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  • 1.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    User-related Complexity Dimensions of Complex Products and Systems (CoPS): A Case of Implementing an ERP-system2009In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Global dreams - local teams: rhetoric and realitites of transnational innovation2004In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 8, no No. 2, p. 115-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article challenges of transnational innovation and global project teams as imperatives for modern management of innovation. Proceeding from an account of the localised dynamics of a radical technology innovation project in the early 1970s, the article reviews the strategy theorists of the 1990s, who proclaimed the virtues of cross-border innovation processes. Their expectations of international synergies and world-wide learning are confronted with the realities and local harvesting in a transatlantic innovation project at a European multinational. An account follows of a radical innovation project at the firm, which was the scene of the introductory study. Now, 25 years later this industrial technology company had become part of a far-flung multinational, which according to popular management theorists was the model of international innovation. The case account highlights the surprising similarities between the two projects, and the sustained importance of intensive local interaction oand commitment in uncertain innovation projects.

  • 3.
    Brantnell, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    THE ROLES OF ACADEMIC INVENTORS IN MEDICAL INNOVATION PROCESSES: EXPLORING THE INFLUENCE OF IPR OWNERSHIP AND IP NATURE2020In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses four medical innovation processes originating from Stanford and Uppsala universities with the purpose of understanding how intellectual property rights (IPR) ownership and intellectual property (IP) nature influence the behaviour of academic inventors. We analyse this behaviour through the roles enacted and evaluate the requirements the roles pose by developing a method to assess the requirements of individual roles, which we label as role intensity. We find that both IPR ownership and IP nature can influence the academic inventors’ roles and role intensities. In contrast to assumptions in research and policy, we find that IPR ownership does not influence the roles and role intensities in a remarkable way. We also find support that research and policy should distinguish between patentable and non-patentable inventions in the field of medical invention as these two types of IP nature are associated with different roles and role intensities. These findings contribute to the literature on commercialisation of science and innovation management by demonstrating the importance of IP nature in influencing the roles of inventors. Managerial and policy implications are provided.

  • 4.
    Bäckström, Izabelle
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Lindberg, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Behavioural implications of employee-driven innovation: a critical discourse analysis2018In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 22, no 7, article id 1850058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines a digital employee-oriented innovation program at a global IT-firm. It addresses the research question: how is the generation and promotion of employee ideas organised by the management, and what are the behavioural implications in terms of participation of such an organising? Drawing on the literature on inclusive innovation and employee-driven innovation, the authors explore the extent to which ordinary employees are included in innovative processes at work. The critical discourse analysis of written and spoken text exposes inclusiveness concerning the managements’ production and distribution of innovation discourse in the initial phases of the program. However, the analysis simultaneously reveals considerable excluding elements in the ordinary employees’ consumption of this discourse in its latter phases, particularly regarding the parallel discourses “we are all innovators” and “the single winning entrepreneur”.

  • 5.
    Chronéer, Diana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Have process industries shifted their centre of gravity during the 90s?2003In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 95-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development is often seen as a main tool for competitiveness in organizations. In process industries, like steel and paper, process and product development are seen as an integrated part. Product development has often been the result of a process development. Heavy investments and costly production give process a priority role in product development. The role of customers and suppliers in development work has increased for process-based companies. This change will have implication on how to organize and manage development in the traditional upstream companies. Therefore, this article presents results that show some of the implications of the changed situation for Swedish process-based companies. The article also emphasizes that there are indications of a shift of traditional upstream companies' centre of gravity due to the changed perspective in development work, towards customer focus.

  • 6.
    Chronéer, Diana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Laurell-Stenlund, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Determinants of an effective product development process: towards a conceptual framework for process industry2006In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 237-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisation and management of the product development process have been an issue in both academia and industry for over three decades. The literature on product development is growing, but Process Industry is often lacking in these discussions. Therefore, this paper focuses on linking the determinants of an effective product development process to Process Industry and the implication this may have on a traditionally very process-oriented industry by nature. Further, the paper organises the burgeoning product development literature into three main determinants: innovation type, technology strategy and organisational aspect. The selection of determinants to the conceptual framework, adjusting for Process Industry origins in previous written research material and our own empirical work of product development in Process Industry, is briefly presented at the beginning of the paper. Our literature review focuses on the product development process and builds the framework of our conceptual model detailing the elements of intra- and inter-firm processes in the product development process of the Process Industry. Our purpose is to give an increased understanding of the changed innovation pattern in Process Industry and its implication on activities concerning organisation and management of the product development process.

  • 7.
    Dávila, Guillermo Antonio
    et al.
    Department of Knowledge Engineering and Management, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario Trindade, Florianópolis/SC, Brazil.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Varvakis, Gregorio
    Department of Knowledge Engineering and Management, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario Trindade, Florianópolis/SC, Brazil.
    Knowledge Absorptive Capacity, Innovation, and Firm’s Performance: Insights From the South of Brazil2018In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 22, no 2, article id UNSP 1850013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to verify the relationships that may exist between knowledge absorptive capacity (ACAP), innovation performance, and organisational performance in Brazilian firms. A sample of 111 firms from Southern Brazil was surveyed and PLSSEM was used to test the theoretical hypotheses. The relevance of ACAP for innovation and organisational performance is supported. The research also shows that realised ACAP has more influence on innovation performance compared with potential ACAP. Some guidelines for furthering ACAP models suitable for developing countries are provided as well. The findings are a good reference for practitioners as they identify possible actions which can enhance ACAP and thereby contribute to improving innovativeness and performance. This research complements earlier studies which called for the exploration of the role of ACAP on innovation performance and firm’s competitiveness in developing countries, and it opens new avenues for multidisciplinary research.

