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  • 1.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Dept Prod Realizat, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1035-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development projects required to build competitive advantages. Design/methodology/approach - A longitudinal case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company by following a manufacturing technology development project in real time during a two-year period. Findings - The results show that three different knowledge integration processes exist when developing unique manufacturing technology: processes for capturing, for joint learning, and for absorb learning. The findings of the current research suggest that the three knowledge integration processes are highly interrelated with each knowledge integration process affecting the other two. Research limitations/implications - The major limitation of the research is primarily associated with the single case, which limits generalizability outside the context that was studied. Practical implications - The findings are particularly relevant to manufacturing engineers working with the development of new manufacturing technologies. By using relevant knowledge integration processes and capabilities required to integrate the knowledge in manufacturing technology development projects, companies can improve design and organize the development of manufacturing technology. Originality/value - Previous research has merely noted that knowledge integration is required in the development of unique manufacturing technology, but without explaining how and in what way. This paper's contribution is the identification and analysis of three knowledge integration processes that contribute to the building of competitive advantages by developing unique manufacturing technology and new knowledge.

  • 2.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Linking product design to flexibility in an assembly system: A case study2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 610-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The recent shift towards accommodating flexibility in manufacturing companies and the complexity resulting from product variety highlight the significance of flexible assembly systems and designing products for them. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design from the assembly system's standpoint. Design/methodology/approach - To fulfil the purpose of the paper, a literature review and a case study were performed. The case study was conducted with an interactive research approach in a global market leader company within the heavy vehicle manufacturing industry. Findings - The findings indicate that common assembly sequence, similar assembly interfaces, and common parts are the main requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design which reduce complexity and facilitate various flexibility dimensions. Accordingly, a model is proposed to broaden the understanding of these requirements from the assembly system's standpoint. Research limitations/implications - This study contributes to the overlapping research area of flexible assembly systems and product design. Practical implications - The proposed model is largely based on practical data and clarifies the role of product design in facilitating flexibility in an assembly system. It can be used by assembly managers, assembly engineers, and product designers. Originality/value - The key originality of this paper compared to the previous studies lies in presenting a novel assembly-oriented design model. The model enhances understanding of a flexible assembly system's requirements for product design with regard to reducing complexity and managing variation in a flexible assembly system. These requirements can be applied to product design across various product families within a company's product portfolio.

  • 3.
    Brannemo, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    How does the industry work with sourcing decisions?: Case studies at two Swedish companies2006In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 547-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of this paper is to present how two Swedish companies work, or plan to work, with sourcing decisions. The aim is furthermore to analyze if their decision process, or parts of it, can be used as a base for building a rightsourcing decision model. In this paper rightsourcing is defined as; “the process to actively apply in-and outsourcing strategically to be competitive now and in the future”.

    Design/methodology/approach – Since the business environment is dynamic and the global aspects are increasing, companies tend to focus on what they do best-their core competence. The concept of outsourcing has, therefore, been growing rapidly during the last decade. Many companies seem to have a vague understanding about the risks and benefits of outsourcing, except from a general idea that it will reduce cost. Many companies hence experience that sourcing decisions are complex and the need for a model supporting sourcing decision exist within many corporations. This is accomplished through a literature overview and a multiple case study.

    Findings – The results indicate that a model for sourcing decisions ought to include, or be based on, following aspects, e.g. the companies overall strategy, the companies core competence, both qualitative and quantitative data and risk analysis. The sourcing process also ought to be made with a process approach, avoiding functional sub-optimization. The results also indicated that financial evaluation and documentation of the decision is important.

    Research limitations/implications – The multiple case study was conducted in one mechanical company and one engineering company from Sweden. The fact that the study only included two studies could affect the possibility to generalize the result.

    Originality/value – This paper offers help to companies that consider sourcing decisions.

  • 4.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Design information for efficient equipment supplier/buyer integration2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 484-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the underlying design information and success factors for production equipment acquisition, in order to support the design of high-performance production systems. Design/methodology/approach - The research strategy employed was an in-depth case study of an industrialization project, together with a questionnaire of 25 equipment suppliers. Findings - The study provides the reader with an insight into the role of design information when acquiring production equipment by addressing questions such as: What type of information is used? How do equipment suppliers obtain information? What factors facilitate a smooth production system acquisition? Research limitations/implications - Limitations are primarily associated with the chosen research methodology, which requires further empirical studies to establish a generic value. Practical implications - The implications are that manufacturing companies have to transfer various types of design information with respect to the content and kind of information. More attention has to be placed on what information is transferred to ensure that equipment suppliers receive all the information needed to design and subsequently build the production equipment. To facilitate integration of equipment suppliers, manufacturing companies should appoint a contact person who can gather, understand and transform relevant design information. Originality/value - External integration of equipment suppliers in production system design by means of design information is an area that has been rarely addressed in academia and industry

  • 5.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University.
    Design information for efficient equipment supplier/buyer integration2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 484-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the underlying design information and success factors for production equipment acquisition, in order to support the design of high-performance production systems.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research strategy employed was an in-depth case study of an industrialization project, together with a questionnaire of 25 equipment suppliers.

    Findings – The study provides the reader with an insight into the role of design information when acquiring production equipment by addressing questions such as: What type of information is used? How do equipment suppliers obtain information? What factors facilitate a smooth production system acquisition?

    Research limitations/implications – Limitations are primarily associated with the chosen research methodology, which requires further empirical studies to establish a generic value.

    Practical implications – The implications are that manufacturing companies have to transfer various types of design information with respect to the content and kind of information. More attention has to be placed on what information is transferred to ensure that equipment suppliers receive all the information needed to design and subsequently build the production equipment. To facilitate integration of equipment suppliers, manufacturing companies should appoint a contact person who can gather, understand and transform relevant design information.

    Originality/value – External integration of equipment suppliers in production system design by means of design information is an area that has been rarely addressed in academia and industry.

  • 6.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Integrated portfolio planning of products and production systems2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 155-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the research presented is to analyse and discuss critical challenges related A to the development of a production system portfolio. Design/methodology/approach: The study employs a longitudinal case study of an industrialization project at a global supplier in the automotive industry. Findings: This research makes two clear theoretical contributions. First, it extends the existing research on the manufacturing and R&D interface by proposing an innovative structure for production system development facilitating manufacturing companies in their efforts of being fast and cost-effective when introducing new products to the market. Second, this research identifies challenges related to the adoption of a production system portfolio and the necessary actions of a manufacturing company applying such a portfolio strategy. Research limitations/implications: The findings should be seen as a first attempt at assisting the development of a production system portfolio that matches the product portfolio. However, since the findings are based on only one case, the findings are to some extent context-specific and thus need to be complemented by more research. Practical implications: The research unveils challenges related to production system development and provides managers with a better understanding of some of the implications of the adoption of a portfolio strategy. Originality/value: This empirical study is among the first to explore the implications of a production system portfolio strategy. It advances the understanding towards a fully integrated product and production system development.

