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  • 1.
    Abildgaard, J. S.
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark, Denmark.
    Hasson, H.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Løvseth, L. T.
    St Olavs University Hospital, Norway.
    Ala-Laurinaho, A.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland, Finland.
    Nielsen, K.
    University of Sheffield, UK, United Kingdom.
    Forms of participation: The development and application of a conceptual model of participation in work environment interventionsIn: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the realm of work environment improvements, the Nordic countries have led the way in demonstrating that employee participation is a key requisite for achieving improvements. Despite this, there is a lack of precision as to what ‘participatory’ in a participatory work environment intervention means. In this study, the authors present a conceptual model for participation in work environment interventions and apply it to protocols and manuals from eight participatory interventions to determine the form of participation used in each intervention. The authors suggest that the conceptual model can be applied in the design and assessment of participatory work environment interventions. 

  • 2.
    Ahlstrand, Roland
    Malmö universitet.
    Integrative Strategy, Competitiveness and Employment: a Case Study of the Transition at the Swedish Truck Manufacturing Company Scania During the Economic Downturn in 2008-20102015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 457-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to investigate how and why the truck manufacturer Scania adapted to the economic downturn between 2008 and 2010 in the manner it did. First, Scania signed a crisis agreement on fewer working hours and lower wages, and, later, it signed an agreement stipulating fewer working hours, but without wage reductions. Both of these agreements were combined with investments in competence development and education as well as with the decision not to give notice to the employees, which was uncommon among Swedish companies. It is claimed that the company wanted to strengthen the competitiveness by integrating the unions and the employees even more in the business. An important prerequisite was the company’s Flexibility Agreement, which allowed the company not to give temporary employees new contracts and to let temporary employees leave the company as soon as their maximum employment period of six months expired.

  • 3.
    Ahlstrand, Roland
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Individual and Society (IS).
    Integrative Strategy, Competitiveness and Employment: a Case Study of the Transition at the Swedish Truck Manufacturing Company Scania During the Economic Downturn in 2008-20102015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 457-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to investigate how and why the truck manufacturer Scania adapted to the economic downturn between 2008 and 2010 in the manner it did. First, Scania signed a crisis agreement on fewer working hours and lower wages, and, later, it signed an agreement stipulating fewer working hours, but without wage reductions. Both of these agreements were combined with investments in competence development and education as well as with the decision not to give notice to the employees, which was uncommon among Swedish companies. It is claimed that the company wanted to strengthen the competitiveness by integrating the unions and the employees even more in the business. An important prerequisite was the company’s Flexibility Agreement, which allowed the company not to give temporary employees new contracts and to let temporary employees leave the company as soon as their maximum employment period of six months expired.

  • 4.
    Ahlstrand, Roland
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Regional Learning and Governance (RELL).
    Social responsibility in connection with business closures: A study of closures of Ericsson Telecom facilities in Norrköping and Linköping2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 537-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyses why and how Ericsson Telecom assumeda greater responsibility than was legally required when it dismissedmore than 23,000 employees in Sweden at the beginning of the21st century. The analysis starts from neoinstitutional theoryand is based on case studies of the company’s closuresin Norrköping and Linköping. The article focuses,in particular, on the interaction between Ericsson, the tradeunions, the County Administrative Board, the County Labour Board,the Public Employment Service, the Swedish Employment SecurityCouncil, the government and the respective municipalities. Itis shown that the greater responsibility taken by Ericsson wasbased on its desire to maintain legitimacy by taking into considerationprevailing societal expectations regarding the company’sbehaviour.

  • 5.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Arnesson, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The managerial position in a Swedish municipal organization: possibilities and limitations2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 500-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore how a group of managers construct their reality, more specifically what it means to work as a manager in a municipal organization. The empirical data for the study were obtained from a Swedish medium-sized municipality and the study takes as its research approach grounded theory, as developed by Glaser and Strauss. Consequently, the empirical data formed the basis for the research, which takes a multi-methodical and theory-generating approach. The methods used in the study include the use of a questionnaire study, interviews in focus groups, observations, reflective work diaries, and the creation of feedback sessions. The result shows that the managers work in an organization where conflicting and competing value systems act together. These can be interpreted as environmental factors and external bounds on a structural societal level, which cannot be influenced. A point of analysis is that these factors and external bounds to a high degree permeate the manager’s workday and can therefore be seen as a plausible explanation for the boundless nature of the managerial task. For most of the managers of the study, this was expressed as uncertainty as to how to define and interpret goals and as to what the managerial role includes with regard to areas of responsibility. It is interesting to ask, however, whether these conditions are not characteristic of the role of managers and work life in general. The results also show that the substantive theory of the study was not judged to be valid for the municipal companies. These managers do not express as ambivalent an approach to competing value systems as the managers in other sections of the municipality do. Nor do they appear to question their professional knowledge, the work content or managership. Another empirical important finding is that the managers believe that the organizational conditions limit ability to carry out the manager task, but that, despite this, they indicate, paradoxically, that they like their work and the social work environment.