  • 8.
    Ellonen, Hanna-Kaisa
    et al.
    Lappeenranta University of Technology.
    Jantunen, Ari
    Lappeenranta University of Technology.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    The interplay of dominant logic and dynamic capabilities in innovation activities2015In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the strategic management literature, both managerial cognition and dynamic capabilities have been identified as drivers of change and transition in changing business environments. The purpose of this study is to explore the interplay of dominant logic and dynamic capabilities in the magazine publishing industry. We investigated four magazine publishing business units of a large media corporation situated in four different countries, namely Finland, the Netherlands, Hungary and Russia. A total of 40 magazine managers were interviewed. The results imply that dominant logic and dynamic capabilities coevolve in a reciprocal relationship, and the interplay of cognition and capabilities seems to be most visible in the seizing and reconfiguring capabilities. The results of the present study also illustrate that there may be several contradictory dominant logics within a single company. Dynamic capabilities useful to innovation processes are developed in the areas that are pinpointed by the managers as the locus of attention. Industry transition does not automatically change what companies think and do. That requires managerial attention and an active reconceptualization of the business and active development of not only day-to-day operations, but capabilities needed to change the way we work.

  • 9.
    Eslami, Mohammad H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköpings universitet, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap.
    Internal integration in complex collaborative product development projects2016In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-28, article id 1650008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the importance of internal integration for effective inter-firm collaboration with suppliers is widely acknowledged, it is presently unclear how it is achieved in complex collaborative product development projects. This paper aims to address this gap in extant knowledge by investigating the internal integration approaches and exploring related project management challenges. Specifically, three internal integration approaches are found, namely integration based on multidirectional, frequent interaction; integration based on delimited, problem-solving; and based on unidirectional, information-oriented interaction. The study findings suggest that internal integration approaches are related to the degree of uncertainty in the subsystems of the suppliers, rather than the overall product system. Consequently, in complex product development projects involving many internal functions and several different suppliers, the specific supplier tasks, rather than the overall project structure and aims, determine the mode of internal integration required. This complexity creates important challenges for organisation, and requires flexibility in internal integration approaches.

  • 10.
    Fried, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gey, Ronny
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Pretorius, Agnieta
    Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa.
    Günther, Lars
    Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany.
    Decoupling from Standards - Process Management and Technical Innovation in Software Development Organizations2013In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 17, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores process management standards in software development organisations. It centres on the question how organisations manage the compliance with process standards as well as the need for ongoing technical innovation at the same time. It refers to former studies where it was concluded that process management standards tend to crowd out technical innovations in organisations. By reconsidering the coupling approach of Orton and Weick (1990) we show based on four case studies that it does not apply to those organisations which allow innovating activities being loosely coupled or decoupled from the reigning standard script. These organisations sustain their chances for incremental and fundamental technical innovations. Dealing with loosely coupled or decoupled innovating activities implies a dialectical standard management. It means that potentially contradictory and conflict-ridden activities like standardised practices and innovating activities are manageable by specific institutional, temporarily limited and formal/informal solutions. Furthermore, we scrutinise in this paper the decoupling discussion of some parts of the standard management literature. Standard decoupling is often seen as an unfortunate, but necessary solution to cope with external pressure for internal standardisation. In contrast to this, we develop an understanding where standard decoupling is not defined as a set of activities without affecting the ‘technical core’ of an organisation (Brunsson and Jacobsson, 2000b; Meyer and Rowan, 1967). Rather, decoupling is seen as a temporary and locally limited situation of an innovating subsystem within an organisation where it is allowed to detach from reigning standardised practices and to test and develop innovative ideas under less formalised conditions.

  • 11.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Managing information in new product development: a conceptual review, research propositions and tentative Model2007In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 441-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies in new product development (NPD) single out the use of information (especially market information) as a key predictor of NPD performance, but knowledge is lacking about what type of information is needed in each phase of the NDP process to enable high NPD performance. Based on a literature review and a pilot case study, this article increases the understanding of managing information in NPD. It is argued that the capability of managing information consists of three components: acquiring, sharing, and using information. By focusing on three different phases of the NPD process, 11 propositions regarding which information, information sources and means of cross-functional integration patterns that are most important to high NPD performance have been derived in each respective phase. In addition, the article also discusses antecedents and consequences of managing information. The article concludes with implications for managers, identifies limitations and proposes an agenda for further research into this area

  • 12.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi.
    Sjöström, Roland
    Industrial Marketing, Management and Engineering, Linkping University.
    Uddenberg, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi.
    Rönnbäck, Anna Öhrwall
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi.
    Fast-growing SMEs and the Role of Innovation2012In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 1240003-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study of 409 Swedish SMEs, the difference between the highest growing, which can be characterized as gazelles, and the lowest growing companies were examined regarding performance change over a four year period and what contributed to the growth from an innovation perspective. It was concluded that, besides growing, the highest growing companies also showed high profitability,increased number of employees, and significantly higher markets shares locally, nationally and internationally than the lowest growing companies. Several traits were found to contribute to this. The highest growing companies had a significantly higher portion of new products as part of the turnover during the four years studied and they perceived themselves as differentiating from their competitors concerning: (1) offering better products, (2) understanding customer needs better, (3) having a higher pace or being more agile, and (4) keeping costs down. They also found it more important to take risks, reinvest any profit, and to focus on growth than the lowest growing companies, and this regardless of industry.

