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  • 1.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Exploring the roles of university spin-offs in business networks2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 59, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies different university spin-off (USO) roles related to resource interaction among business parties. It does so by mapping how USOs become part of business networks in terms of their roles relative to other parties. The theoretical frame of reference focuses on roles and resource interaction based on an industrial network approach to business markets. The empirical research is based onfive cases of USOs representing a variety in terms of technology, degree of newness, sector, and area of application. As a result of the analysis, three different roles are identified: the USO as resource mediator, resource re-combiner and resource renewer. These roles reflect how USOs adapt resources to, or require changes among, business parties' resources. The paper also discusses the main resource interfaces associated with the three roles and related challenges. The paper contributes to previous research through illustrating USOs' roles relative to business parties from a resource interaction point of view, and by pointing to the establishment of new companies in business networks as a way of implementing innovation. Finally, the paper discusses the managerial implications of the research in terms of the USO's need to understand which role to take and how to develop it.

  • 2. Akpinar, Murat
    et al.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The dynamics of coopetition: A stakeholder view of the German automotive industry2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 57, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to calls for better understanding the dynamics of coopetition, this study aims to develop a framework that explains why the levels of competition and cooperation change over time. The framework adopts the two-continua approach to coopetition and the theoretical concepts of power and stake from the stakeholder literature. Integrating concepts from the coopetition and stakeholder literatures is a promising attempt, which is justified by the fact that stakeholders are in coopetition with the firm. According to our framework the power difference affects the level of competition, and vice versa, whereas common stakes affect the level of cooperation, and vice versa. This was subject to a test with insights from the in-depth analysis of the changing coopetition between the Volkswagen Group and Porsche AG during the period 2001–2012. Our findings explain why an environmental threat on one of the firms shifted the power difference and changed the coopetition first from cooperation-dominant to balanced-strong and then ended it through a full acquisition.

  • 3.
    Aliasghar, Omid
    et al.
    Auckland University of Technology.
    Rose, Elizabeth
    Leeds University.
    Chetty, Sylvie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Building absorptive capacity through firm openess in a context of a less open country2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Andersen, Poul Houman
    et al.
    Medlin, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Törnroos, Jan-Åke
    Re-appraising interaction and process for industrial network research: Thefuture plunging mirror hall metaphorIn: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Havila, V.
    Salmi, A.
    Can You Buy a Business Relationship?: On The Importance of Customer and Supplier Relationships in Acquisitions2001In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 575-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions have become a popular strategy for gaining growth. Studies show, however, high failure rates for acquisitions. Earlier literature concentrates on the strategic or organizational fit between companies and integration processes and fails to recognize the companies' external business relationships. An implicit assumption seems to be that through acquisition the market position of the target firm can be taken over. We argue that it is not always easy or even possible to take over a company's customer and supplier relationships. We elaborate on the various problems related to relationships that acquisitions may give rise to. Our conceptual discussion is illustrated with a case study from the graphics industry. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  • 6.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Havila, V.
    Salmi, A.
    Can You Buy a Business Relationship?: On The Importance of Customer and Supplier Relationships in Acquisitions2001In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 575-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions have become a popular strategy for gaining growth. Studies show, however, high failure rates for acquisitions. Earlier literature concentrates on the strategic or organizational fit between companies and integration processes and fails to recognize the companies' external business relationships. An implicit assumption seems to be that through acquisition the market position of the target firm can be taken over. We argue that it is not always easy or even possible to take over a company's customer and supplier relationships. We elaborate on the various problems related to relationships that acquisitions may give rise to. Our conceptual discussion is illustrated with a case study from the graphics industry. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  • 7.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Havila, V
    Salmi, A
    Can You Buy a Business Relationship?: On The Importance of Customer and Supplier Relationships in Acquisitions2001In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 575-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions have become a popular strategy for gaining growth. Studies show, however, high failure rates for acquisitions. Earlier literature concentrates on the strategic or organizational fit between companies and integration processes and fails to recognize the companies' external business relationships. An implicit assumption seems to be that through acquisition the market position of the target firm can be taken over. We argue that it is not always easy or even possible to take over a company's customer and supplier relationships. We elaborate on the various problems related to relationships that acquisitions may give rise to. Our conceptual discussion is illustrated with a case study from the graphics industry.

  • 8.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    A professional services firm's competence development2007In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1068-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conceptualization of a firm's competence development has undergone some developments, as seen from the extant literature. However, studies or explanations of a firm's competence development over time seem to concentrate on firms that manufacture physical goods. The literature is devoid of studies on the competence development of professional services firms (PSFs). With two in-depth case studies, this paper seeks to shed light on factors that impinge on PSFs' competence development over time. An important finding of this study is that all the two PSFs' competence development over time has been influenced, in large measure, by their close and regular interaction with their respective immediate customers as well as with some significant third parties in their network of exchange relationships, where the actors mutually adapt to each other and also learn from each other. Evidences in all the two cases show that each of the firms has won and kept important customers that give them the most and frequent assignments per year, thanks to the factors that have affected their competence to meet customers' demand over time.

