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  • 1.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Accessible luxury fashion brand building via fat discrimination2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if accessible luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: The physical sizes of garments are surveyed in-store and compared to the body sizes of the population. A gap analysis is carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the demand of each market segment.

    Findings: The surveyed accessible luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The survey is limited to London while the corresponding population is British. It is therefore possible that the mismatch between assortments and the population is in part attributable to geographic and demographic factors. The study’s results are however so strikingly clear that even if some of the effect were due to extraneous variables, it would be hard to disregard the poor match between overweight and obese women and the clothes offered to them.

    Practical implications: For symbolic/expressive brands that are conspicuously consumed, that narrowly target distinct and homogenous groups of people in industries where elitist practices are acceptable, companies can build brands via customer rejection.

    Social implications: The results highlight ongoing discrimination of overweight and obese fashion consumers.

    Originality/value: The study is the first to provide quantitative evidence for brand building via customer rejection, and it delineates under which conditions this may occur. This extends the theory of typical user imagery. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 2.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Accessible luxury fashion brand building via fat discrimination2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if accessible luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: The physical sizes of garments are surveyed in-store and compared to the body sizes of the population. A gap analysis is carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the demand of each market segment.

    Findings: The surveyed accessible luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The survey is limited to London while the corresponding population is British. It is therefore possible that the mismatch between assortments and the population is in part attributable to geographic and demographic factors. The study’s results are however so strikingly clear that even if some of the effect were due to extraneous variables, it would be hard to disregard the poor match between overweight and obese women and the clothes offered to them.

    Practical implications: For symbolic/expressive brands that are conspicuously consumed, that narrowly target distinct and homogenous groups of people in industries where elitist practices are acceptable, companies can build brands via customer rejection.

    Social implications: The results highlight ongoing discrimination of overweight and obese fashion consumers.

    Originality/value: The study is the first to provide quantitative evidence for brand building via customer rejection, and it delineates under which conditions this may occur. This extends the theory of typical user imagery.

  • 3.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 557-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of obese models vs. normal weight models on fashion brands’ attractiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 1,225 university students in Sweden and Brazil rated the attractiveness of a fashion brand worn by a normal weight model and an obese model.

    Findings: The overall effect of obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness was insignificant. Further, neither culture, nor the consumer’s own weight had a significant effect. There was, however, a significant effect of the participant’s own gender; women rate fashion brands worn by obese models significantly higher on attractiveness than they did fashion brands worn by normal weight models. Men displayed the inverse response.

    Research limitations/implications: The effect of the model’s ethnicity was beyond the scope of the experiment, and the brand attractiveness scale captured only one aspect of brand character, leaving other potential brand effects for future studies.

    Practical implications: Companies can use obese models with no overall brand attractiveness penalty across markets and for marketing to women of all sizes. Given men’s negative reactions, such models might however be unsuitable for the male-to-female gift market.

    Social implications: The results support the use of obese models, which can lead to greater representation of larger women in the media, and consequently, reduced fat stigma.

    Originality/value: The study validates the theory of user imagery, and it extends the theory by examining how different target consumers react to user imagery traits and thus provides evidence for gender bias towards obese models. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 4.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 557-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of obese models vs. normal weight models on fashion brands’ attractiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 1,225 university students in Sweden and Brazil rated the attractiveness of a fashion brand worn by a normal weight model and an obese model.

    Findings: The overall effect of obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness was insignificant. Further, neither culture, nor the consumer’s own weight had a significant effect. There was, however, a significant effect of the participant’s own gender; women rate fashion brands worn by obese models significantly higher on attractiveness than they did fashion brands worn by normal weight models. Men displayed the inverse response.

    Research limitations/implications: The effect of the model’s ethnicity was beyond the scope of the experiment, and the brand attractiveness scale captured only one aspect of brand character, leaving other potential brand effects for future studies.

    Practical implications: Companies can use obese models with no overall brand attractiveness penalty across markets and for marketing to women of all sizes. Given men’s negative reactions, such models might however be unsuitable for the male-to-female gift market.

    Social implications: The results support the use of obese models, which can lead to greater representation of larger women in the media, and consequently, reduced fat stigma.

    Originality/value: The study validates the theory of user imagery, and it extends the theory by examining how different target consumers react to user imagery traits and thus provides evidence for gender bias towards obese models.