  • 13.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöström, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uddenberg, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fast-growing SMEs and the Role of Innovation2012In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 1240003-1-1240003-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study of 409 Swedish SMEs, the difference between the highest growing, which can be characterized as gazelles, and the lowest growing companies were examined regarding performance change over a four year period and what contributed to the growth from an innovation perspective. It was concluded that, besides growing, the highest growing companies also showed high profitability,increased number of employees, and significantly higher markets shares locally, nationally and internationally than the lowest growing companies. Several traits were found to contribute to this. The highest growing companies had a significantly higher portion of new products as part of the turnover during the four years studied and they perceived themselves as differentiating from their competitors concerning: (1) offering better products, (2) understanding customer needs better, (3) having a higher pace or being more agile, and (4) keeping costs down. They also found it more important to take risks, reinvest any profit, and to focus on growth than the lowest growing companies, and this regardless of industry.

  • 14.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lunds universitet.
    Rönnbäck, Anna Öhrwall
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi.
    VIEW AND MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATIVENESS UPON SUCCESSION IN FAMILY-OWNED SMEs2011In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 617-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into how the successors of family-owned manufacturing SMEs view and manage innovativeness. Research into company takeovers mainly focuses on large companies and little is known about innovativeness in research on family-owned businesses, often SMEs. This paper presents findings from ten company successions, five of which describe family successions and five external ones. The paper points to that there is little difference in how various types of successor view and manage innovativeness. A successor is chosen with care and this also influences the view and management of innovativeness; other criteria seem to apply in the succession and radical changes can only be introduced if a number of contextual factors are managed properly. The paper also indicates that while financial constraints may limit innovations, a strong financial situation is not an antecedent for innovativeness.

  • 15.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lunds Tekniska Högskola.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    VIEW AND MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATIVENESS UPON SUCCESSION IN FAMILY-OWNED SMEs2011In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 617-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into how the successors of family-owned manufacturing SMEs view and manage innovativeness. Research into company takeovers mainly focuses on large companies and little is known about innovativeness in research on family-owned businesses, often SMEs. This paper presents findings from ten company successions, five of which describe family successions and five external ones. The paper points to that there is little difference in how various types of successor view and manage innovativeness. A successor is chosen with care and this also influences the view and management of innovativeness; other criteria seem to apply in the succession and radical changes can only be introduced if a number of contextual factors are managed properly. The paper also indicates that while financial constraints may limit innovations, a strong financial situation is not an antecedent for innovativeness.

  • 16.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    View and management of innovativeness upon succession in family-owned SMEs2011In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 617-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into how the successors of family-owned manufacturing SMEs view and manage innovativeness. Research into company takeovers mainly focuses on large companies and little is known about innovativeness in research on family-owned businesses, often SMEs. This paper presents findings from ten company successions, five of which describe family successions and five external ones. The paper points to that there is little difference in how various types of successor view and manage innovativeness. A successor is chosen with care and this also influences the view and management of innovativeness; other criteria seem to apply in the succession and radical changes can only be introduced if a number of contextual factors are managed properly. The paper also indicates that while financial constraints may limit innovations, a strong financial situation is not an antecedent for innovativeness.

  • 17.
    Han, Junghee
    et al.
    Science Management Hongik University, Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Department of Economics, Sogang University, Korea.
    Determinants of Financial Rewards from Industry-University Collaboration in South Korea2016In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 235-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The external circumstances for universities have been changing rapidly. In order to be competitive, survive and flourish, universities have turned to external sources to generate revenues. The literature refers to this phenomenon as academic capitalism, defined as the involvement of colleges and their faculty in market-like behaviours, which has become a key feature of higher education finances in most countries. As a result, technology transfer, technological commercialisation, and patents via industry–university collaboration represent a source of financial rewards. This paper explores the determinants of financial rewards of universities sourced from academic engagement through industry–university collaboration in South Korea. We have found that technology transfer per employees working at technology licensing offices, participation of engineering faculty, patent approvals, and the number of firms with incubators within universities significantly contributes to university revenues. The following determinants of financial performance are unexpectedly not contributors to revenue: technological commercialisation using technology transfer, distinguished faculty and incentive rules for inventors. In the light of these findings, it appears that an entrepreneurial university program is likely to play a strong role in university finances in Korea.

  • 18.
    Hinteregger, Christoph
    et al.
    School of Management, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Temel, Serdal
    Department of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey.
    Yesilay, Rustem Baris
    Aviation Higher Vocational School, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey.
    The impact of openness on innovation in SMEs2019In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1950003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of modes of open innovation in smaller companies is still in the development phase. This study responds to this situation and, drawing upon a data set from 4,679 Turkish small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), explores the influence of inbound open innovation and coupled open innovation on marketing innovation as well as process and organisational innovation in SMEs. Results reveal major differences between small and medium-sized Turkish enterprises with regard to both marketing innovation as well as process and organisational innovation. While inbound open innovation positively influences both, marketing as well as process and organisational innovation, the effects for small-sized enterprises are even higher than for medium-sized ones. Coupled open innovation positively influences both innovation outcomes as well, although the effects for medium-sized enterprises are significantly higher than for smaller ones.