  • 7.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Bengtsson, L
    Balanced scorecards for strategic and sustainable continuous improvement capability2004In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 350-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Illustrates how strategic continuous improvement (CI) capabilities were developed in three Swedish manufacturing companies that have implemented the Balanced Scorecard (BSC). A multiple case study was conducted; each company followed a unique team-based CI strategy. Shows how the use of BSC was adapted to the specific characteristics that each of the CI strategies entail. Furthermore, shows that it could be difficult to sustain the capability that was developed. However, also finds that certain mechanisms in the management control system, as well as the presence of an advanced work organisation, may help in sustaining the strategic CI capability.

  • 8.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    Balanced scorecards for strategic and sustainable continuous improvement capability2004In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 350-359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Fjällström, S.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Säfsten, K.
    Jönköping University.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Stahre, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Information enabling production ramp-up2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 178-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper seeks to identify information enabling and supporting production ramp-up processes, by exploring critical events and the role of information in such events. Design/methodology/approach - The research approach was based on empirical and theoretical investigations. A selection of 30 events, considered the most critical for production ramp-up realization and/or performance at one Swedish automotive company, were categorized and constituted the base for the analysis which focused information types and sources enabling event handling. Findings - Information enabling event handling is a balanced combination of problem and domain information, regardless of event category. However, a differentiation concerning preference and usage of information types between experienced and less experienced personnel is identified. Problem-solving information has the character of pragmatic information, composed of complementary parts of confirmation and novelty in terms of domain and problem information. The preferred information source in all event categories was "other people". Research limitations/implications - The study focuses on the application of information in relation to critical events during production ramp-up. General information theory is not addressed in depth. Practical implications - Information type and information source are not dependent on certain event categories, which allows a general information strategy enabling production ramp-up. To facilitate production ramp-up and event handling managers and key personnel need to apply a holistic perspective and need to be updated on domain information of the products, the equipment, and the production process during production ramp-up. Originality/value - The originality is in the focus and role of information to achieve an efficient production ramp-up performance. A supporting model is developed which describes the structure of pragmatic information for personnel with various levels of experience, regardless of event category. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 10.
    Fjällström, Sabina
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Stahre, Johan
    Swerea IVF AB.
    Information enabling production ramp-up2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 178-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper seeks to identify information enabling and supporting production ramp-up processes, by exploring critical events and the role of information in such events.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research approach was based on empirical and theoretical investigations. A selection of 30 events, considered the most critical for production ramp-up realization and/or performance at one Swedish automotive company, were categorized and constituted the base for the analysis which focused information types and sources enabling event handling.

    Findings – Information enabling event handling is a balanced combination of problem and domain information, regardless of event category. However, a differentiation concerning preference and usage of information types between experienced and less experienced personnel is identified. Problem-solving information has the character of pragmatic information, composed of complementary parts of confirmation and novelty in terms of domain and problem information. The preferred information source in all event categories was “other people”.

    Research limitations/implications – The study focuses on the application of information in relation to critical events during production ramp-up. General information theory is not addressed in depth.

    Practical implications – Information type and information source are not dependent on certain event categories, which allows a general information strategy enabling production ramp-up. To facilitate production ramp-up and event handling managers and key personnel need to apply a holistic perspective and need to be updated on domain information of the products, the equipment, and the production process during production ramp-up.

    Originality/value – The originality is in the focus and role of information to achieve an efficient production ramp-up performance. A supporting model is developed which describes the structure of pragmatic information for personnel with various levels of experience, regardless of event category.

  • 11.
    Ghobakhloo, Morteza
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Hormozgan, Bandar Abbas, Iran / Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia.
    Fathi, Masood
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Corporate survival in Industry 4.0 era: the enabling role of lean-digitized manufacturing2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    purpose– The study demonstrates how small manufacturing firms can leverage their Information Technology (IT) resources to develop the lean-digitized manufacturing system that offers sustained competitiveness in the Industry 4.0 era.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study performs an in-depth 5-years case study of a manufacturing firm, and reports its journey from failure in the implementation of enterprise resource planning to its success in integrating IT-based technology trends of Industry 4.0 with the firm’s core capabilities and competencies while pursuing manufacturing digitization.

    Findings – Industry 4.0 transition requires the organizational integration of many IT-based modern technologies and the digitization of entire value chains. However, Industry 4.0 transition for smaller manufacturers can begin with digitization of certain areas of operations in support of organizational core strategies. Development of leandigitized manufacturing system is a viable business strategy for corporate survivability in the Industry 4.0 setting.

    Research limitations/implications – Although the implementation of lean-digitized manufacturing system is costly and challenging, this manufacturing strategy offers superior corporate competitiveness in the long run. Since this finding is rather limited to the present case study, assessing the business value of lean-digitized manufacturing system in a larger-scale research context would be an interesting avenue for future research.

    Practical implications – Industry 4.0 transition for typical manufacturers should commensurate with their organizational, operational, and technical particularities. Digitization of certain operations and processes, when aligned with the firm’s core strategies, capabilities, and procedures, can offer superior competitiveness even in Industry 4.0 era, meaning that the strategic plan for successful Industry 4.0 transition is idiosyncratic to each particular manufacturer.

    Social implications – Manufacturing digitization can have deep social implications as it alters inter and intra organizational relationships, causes unemployment among low-skilled workforce, and raises data security and privacy concerns. Manufacturers should take responsibility for their digitization process and steer it in a direction that simultaneously safeguards economic, social, and environmental sustainability.

    Originality/value – The strategic roadmap devised and employed by the case company for managing its digitization process can better reveal what manufacturing digitization, mandated by Industry 4.0, might require of typical manufacturers, and further enable them to better facilitate their digital transformation process.

  • 12.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    How to Improve the Use of Industrial Robots in Lean Manufacturing Systems2011In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 891-905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify how industrial robotics fits into lean manufacturing systems. This paper presents results from case studies where Swedish and Japanese manufacturing industries have been compared in order to identify differences on how advancedmanufacturing technologies and industrial robotics are utilized. Design/methodology/approach: The research has been conducted via case studies where researchers from academia have worked together with industrial companies. During the case studies, the results of interviews, observations and data collection in the form of performance measures and historical production data have been analyzed. Findings: This paper highlights some of the differences between how Swedish and Japanese companies work with industrial robotics. It also proposes some key areas where development could lead to better integration of industrial robotics into lean manufacturing systems. Originality/value: This research has been performed with the intention of identifying how manufacturing industries could increase their competitiveness through industrial robotautomation. The companies involved in the research project have received feedback on their automation solutions. The overall goal is to create a guideline for how to design industrial robotic work cells that can easily be integrated into lean manufacturing systems. This research area is important in order to increase competitiveness in industry. It is thus of value for both industry and the scientific community.