  • 6.
    Andersson-Stråberg, Teresia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Perceptions of justice in connection with individualized pay setting2007In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 431-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individualized pay is typically assumed to enhance employee work motivation, but a precondition for such beneficial effects is that employees perceive the pay-setting process to be fair. The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the nature, determinants and consequences of pay justice. Questionnaire data, obtained from a Swedish nationally representative sample of nurses, provided support for distinguishing between distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational justice. The results also showed that perceptions of pay justice were predicted by both work climate variables and factors related to the pay-setting procedure, even after controlling for demographic characteristics. Although pay justice had only marginal effects on employee work attitudes and behaviour when demographics, work climate and pay-related factors had been taken into account, justice was found to be an important goal in itself, given that a prerequisite for the success of any pay system is that it is perceived as fair.

  • 7.
    Arnesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Interaction patterns in a steering group: Power and action outcome2014In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 325-340Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to study interaction patterns within a steering group. Most large projects include a group of this kind whose task it is to steer towards set goals and provide the required resources. The origin of the research area lies in the observation that steering groups seem to have difficulties in living up to the expectations of project management and project participants, despite structured working methods such as regular meetings, distribution of responsibility and cooperation with different interested parties. By means of interviews and observations the article attempts to capture interaction patterns in a specific steering group. The study is anchored in theories of power with the purpose of supplying theoretical concepts and analytical tools. The most important conclusion is that the interaction patterns that emerged in the steering group rested on two foundations. The first one was that social relations in the steering group created power that was produced and manifested in different ways. The second one was that the exercise of power affected the action outcome, that is, the results of the actions and consequences for future actions. Another conclusion is that the exercising of the assignment presupposes four premises: the steering group member needs to have a positive approach to the project idea and the set goals, to have knowledge of the assignment, to have a position with the authority to make and carry out strategic decisions of the project, and be able to allocate time for active work and participation in meetings.

  • 8.
    Arnesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Interaction patterns within a steering group: power and action outcome2014In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 325-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to study interaction patterns within a steering group. Most large projects include a group of this kind whose task it is to steer towards set goals and provide the required resources. The origin of the research area lies in the observation that steering groups seem to have difficulties in living up to the expectations of project management and project participants, despite structured working methods such as regular meetings, distribution of responsibility and cooperation with different interested parties. By means of interviews and observations the article attempts to capture interaction patterns in a specific steering group. The study is anchored in theories of power with the purpose of supplying theoretical concepts and analytical tools. The most important conclusion is that the interaction patterns that emerged in the steering group rested on two foundations. The first one was that social relations in the steering group created power that was produced and manifested in different ways. The second one was that the exercise of power affected the action outcome, that is, the results of the actions and consequences for future actions. Another conclusion is that the exercising of the assignment presupposes four premises: the steering group member needs to have a positive approach to the project idea and the set goals, to have knowledge of the assignment, to have a position with the authority to make and carry out strategic decisions of the project, and be able to allocate time for active work and participation in meetings.

  • 9.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    A Tribute to Knowledgeable Swedes2003In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 631-634Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bergman, Paavo
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 4, Sociology.
    Wigblad, Rune
    Workers' last performance: Why some factories show their best results during countdown1999In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 343-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we highlight rationalizations within industry that were initiated and conducted locally during overt or latent threat of plant close-down. A common feature in our four investigated cases of 'declining organizations' is that the surprising increases in productivity cannot be thought of as the result of 'management by fear' or other active measures taken by management. On the contrary, our findings suggest that the 'dose-down effect' is brought about through workers' active and creative involvement in production matters when managers' interest in maintaining the established order at the workplace is fading away.