  • 5.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). School of Business, Economics, and Law, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The influence of real women in advertising on mass market fashion brand perception2011In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 486-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the weight of ideal users affects the perception of mass market fashion brands. Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 640 university students replied to a web survey, rating the brand personality of jeans and shirts according to Aaker's Big Five construct. The garments were worn by thin, overweight, and obese models. Findings: The findings show that consumers' impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of ideal users. Slender models lead to the most positive brand perception followed by obese models. Overweight user imagery is for pure fashion brand building the least attractive kind. Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is the use of convenient student samples. Consequently, the generalization of the results beyond this convenience sample may be limited. It is further possible, even probable, that high fashion would suffer more from the negative imagery of overweight and obese users than mass market fashion. It would therefore be interesting to replicate this experiment using clothes of higher fashion grade and price. Practical implications: The demonstrated effects of user imagery support the industry practice of slim ideal female imagery. Social implications: The results inform the debate over skinny models vs real women in advertising. Originality/value: Previous research regarding the effectiveness of real women in advertising has been inconclusive. This paper demonstrates not only that model weight affects consumers' brand perception, but also how. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    The influence of real women in advertising on mass market fashion brand perception2011In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 486-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the weight of ideal users affects the perception of mass market fashion brands. Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 640 university students replied to a web survey, rating the brand personality of jeans and shirts according to Aaker's Big Five construct. The garments were worn by thin, overweight, and obese models. Findings: The findings show that consumers' impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of ideal users. Slender models lead to the most positive brand perception followed by obese models. Overweight user imagery is for pure fashion brand building the least attractive kind. Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is the use of convenient student samples. Consequently, the generalization of the results beyond this convenience sample may be limited. It is further possible, even probable, that high fashion would suffer more from the negative imagery of overweight and obese users than mass market fashion. It would therefore be interesting to replicate this experiment using clothes of higher fashion grade and price. Practical implications: The demonstrated effects of user imagery support the industry practice of slim ideal female imagery. Social implications: The results inform the debate over skinny models vs real women in advertising. Originality/value: Previous research regarding the effectiveness of real women in advertising has been inconclusive. This paper demonstrates not only that model weight affects consumers' brand perception, but also how.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hedelin, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Nilsson, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Welander, Charlotte
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Violent advertising in fashion marketing2004In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 96-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, violent advertising is discussed. An empirical study, using picture analysis, is carried out. The intent of the advertisers' message is compared with the interpretation of a male and a female consumer group. It is concluded that the consumers' interpretations not are the ones that the advertisers had intended. The violence was interpreted in a much more negative way than expected. It is also concluded that there are differences in interpretations between men and women. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 8.
    Andrea, Geissinger
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Marknadsföring.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholms universitet, Marknadsföring.
    User engagement in social media – an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 177-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The present paper aims to add to the literature by exploring how curvilinear manifestations of user engagement can be explained in the setting of fashion-oriented social media.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study analyses how ten Swedish fashion brands have been integrated in expressions of user engagement in social media. In total, a material of 11,173 user-generated contents from different types of social media applications over a period of 12 weeks was collected and analysed.

    Findings

    The results of this paper show that user engagement fluctuates considerably over time in social media. It also shows that the degree of engagement varies between different forms of social media applications.

    Originality/value

    This study contributes to the literature on fashion marketing and user engagement by adding empirical support for the suggestion that expressions of engagement found in social media are curvilinear in their nature. It also concludes that highly involved and engaged users, instead of being brand activists, tend to be variety seekers in the studied setting that when taken together represents an emerging managerial challenge for the fashion industry and particularly fashion firms.

  • 9.
    Andrea, Geissinger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    User engagement in social media – an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 177-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The present paper aims to add to the literature by exploring how curvilinear manifestations of user engagement can be explained in the setting of fashion-oriented social media.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study analyses how ten Swedish fashion brands have been integrated in expressions of user engagement in social media. In total, a material of 11,173 user-generated contents from different types of social media applications over a period of 12 weeks was collected and analysed.

    Findings

    The results of this paper show that user engagement fluctuates considerably over time in social media. It also shows that the degree of engagement varies between different forms of social media applications.

    Originality/value

    This study contributes to the literature on fashion marketing and user engagement by adding empirical support for the suggestion that expressions of engagement found in social media are curvilinear in their nature. It also concludes that highly involved and engaged users, instead of being brand activists, tend to be variety seekers in the studied setting that when taken together represents an emerging managerial challenge for the fashion industry and particularly fashion firms.

  • 10.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet Handelshögskolan, Örebro, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tracing brand constellations in social media: the case of Fashion Week Stockholm2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 35-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of fashion weeks on brand constellations of participating fashion companies in social media.