  • 13.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    How to Improve the Use of Industrial Robots in Lean Manufacturing Systems2011In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 891-905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify how industrial robotics fits into lean manufacturing systems. This paper presents results from case studies where Swedish and Japanese manufacturing industries have been compared in order to identify differences on how advancedmanufacturing technologies and industrial robotics are utilized. Design/methodology/approach: The research has been conducted via case studies where researchers from academia have worked together with industrial companies. During the case studies, the results of interviews, observations and data collection in the form of performance measures and historical production data have been analyzed. Findings: This paper highlights some of the differences between how Swedish and Japanese companies work with industrial robotics. It also proposes some key areas where development could lead to better integration of industrial robotics into lean manufacturing systems. Originality/value: This research has been performed with the intention of identifying how manufacturing industries could increase their competitiveness through industrial robotautomation. The companies involved in the research project have received feedback on their automation solutions. The overall goal is to create a guideline for how to design industrial robotic work cells that can easily be integrated into lean manufacturing systems. This research area is important in order to increase competitiveness in industry. It is thus of value for both industry and the scientific community.

  • 14.
    Hedenstierna, Philip
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ng, Amos H.C.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Dynamic implications of customer order decoupling point positioning2011In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1032-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The positioning of the customer order decoupling point (CODP) is an important strategic consideration for supply chains. Recently, research has focused only on the static effects of CODP positioning. The purpose of this paper is to expand the body of knowledge by describing the dynamic consequences that arise from shifting the CODP upstream or downstream.

    Design/methodology/approach: A generic assembly-to-order system dynamics simulation model is developed and used to evaluate the dynamic consequences of shifting the CODP.

    Findings: Placing the CODP downstream allows for short-term fluctuations in demand to be absorbed by the order book, leading to a stable production rate and inventory response. This benefit must, however, be weighed against any additional safety stock a CODP placed far downstream may require.

    Research limitations/implications: The paper demonstrates the importance of considering the dynamic aspects of CODP positioning. Further research should investigate the phenomenon for different demand scenarios and supply chain configurations.

    Practical implications: Downstream shifting of the CODP has been identified as a powerful way to reduce variability in assembly-to-order systems.

    Originality/value: This paper introduces the dynamic consequences of CODP location, providing a new perspective that should be considered when positioning the CODP.

  • 15.
    Holmbom, Martin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Bergquist, Bjarne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Vanhatalo, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Performance-based logistics: an illusive panacea or a concept for the future?2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 958-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to summarize previously reported benefits, drawbacks and important aspects for implementation of performance-based logistics (PBL), and to identify knowledge gaps.Design/methodology/approach– This is a literature review based on 101 articles. The reviewed articles are relevant to PBL in particular, but also to performance contracting, product-service systems (PSS) and servitization in general. The research method involved database searches, filtering results and reviewing publications.Findings– PBL is a business concept that aims to reduce the customer's total costs for capital-intensive products and increase the supplier's profit. The design of the contract, performance measurements and payment models are important aspects for successful implementation. However, the authors find a reason for concern to be the lack of empirical evidence of the profitability of PBL for the customer and the supplier.Originality/value– This literature review of PBL also includes publications from the related research areas: performance contracting, PSS and servitization. Developing PBL can benefit from results in these research areas.

  • 16.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, ISSN 1741038X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 535-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can facilitate that process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

    Design/methodology/approach: A literature review in combination with a multiple-case study were used to achieve the purpose of the paper. The multiple-case study was based on two product development projects in a low-volume manufacturing company.

    Findings: The main identified characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were a low number of prototypes, absence of conventional production ramp-up, reduced complexity of the process, failure to consider the manufacturability of the products due to an extensive focus on their functionality, and increased complexity of resource allocation. It was determined that knowledge and experiences from prior production of similar products could serve as a facilitator of the manufacturing process.

    Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this study is that the identified characteristics and facilitating factors are confined to the internal variables of the studied company. A study of the role of external variables during the product introduction process such as suppliers and customers could be the subject of future studies.

    Practical implications: This research will provide practitioners in low-volume manufacturing industries with general insight about the characteristics of the product introduction process and the aspects that should be considered during the process.

  • 17.
    Johansson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Medbo, Lars
    On the use of product data in the design of the materials supply system2004In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 641-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing focus on reducing time-to-market for new products and a prerequisite for succeeding in this is the ability to transfer and use information about the products early on in projects, thus facilitating early problem-solving. This paper focuses on the use of product data and information systems for the design of materials supply systems in product development projects. The results from a case study show that there are product data available at an early stage in the project. However, the product data have to be retrieved from several information systems and from information systems, which the materials supply systems designers cannot use. In addition, product data can be obtained by means of personal communication much earlier than they can be retrieved from the information systems. It is concluded that research and development are required so that the information systems can be utilised for early release as well as for early retrieval of preliminary information.

  • 18.
    Kans, Mirka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    IT Practices within Maintenance from a Systems Perspective: Study of IT Utilisation within Firms in Sweden2013In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 768-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim with this paper is to describe current IT practices within maintenance in Swedish industry, and to outline the future possible developments. Design/methodology/approach – The study is performed as a web-based questionnaire survey consisting of 71 participants. A systems perspective is applied for capturing the most relevant aspects of IT utilisation. Findings – The IT practices are characterised by high use of business-specific IT solutions, low use of company-wide IT solutions, low IT intensity and the client-server architecture is dominating. The purchase decision and ownership of IT is to high extent tied to the maintenance function. Moreover, IT systems are apprehended as beneficial and connected to real needs. The findings imply a decentralised IT governance form and a mainly vertical (functional) IT support. Research limitations/implications – The socio-technical approach suggested in this paper helps us to identify which areas to study, and also shows the tight interrelationship between different factors, layers and systems. Practical implications – The study results could be used for benchmarking purposes or to highlight state-of-the-art of IT utilisation in maintenance, and thereby set the topic on the corporate agenda. Originality/value – Studies describing IT utilisation within maintenance in the form of case studies and surveys exist, but they mainly focus on one aspect. This study approached the problem from a socio-technical perspective, covering several aspects connected to IT utilisation.

  • 19. Kvarnström, Björn
    et al.
    Vanhatalo, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Using RFID to improve traceability in process industry: experiments in a distribution chain for iron ore pellets2010In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 139-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the article is to explore the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) to improve traceability in a flow of granular products and to illustrate examples of special issues that need to be considered when using the RFID technique in a process industry setting.Design/methodology/approach: The article outlines a case study at a Swedish mining company including experiments to test the suitability of RFID to trace iron ore pellets (a granular product) in parts of the distribution chain.Findings: The results show that the RFID technique can be used to improve traceability in granular product flows. A number of special issues concerning the use of RFID in process industries are also highlighted, for example, the problems to control the orientation of the transponder in the read area and the risk of product contamination in the supply chain.Research limitations/implications: Even though only a single case has been studied, the results are of a general interest for industries that have granular product flows. However, future research in other industries should be performed to validate the results.Practical implications: The application of RFID described in this article makes it possible to increase productivity and product quality by improving traceability in product flows where traceability normally is problematic. Originality/value: Prior research has mainly focused on RFID applications in discontinuous processes. By contrast, this article presents a novel application of the RFID technique in a continuous process together with specific issues connected to the use of RFID.