  • 9.
    Bai, Wensong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Johanson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. School of Technology and Business Studies, Dalarna University.
    International opportunity network2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunity seeking has become increasingly important for explaining firm internationalization, but our understanding of how opportunity is mediated within international networks is limited. This study probes the concept of network-mediated opportunities and attempts to identify what drives a firm’s reception of new international opportunities. Based on the notion of opportunity in the entrepreneurship literature with the network view on internationalization, we bring together the concepts of relationships, networks, capabilities, and opportunity in a structural model, where we hypothesize that network-mediated opportunity is dependent on networking capability. This, in turn, is positively influenced by network closure and relational embeddedness. We test the model on a sample of 200 Chinese firms. The analysis partly supports the model, as we find that networking capability is a mediating factor between relational embeddedness and network-mediated opportunity, but does not mediate the relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity; on the other hand, we find a direct relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity. The paper ends with a discussion of the results and suggestions for future research.

  • 10.
    Bai, Wensong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. Department of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, College of Economics and Management, Zhejiang University of Technology, 312000 Hangzhou, China.
    Johanson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. School of Technology and Business Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden; Department of Business, Economics and Law, Mid Sweden University, Sweden .
    International opportunity networks2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 70, no S1, p. 167-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunity seeking has become increasingly important for explaining firm internationalization, but our understanding of how opportunity is mediated within international networks is limited. This study probes the concept of network-mediated opportunities and attempts to identify what drives a firm's reception of new international opportunities. Based on the notion of opportunity in the entrepreneurship literature with the network view on internationalization, we bring together the concepts of relationships, networks, capabilities, and opportunity in a structural model, where we hypothesize that network-mediated opportunity is dependent on networking capability. This, in turn, is positively influenced by network closure and relational embeddedness. We test the model on a sample of 200 Chinese firms. The analysis partly supports the model, as we find that networking capability is a mediating factor between relational embeddedness and network-mediated opportunity, but does not mediate the relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity; on the other hand, we find a direct relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity. The paper ends with a discussion of the results and suggestions for future research.

  • 11.
    Bai, Wensong
    et al.
    Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, China; Uppsala University.
    Johanson, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law. Uppsala University; Dalarna University.
    International opportunity networks2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 70, no April 2018, p. 167-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunity seeking has become increasingly important for explaining firm internationalization, but our understanding of how opportunity is mediated within international networks is limited. This study probes the concept of network-mediated opportunities and attempts to identify what drives a firm's reception of new international opportunities. Based on the notion of opportunity in the entrepreneurship literature with the network view on internationalization, we bring together the concepts of relationships, networks, capabilities, and opportunity in a structural model, where we hypothesize that network-mediated opportunity is dependent on networking capability. This, in turn, is positively influenced by network closure and relational embeddedness. We test the model on a sample of 200 Chinese firms. The analysis partly supports the model, as we find that networking capability is a mediating factor between relational embeddedness and network-mediated opportunity, but does not mediate the relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity; on the other hand, we find a direct relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity. The paper ends with a discussion of the results and suggestions for future research.

  • 12.
    Bai, Wensong
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet; Zhejiang University of Technology.
    Johanson, Martin
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Business Administration and Management. Uppsala universitet; Mittuniversitetet.
    International opportunity networks2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 70, p. 167-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunity seeking has become increasingly important for explaining firm internationalization, but our understanding of how opportunity is mediated within international networks is limited. This study probes the concept of network-mediated opportunities and attempts to identify what drives a firm's reception of new international opportunities. Based on the notion of opportunity in the entrepreneurship literature with the network view on internationalization, we bring together the concepts of relationships, networks, capabilities, and opportunity in a structural model, where we hypothesize that network-mediated opportunity is dependent on networking capability. This, in turn, is positively influenced by network closure and relational embeddedness. We test the model on a sample of 200 Chinese firms. The analysis partly supports the model, as we find that networking capability is a mediating factor between relational embeddedness and network-mediated opportunity, but does not mediate the relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity; on the other hand, we find a direct relationship between network closure and network-mediated opportunity. The paper ends with a discussion of the results and suggestions for future research.

  • 13.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Brennan, Ross
    Harrison, Debbie
    Tunisini, Annalisa
    Zolkiewski, Judy
    Strategic thinking and the IMP approach: a comparative analysis2007In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 879-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a characteristic of the IMP approach in studying business markets that the emphasis is placed upon rich description and efforts to understand the underlying processes behind interaction between organizations in networks, rather than on the formulation of managerial checklists and decision rules. For this reason, while IMP scholars have made some interesting and profound contributions to the explicit literature on management strategy, the overall contribution of the IMP approach to the strategy literature has been fairly slim. The purpose of this paper is to compare the IMP approach with five important schools of thought in strategy, with the aims of establishing what areas of agreement and disagreement exist and identifying whether the IMP approach can yield unique insights into strategy, strategizing, and the strategy process. We compare and contrast the IMP approach with, in turn, the rational planning approach to strategy associated with Ansoff, the positioning approach associated with Porter, the resource-based view associated with Barney, the deliberate/emergent approach associated with Mintzberg, and the strategy-as-practice approach associated with Whittington. As we move through these five schools of thought - which are addressed in a roughly chronological order - we discern an increasing degree of alignment with the assumptions and methods of IMP scholars. The outcome from our analysis is a suggested research agenda designed to bring the concepts and methods of industrial network research to bear upon strategy, strategizing, and the strategy process.

