affective and emotional aspects of experience, the body – which is the locus of these – is conspicuous by its absence. In these terms, researchers have relied on a theory of mind. This article seeks to suggest an embodied, spatial approach to customer experience, arguing that it is thanks to the body that we sense the environment, and that likewise, it is thanks to the environment that we can sense and experience our body. The reciprocity between body and world implies an inter-corporeality that extends or retracts the spatiality of the body as a result of its motility. This article emphasizes the bodily, spatial character of customer experience, concluding with implications and suggestions for future studies. 

  • 33.
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Fashion Studies.
    Thou shalt sport a banana in thy pocket: Gendered body size ideals in advertising and popular culture2010In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 45-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article addresses the issue of how idealized accounts of penis size - a bodily feature that plays a crucial role in how masculinity is constructed today-gets produced and reproduced through advertising and popular culture. The analysis shows that there are plenty of normative accounts of a particular penis size, despite a lack of explicit representations in mainstream cultural outlets. These normative messages are so ubiquitous that men in Western consumer cultures are bombarded with the archaic imperative: thou shalt sport a banana in thy pocket. Discourse analysis is used to illustrate the different sets of interpretive repertoires available that circumvent the taboos surrounding penis size in subtle and roundabout ways in order to create a sense of an ideal that should be adhered to. These sets of discourses function to give an ambivalent message in which males are caught in a discursive cross-fire where they are potentially made to feel anxious about their anxiousness and embarrassed about their embarrassedness.

1 - 33 of 33
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