  • 20.
    Lager, Thomas
    et al.
    Centre for Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship, Grenoble Ecole de Management.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Equipment supplier/user collaboration in the process industries: in search of enhanced operating performance2010In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 698-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide theoretical insight and practical guidance on how both process firms and equipment manufacturers can address the challenges posed by collaboration during the operational stage of the process technology/equipment life cycle. Design/methodology/approach - Motives and driving forces for entering collaborative projects far from always converge, and while some projects require deep and long-lasting relationships, others call for pure transactions and arms-length relationships. The questions of why, when and how collaboration should take place and be organised and managed are addressed and discussed in the light of the literature on technology diffusion and technology transfer, and supplemented by ideas fromindustry professionals. Findings - A tentative list of potential pros and cons has been compiled to serve as an embryo for further creation of a more complete set of expected outcomes with a view to developing a firm benchmarking instrument for establishing new collaborative relationships. Subsequently, a conceptual model of the full life-cycle of process technology/equipment is developed to create a platform for determining collaboration intensity and success factors during different phases. Finally, a matrix with the dimensions "type of capability" and "expected performance improvements" is introduced as a tool for selection of different forms of collaboration. Research limitations/implications - The main limitation is that so far this is only a theoretical framework, but as such it will serve as a new platform and a guide for further empirical studies of this important yet under-researched area. Originality/value - This area of technology and innovation management research for the process industries has not been addressed before in depth. The new framework can already be deployed by industry professionals in their efforts to improve inter-company collaboration and technology transfer, but also as a means of avoiding unintended technology diffusion.

  • 21.
    Löfving, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Homogeneity of manufacturing choices in subcontractor SMEs2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 261-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the choices made in manufacturing decision categories by subcontractor small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) and determines if subcontractor SMEs make homogenous manufacturing choices.

    Design/methodology/approach – A literature review was used to develop theoretical propositions. A multiple case study with 19 subcontractor SMEs was conducted.

    Findings – Factors that might lead to homogenous choices in the manufacturing strategy decision categories were formalised into four theoretical propositions. The propositions were based on new institutionalism factors as well as SME factors. The findings reveal that there is considerable heterogeneity across the subcontractor SMEs in the various manufacturing decision categories. However, there are similarities between some manufacturing choices. This can partly be explained by the proposed factors and partly by other factors, such as SME characteristics and process choices.

    Research limitations/implications – The study reinforces the need for more research that is focused on manufacturing decisions and choices in SMEs. All cases were of Swedish SMEs belonging to three different industries, potentially limiting the generalisability of findings to other industries or countries.

    Practical implications – This study highlights the importance of the different choices made considering manufacturing and the factors influencing those choices. This provides guidance for managers when they make manufacturing choices in various decision categories.

    Originality/value – By addressing new institutionalism, SME characteristics and decision categories in the same study, the author provides new insights into the categories of manufacturing decisions.

  • 22.
    Löfving, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Manufacturing strategy frameworks suitable for SMEs2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 7-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The paper aims at increasing the understanding of how manufacturing strategy formulation can be facilitated in SMEs.

    Design/methodology/approach: The research presented in this paper follows a four-stage logic. Initially a literature review was conducted identifying a number of manufacturing strategy frameworks. Thereafter, theoretical and practical assessment criteria were established. The SME requirements were identified through five case studies. Based on these assessment criteria, identified manufacturing strategy formulation frameworks were evaluated. When a framework was found that fulfilled most of the requirements set out, a detailed analysis of the framework was done, based on criteria related to specific SME characteristics.

    Findings: In total 15 different manufacturing strategy formulation frameworks were identified in the literature. To evaluate the suitability of these frameworks in SMEs, a number of assessment criteria were established, both in theory and in practice. These assessment criteria were grouped into three parts based on their character: procedure, realisation and contextual issues. The assessment of the 15 frameworks revealed that among the identified frameworks there was one framework that stood out and fulfilled several of the criteria. However, the frameworks still need to be adapted to the specific SME characteristics.

    Practical implications: Based on an assessment of the existing manufacturing strategy frameworks we have been able to identify one framework that fulfills 10 out of 14 of the theoretical and empirical requirements.

    Originality/contribution: Although a number of manufacturing strategy frameworks exist, their applicability in practice has seldom been investigated. The results presented provide valuable knowledge for the continued work of rendering manufacturing strategy frameworks suitable and thereby useful for SMEs.

  • 23.
    Maletic, Damjan
    et al.
    University of Maribor, Slovenia.
    Maletic, Matjaz
    University of Maribor, Slovenia.
    Al-Najjar, Basim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Gomiscek, Bostjan
    University of Maribor, Slovenia.
    The role of maintenance in improving company’s competitiveness and profitability: A case study in a textile company2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 441-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of maintenance in improving company’s competitiveness and profitability. In the first part the paper aims to discuss the potential improvement areas from the company perspective. Second part of this paper examines maintenance impact on company’s business.

    Design/methodology/approach - An empirical case study was utilised aiming to provide an understanding of the role of maintenance in improving company’s business. The empirical data for this study was collected from a Slovenian textile company. A gap analysis was used in order to address the research problem and to identify potential improvement areas.

    Findings - Based on the gap analysis, the results suggest that from respondents’ points of view, maintenance practices related to condition based maintenance (CBM) approach represent the highest opportunity for improvement. The most notable empirical results of the case study showed that around 3 % of additional profit could be generated at weaving machine, especially if all unplanned stoppages and loss of quality due to decrease in the productivity would be prevented.

    Practical implications - This paper demonstrates to managers the potential benefits of maintenance policy in terms of productivity, quality and profitability. In this regard, this paper builds on a premise that company can gain higher performance benefits using more effective maintenance policy.

    Originality/value - The proposed conceptual model contributes to the existing literature by showing the interactions between maintenance and company’s competitiveness and profitability. Empirical findings of this study therefore, acknowledge maintenance’s potential of increasing the overall profit. In addition this study advances prior studies by utilizing a gap analysis which is rare in this type of research.

  • 24.
    Malm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bridging capability gaps in technology transfers within related offsets2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 640-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how capability gaps can be identified and how they can be dealt with in aircraft technology transfers in future offset deals.

    Methodology – The study is based on lessons learned as identified from three case studies of technology transfers from Saab, a Swedish aircraft manufacturing company to South Africa, the Czech Republic, and India.

    FindingsThe capability gap between sender and receiver has to be dealt with on two levels: on an organizational level; and on an individual level. It is proposed that the disseminative capacity constitutes the ability to assess the capability gap between the sender and receiver, and to convert this assessment to adaptations of the product and production process to include in an industrialization process. On the individual level, the capability-raising activities were connected to employees’ knowledge, Personal Development Plans for the transfer of explicit knowledge, as well as on-the-job training to facilitate the exchange of tacit knowledge.

    Research limitations The research is based on case studies from one company.

    Originality/value – The paper focuses on the context of offset and reports on actual experiences from a capability perspective of technology transfers within the aircraft manufacturing area. It proposes a structured way of identifying and bridging the capability gap within such transfers.