  • 14.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ciabuschi, Francesco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Fratocchi, Luciano
    Univ Aquila, Dept Ind & Informat Engn & Econ, Via G Gronchi 18, I-67100 Laquila, Italy.
    A network perspective on the reshoring process: The relevance of the home- and the host-country contexts2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 70, p. 156-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While research on reshoring generally focuses on the host-country to explain why a company brings its previously offshored activities back home, this paper stresses the relevance also of the home-country context. Specifically, relying on the IMP (Industrial Marketing & Purchasing) perspective we show how offshoring and reshoring processes and decisions are both enabled and constrained by the micro-interactions and inter-dependencies in the industrial networks stretching over the home-country and the host-country. This work relies on a longitudinal case study about an Italian manufacturing firm to develop a model indicating how offshoring/reshoring is a long-term process which unfolds depending both on the focal firm's strategy and on its interplay with the embedding network. Next to this interactive process perspective, we contribute to the literature on reshoring and the global factory also the concept of "selective reshoring", whereby companies bring back a very specific sub-set of activities, which were previously fine-sliced and offshored, and re-embed these activities in their local home context. The more flexible and selective nature of this relocation of activities between different supply markets depends both on the firm's strategy and on the structure, overlap and evolution of the network elements located in the home- and host-country contexts.

  • 15.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Gregori, Gian Luca
    Perna, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Analysis and Applied Mathematics.
    Network evolution and the embedding of complex technical solutions: The case of the Leaf House network2011In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 838-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the connection between network evolution and technology embedding. To this end, we performed an exploratory case study of the network surrounding an eco-sustainable technology, Leaf House, Italy's first zero-carbon emission house. We apply theories on technological development within industrial networks, with a specific focus on their resource layer and on the three settings involved in embedding an innovation: “developing”, “producing”, and “using”. Our results contribute to these theories by developing four propositions on the connections between network evolution and embedding: first, technology embedding entails both downstream network expansion and upstream restrictions. Secondly, conflicts among actors increase as technology embedding approaches the producing and using settings. Third and fourth, the more the shapes a technology can assume, and the more each of these shapes involves actors acting in different settings, the easier it is to embed it. The paper concludes with managerial implications and suggestions for further research.

  • 16.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Havenvid, Malena Ingemansson
    NTNU, Norway.
    Linné, Åse
    Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ration Institute, Sweden.
    Start-ups and networks: Interactive perspectives and a research agenda2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 80, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces Industrial Marketing Management's special issue on start-ups and networks. To begin with, we stress the relevance of understanding the context wherein entrepreneurship unfolds – a context filled with social, technical and economic connections to which the start-up needs to relate. We also present and confront three network perspectives which bring different insights to the interplay between start-ups and networks: Social Network (SN) theory, the Industrial Marketing & Purchasing (IMP) view, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT). Next, we introduce the 12 papers of this special issue and place them on a continuum covering a start-up's process of network embedding and including the three periods of establishmentconsolidation and stabilization. We conclude with a research agenda suggesting five avenues for further research: (1) tracing start-ups' process of network embedding, (2) mapping the connections between the different networks affecting a start-up, (3) grasping the negative effects of networks on start-ups, (4) making longitudinal case studies on start-ups and networks more comparable via common analytical tools, and (5) investigating how policy influences the complex interplay between start-ups and networks.

  • 17.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ingemansson Havenvid, Malena
    NTNU, Norway.
    Linné, Åse
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University and The Ratio Institute, Sweden.
    Start-ups and networks: Interactive perspectives and a research agenda2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 80, p. 58-67Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces Industrial Marketing Management's special issue on start-ups and networks. To begin with, we stress the relevance of understanding the context wherein entrepreneurship unfolds – a context filled with social, technical and economic connections to which the start-up needs to relate. We also present and confront three network perspectives which bring different insights to the interplay between start-ups and networks: Social Network (SN) theory, the Industrial Marketing & Purchasing (IMP) view, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT). Next, we introduce the 12 papers of this special issue and place them on a continuum covering a start-up's process of network embedding and including the three periods of establishment, consolidation and stabilization. We conclude with a research agenda suggesting five avenues for further research: (1) tracing start-ups' process of network embedding, (2) mapping the connections between the different networks affecting a start-up, (3) grasping the negative effects of networks on start-ups, (4) making longitudinal case studies on start-ups and networks more comparable via common analytical tools, and (5) investigating how policy influences the complex interplay between start-ups and networks.

  • 18.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Ingemansson, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Launberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Controlling the commercialisation of science across inter-organisational borders: Four cases from two major Swedish universities2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 382-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse howdifferent types of control are applied in different mechanisms for commercialisingscience, according to the inter-organisational interactions involved. To achievethis purpose, we followed a multiple-case study design and selected four casesfrom Uppsala University and the Karolinska Institutet that provided variationin the commercialisation mechanisms (PET Centre, Ångström Materials Academy,Actar, and Karolinska Development). We find that action and resultcontrols dominate in linear ‘spin-out’ funnel mechanisms, while interactive mechanismsentail a combination of action, result and personalcontrols. However, the inter-organisational interactions also impact whichcontrols are applied in a commercialisation mechanism: conflicting goals between a few closely related organisations or limited external interactions are associated with result controls, whileaction controls dominate in the absence of external interactions if timeand efficiency are key goals. Result controls also assume very different roles, depending on the inter-organisational context of a specific commercialisation mechanism.