    Design/methodology/approach The study analyses how brand constellations take form for seven Swedish fashion companies before, during and after Fashion Week Stockholm. In total, 3,449 user-generated contents referring to the sampled brands were collected and analysed.

    Findings On average, brand constellations of participating companies are increasingly incorporating other participating brands as a result of the fashion week. Based on the presented results, four brand constellation outcomes for participating fashion companies are identified: brand constellation amplification, concentration, division and dilution.

    Research limitations/implicationsAs this paper is focussed on the Swedish market, additional results from fashion weeks taking place in other cities would be beneficial to verify the four brand constellation outcomes.

    Practical implicationsThe results question the resilience of professionally curated brand constellations due to the emergence of user-driven constellations that also shape the position of fashion brands. Therefore, this development can potentially have a considerable impact on often carefully orchestrated brand positioning strategies executed by fashion companies.

    Social implications Digitally fuelled interdependences of brand constellations by professionals and consumers attest to the dilution of borders between consumers and producers.

    Originality/value This paper contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by identifying four different brand constellation outcomes in social media for participating fashion companies as a result of fashion weeks and how to managerially handle these respective outcomes.

  • 11.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tracing brand constellations in social media: the case of Fashion Week Stockholm2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 35-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of fashion weeks on brand constellations of participating fashion companies in social media.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study analyses how brand constellations take form for seven Swedish fashion companies before, during and after Fashion Week Stockholm. In total, 3,449 user-generated contents referring to the sampled brands were collected and analysed.

    Findings: On average, brand constellations of participating companies are increasingly incorporating other participating brands as a result of the fashion week. Based on the presented results, four brand constellation outcomes for participating fashion companies are identified: brand constellation amplification, concentration, division and dilution.

    Research limitations/implications: As this paper is focussed on the Swedish market, additional results from fashion weeks taking place in other cities would be beneficial to verify the four brand constellation outcomes.

    Practical implications: The results question the resilience of professionally curated brand constellations due to the emergence of user-driven constellations that also shape the position of fashion brands. Therefore, this development can potentially have a considerable impact on often carefully orchestrated brand positioning strategies executed by fashion companies.

    Social implications: Digitally fuelled interdependences of brand constellations by professionals and consumers attest to the dilution of borders between consumers and producers.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by identifying four different brand constellation outcomes in social media for participating fashion companies as a result of fashion weeks and how to managerially handle these respective outcomes.

  • 12.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    User engagement in social media: an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 177-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to add to the literature by exploring how curvilinear manifestations of user engagement can be explained in the setting of fashion-oriented social media.

    Design/methodology/approach - This study analyses how ten Swedish fashion brands have been integrated in expressions of user engagement in social media. In total, a material of 11,173 user-generated contents from different types of social media applications over a period of 12 weeks was collected and analysed.

    Findings - The results of this paper show that user engagement fluctuates considerably over time in social media. It also shows that the degree of engagement varies between different forms of social media applications.

    Originality/value - This study contributes to the literature on fashion marketing and user engagement by adding empirical support for the suggestion that expressions of engagement found in social media are curvilinear in their nature. It also concludes that highly involved and engaged users, instead of being brand activists, tend to be variety seekers in the studied setting that when taken together represents an emerging managerial challenge for the fashion industry and particularly fashion firms.

  • 13.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Small-series supply network configuration priorities and challenges in the EU textile and apparel industry2022In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Technology and market pressures are encouraging localized and small-series production in customer-driven industries. The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand the supply chain-, product- and process-design factors for small-series production in EU's textile and apparel industry, to understand configuration decisions, priorities and challenges. 

     Design/methodology/approach 

    An interview study was undertaken with ten companies that represent diverse small-series production models and value chain roles. Interview data was analysed to identify supply network configuration characteristics, decision priorities and challenges. 

     Findings

    Three small-series production models emerged from the analysis, differing with respect to adoption of process postponement and customization. The findings confirm and extend past research regarding diverse decision priorities and product, process, supply chain structure/relationship configurations. Challenges identified relate to planning (priorities) and implementation (configuration). Whereas competence availability and digital technology challenges are common, several difficulties are linked to production model like tensions related to priorities and small volumes, which are not found with customization. 

     Research limitations/implications 

    Future research can make comparisons with other industry and location contexts; adopt dynamic approaches to distinguish between design and reconfiguration processes; and address indicated paradoxical-tensions. 

     Practical implications 

    The study findings can provide guidance for companies regarding identification of priorities and management of (planning/implementation) challenges impacting small-series production in T&A. 