  • 25.
    Malm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Industriell Produktion.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Kommunikations- och transportsystem.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköpings universitet, Maskinkonstruktion.
    Bridging capability gaps in technology transfers within related offsets2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 640-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how capability gaps can be identified and how they can be dealt with in aircraft technology transfers in future offset deals.

    Methodology – The study is based on lessons learned as identified from three case studies of technology transfers from Saab, a Swedish aircraft manufacturing company to South Africa, the Czech Republic, and India.

    FindingsThe capability gap between sender and receiver has to be dealt with on two levels: on an organizational level; and on an individual level. It is proposed that the disseminative capacity constitutes the ability to assess the capability gap between the sender and receiver, and to convert this assessment to adaptations of the product and production process to include in an industrialization process. On the individual level, the capability-raising activities were connected to employees’ knowledge, Personal Development Plans for the transfer of explicit knowledge, as well as on-the-job training to facilitate the exchange of tacit knowledge.

    Research limitations The research is based on case studies from one company.

    Originality/value – The paper focuses on the context of offset and reports on actual experiences from a capability perspective of technology transfers within the aircraft manufacturing area. It proposes a structured way of identifying and bridging the capability gap within such transfers.

  • 26.
    Quist, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Hellström, Andreas
    Lifvergren, Avante
    Process Management in Health Care: Investigating why it´s easier said than done2010In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 499-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate what happens when a new management idea with manufacturing origin is implemented in a healthcare organization. In this paper, it is focussed on process management: what happens when the processes are highlighted, process owners are appointed and more power is allocated to the process dimension of the organization

  • 27.
    Rexfelt, Oskar
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Consumer acceptance of product-service systems: Designing for relative advantages and uncertainty reductions2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 674-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Product-service systems (PSS) could potentially benefit consumers, but empirical studies of business-to-consumer PSS solutions have been scarce. The purpose of this paper is to identify conditions for consumer acceptance, and propose a methodology for PSS development. Design/methodology/approach – Factors influencing consumer acceptance of PSS are investigated through focus groups and individual interviews, and elaborated in relation to theory from user acceptance and innovation adoption literature. Procedures for conceptual development of PSS are then proposed, based on methodology adapted from user-centred design. Findings – The two factors “impact on everyday life”, and “uncertainties” in anticipating such consequences were repeatedly brought up by participants. PSS affect consumers through practical implications for the activities they engage in. This goes beyond the service encounter, is highly complex and case specific why development processes should include iterative studies with consumers. Research limitations/implications – The studies use hypothetical PSS offers. Validation and refinement of the proposed methodology would require application in commercial development projects.Practical implications - The proposed methodology is expected to support requirements elicitation, and facilitate early stages of PSS development.Originality/value - This paper presents empirical findings regarding consumer acceptance, and provides a detailed analysis of factors that are central to PSS acceptance. It also introduces methodology for description and analysis of the complex consequences a solution may have from a consumer perspective.

  • 28.
    Rosell, David T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wasti, S. Nazli
    Department of Business Administration, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Integrating knowledge with suppliers at the R&D-manufacturing interface2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 240-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Many manufacturing firms source components and subsystems from suppliers. Consequently, the suppliers' product and manufacturing knowledge is a central concern at the interface between R&D and manufacturing. This paper aims to specifically investigate how supplier knowledge is integrated and what role trust plays in knowledge integration with suppliers at the R&D-manufacturing interface.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on qualitative case studies of two different collaborations with suppliers at one firm.

    Findings – Two distinct processes are identified. First, capturing represents knowledge integration through decoupling, for which a basic level of trust specifically with regard to the competence of the supplier is necessary. Capturing can take place through interactions that are limited in time and scope. Second, joint learning represents a coupled knowledge integration process and takes place during a more extended period of time preceding and following the R&D-manufacturing interface and builds on relational-based trust.

    Practical implications – The interface between R&D and manufacturing needs to be extended to include a focus on suppliers' contributions in terms of product and manufacturing knowledge. The choice for suitable knowledge integration processes needs to be guided by concerns about the level of trust and the character of the supplier contributions.

    Originality/value – The paper adds new insights to previous literature by distinguishing between different types of knowledge integration processes and levels of trust. It bridges the gap between innovation and operations management and clearly shows that the interface between R&D and manufacturing crosses organizational borders.

  • 29.
    Rosio, Carin
    et al.
    Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring the design process of reconfigurable industrial production systems Activities, challenges, and tactics2018In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 85-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore activities, challenges, and suggest tactics for the design of industrial reconfigurable production systems that can easily adapt to changing market opportunities. Design/methodology/approach - The paper synthesizes the empirical findings of seven case studies including 47 in-depth interviews at four manufacturing companies. Findings - A conceptual production system design process and including activities that enables a long-term perspective considering reconfigurability is proposed. Additionally, critical challenges indicating that reconfigurable production system design is not a trivial issue but one that requires separate control and coordination are identified and tactics to overcome the challenges described. Research limitations/implications - The authors propose a process for designing reconfigurable production systems that are better suited to adjust to future needs. The knowledge of reconfigurability from the reconfigurable manufacturing system literature is applied in the general production system literature field. This study contributes to a clearer picture of managerial challenges that need to be dealt with when designing a reconfigurable production system. Practical implications - By clarifying key activities facilitating a long-term perspective in the design process and highlighting challenges and tactics for improvement, the findings are particularly relevant to production engineers and plant managers interested in increasing the ability to adapt to future changes through reconfigurability and improve the efficiency of their production system design process. Originality/value - Although reconfigurable production systems are critical for the success of manufacturing companies, the process of designing such systems is not clear. This paper stretches this by giving a comprehensive picture of the production system design process and the activities that need to be considered to meet these challenges.

  • 30.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Department of Product Realization, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Exploring the design process of reconfigurable industrial production systems activities, challenges, and tactics2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 85-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore activities, challenges, and suggest tactics for the design of industrial reconfigurable production systems that can easily adapt to changing market opportunities.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper synthesizes the empirical findings of seven case studies including 47 in-depth interviews at four manufacturing companies.

    Findings – A conceptual production system design process and including activities that enables a long-term perspective considering reconfigurability is proposed. Additionally, critical challenges indicating that reconfigurable production system design is not a trivial issue but one that requires separate control and coordination are identified and tactics to overcome the challenges described.

    Research limitations/implications – The authors propose a process for designing reconfigurable production systems that are better suited to adjust to future needs. The knowledge of reconfigurability from the reconfigurable manufacturing system literature is applied in the general production system literature field. This study contributes to a clearer picture of managerial challenges that need to be dealt with when designing a reconfigurable production system.

    Practical implications – By clarifying key activities facilitating a long-term perspective in the design process and highlighting challenges and tactics for improvement, the findings are particularly relevant to production engineers and plant managers interested in increasing the ability to adapt to future changes through reconfigurability and improve the efficiency of their production system design process.