  • 19.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Proenca, Joao F.
    Proenca, Teresa
    de Castro, Luis Mota
    The supplier's side of outsourcing: Taking over activities and blurring organizational boundaries2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 553-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since most of the literature on outsourcing focuses only to the buying (outsourcing) company, this paper aims to highlight the supplier's side from a relational perspective. The paper stresses the importance of business relationships between suppliers of outsourced activities and their customers. The paper's purpose is specified in two research questions: (1) how is value created within outsourcing and (2) how does the supplier interact with the outsourcing company? Our method relies on an in-depth qualitative case study of Logoplaste, a Portuguese packaging company which supplies large consumer goods manufacturers through complex outsourcing activities. Our analysis identifies three key dimensions of outsourcing relationships: (1) value co-creation via inter-firm coordination (as opposed to unilateral externalization of activities); (2) mutual dependence between supplier and customer due to the supplier's taking over activities; and (3) the blurring of organizational boundaries because of mutual dependence. These dimensions manifest themselves, even though in different degrees, after the initiation of any outsourcing relationship: these variables are new to the literature on outsourcing, which focuses on the ex ante dimensions that influence the customer's pre-relational choices such as "make or buy" and relationship type. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 20.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Strömsten, Torkel
    Controlling and combining resources in networks - from Uppsala to Stanford, and back again: The case of a biotech innovation2009In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 541-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how resources are controlled and combined in a biotech network that spans from Uppsala, Sweden, to Stanford, USA. A case study is reported that describes and analyses how the original discovery, developed at the Department of Genetics and Pathology at Uppsala University, Sweden. was combined with other innovations at Stanford University, California, and under the influence and control of several different actors, including venture capitalists, were exploited within a newly founded company, ParAllele. The paper analyzes the resources that are created, combined and controlled in the network around these scientific discoveries and the company hosting them. This analysis shows how actors are using and are exposed to different control mechanisms, such as action, results and personnel controls, in the innovation process. Our discussion emphasizes how the involved actors apply various types of controls on resources in order to reach their objectives. Forms of control that both entail mobilizing other actors and preventing actions in the emerging network are of importance. We conclude the paper by pointing out the features of control in innovation processes as well as obstacles to control in a business network setting.

  • 21.
    Bengtson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Pahlberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Pourmand, Firouze
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Small firms' interaction with political organizations in the European Union2009In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 687-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About 99% of all firms in the European Union are small, and politicians are increaslingly emphasizing their importance for job creation, technological development and prosperity. Consequently, the political focus is on these firms and a large number of decisions influencing their business activities are constantly taken by political actors at various levels. The aim of this article is to investigate small firms´interaction with political organizations in the EU. Previous studies have shown that these firms have been obliged to follow the coercive political decisions of the EU´s political units. In this paper, however, we identify some changes which demonstrate political support and influence by small firms. Based on case study approach as well as data from a Swedish survey, four propositions concerning small firms´interaction patterns within the political context of the EU will be highlighted and further discussed.

  • 22.
    Bengtson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Pahlberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala Universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Pourmand, Firouze
    Uppsala universitet.
    Small firms' interaction with political organizations in the European Union2009In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 687-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About 99% of all firms in the European Union are small, and politicians are increasingly emphasizing their importance for job creation, technological development and prosperity. Consequently, the political focus is on these firms and a large number of decisions influencing their business activities are constantly taken by political actors at various levels. The aim of this article is to investigate small firms' interaction with political organizations in the EU. Previous studies have shown that these firms have been obliged to follow the coercive political decisions of the EU's political units. In this paper, however, we identify some changes which demonstrate political support and influence by small firms. Based on a case study approach as well as data from a Swedish survey, four propositions concerning small firms' interaction patterns within the political context of the EU will be highlighted and further discussed.

  • 23.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Kock, Sören
    Department of Management and Organization, Hanken School of Economics, Finland & Erling-Persson Center for Entrepreneurship, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Coopetition - Quo vadis?: Past accomplishments and future challenges2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 180-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on coopetition has been conducted for more than two decades. However, several concepts remain that require elaboration. A study on the literature shows that there is a lack of unified definitions, as various definitions have been employed in previous accomplished research. In this article we suggest that the early definition of coopetition, as a dual relationship between firms that simultaneously cooperate and compete needs to be refined. Our new definition suggests that coopetition is a paradoxical relationship between two or more actors, regardless of whether they are in horizontal or vertical relationships, simultaneously involved in cooperative and competitive interactions. We also highlight important contributions to the field, and some shortcomings that point to future challenges for coopetition research. Finally, we put forward five directions for future research: (1) understand the balancing of cooperation and competition, (2) understand the coopetition paradox and engendered tension, (3) apply a multilevel perspective on coopetition (4) understand the dynamics of coopetitive interaction, and (5) understand how coopetition impacts business models and strategy.

  • 24.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Kock, Sören
    Hanken School of Economics, Department of Management and Organization, Finland.
    Lundgren-Henriksson, Eva-Lena
    Hanken School of Economics, Department of Management and Organization, Finland.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Coopetition research in theory and practice: growing new theoretical, empirical, and methodological domains2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 57, p. 4-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the theoretical rooting of present research on coopetition and point to the need for an integration of theories on competition dynamics, and cooperative interactions in social networks. We argue that the future growth of the coopetitive research field hinges on creatively combining existing theoretical approaches with novel research methods and contexts. In particular, we suggest that incorporating theories on the micro foundations of strategic action can substantially enhance the field. The aim of this paper is both to raise questions regarding the theory and practice of coopetition research and to give examples of new approaches and trends that may contribute to the advancement of the field in the future. We consider our research practice and explore avenues for further research starting from what, where and how we study coopetition, to when and who we study. In general, we call for a stronger focus on the centrality of multiple stakeholders in forming, executing, and developing coopetition, and on research methods that can investigate in depth the multitude of actors, interests, and interactions using a multi-level analysis, including the micro foundations of coopetition.