     Originality/value 

    The paper brings a configuration perspective at the supply chain level to the problem of small-series production implementation, which demands holistic and context-specific understanding.

  • 14.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University.
    Fashion spheres - from a systemic to a sphereological perspective of fashion2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 520-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article aims to explore how the fragmentation of the fashion system can be conceptually explained by drawing on Peter Sloterdijk’s theory of spheres.

    Design/methodology/approach: By conceptually discussing the changing nature of the fashion system and the institutional pressures exerted on fashion systems as a result of digital technology, the fundamental conceptual underpinnings of the theory of spheres are applied to these developments in order to explain the character of the contemporary organization of fashion.

    Findings: Based on the conceptual analysis, this article illustrates how a sphereological perspective to fashion provides a conceptual approach to explain the transformation and fragmentation of fashion systems.

    Originality/value: This article contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by demonstrating how the concept of fashion spheres can explain social arrangements going beyond the boundaries of fashion systems and the associated implications that this brings to bear on the role of fashion.

  • 15.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Fashion Spheres: From a Systemic to a Sphereological Perspective of Fashion2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 520-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article aims to explore how the fragmentation of the fashion system can be conceptually explained by drawing on Peter Sloterdijk’s theory of spheres.

    Design/methodology/approach: By conceptually discussing the changing nature of the fashion system and the institutional pressures exerted on fashion systems as a result of digital technology, the fundamental conceptual underpinnings of the theory of spheres are applied to these developments in order to explain the character of the contemporary organization of fashion.

    Findings: Based on the conceptual analysis, this article illustrates how a sphereological perspective to fashion provides a conceptual approach to explain the transformation and fragmentation of fashion systems.

    Originality/value: This article contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by demonstrating how the concept of fashion spheres can explain social arrangements going beyond the boundaries of fashion systems and the associated implications that this brings to bear on the role of fashion.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 16.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Extended responsibility through servitization in PSS: An exploratory study of used-clothing sector2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 453-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The global textile-fashion industry is resource inefficient thus requiring higher product- service systems (PSS) intervention. Further, insight of how PSS extends corporate responsibility is rather limited; knowledge of which may contribute towards increased PSS viability. The purpose of this paper is to explore how companies operating with used-clothing PSS extend their responsibilities through servitization.

    Design/methodology/approach – An exploratory study of seven companies operating with various used-clothing PSS is conducted through semi-structured interviews and supplementary document studies.

    Findings – Six dominant ways through which servitization drives responsibility in used-clothing PSSare identified. These are through: value-adding services, product leverage, collaborative partnership, information transparency, awareness and platform-enabled networking. Two trade-offs exist in terms of their focus on physical process or digitalization, and developed by honing core competency or collaborative partnership. Further three differentiating attributes underlie these mechanisms for: raising awareness and/or improving transparency, collaboration in value creation and/or in promoting consumption, and product ownership and/or leverage.

    Research limitations/implications – A wide range of used-clothing PSS exists each in its own way extending responsibility. In-depth studies are required to investigate the relationship between servitization and extended responsibility for diverse PSS-types and on type of responsibilities they address.

    Practical implications – By identifying the key mechanisms or ways and their underlying characteristics companies can identify new servitization forms and ways to extend their responsibility, identify best practices and establish viability beyond the traditional measures, e.g. financial.

    Originality/value – So far no studies have investigated the role of servitization in PSS and how it extends corporate responsibility, especially in industries like textile-fashion, where both resource efficiency and responsibility is low.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Shen, Bin
    Glorious Sun School of Business and Management, Donghua University.
    Sandberg, Erik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University.
    Circular fashion supply chain management: exploring impediments and prescribing future research agenda2019In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 298-307Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Shen, Bin
    Donghua Univ, Peoples R China.
    Sandberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Circular fashion supply chain management: exploring impediments and prescribing future research agenda2019In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 298-307Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Paras, Manoj Kumar
    et al.
    National Institute of Fashion Technology, Kangra, India.
    Wang, Lichuan
    Graduate School, Soochow University, Suzhou, China.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden) (Supply Chain Management and Social Responsibility, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    A sustainable model based on genetic algorithm for garment redesign process2023In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 870-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study proposes a garment modularization model based on an interactive genetic algorithm. The suggested model consists of extraction and identification of parts and the determination and implementation of connections. Rules and corresponding mathematical equations have been formulated for the part's extractions from the discarded products and connections for the redesigned products.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Sustainability entices scholars and practitioners while referring to reducing waste to control environmental degradation. One of the ways to safeguard natural resources is to increase the reuse of old or discarded products. The current study focuses on the redesign process to improve the reuse of products.