  • 19.
    Holzweissig, Kai
    et al.
    Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University Stuttgart, School of Business, Stuttgart, Germany.
    Rundquist, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Factors affecting organisational acceptance of formal NPD processes2017In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 21, no 2, article id 1750011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formal new product development (NPD) processes have become an important tool in NPD management. However, our understanding of what makes formal NPD process implementation successful in terms of acceptance and performance is still limited. This paper contributes to an improved understanding of factors affecting the acceptance and use of formal NPD processes. Our results show that acceptance of formal NPD processes is determined by several factors, such as ease of use, transparency of discourse, continuous improvement, involvement of NPD actors, and the ability to bridge differences in thinking. Furthermore, that acceptance of formal NPD processes affects NPD performance positively. These results draw on data from a survey posted to employees working for nine large manufacturers of commercial vehicles worldwide. The results should encourage managers to consider and enhance the factors affecting acceptance. This could be done through using new media for publication to increase transparency and perceived ease of use of the NPD process. Further acceptance of the formal NPD process is increased if it mirrors an operative reality and if organisational structures for improvement of the process are implemented and inclusive to employees involved in NPD. © 2017 World Scientific Publishing Europe Ltd.

  • 20.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Lovén, Eva
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Managing new technology integration: Integrating software in manufactured products2005In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 343-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development processes in which software is integrated in hardware products are explored with the aim of finding obstacles to the development process and hypothesizing how they can be dealt with. Empirical data are based on case studies in nine manufacturing companies chosen to have a varied amount of software in their products and experience of technology integration. Results indicate that obstacles in experienced companies concern processes, structures and resources but few culture-related issues. In companies with short experience of software integration in hardware development, cultural aspects were important. Where new technology played a strategic role in the product function, organizational issues such as structures, processes and cultural differences formed obstacles. Where technology only had a supporting role, resource-related obstacles such as lack of competencies were more important. Managerial measures tended to be partly related to the different types of obstacles, partly to the strategic situation of the company.

  • 21. Lager, Thomas
    A new conceptual model for the development of process technology in process industry: a point of departure for the transformation of the “process development process” into a formal work process?2000In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 319-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an exploratory survey to R&D managers in different sectors of European Process Industry, the importance and present use of a formal work process for process development has been studied. A new conceptual three-phase model for the "process development process", including the identification of production needs, process development and transfer of results to production, was also tested. The results show that only 44% of the companies in the study presently use a formal work process for process development, but the need for such a process is considered to be high. Good support was given for the new conceptual model as a starting point for further development of a company-specific "process development process".

  • 22. Lager, Thomas
    Multiple progression: a proposed new system for the application of quality function development in the process industry2005In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 311-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a thorough literature review of the present Quality Function Deployment (QFD) methodology and its use in the process industry, it has been concluded that present QFD systems do not address the specific needs of this type of industry. A new QFD system has consequently been developed based on those research findings. The new system has been specially adapted to Process Industry applications and production systems that are often characterised by long chains of customers and suppliers and sometimes by lack of direct contact with end users. The use of the new system is illustrated by a simplified industrial case, and its further application in Process Industry is discussed

  • 23. Lager, Thomas
    Product and process development intensity in process industry: a conceptual and empirical analysis of the allocation of company resources for the development of process technology2002In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 105-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Process Industry, process development traditionally takes a large part of the company's total development efforts, but has nevertheless not received much attention in academic studies. As a part of a larger research project concerning process development in Process Industry, the allocation of company resources to R&D, and to process development in particular, has been investigated in an exploratory survey to R&D managers in European Process Industry (Mining & Mineral Industry, Food & Beverage Industry, Pulp & Paper Industry, Chemical Industry, Basic Metal Industry, and Other Process Industry). The results show that of the total resources for R&D, 40% was allocated to process development, and over 60% of the companies expected this figure to increase in the future. This figure not only shows the future importance of process development, but also indicates that the importance of product development in this group of companies is at present still rated higher than process development. The results from the study do not fit the most widely used theoretical models, and it is concluded that there is a need for better models with more explanatory power. The new concepts of product and process development intensity are introduced. The product and process development intensities can be looked upon as aggregated measures of individual development efforts by a company, and it is thus argued that they are of overall company strategic importance

  • 24.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Marknadsföring.
    Christian, Sandström
    Chalmers University of Technology and the Ratio Institute.
    Analysing uber in social media - disruptive technology or institutional disruption?2016In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant literature suggests that market disruptions take place because of two main reasons: technological disruption or institutional change. In view of these two alternative explanations, this paper aims to explore how the recent rise of the collaborative consumption platform Uber is perceived by consumers and whether this platform is primarily regarded as a technological innovation or as an institutional disruption. Drawing from a dataset of more than 6500 user-generated contents in social media, our findings suggest that Uber is not primarily perceived as a technological innovation, but rather as an institutional disruption.