  • 25.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Raza-Ullah, Tatbeeq
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    A systematic review of research on coopetition: Toward a multilevel understanding2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 57, p. 23-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While research on the phenomenon of coopetition has dramatically increased during the last years, this line of inquiry often embodies a loosely connected body of work with fragmented themes, underdeveloped concepts, and little work explaining coopetition at multiple levels. In this paper, we conduct a systematic literature review of the field, and based on a final set of 142 contributions, synthesize the disparate research into a coherent whole by developing an overarching and dynamic multilevel model. We first systematize diverse conceptualizations of coopetition with respect to different levels into The Actor and The Activity Schools of Thought. Then we integrate major critical themes into a Driver, Process, Outcomes (DPO) framework, and offer a Blended School of Thought to show how different levels are intertwined and affect each other. Next, we develop a multilevel conceptual model of coopetition by integrating the Blended School into the DPO framework. This model helps future re- search better understand how the phenomena of coopetition at one level of analysis are distinct, yet interlinked, from coopetition at other levels, and in so doing, provides a richer and more complete perspective of the phe- nomenon of coopetition. Finally, we identify promising research avenues and suggest how future research can strengthen this line of inquiry.

  • 26.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Raza-Ullah, Tatbeeq
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Vanyushyn, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The coopetition paradox and tension: the moderating role of coopetition capability2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 53, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we apply a paradox perspective on coopetition to investigate the effects of coopetition paradox on managers' experience and perception of coopetitive tensions, and the role of coopetition capability in managing such tensions. We propose a theoretical model to posit that the intensity of coopetition paradox positively associates with managers' experience of external tension, which in turn lead them to perceive internal tension. Further, coopetition capability plays a dual role—moderates the relation between coopetition paradox and external tension, and reduces internal tension. We tested hypotheses on a representative multi-industry sample of 1532 firms in Sweden and the results confirm them. Our study contributes to understanding the critical role of coopetition capability that enables firms to maintain a moderate level of tension regardless of the intensity of coopetition paradox. 

  • 27. Berthon, Pierre
    et al.
    Ewing, Michael
    Monash University, Melbourne, VIC.
    Pitt, Leyland
    Naudé, Peter
    Department of Management, University of Bath.
    Understanding B2B and the Web: the acceleration of coordination and motivation2003In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 553-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores business-to-business (13213) marketing on the Internet, and how the confluence of the two may transform the 13213 landscape. Specifically, it discusses the notion of linkage value to demonstrate why the 13213 phenomenon on the Internet is so significant. It then considers the mechanisms and enablers that have made the Web such an important 13213 marketing channel. It also explores how the Web can reduce transaction costs, thereby facilitating more efficient exchanges and markets. The concepts of links and nodes are then introduced and the processes of disintermediation, reintermediation, disaggregation and reaggregation are explored. Finally, Web B2B configurations are considered by way of a model that describes four archetypal configurations, and the factors that are antecedent to these modes and how the Web may influence them.

  • 28.
    Berthon, Pierre
    et al.
    McCallum School of Business, Bentley College, Waltham, MA.
    Pitt, Leyland
    Berthon, Jean-Paul
    Campbell, Colin
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Thwaites, Des
    University of Leeds.
    e-Relationships for e-Readiness: culture and corruption in international e-B2B2008In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of electronic networks in B2B relationships has been growing exponentially. From massive internet B2B exchanges to tiny RFID chips, B2B is increasingly becoming e-B2B. Whilst e-B2B has been explored intra-nationally, its international counterpart is less well documented; as has been the role that culture might play in the development of international e-B2B relationships. In this paper we address this important issue of international e-business relationships. Specifically we explore the interconnection between national e-readiness and cultural values, and address the research question: How do cultural values impact a nation's readiness to engage in e-business? Drawing upon international surveys we link cultural values with national e-business infrastructure. Our findings suggest an intriguing link between cultural values and a nation's readiness for e-B2B. From these results we develop managerial recommendations and extrapolate research opportunities.

  • 29.
    Bessant, John
    et al.
    Centre for Innovation and Service Research, University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Centre for Innovation and Service Research, United Kingdom and Department of Business Administration, University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Trifilova, Anna
    Centre for Innovation and Service Research, University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom; Faculty of Economics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Framing problems in radical innovation2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1284-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of managing radical innovation is partly about dealing with higher levels of uncertainty as organisations seek to extend their exploration into new technological and market spaces. Innovation management routines for dealing with this differ from those around incremental innovation — the well-established exploit/explore dilemma. But it can be argued that there is a second challenge associated with radical innovation under conditions of discontinuity — when new elements in the environment need to be brought into the organisation's frame for search, selection and implementation. Under these conditions existing routines fail and otherwise successful incumbents experience significant difficulties. This paper explores the challenge of such radical innovation through the lens of the ways in which innovation activity is framed and contributes to the theme of this Special Issue through discussing barriers and enabling routines associated with the search, selection, and implementation processes within organisations.