    Findings

    The intelligent system proposed based on the modularization techniques is expected to simplify and quantify the redesign process. The model can further help in the minimization of wastage and environmental degradation.

    Originality/value

    Presently, manual decisions are taken by the designers based on their memory, experience and intuition to extract and join the parts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Paras, Manoj Kumar
    et al.
    National Institute of Fashion Technology, Kangra, India.
    Wang, Lichuan
    Graduate School, Soochow University, Suzhou, China.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Supply Chain Management and Social Responsibility, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    A sustainable model based on genetic algorithm for garment redesign process2023In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 870-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study proposes a garment modularization model based on an interactive genetic algorithm. The suggested model consists of extraction and identification of parts and the determination and implementation of connections. Rules and corresponding mathematical equations have been formulated for the part's extractions from the discarded products and connections for the redesigned products.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Sustainability entices scholars and practitioners while referring to reducing waste to control environmental degradation. One of the ways to safeguard natural resources is to increase the reuse of old or discarded products. The current study focuses on the redesign process to improve the reuse of products.

    Findings

    The intelligent system proposed based on the modularization techniques is expected to simplify and quantify the redesign process. The model can further help in the minimization of wastage and environmental degradation.

    Originality/value

    Presently, manual decisions are taken by the designers based on their memory, experience and intuition to extract and join the parts.

     

  • 21.
    Pihl, Christofer
    School of Business Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brands, community and style – exploring linking value in fashion blogging2014In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: By using the concept of style, the purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the notion of brand community. More specifically, it seeks to explore how style can function as a linking value in forms of communities centred on brands that emerge within the empirical context of fashion and social media.

    Design/methodology/approach: A netnography of the content produced by 18 fashion bloggers in Sweden was conducted. Content analysis of this material was used to map how consumption objects, in terms of fashion brands, were integrated in activities taking place on blogs, and through these processes, acted as a linking value for community members.

    Findings: This paper demonstrates how fashion bloggers, together with their readers, constitute a form of community centred on style. It also shows how fashion bloggers, by combining and assembling fashion brands and products, articulate and express different style sets, and how they, together with their followers, engage in activities connected to these style ideals.

    Research limitations/implications: As this study has been empirically limited to a Swedish setting, future research would benefit from findings of international expressions of communities of style. Practical implications: Based on this study, strategies for managing communities of style is suggested to represent a potential source of competitive advantage for fashion firms.

    Originality/value: In the context of the conceptual discussion about what brings members of communities together, this study provides evidence of how style can function as a linking value in the setting of consumer communities that emerge within the boundaries of fashion and social media.

  • 22.
    Pihl, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Brands, community and style: exploring linking value in fashion blogging2014In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – By using the concept of style, this article aims to elaborate on the notion of brand community. More specifically, it seeks to explore how style can function as a linking value in forms of communities centred on brands that emerge within the empirical context of fashion and social media.

    Design/methodology/approach - A netnography of the content produced by 18 fashion bloggers in Sweden was conducted. Content analysis of this material was used to map how consumption objects, in terms of fashion brands, were integrated in activities taking place on blogs, and through these processes, acted as a linking value for community members.

    Findings – This paper demonstrates how fashion bloggers, together with their readers, constitute a form of community centred on style. It also shows how fashion bloggers, by combining and assembling fashion brands and products, articulate and express different style sets, and how they, together with their followers, engage in activities connected to these style ideals.

    Research limitations/implications - As this study has been empirically limited to a Swedish setting, future research would benefit from findings of international expressions of communities of style.

    Practical implications - Based on this study, strategies for managing communities of style is suggested to represent a potential source of competitive advantage for fashion firms.

    Originality/value – In the context of the conceptual discussion about what brings members of communities together, this study provides evidence of how style can function as a linking value in the setting of consumer communities that emerge within the boundaries of fashion and social media.

  • 23.
    Sirilertsuwan, Petchprakai
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hjelmgren, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Hanken School of Economics.
    Exploring Current Enablers and Barriers for Sustainable Proximity Manufacturing2019In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, no 4, p. 551-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Amidst offshoring and reshoring trends, the purpose of this paper is to explore why business practitioners, especially from the labour-intensive clothing industry, choose to manufacture some products in proximity to the high-cost European market. Moreover, the rise of sustainability concerns led us to further explore whether these reasons relate to triple bottom line (TBL): business, environment and society.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The content analysis was adopted for within-case and cross-case analysis of data from semi-structured interviews of managers from 12 clothing companies.