  • 25.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Sandström, Christian
    Analysing uber in social media - disruptive technology or institutional disruption?2016In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 20, no 5, article id UNSP 1640013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant literature suggests that market disruptions take place because of two main reasons: technological disruption or institutional change. In view of these two alternative explanations, this paper aims to explore how the recent rise of the collaborative consumption platform Uber is perceived by consumers and whether this platform is primarily regarded as a technological innovation or as an institutional disruption. Drawing from a dataset of more than 6500 user-generated contents in social media, our findings suggest that Uber is not primarily perceived as a technological innovation, but rather as an institutional disruption.

  • 26.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology and The Ratio Institute.
    Disruption and social media - entrant firms as institutional entrepreneurs2014In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 18, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological change often leads to competitive turbulence in established industries. Little is known about how the introduction of social media affects incumbent and entrant firms. This paper explores the impact of social media on the fashion journalism industry. Our findings show that entrant fashion bloggers have toppled incumbent fashion journalists. Through a netnographic analysis of published blog content, we argue that entrants have become dominant by transforming the profession of fashion journalism and in doing so, they have acted as institutional entrepreneurs. We argue that entrants are less bound by established institutional practices and that their ability to redefine the dominant logic of an industry can explain why they have outperformed incumbents.

  • 27.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Sandström, Christian
    Disruption and social media: entrant firms as institutional entrepreneurs2014In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological change often leads to competitive turbulence in established industries. Little is known about how the introduction of social media affects incumbent and entrant firms. This paper explores the impact of social media on the fashion journalism industry. Our findings show that entrant fashion bloggers have toppled incumbent fashion journalists. Through a netnographic analysis of published blog content, we argue that entrants have become dominant by transforming the profession of fashion journalism and in doing so, they have acted as institutional entrepreneurs. We argue that entrants are less bound by established institutional practices and that their ability to redefine the dominant logic of an industry can explain why they have outperformed incumbents.

  • 28.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Business Studies, Business studies.
    Formal institutional contexts as ownership of intellectual property rights and their implications for the organization of commercialization of innovations at universities comparative data from Sweden and the United Kingdom2011In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1069-1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies differences in institutional contexts (legislation) between Sweden and the UK and their effects on technology transfer policies. It then proceeds to examine how such activities are organized by universities. Empirical evidence from surveys conducted with technology transfer managers at eight Swedish universities and eleven UK universities gathered in Sweden and the UK during 2004 is analyzed. It is argued that the historical developments of these systems depend on different institutional contexts, which influence the modes of organization. The UK technology transfer system is based on similar legislation to that of the US, with IPRs being granted to the universities. The Swedish system, however, grants IPRs to the individual researchers, though with some new features such as science parks and incubators suggesting a change towards greater agent (university) involvement in encouraging technology transfer. This change indicates a breakthrough for the "entrepreneurial university" in Sweden.

  • 29.
    Lundbäck, Magnus
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Inter-firm product platform development in the automotive industry2005In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 155-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The product platform development process becomes critical and of general interest when different brand name products are developed from inter-firm developed product platforms. The inter-firm platform adds perspectives not considered in previous research. In this article areas related to the inter-firm product platform integration process are described. The study is a longitudinal, deep, explorative study aimed at identifying managerial challenges to inter-firm platform development and how they can be dealt with. Analysis shows that the factory sequence is a critical factor when developing inter-firm platform architecture. Also, making architectural concessions without jeopardising brand uniqueness places new demands on managers involved in the development processes. Further, we found a reciprocal interdependence between technological and managerial factors that created a need for innovative organisational and managerial solutions. Finally, reciprocal interdependences add complementary theoretical knowledge on how to better control and understand areas that hamper inter-firm product development projects from attaining cost-effective solutions and economies of scale.

  • 30.
    Luthfa, Sabrina
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    A study of how uncertainty emerges in theuncertainty-embedded innovation process2019In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 46--79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to understand about how uncertainty emerges in the innovation process. Since uncertainty is embedded in the innovation process, to understand how uncertainty emerges in the process one needs to understand how innovation process unfolds over time. Since an innovation process involves various resource recombination activities occurring in several phases, to understand how innovation process unfolds one needs understand “how do various resource recombination activities occur over time for the creation of novelty?” This knowledge would enable us to understand the conditions under which vital activities of resource recombination can/cannot be undertaken and coordinated as well as would allow us to understand the underlying decisions made by the innovators for their efficient undertaking and coordination. This paper investigates the innovation process in two companies through performing qualitative study. The innovation processes are analysed in the light of a conceptual model developed based on the Dubois’ (1994) End-product related activity structure model, Håkansson’s (1987) “ARA model” and Goldratt’s (1997) “Critical chain concept”. The findings suggest that uncertainty emerges in the innovation process in a cycle of interaction with resource void, activity void and actors’ limited cognition due to lack of knowledge, undue optimism, and rationally justified reason for disregarding information. Accordingly, a great deal of compromises is made while undertaking the activities.

  • 31.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Product innovation in small companies: managing resource scarcity through financial bootstrapping2017In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 21, no 2, article id UNSP 1750020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have proposed that scarce resources are the main factor hindering product innovation in small companies. However, despite scarce resources, small companies do innovate, so the research question is: How do small companies manage resource scarcity in product innovation? To answer the research question a multiple case study of three small established companies and their product innovation was used, including interviews and observations over a period of five months. The small companies were found to use many different bootstrapping methods in combination within their product innovation. The methods can be classified into three different functional categories: bootstrapping methods for increasing resources, for using existing resources more efficiently, and those for securing a fast payback on resources put into product innovation. Due to their resource scarcity, the studied companies also favoured an innovation strategy only involving new products done with known technology and targeting existing markets. This strategy seems to avoid unsuccessful innovation but at the same time exclude technologically radical innovation.