    Originality/value – Although reconfigurable production systems are critical for the success of manufacturing companies, the process of designing such systems is not clear. This paper stretches this by giving a comprehensive picture of the production system design process and the activities that need to be considered to meet these challenges. 

  • 31.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Reconfigurable Production System Design - theoretical and practical challenges2013In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 998-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore theoretical and practical challenges to achieve reconfigurable production system designs. Design/methodology/approach – Presented results are based on a multiple-case study involving two industrial companies and in total four production system design projects in which considerations of reconfigurability were studied. Additionally, literature related to reconfigurability and production system design was reviewed.

    Findings – For more than a decade foresight reports have pointed out the need for responsiveness to change through reconfigurability in production system design. In order to achieve reconfigurable production systems, three challenges were identified: to use a structured design methodology, to gain knowledge in reconfigurability and its characteristics, and to include the reconfigurability knowledge in a structured design methodology. Still there is no comprehensive support available for reconfigurability in the production system design process.Research limitations/implications – Limitations are mostly related to the chosen methodology approach, and additional empirical studies to establish generic results are required. Practical implications By combining knowledge from the production system design field with the reconfigurable manufacturing system field a potential of meeting identified challenges is pointed out. Originality/value This paper adds to current knowledge by pointing out three main challenges to achieving reconfigurable production systems. The paper also contributes with ideas on how to respond to these challenges.

  • 32.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University.
    Reconfigurable production system design – theoretical and practical challenges2013In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 7, p. 998-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore theoretical and practical challenges to achieve reconfigurable production system designs. Design/methodology/approach - The empirical material of this paper includes a multiple-case study with an embedded design (Yin) including four cases, where each case represents a production system design project. The consideration of reconfigurability and its characteristics in the production system design projects was studied. To enhance validity, two real-time studies were combined with two retrospective studies (Leonard-Barton). Findings - For more than a decade foresight reports have pointed out the need for responsiveness to change through reconfigurability in production system design. In order to achieve reconfigurable production systems, three challenges were identified: to use a structured design methodology, to gain knowledge in reconfigurability and its characteristics, and to include the reconfigurability knowledge in a structured design methodology. Still there is no comprehensive support available for reconfigurability in the production system design process. Research limitations/implications - Limitations are mostly related to the chosen methodology approach, and additional empirical studies to establish generic results are required. Practical implications - By combining knowledge from the production system design field with the reconfigurable manufacturing system field a potential of meeting identified challenges is pointed out. Originality/value - This paper adds to current knowledge by pointing out three main challenges to achieving reconfigurable production systems. The paper also contributes with ideas on how to respond to these challenges.

  • 33. Sakao, T.
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Matsen, D.
    Framing research for service orientation of manufacturers through PSS approaches2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 754-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In order to respond to the industrial trend towards service design and delivery, research must address a vast area partially related to value creation, marketing and network theories. However, compared to the space to be explored, there is little insight available. Thus, the purpose of this paper, as a first step, is to propose a way to frame such research. Design/methodology/ approach: An extensive literature review is performed of over 100 articles on product/service system (PSS) in general, service design, innovation, and business models in a broad view. Then, the analysis from the authors' viewpoint is carried out to give a frame. Findings: The paper presents three crucial dimensions for service-orientation research, i.e. an offer dimension representing products and services, a provider dimension, and a customer/user dimension. In addition, three research targets are proposed: PSS-offer modelling, PSS development and PSS potential. Furthermore, several promising future research directions are identified. These include evaluating economic consequences or environmental benefits, establishing terminology, organizational issues, and developing methods and tools to support designers. Originality/value: The paper presents a way of viewing research for service orientation, which contributes especially to further research in this area.

  • 34.
    Samuelsson, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Storm, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Lager, Thomas
    Profiling company-generic production capabilities in the process industries and strategic implications2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 662-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - A robust description of the material transformation system is fundamental for understanding its capabilities and thus for communicating, prioritising and changing the system. Deploying a previously developed configuration model the purpose of this paper is to test the industrial usability of the model as an instrument to gain a better understanding of the material transformation system through externalising the generic production capabilities of the system. Design/methodology/approach - In a multiple case study approach and using a prior conceptual configuration model of the material transformation system in the process industries as a research instrument, company-generic production capabilities were investigated in three companies representing the mineral, food and steel industries. Findings - The empirical results supported the utility of the model as an instrument in providing a coherent set of elements that define operations and thus serve as a platform to model company-generic production capabilities and serve as input to strategizing though implicating needed change to the material transformation system. The theoretical contribution was mainly the empirical validation of the previously developed conceptual model as a tool in knowledge formation of the capabilities of the system and to outline the concept of "production capabilities configuration". Research limitations/implications - Three sectors of the process industries were studied but it is recommended that the results should be replicated in complementary case studies or a survey of larger samples from the process industries. Those studies should not only be limited to increase the empirical knowledge base, but possibly to identify additional new variables, further refine the set of variables in the present model and investigate their relationships. Practical implications - It is argued that the model can already be used as a tool to support both horizontal and vertical communication on production capabilities, thus facilitating, e.g. manufacturing strategy development. Originality/value - The validated conceptual model supported by the empirical evidence is new knowledge to be used in the analysis of company-generic production capabilities in the process industries.

  • 35.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A lifecycle perspective on buyer-supplier collaboration in process development projects2013In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 235-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Development and implementation of new process equipment within the process industries frequently necessitate strong collaboration between process firms and their equipment suppliers in joint process development projects. However, collaboration in this setting entails significant challenges over the lifecycle of these projects. Accordingly, the purpose of this article is to explore the problems and opportunities faced encountered by equipment suppliers during collaboration with process firms, throughout the various lifecycle stages of process development projects.Design/methodology/approach – The article synthesizes results from 22 interviews in a multiple case study of eight equipment suppliers in the process industries and a comprehensive review of relevant literature to identify critical problems of opportunities during the lifecycle. In total, data was gathered from firms in six different countries.Findings – A deficient pre-study may create problems due to miscommunication during development when close interaction is required. Purchasing discussions can be done simultaneously to development when a supplier has been selected, although high uncertainty is a problem. It is important to get end-user feedback and commitment during development and later stages. During assembly and installation and start-up a variety of actors are working simultaneously which requires coordination and planning from an early stage. Close interaction and education with end-user is critical for the technology transfer in the start-up stage. Sharing of experiences enhances operational performance during production.Practical implications - The findings of this article serves as guidelines to managers in equipment supplier firms and their customers by highlighting the problems and opportunities for improvement that occur during the interconnected stages of process development projects.Originality/value – By focusing on the collaborative activities in different stages, this study theorizes the critical problem and opportunities in the lifecycle of process equipment. In addition this article outlines how joint process development activities can facilitate enhanced operational performance, by means of collaborative design and installation of new process equipment – i.e. “open operation”.Keywords – Open innovation; buyer-supplier relationships; collaboration; process equipment; operations management; project management.