    Findings

    Within-case analysis showed enablers and barriers (factors) of proximity manufacturing within each company’s characteristics under TBL. Cross-case analysis showed the most-mentioned enablers (high-quality suppliers, short lead-time and fast replenishment) and barriers (expensive production cost and lack of industrial set-up and seamstresses). The findings revealed both common and different factors from existing studies.

    Research limitations/implications

    Besides being motives for companies to bring manufacturing back to Europe, the results can be used by researchers and companies to develop criteria and performance measures of manufacturing locations for enhancing the TBL sustainability. Future research may explore different locations and industries for possibilities of proximity–manufacturing generalisation.

    Social implications

    Findings show that governments could focus on eliminating barriers of proximity manufacturing and creating favourable institutional infrastructure for the European clothing industry and sustainability.

    Originality/value

    This paper highlights updated proximity–manufacturing factors from practices in relation to TBL sustainability, including support for proximity manufacturing as a practice for TBL enhancement.

  • 24.
    Sörum, Niklas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gianneschi, Marcus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The role of access-based apparel in processes of consumer identity construction2023In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 27, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of the study is to analyse negotiations about ownership and style in access-based apparel related to processes of identity construction.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study applies a qualitative and interpretative method and relies on semi-structured depth interviews and focus group interviews with clothing library users as the main data source. The conceptual context of this paper is that of consumer culture theory approaches to consumer identity construction and the role of object ownership in consumer identity projects.

    Findings

    The empirical analysis highlights how processes of consumer identity construction related to symbolic values of clothing and self-possession mechanisms related to ownership are negotiated in encounters with access-based types of fashion consumption with effects on potential consumer adoption of access-based forms of consumption. The findings are structured in six analytical themes.

    Social implications

    There are several aspects of this research which are of relevance to the sustainability agenda and which have societal implications. Identity has been identified, in previous research, as a key conceptual tool for exploring, predicting and deepening the understanding of pro-environmental and sustainable behaviours. As such, if the aim is to strengthen the commitment of societies to environmental and sustainable behaviours, then this will require greater knowledge of consumers' identities and meaning-making processes. This is a challenge, not least in terms of recognizing the barriers identified in this study as relating to issues of consumer identity construction.

    Originality/value

    This study reveals multiple possibilities as well as barriers for implementing collaborative apparel consumption schemes in a fashion and apparel context. Some of the barriers might be explained by clothing's emotional character and close relationship to identity formation. Furthermore, the participants questioned whether access and renting services could substitute the meanings of owning. In conclusion, the authors argue that clothing may be a challenging type of goods to integrate in liquid forms of consumption and findings point out complexities amongst fashion-conscious consumers regarding meaning and identity values of collaborative apparel consumption. Theoretical contributions of an interpretative consumer identity approach for understanding barriers as well as possibilities for consumer adoption of access-based fashion are developed in the concluding sections of the article.

  • 25.
    Woldeyohanis, Yilma Geletu
    et al.
    Addis Ababa Univ, Dept Management, Coll Business & Econ, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.;Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping Int Business Sch, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Univ Pretoria, Gordon Inst Business Sci, Johannesburg, South Africa..
    Elifneh, Yohannes Workeaferahu
    Addis Ababa Univ, Coll Business & Econ, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Clothing disposal in Ethiopia: methods and motives2024In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explores clothing disposal in a developing economy. It focuses on how consumers dispose of clothing and what motives influence them to use a specific disposal method. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews, a qualitative research method, were conducted with a purposive sample of 27 participants from diverse demographic backgrounds within the developing economy of Ethiopia. The interviews were coded and analysed using thematic analysis to identify categories and themes. Findings: The findings reveal various clothing disposal methods, such as bartering, donating, gifting, repurposing and reusing, and discarding. Different motives drive consumers to use these methods, including economic benefits, altruism, and convenience. Originality/value: The study bridges an important knowledge gap in literature mainly on three aspects, as highlighted by previous research. Theoretically, in addition to proposing a different perspective of bartering as a disposal method, the study investigates the motives behind clothing disposal methods from diverse consumer groups and proposes a conceptual framework to illustrate the link between clothing disposal methods and motives. Methodologically, the study addresses the call for a more inclusive and diverse sample, considering gender and varied socio-economic groups. Contextually, while previous research has focused on developed economies, this study explains clothing disposal methods and motives from a developing economy context, specifically Ethiopia. 

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