  • 32.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindström, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Architectural or modular innovation? Managing discontinuous product development in response to challenging environmental performance targets2003In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By adopting challenging targets on environmental performance, pro-active industrial firms may push themselves towards discontinuous product innovation. Such innovation can be understood as being either architectural, i.e. arranging components in new ways, or modular, i.e. introducing new technologies in specific components or subsystems. We argue that these two dimensions of discontinuous change call for some specific managerial responses. Architectural innovation challenges the whole engineering organisation, making it necessary to focus development efforts on technological interfaces, whereas modular innovation has a more isolated effect, making specialisation and co-ordination over organisational boundaries particularly important. Altogether, our analysis highlights the importance of adapting the project organisation to the development task and addressing part-whole relationships when managing innovation in established products and systems, something that becomes increasingly important in the strive towards sustainable development.

  • 33. Mattsson, J.
    et al.
    Helmersson, H.
    Stetler, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    MOTIVATION FATIGUE AS A THREAT TO INNOVATION: BYPASSING THE PRODUCTIVITY DILEMMA IN R&D BY CYCLIC PRODUCTION2016In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 20, no 2, article id 1650018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What do employees need in order to be innovative? In this paper, we explored how employees with different lengths of tenure within the research and development (R&D) department of a company in the automotive industry answer this question. We found that the needs vary depending on the length of the employee's tenure. New employees view innovation as an organisational work issue and employees with longer tenure seek the support of management in changing the work situation themselves in a way that will enhance innovation. In contrast, employees who have been with the company over 10 years show signs of resignation and blame management for the problems around innovation that they experience. However, one opinion that all groups of different tenures share is that there is not enough time to engage in innovation activities. To address some of these different needs, we suggest viewing productivity as a cycle of two outcomes: product information and knowledge creation. When one is low, the other peaks, and vice versa. This view of dual value creation in R&D is one way to bypass the productivity dilemma.

  • 34.
    Mohammad, Eslami
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Internal integration in complex collaborative product development projects2016In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-28, article id 1650008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the importance of internal integration for effective inter-firm collaboration with suppliers is widely acknowledged, it is presently unclear how it is achieved in complex collaborative product development projects. This paper aims to address this gap in extant knowledge by investigating the internal integration approaches and exploring related project management challenges. Specifically, three internal integration approaches are found, namely integration based on multidirectional, frequent interaction; integration based on delimited, problem-solving; and based on unidirectional, information-oriented interaction. The study findings suggest that internal integration approaches are related to the degree of uncertainty in the subsystems of the suppliers, rather than the overall product system. Consequently, in complex product development projects involving many internal functions and several different suppliers, the specific supplier tasks, rather than the overall project structure and aims, determine the mode of internal integration required. This complexity creates important challenges for organisation, and requires flexibility in internal integration approaches.

  • 35. Olsén Hammarfjord, Magnus
    et al.
    Roxenhall, Tommy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    The relationship between network commitment, antecedents, and innovation in strategic innovation networks2017In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 21, no 4, article id UNSP 1750037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic innovation networks, formed to stimulate innovation performance and eco- nomic growth for members and regions via collaborative activities, have recently be- come increasingly common. Numerous researchers have noted the effect of network structure on innovation performance and also discussed the mediating role of commit- ment. Many studies suggest that commitment strongly mediates firm and network out- come and performance. Studies of organisational behaviour, relationship marketing, and human resources demonstrate that commitment leads to better firm performance, inter- firm cooperation, network performance, market knowledge transfer, knowledge sharing, future intentions, retention, and enforcement mechanisms. Strangely, studies of the re- lationship between commitment and innovation from a network perspective are lacking. This study investigates the relationships between commitment, its antecedents, and in- novation performance in strategic innovation networks. The antecedents examined are expectation gap, shared values, ego network density, and ego network size. A ques- tionnaire was emailed to all members of three Swedish strategic innovation networks in different industries and regions to collect data; 150 completed questionnaires were re- ceived for a 27% response rate. Multiple regression, path, and mediation analyses demonstrate that commitment is an important mediating variable when firms in strategic networks jointly develop innovations. Expectation gap and shared values are strongly related to commitment, but ego network density and ego network size are not; however, the last two variables directly affect innovation. This means that relational influence is more important for commitment than the structural effects, while structural effects are more significant for innovation. 

  • 36.
    Remneland-Wikhamn, Björn
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kuschel, Jonas
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Open Innovation, Generativity and the Supplier as Peer: The Case of iPhone and Android2011In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 205-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diffusion of various forms of digital technologies has acted as a disrupting force in several industries, promoting open and distributed innovation processes. In this paper we argue that the supplier in open innovation networks tends to get a more active role as a creative peer producer, rather than merely a contractual deliverer. A comparative case study of the mobile phone platforms iPhone and Android is used to analyze this shift in innovative value creation. The notion of generative capacity is introduced to the research on open innovation, suggesting that it is generativity rather than openness that drives the platforms' aggregated wealth. The two cases from the mobile phone industry illustrate that innovation initiatives can successfully approach generativity in different ways and that both openness and control are important to facilitate supplier contributions. © 2011 Imperial College Press.