  • 30.
    Biedenbach, Galina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design, Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Brand equity in the professional service context: Analyzing the impact of employee role behavior and customer–employee rapport2011In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 1093-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines whether factors related to customers' perception of employees' behavior in terms of customer perceived role ambiguity, role overload and customer–employee rapport influence the development of brand equity in the professional service context. 632 customers of one of the Big Four auditing companies participated in the study. The results of structural equation modeling show negative effects of role ambiguity and role overload on brand associations, perceived quality and brand loyalty, which constitute brand equity. The findings indicate a positive effect of customer–employee rapport on the enhancement of B2B brand equity. However, the negative influences of role ambiguity and role overload on customer–employee rapport transfer detrimental indirect effects on brand equity. The study contributes to an understanding of how the real interaction between service providers and customers can influence brand equity in the professional service setting.

  • 31.
    Biedenbach, Galina
    et al.
    Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Brand equity in the professional service context: Analyzing the impact of employee role behavior and customer–employee rapport2011In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 1093-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines whether factors related to customers' perception of employees' behavior in terms of customer perceived role ambiguity, role overload and customer–employee rapport influence the development of brand equity in the professional service context. 632 customers of one of the Big Four auditing companies participated in the study. The results of structural equation modeling show negative effects of role ambiguity and role overload on brand associations, perceived quality and brand loyalty, which constitute brand equity. The findings indicate a positive effect of customer–employee rapport on the enhancement of B2B brand equity. However, the negative influences of role ambiguity and role overload on customer–employee rapport transfer detrimental indirect effects on brand equity. The study contributes to an understanding of how the real interaction between service providers and customers can influence brand equity in the professional service setting.

  • 32.
    Biggemann, Sergio
    et al.
    University of Otago, Department of Marketing, New Zealand.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Hanken School of Economics.
    Maley, Jane
    Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development and implementation of customer solutions: A study of process dynamics and market shaping2013In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 1083-1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A broad, dynamic network perspective on solution processes remains scarce. This article presents the process of developing and implementing customer solutions and its effects on the wider business environment by investigating customers and suppliers in the global mining industry (Australia, Chile, and Sweden), analyzing the deployment of a new customer solution, and assessing the changes to the competitive environment and focal firms' relationships with other customers and suppliers. It shows that the forces that drive customer and supplier interests and motivation to co-develop customer solutions may change over time, thus redefining the aim and scope of solutions and creating failure risks. Customers present problems; suppliers respond, on the basis of not only the feasibility of the customer-specific solution but also of their evaluation of future solutions in a broader market; then suppliers aim to standardize successful solutions across markets. Customers want close supplier relationships and unique solutions but also like standardized and repeatable solutions, so they can share development costs with competitors and expose the supplier to competition to avoid lock-in effects. From a network perspective, a novel solution can have a market-shaping effect and evoke reactions from other actors who want to enhance their market position. However, these changes are not necessarily deliberate, and the dynamics that market introductions of solutions trigger may be difficult to predict.

  • 33.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Successful Cooperation in Professional Services: What Characteristics Should the Customer Have?1995In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 151-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The service sector is a growing part of the economy in many countries. To be able to survive in this sector, it is necessary to offer the market services that are perceived as having quality. Interviews with both providers and customer stated the importance of cooperation between the two parties. The perspective on cooperation in this article was from the providers' side. The question was, “What characteristics should a customer have?” An aggregation of the different answers to this question by Swedish architects suggested a customer that has good knowledge and relates well with the professional service provider was the best.

  • 34.
    Brashear Alejandro, Thomas
    et al.
    Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ritter, João Gustavo da Silva Freire
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, PUC/PR, Curitiba.
    Marchetti, Renato Zancan
    Programa de Pos-Graduação em Administração – PPAD/PUCPR, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, PUC/PR, Curitiba.
    Prado, Paulo Henrique
    Centro de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Administração, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CEPPAD/UFPR, Curitiba.
    Information search in complex industrial buying: Empirical evidence from Brazil2011In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study develops and tests a model of information search in complex buying. We incorporate three categories of influences of organizational, personal and situational factors that affect information searching efforts. A sample of 96 of the largest Brazilian firms reported their use of the various influences in the decision to purchase integrated business management systems. Findings show that formalization of the organization is a key driver of information search efforts. Situational characteristics of importance, novelty and bargaining power increased the level of information search. Also, conformity of the purchasing agent and organizational centralization reduce information search efforts among the sampled Brazilian firms.

  • 35.
    Brege, Harald
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Exploring proactive market strategies2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proactivity is an important driver of firm performance and for the creation of customer value on business-to-business markets. It is however not entirely clear what it is proactive firms actually do to achieve success. By investigating proactive firms' market strategies, i.e. the sets of activities they perform in order to create superior customer value, a holistic overview of the activities involved in proactive market strategies is provided. Through a case study of five proactive firms, proactive activities are identified. Using three strategic orientations—customer, competition, and innovation orientation—unique proactivity profiles are created, reflecting the patterns in the identified proactive activities. Through these profiles, three overarching proactive market strategies are forwarded: market shaping, customer engagement, and innovation leadership. These are proposed to act as generic proactive market strategies, representing coordinated proactive activities driven by multiple strategic orientations and aimed at creating customer value. These generic strategies help us understand of the role of proactivity in crafting high-performing market strategies by representing different routes to success.