  • 36.
    Soosay, Claudine
    et al.
    University of South Australia Business School, Adelaide, Australia.
    Nunes, Breno
    Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham, UK.
    Bennett, David J.
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden AND University of South Australia Business School, Adelaide, Australia.
    Sohal, Amrik
    Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Jabar, Juhaini
    Faculty of Technology and Technopreneurship, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Melaka, Malaysia.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strategies for sustaining manufacturing competitiveness: Comparative case studies in Australia and Sweden2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 6-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of local sustainable production in Australia and Sweden aimed at exploring the factors contributing to survival and competitiveness of manufacturing companies.

    Design/methodology/approach – In Australia, six companies were studied in 2010, with comparisons being made with three of them from earlier projects. In Sweden, eight manufacturing companies were studied on two occasions 30 years apart, in 1980 and 2010. To provide a valid comparative perspective a common format for data collection and analysis was used.

    Findings – There has been a shift in the nature of competition in both Sweden and Australia due to an increasing complexity of the global business environment as well as changes in technology and customer expectations. Despite the differences in country context, the findings suggest that all the manufacturing companies have a good awareness of the elements of the market environment and the relationships with their competitive strategy. However, in general, the Swedish companies have more experience of managing the risks and benefits from operating in the international environment.

    Research limitations/implications – The results of the research are based on a relatively small sample of case companies in a limited number of industrial sectors. There are methodology implications for future research in the area.

    Practical implications – The research results have practical implications for the manufacturing industry, especially for companies operating in a competitive international environment.

    Originality/value – The paper is based on original case research and comparative analysis of data from different geographical contexts. It contributes to both theory and management practice about the strategic resources, decision choices, competitive environments and firm values needed to address external market demands as well as in building internal capabilities.

  • 37.
    Stålberg, Lina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lean production integration adaptable to dynamic conditions2018In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1358-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to understand how a continuous improvement (CI) approach like lean production (LP) integration is affected by dynamic conditions and to propose how LP integration can be adaptable to dynamic conditions. Design/methodology/approach A longitudinal case study has been conducted in which data were collected through participative observations, observations, documents and an in-depth semi-structured interview. Findings The adaptability is related to the maturity level of the LP integration, where more mature organisations are better equipped to deal with the challenges occurring due to their learning and experimentation capabilities. The main problem is that the LP integration needs to be adapted, like compromising with just-in-time. This creates challenges to more immature organisations; they do not seem to be able to adapt the LP integration since the skills are lacking. Research limitations/implications The research limitations are associated with the research design and therefore might limit generalisation of the context studied. Practical implications The management needs to stay focused on the LP integration to continue building CI capability. There is a need to adapt the LP concept, which includes assessing how proposed changes and the LP concept interact in order to make them reinforce each other. This involves creating guidelines concerning adaptation and facilitating a transition from mainly single-loop learning to double-loop learning. Originality/value This paper contributes by describing challenges that have an impact on LP integration and related organisational adaptability under dynamic conditions.

  • 38.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ijomah, Winifred
    DMEM, Faculty of Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Product design for product/service systems: Design experiences from Swedish industry2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 723-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to elucidate how Swedish industry has adapted theirproducts for product/service systems (PSS).Design/methodology/approach – Three case study companies that manufacture forklift trucks,soil compactors and household appliances are studied. Interviews with company staff are conducted aswell as product analyses in laboratorial environment. The theory is based mainly on previous PSS,design and remanufacturing research.Findings – A key factor when developing products for PSS is to design the product from a life-cycleperspective, considering all the product’s life-cycle phases, namely manufacturing, use, maintenanceand end-of-life treatment. Many of the design improvements deal with the accessibility of parts andcomponents during maintenance and remanufacturing operations, and several of them could reducethe need and cost for maintenance, repair and remanufacturing.Research limitations/implications – Uncovering any additional product requirements needed fora successful PSS not addressed in this paper. For example, it could be interesting to explore whichproduct data could be collected during use in order to improve the products’ different life stages.Practical implications – The findings in this paper illustrate and describe many industrialimplications for engineering designers to consider when developing PSS.Originality/value – The novelty of this paper is aimed for designers to study how they can adapttheir future products used in PSS in a more beneficial way than in traditional product design. Thepaper shows ideas and general guidelines to follow which have been scarcely published.

  • 39.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interface challenges and managerial issues in the industrial innovation process2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 218-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfaces between technology development, product development, and production must be managed in order to avoid misfits between technology and product concepts and ensure the fit of the product design and the production process. In this paper, critical challenges related to these interfaces are studied based on in-depth case studies of ten product development projects at five manufacturing firms, two workshops and a questionnaire. Our findings indicate that factors related to synchronisation and transfer management are most critical. A tentative model is formulated as an instrument to reduce risk and uncertainty related to the interfaces.

  • 40.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping university.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping university.
    Interface challenges and managerial issues in the industrial innovation process2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 218-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of challenges related to interfaces in industrial innovation processes, together with suggestions on how these interface challenges can be managed. The paper investigates similarities and differences between the interfaces and identified challenges in terms of required managerial issues.

    Design/methodology/approach: The result presented in this paper is based on in-depth case studies of ten product development projects from five different manufacturing firms in Sweden. The empirical results are supplemented with results from a review of relevant literature.

    Findings: To manage the interface challenges market uncertainty, technological uncertainty, product complexity and/or degree of change in product, production complexity and/or degree of change in production, geographical and/or organisational dispersion between technology development and product development, and between product development and production, it was found that several issues have to be considered. Most of the identified managerial issues concern transfer synchronisation, transfer management and transfer scope. The authors have shown that despite many differences between the different phases in the innovation process, a quite concordant picture emerges when it comes to how to manage interface challenges.

    Practical implications: The classification of managerial issues into transfer synchronisation, transfer management and transfer scope provides an overview of areas that need to be addressed to manage interface challenges during the industrial innovation process. This knowledge provides some guidance for managers aiming at a smooth transition process, from technology development to production.

    Originality/value: By addressing both the interface between technology development and product development, and between product development and production in the same study, the authors have been able to provide a comprehensive overview of managerial issues related to interfaces challenges in industrial innovation processes in manufacturing firms.

  • 41.
    Wallin, Johanna
    et al.
    Product and Production Development, GKN Aerospace Engine System, Trollhättan.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Product and Production Development, GKN Aerospace Engine System, Trollhättan.
    Understanding product-service system innovation capabilities development for manufacturing companies2015In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 763-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeManufacturing companies are increasingly making efforts to combine products and services into integrated offerings. However, the companies’ success in such transformation is linked with the presence of structured routines and processes, which we conceptualize as Product-Service Systems (PSS) innovation capabilities. Therefore, in this study we address the important question of how manufacturing companies can systematically build PSS innovation capabilities and does its presence or absence significantly influence PSS innovation.Design/methodology/approachThis study is based on longitudinal data from an aerospace company, which acts both as an OEM providing through-life services for aircraft engines, as well as a developer of innovative subsystem technologies. Data has been collected over 3 years (2009-2012) and constitutes 40 in-depth explorative and semi-structured interviews with diverse respondents. For analysis of the data, we have used constant comparison technique leading to identification of three high-order categories. In addition, we gain from observations and secondary data which enable us to achieve data triangulation and data validity.FindingsThe results objectively depict an overview of how the case company developed PSS innovation capabilities, though progression of routines over three early PSS development stages. More specifically, we find evidence for development of formalized routines related to customer interaction and innovative organizational climate during need phase, cross-functionality and network partnering during solution seeking phase, and competence and business case development during solution development phase. As these routines become more structured within the case company, they forge a path for PSS innovation capabilities development.Originality/valueThis study provides two distinctive contributions to emerging PSS literature. First, we propose and explain how PSS innovation capabilities are developed. Although prior studies acknowledge the importance of possessing specialized PSS innovation capabilities, limited studies have reported empirically how they are developed. Second, through adopting a longitudinal perspective, we reveal key routines and actions that drive PSS innovation during different development stages. To our knowledge, no prior study has combined insights from PSS literature and resource based view to objectively explain capabilities development process.