  • 37.
    Rossell, David T.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Implementation of Open Innovation Strategies: A Byers-Supplier Perspective2014In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 18, no 06, p. -23, article id 1440013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open innovation concept has been discussed for more than a decade. However, there are relatively few studies related to implementation of open innovation. Barriers of implementation have been identified, but they are not related to the external knowledge searched for. This multiple-case study adds to current understanding of implementing open innovation strategies by focusing on the cooperation and coordination challenges when opening up for different types of supplier knowledge. Possible solutions and trade-offs between short-term benefits and long-term goals are presented that take into consideration the character of knowledge and human behavior. By applying theories such as knowledge-based view and transaction cost theories on empirical findings, different explanations are sought that bring new insights into managing open innovation.

  • 38.
    Roxenhall, Tommy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Network Structure and Innovation in Strategic Innovation Networks2013In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 1350002-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to improve our understanding of how network structure affects innovation outcomes in strategic innovation networks. The theoretical argument is illustrated by the case of a Swedish strategic innovation network. I conducted a social network analysis of the relationships between 58 network members. Roughly half of the network actors were involved in producing innovations; they had significantly larger, higher-density networks and occupied more central positions in their networks than did those not participating in the innovation or scientific work.

  • 39.
    Rundquist, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The ability to integrate different types of Knowledge and its effect on Innovation Performance2012In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 16, no 2, article id 1250014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of a firm’s ability to integrate knowledge on their innovation performance, in order to help firms prioritize their resources used for knowledge integration more effectively. Data were collected from a survey mailed to R&D managers in firms with between 100-1000 employees in a cross-section of industries. Five hypotheses were tested using multiple regression analysis with and without interaction terms. The results indicate that a categorization of knowledge is useful for understanding knowledge integration. The study also shows that the ability to integrate domain-specific knowledge is significantly related to innovation performance. Furthermore, the results indicate that technology turbulence in the industry has a positive moderating effect on the above relation. Managerial implications suggest how managers can focus their efforts in order to effectively integrate knowledge in product development projects. © Imperial College Press.

  • 40.
    Ryzhkova, Natalia
    et al.
    Blekinge tekniska högskola.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Absorptive Capacity, Collaboration with Customers and Innovation Performance of Gazelle Companies in Knowledge-Intensive Industries2015In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 1550059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowing what customers want and how they use products contribute to company's innovativeness. Absorptive capacity (ACAP) is one theoretical construct that explains how companies gain information about customers and how such information is applied into practice. Yet, empirical evidence on the relationship between ACAP and knowledge from customers is still lacking. This study proposes and tests if customer collaboration is supported by ACAP and mediates the effect of ACAP on innovation performance. An established and previously validated second-order construct of ACAP is suggested to test these hypothesised relationships. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to a sample of 120 selected gazelle companies that have had stable growth rates during the past three years to analyse the proposed relationships. The main finding of the study is that customer collaboration mediates the effect of ACAP on innovation performance.

  • 41.
    Ryzhkova, Natalia
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Absorptive Capacity, Collaboration with Customers and Innovation Performance of Gazelle Companies in Knowledge-Intensive Industries2015In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 19, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowing what customers want and how they use products contribute to company’s innovativeness. Absorptive capacity (ACAP) is one theoretical construct that explains how companies gain information about customers and how such information is applied into practice. Yet, empirical evidence on the relationship between ACAP and knowledge from customers is still lacking. This study proposes and tests if customer collaboration is supported by ACAP and mediates the effect of ACAP on innovation performance. An established and previously validated second-order construct of ACAP is suggested to test these hypothesised relationships. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to a sample of 120 selected gazelle companies that have had stable growth rates during the past three years to analyse the proposed relationships. The main finding of the study is that customer collaboration mediates the effect of ACAP on innovation performance. © 2015 Imperial College Press.

  • 42.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Procurement procedures for supplier integration and open innovation in mature industries2010In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 655-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development and installation of new process equipment in production plants typically require strong collaborative efforts by a process firm and its equipment suppliers. However, existing knowledge about how such supplier integration and open innovation practices should be organized and managed is scarce. The purpose of this investigation is therefore to explore how process firms can organize and manage supplier integration and open innovation practices when developing and installing new process technology. By means of a literature review and a case study of two process firms, a lifecycle perspective on procurement is adopted. Our results show that the process firms utilize different interconnected cooperative procurement procedures in different stages of the equipment's lifecycle, in order to enhance integration both in buyer-supplier dyads and among the suppliers in the project network. The contributions of the paper are summarized and illustrated in a developed lifecycle-based procurement model that guides practitioners in organizing and managing supplier integration and open innovation practices

  • 43.
    Srinivasan, Jayakanth
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.
    Creating a Lean System of Innovation: The Case of Rockwell Collins2010In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 379-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean and Innovation have both been touted as transformational strategies that are essential to long term survival of organizations. The question of whether the two constructs can be used simultaneously remains unanswered. This paper is the first step at deriving a theory of lean systems of innovation that combines the notions of lean transformation with that of innovation. The descriptive understanding of Rockwell Collins developed in this paper, draws on publicly available material to support the identifications of the key elements of a strategic system of innovation. Our analysis highlighted the successful use of technology scanning, internal R&D, and open innovation at Rockwell Collins. These approaches were supported by the existence of a shared value proposition, a strong organizational culture that recognized and rewarded innovation, and the requisite organizational infrastructure.