  • 36.
    Bygballe, Lena
    et al.
    Department of Strategy and Logistics, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo.
    Ingemansson, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    The Logic of Innovation in Construction2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 512-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates the logic of innovation in construction by addressing four questions: What is actually being renewed in construction? How is it being done? Who is involved? Why do or do not the companies innovate? The paper draws on a combination of an industrial network perspective and the exploration–exploitation dichotomy to analyze data from a study of innovation in the Norwegian and Swedish construction industries. The findings show that construction companies are increasingly working more systematically to turn project-level ideas into company-wide knowledge. This indicates an innovation logic that is oriented towards exploitation of new combinations through the internal network. The companies are also increasingly concerned with establishing closer connections to customers and users, which have traditionally been weak. This has led to an orientation towards exploitation through the external network, at least on the customer side. In turn, this may lead to more innovative behavior and renewal in the industry as a whole. However, it requires that not only the customer relationships must change, but also relationships on the supply side. Companies in the construction industry should be conscious about their innovation logic, in terms of whether they base their innovation behavior on a biased orientation towards exploitation or exploration and towards the internal or external network. A balance is needed.

  • 37.
    Cenamor, J.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Parida, V.
    Luleå University of Technology / University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Pesämaa, O.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Wincent, J.
    Luleå University of Technology / Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms in subsidiary performance2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 78, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity.

  • 38.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Södertörn, Sweden.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Entrepreneurship and Management, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 78, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity.

  • 39.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Social media engagement strategy: Investigation of marketing and R & D interfaces in manufacturing industry2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 138-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that effective marketing and R&D interface is pivotal in a company's new product development performance and future competitiveness. The increased popularity of social media promised to enhance interaction, collaboration, and networking between the two functions. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the key activities, infrastructure requirements, and potential benefits of social media in the marketing and R&D interface. This study aims to advance the current understanding of social media engagement strategies, which facilitates improved marketing and R&D interfaces and ultimately NPD performance for manufacturing companies. Based on a multiple-case study in two manufacturing companies, this study first presents the role of social media in facilitating improved marketing and R&D interface within a B2B context. Second, it presents the adoption process of the social media engagement strategy for an evolving marketing and R&D interface. The adoption process is divided into three phases, namely coordination, cooperation, and coproduction, to provide detailed insights regarding full-scale social media engagement. Taken together, the study provides novel insights into industrial marketing management literature by exemplifying the role of social media and proposing a systematic social engagement strategy for improved marketing and R&D interface in the manufacturing industry.

  • 40.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology / University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Social media engagement strategy: Investigation of marketing and R&D interfaces in manufacturing industry2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 138-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Research shows that effective marketing and R&D interface is pivotal in a company’s new product development performance and future competitiveness. The increased popularity of social media promised to enhance interaction, collaboration, and networking between the two functions. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the key activities, infrastructure requirements, and potential benefits of social media in the marketing and R&D interface. This study aims to advance the current understanding of social media engagement strategies, which facilitates improved marketing and R&D interfaces and ultimately NPD performance for manufacturing companies. Based on a multiple-case study in two manufacturing companies, this study first presents the role of social media in facilitating improved marketing and R&D interface within a B2B context. Second, it presents the adoption process of the social media engagement strategy for an evolving marketing and R&D interface. The adoption process is divided into three phases, namely coordination, cooperation, and coproduction, to provide detailed insights regarding full-scale social media engagement. Taken together, the study provides novel insights into industrial marketing management literature by exemplifying the role of social media and proposing a systematic social engagement strategy for improved marketing and R&D interface in the manufacturing industry.

  • 41.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Business Studies, School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Social media engagement strategy: Investigation of marketing and R&D interfaces in manufacturing industry2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 138-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that effective marketing and R&D interface is pivotal in a company's new product development performance and future competitiveness. The increased popularity of social media promised to enhance interaction, collaboration, and networking between the two functions. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the key activities, infrastructure requirements, and potential benefits of social media in the marketing and R&D interface. This study aims to advance the current understanding of social media engagement strategies, which facilitates improved marketing and R&D interfaces and ultimately NPD performance for manufacturing companies. Based on a multiple-case study in two manufacturing companies, this study first presents the role of social media in facilitating improved marketing and R&D interface within a B2B context. Second, it presents the adoption process of the social media engagement strategy for an evolving marketing and R&D interface. The adoption process is divided into three phases, namely coordination, cooperation, and coproduction, to provide detailed insights regarding full-scale social media engagement. Taken together, the study provides novel insights into industrial marketing management literature by exemplifying the role of social media and proposing a systematic social engagement strategy for improved marketing and R&D interface in the manufacturing industry.

  • 42.
    Crespin-Mazet, Florence
    et al.
    E.M.LYON.
    Ingemansson Havenvid, Malena
    NTNU.
    Linné, Åse
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Antecedents of project partnering in the construction industry: The impact of relationship history2015In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 50, p. 4-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at increasing the understanding of construction partnering and relationships in project marketing by analyzing the impact of previous relationships among project stakeholders on the choice of partnering and of partners. Based on a conceptual framework combining the insights of the Industrial Network Approach with the model of project co-development proposed by Crespin-Mazet and Ghauri (2007), the paper analyzes a focal partnering project and its connections to other projects. It concludes that the context of the relationships seems to influence the customer's selection of partnering and partners. The paper's contributions address the relative importance of the project's functional challenge and relational congruence in the project network on the customer's procurement choice. For a first partnering agreement, this choice seems primarily influenced by the project's functional challenge while the subsequent choice of partners relies on high relational congruence. Once a positive experience of project partnering gained, the customer's choice seems primarily influenced by the relational congruence in the project network so as to harvest previous investments (resource adaptations) made in their relationship with a given partner. The paper highlights several contributions to the construction partnering literature and project marketing literature.