  • 42.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    A longitudinal study of Swedish manufacturing: eight short cases2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 535-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study the status of Swedish manufacturing industry and compare with the status of 30 years ago.

    Design/methodology/approach – The author conducted a series of semi-structured interviews with follow-up questions, transcribed and sent back to the companies for approval.

    Findings – It was found that all eight factories are still running, although one is to be switched to another owner and other types of production. Another company faces severe financial problems and it is questionable if it will survive. All but two of the companies.

    Research limitations/implications – The study was made at factory and production systems level, thus no studies were made at the group level. Sometimes it was hard to determine the financial key performance indicators (KPIs) for the factory, since they were kept secret.

    Practical implications – Most companies have worked hard on lean production and it can be seen that this has had a considerable impact on their routines. Even when companies change owners and go global, it is possible to keep the tradition of the companies and to keep the core products and processes at factory level.

    Social implications – The companies are consistent at keeping their skilled employees, but the traditional “Swedish model” in work organisation, which emphasises cross-functional teams and self-managing groups, has been abandoned.

    Originality/value – The research described in the paper is valuable since it was possible to re-do a study made 30 years ago at the same factories. The focus of the follow-up study was the same, but extended with additional issues such as globalisation and sustainability.

  • 43.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University.
    Sustainable production indicators at factory level2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 842-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Sustainable production (SP) is a very broad area and the awareness and communication of the concept differ between varying levels in a company. The supposition is that the awareness and improvement of sustainability on shop floor level would improve, if a suitable set of indicators for measuring sustainability was available. The purpose of this paper is therefore to identify a list of performance indicators relevant for a production manager.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents a two-step analysis, where the first step is a literature review with the purpose of compiling a gross list of sustainability indicators relevant on shop floor level. In the second phase, the relevance of this list for production managers in Swedish small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is tested in a questionnaire survey.

    Findings – The conclusion from the survey is that 27 out of 52 proposed indicators were relevant with statistical significance and that another 20 indicators were supported by at least 50 percent of the respondents. The respondents found the economic indicators to be most relevant for their purpose. However, the economic field seems to need more indicators in order to be more useful for daily operation.

    Practical implications – This set of indicators may be beneficial for companies seeking relevant indicators to drive sustainability improvements.

    Originality/value – This paper takes a new perspective on SP, as it focusses on shop floor production, which is possible to influence for a production manager.

  • 44.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    R&D in Sweden and manufacturing in China: a study of communication challenges2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 258-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore communication challenges related to geographic distance, with emphasis on differences in national culture and language between R&D and manufacturing engineers, in a development project faced with uncertainty and equivocality.

    Design/methodology/approach: The results originate from a longitudinal single-case study of a commercial product development project.

    Findings: Three communication challenges are identified: clarity of shared information, intention to share information, and responsiveness to information received. The challenges are strongly associated with differences in national culture and language. The study also indicates that the communication challenges cannot only be handled by the use of rich communication media, but also by employment of communication media of low richness such as e-mails or “picture books”.

    Research limitations/implications: The single-case study approach limits the ability to generalize the findings. Future research should thus focus on additional studies of geographically separated R&D and manufacturing.

    Originality/value: The results from the study provide important insights for the management of product development in geographically dispersed settings. The findings emphasize the need to consider potential differences in national culture and language within a product development team. Acknowledging these differences and managing them properly can support efficiency of product development projects.

  • 45.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Prod Dev Prod & Design, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Supply Chain & Operat Management, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Supply Chain & Operat Management, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Univ Gavle, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Gavle, Sweden..
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM-supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up. Design/methodology/approach The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research. Findings This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM-supplier integration, the OEM's research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM's (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM-supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator's role, the OEM's face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers' formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally. Originality/value This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up.

  • 46.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM–supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up.

    Design/methodology/approach: The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research.

    Findings: This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM–supplier integration, the OEM’s research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM’s (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM–supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator’s role, the OEM’s face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers’ formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally.

    Originality/value: This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up. 

  • 47.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden and School of Innovation, Design; Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Supply Chain and Operations Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM-supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research.

    Findings

    This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM-supplier integration, the OEM's research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM's (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM-supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator's role, the OEM's face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers? formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally.

    Originality/value

    This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up.

  • 48.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Prod Dev Prod & Design, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Prod Dev Prod & Design, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Supply Chain & Operat Management, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Univ Gavle, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Gavle, Sweden..
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM-supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up. Design/methodology/approach The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research. Findings This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM-supplier integration, the OEM's research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM's (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM-supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator's role, the OEM's face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers' formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally. Originality/value This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up.

  • 49.
    Yuji, Yamamoto
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Monica, Bellgran
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Manufacturing process innovation initiatives at Japanese manufacturing companiesIn: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Ünal, Enes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Politecn Milan, Sch Management, Milan, Italy.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Ind Econ & Management, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Urbinati, Andrea
    Politecn Milan, Sch Management, Milan, Italy.;Univ Carlo Cattaneo, Castellanza, Italy..
    Chiaroni, Davide
    Politecn Milan, Sch Management, Milan, Italy..
    Managerial practices for designing circular economy business models The case of an Italian SME in the office supply industry2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 561-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the managerial practices that companies can implement in order to design a circular economy business model and how companies can create and capture value from a circular economy business model. Design/methodology/approach The paper adopts a single case study methodology with semi-structured interviews and company, supplier, and manufacturing site visits, conducted in a small-to-medium-size Italian company operating in the office supply industry. Findings The theoretical setting maps a set of managerial practices for a circular economy business model and sets the research gaps and questions in a research framework designed along three main dimensions: value network, customer value proposition and interface, and managerial commitment. Then, through an empirical analysis, the findings reveal that the proposed dimensions are interdependent and reinforce each other. Moreover, the managerial commitment as moderating factor between the value network and the customer value proposition and interface dimensions is identified as essential for reaching the intended goals of circular economy business models. Originality/value An interdisciplinary approach that integrates the research streams of circular economy, social psychology, organizational behavior, and business model design has been pursued to test the theoretical setting and the research framework for circular economy business models in a real-world context.

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