  • 44.
    Sukhov, Alexandre
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Magnusson, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    That makes sense to me: Openness to change and sensemaking in idea screening2018In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1-15, article id 1840009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how a person’s sense of identity (expressed in terms of openness to change vs. conservation) influences the way in which they screen early ideas for innovation projects. To study this, we recruited 20 experts from a leading IT-consultancy firm to individually evaluate and comment on 12 R&D project ideas. This data was then analysed by using a configurational approach (fsQCA) to understand how different experts combine various evaluation dimensions together to make sense of and decide on the goodness of an idea. The findings show that experts who are open to change view ideas as opportunities and approach idea screening as a generative process, while conservative experts are more reserved in their idea screening activities.

  • 45.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. BI Norwegian School of Management, Norway.
    Competence dynamics and learning processes in project-based firms: shifting, adapting and leveraging2008In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 41-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In times of increasing use of project-based structures, the capability of managing and organising projects becomes critical for competition. Previous research has documented the problems and possibilities of cross-project learning and various mechanisms that organisations can use to stimulate and facilitate learning. Moreover, research on project competence and project capabilities has positioned these capabilities within a knowledge-based theory of the firm. This paper tries to integrate these streams of research and attempts to broaden our current conceptual frameworks of how firms develop project competence. Based on an exploratory multiple-case study of six firms, it is suggested that a more fine-grained analysis of competence dynamics is required. We identify three different learning processes that contribute to the competence dynamics operating in project-based organisations. The first one labelled "shifting" revolves around the major shifts in the project operations of the firm. It is suggested that such major shifts play an important role in laying the foundation and rejuvenating the challenges of project organising. The second learning process identified, labelled "adapting", focuses on the continuous learning that takes place within project operations of the firm, between project generation, project organising, project leadership and project teamwork. The third and final learning process - "leveraging" - emphasises the role of knowledge transfer across projects, across similar projects, across different types of projects. It is suggested that empirical research into competence dynamics in project-based organisations should consider all three types of learning processes and further develop our understanding how these processes are linked to each other.

  • 46.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration.
    Developing project competence: empirical regularities in competitive project operations2005In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 451-480Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Acquiring once, acquiring twice: Lessons learned from repeated acquisitions of innovative firms2011In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1243-1269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and discusses learning in repeated acquisitions of innovative firms. Researchers have pointed to how companies may improve performance through conducting repeated acquisitions, while they have not previously focused on repeated acquisitions of innovative firms. Findings of this present study are summarised in five learnings: forming a professional organisation that deals with acquisitions; acquiring present, ready-for-market innovations rather than innovative capabilities; acquiring complementary rather than diverse innovations; keeping the innovator and disbanding from him/her; and the slow process of integration. The findings indicate risk reductions and decreased diversification foci in later acquisitions. They also pinpoint learning on how to handle acquisitions, not just knowledge related to the acquired party. The paper contributes to research on acquisitions of innovative firms through discussing performance improvements and what expectations to place on acquisitions. It also contributes to the learning literature through providing a case illustration on a company that changed its acquisition strategy based on knowledge accumulated through previous acquisitions.

  • 48.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Customer roles in innovations2010In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 989-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and classify the roles of customers in innovations. In literature on innovations, customers have been increasingly emphasised as a source for innovations and also in how they help develop ideas in their early phases. This paper exemplifies various customer roles in innovations through three case studies. These describe the customer as initiator, as co-producer and as inspiration for business development. Through using role theory to discuss customers in innovations, it becomes explicit how customers may play their traditional roles, add roles or transfer to new roles beyond the scope of being a customer. Furthermore, the paper shows that customer roles change during the innovation process from added or transferred towards more traditional ones.

  • 49.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Customer roles in innovations2010In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 989-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and classify the roles of customers in innovations. In literature on innovations, customers have been increasingly emphasised as a source for innovations and also in how they help develop ideas in their early phases. This paper exemplifies various customer roles in innovations through three case studies. These describe the customer as initiator, as co-producer and as inspiration for business development. Through using role theory to discuss customers in innovations, it becomes explicit how customers may play their traditional roles, add roles or transfer to new roles beyond the scope of being a customer. Furthermore, the paper shows that customer roles change during the innovation process from added or transferred towards more traditional ones.

  • 50.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    How innovation impacts artistic creativity: Managing innovation in the advertising sector2016In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 20, no 4, article id UNSP 1640005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and discusses how innovation impacts creativity in the advertising sector. It points to the double meaning of creativity - as innovativeness and as artistic skills - and indicates a tension between the two. Empirical illustrations consist of two case studies from the advertising sector. These point to how innovations (in terms of adaptation of new technology) negatively impact artistic creativity. Contextual factors creating a need for new technology did have an impact, and meant that companies became increasingly competitive and roles became unclear. On the company level, innovation caused knowledge gaps, increased formalization, and expanded the division of work. Contribution is made to research on the management of creativity by suggesting how innovation impacts artistic creativity. Furthermore, the discussion on company level creativity contributes to research on the advertising sector, since the literature has foremost discussed creative processes of individual campaigns.

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