  • 43.
    Cui, Lianguang
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Networks and capabilities as characteristics of logistics firms2011In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 1004-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse how three basic types of logistics firms differ in terms of their core capabilities and network development as well as the effects of the difference. Based on the resource-based view and the industrial network approach, a conceptual framework is developed to differentiate logistics firms. Two case studies of logistics firms are used as examples to demonstrate how the framework can be used. Logistics firms have clear differences in capabilities and network focus. These firms follow different dominating logics of value creation that make them develop in different ways and think totally differently. This research enhances our understanding of the different logics of logistics firms and their interdependence. They are complementary and interacting in the logistics service supply chain. Moving between the basic types of logistics firms means changing the capabilities and network focus, which is costly and difficult. The conceptual framework can be used as a tool to comprehend multiple types of logistics firms. It also helps us to analyze related strategic moves.

  • 44.
    Cui, Lianguang
    et al.
    Business School, Nankai University, Tianjin, China.
    Su, Shong-Iee Ivan
    Business School, Soochow University, Taipei, China.
    Feng, Yongchun
    Business School, Tianjin University of Finance and Economics, Tianjin, China.
    Hertz, Susanne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Causal or effectual? Dynamics of decision making logics in servitization2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores servitization as an innovative market strategy for manufacturers and investigates how the decision making logics change over time in the servitization transformation process. Effectuation theory is applied to examine servitization as a new theoretical exploration. A longitudinal case study of a global heavy vehicle manufacturer's servitization process in China reveals that the decision makers adjust their decision making logics depending on the stage of the servitization process and associated risk patterns. As the servitization process evolves into a more sophisticated stage, decision makers will change their decision making logics from a causation dominant logic to an effectuation dominant logic in order to cope with the increased risks. Effectuation theory originally developed from entrepreneurship research is found to be a valid theory for the explanation of the risk and uncertainty control behaviors in the servitization transformation process of manufacturing firms. 

  • 45.
    Diaz Ruiz, Carlos
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Hanken School of Economics.
    Market representations in industrial markerting: Could representations influence strategy?2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 1026-1034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central question in industrial marketing is whether the form in which the external environment of a firm is represented influences the marketing strategy. This influence has been studied generally through case study research, and quantitative evidence is limited. In response to this limitation, this paper reports on a quasi-experiment investigating whether market representations have a constructive aspect in business. Empirically, this study compares two types of ostensive and performative market representations—service focus and product differentiation—in order to test for influence exacted by industrial marketing on strategies. Results indicate that service focus is selected when market representations rely on agency in firms (i.e., performative), and product strategies are selected when structures are emphasized (i.e., ostensive). This paper contributes to methodology development by expanding the link between a case study approach and quasi-experiments explaining how quasi-experiments can replicate findings in industrial marketing.

  • 46.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group.
    Holmlund, M.
    Strandvik, T.
    Inotation of Business Relationshops in Service-dominant Settings2007In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Holmlund, Maria
    Department of marketing, CERS, Swedish School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Strandvik, Tore
    Department of marketing, CERS, Swedish School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Initiation of business relationships in service-dominant settings2008In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 339-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial companies today are becoming increasingly service-oriented and therefore need to shift from selling hardware to valuing services and managing customer relationships. A new and particularly significant challenge for these companies is how to initiate relationships which is an issue that has received surprisingly limited scientific attention. The aim of this study is to develop a conceptualization that explores the dynamics in the relationship initiation process in service-dominant settings. Narratives from three sellers of professional services, augmented with narratives from a buyer's view, form the empirical basis of the study. The dynamics in the relationship initiation process are clarified with three new concepts: status, converter, and inhibitor. The paper concludes with implications of the new conceptualization and suggestions for future research.

  • 48.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Holmlund, Maria
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki.
    Strandvik, Tore
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki.
    Initiation of businessrelationships in service-dominant settings2008In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 339-350Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Einola, Suvi
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, Department of Management,.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics.
    Retrospective relational sensemaking in R&D offshoring2017In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 63, p. 205-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the increasing relational challenges in international R&D collaboration, the present study develops a framework for understanding retrospective relational sensemaking in R&D offshore relationships. Using a comparative case study methodology, this study analyzes relational data from 56 interviews regarding four R&D offshore relationships between two large Swedish multinational companies and four R&D offshore partners. This study contributes to existing sensemaking theory by constructing a framework for retrospective relational sensemaking, including triggers and the phases of enactment, selection, and retention, to improve relational learning in R&D offshore relationships.

  • 50.
    Eklinder Frick, Jens
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration. Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Lars-Torsten
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Hallén, Lars
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bridging and bonding forms of social capital in a regional strategic network2011In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 994-1003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on networks emphasizes the importance of bonds between actors. Social reciprocity strengthens network bonds, which is assumed to have positive effects on business relationships between firms. However,the importance of weak ties is also stressed in network research. An important policy issue is therefore if more attention should be devoted to the creation of bridges to other social groups and loosening bonds between network actors. The difficulty in doing so is described and analyzed in this article focusing on a regional strategic network, which is viewed in three network perspectives. Interview data were collected from all participating managers in a regional strategic network in 2004 and 2010. The findings shed light upon the paradox of using a regional strategic network to counteract over-embeddedness and freeing the involved actors from existing network lock-ins instead of further strengthening such social institutions.

1234 1 - 50 of 177
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