  • 11.
    Bergqvist, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Gender (In)Equality, European Integration and the Transition of Swedish Corporatism2004In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 125-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents data on the development of women’s representation in social partner organizations and corporatist arrangements in Sweden. It analyses changes in corporatist arrangements and the emergence of a European ‘corporatist policy community’. What are the implications for gender equality if corporatism moves from the national level to the EU level? The article shows that it is usually harder for women to gain access to corporatist arrangements than to directly elected bodies. The mechanisms behind this are related to the openness and transparency of the institution. The more democratic and the more open an institution is to criticism and scrutiny by citizens, voters, members, media, etc., the more women we .nd. Usually, corporatist arrangements based on organized interests are more closed, exclusionary and discriminatory against women than the more open electoral/parliamentary system. The article concludes that the fact that we now might see a new form of corporatism at EU level could lead to a situation where some of the gains women have won in the national arena are lost in the European arena.

  • 12.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Bellaagh, Katalin
    Patterns of contract motives and work involvement in temporary work: Relations to work-related and general well-being2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 565-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary work is characterized by heterogeneity, and contract motives and work involvement are believed to differentiate temporary workers, which may explain their divergence in terms of subjective well-being. Applying a person-oriented approach using questionnaire data from a sample of Swedish temporary workers (N = 184), this study identified six patterns, characterized by distinct combinations of voluntary and involuntary contract motives and work involvement. While controlling for demo-graphics, comparative analyses found differences between these patterns in terms of work-related and general well-being. These findings indicate that knowledge about temporary work and its various consequences is enhanced by considering whole patterns instead of single variables in a person-oriented approach.

  • 13.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Bellaagh, Katalin
    Minist Hlth & Social Affairs Sweden.
    Patterns of contract motives and work involvement in temporary work: Relationschips to work-related and general well-being2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 565-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary work is characterized by heterogeneity, and contract motives and work involvement are believed to differentiate temporary workers, which may explain their divergence in terms of subjective well-being. Applying a person-oriented approach using questionnaire data from a sample of Swedish temporary workers (N = 184), this study identified six patterns, characterized by distinct combinations of voluntary and involuntary contract motives and work involvement. While controlling for demographics, comparative analyses found differences between these patterns in terms of work-related and general well-being. These findings indicate that knowledge about temporary work and its various consequences is enhanced by considering whole patterns instead of single variables in a person-oriented approach.

  • 14.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Staying in or switching between permanent, temporary and self-employment during 2008-2010: Associations with changing job characteristics and emotional exhaustion2019In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 215-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labour market segmentation theories suggest that permanent and temporary workers are exposed to economic risks to different degrees, and differ in their working life quality and well-being. However, few studies have tested these ideas during times of economic crisis. Also, little is known about how the self-employed compare to permanent and temporary workers and are affected by economic downturns. This study investigated Swedish workers in different labour market segments before and after the financial crisis (2008 and 2010). More specifically, it looked at job characteristics and strain differences between permanent, temporary and self-employed workers. Data (N = 6335) came from SLOSH, a longitudinal representative cohort study of the Swedish workforce. Contradicting segmentation theories, differences between permanent and temporary workers were small. The self-employed stood out with favourable job characteristics, but comparable strain levels. During the crisis, work demands and strain declined for many of the workers studied here.

  • 15.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating role of employability in the association between job insecurity and exit, voice, loyalty and neglect2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 215-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exit, voice, loyalty, or neglect as employee responses to organizations in decline have been investigated in several studies. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether employability moderates the effects of job insecurity on exit, voice, loyalty and neglect. The results, based on questionnaire data from white-collar workers in Sweden (N = 725), indicate that individuals who are high in employability may have greater opportunities for gaining control over their working life. Job insecurity was found to be associated with increased exit as well as with decreased voice and loyalty, although these effects were stronger among individuals who perceived themselves to be employable. Thus, instead of making employees more likely to use voice in times of uncertainty, employability appears to primarily induce vocational mobility.

  • 16.
    Björklund, Fredrika
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 1, Political science.
    Equal democracies?: Gender and politics in the Nordic countries2001In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 311-314Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Richter, Anne
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Svedberg, Pia
    The associations between job insecurity, depressive symptoms and burnout: The role of performance-based self-esteem2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite agreement on the negative effects of job insecurity, more knowledge needs to be generated on the health effects in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms and for whom job insecurity has these negative effects. The present study aims to investigate the associations between job insecurity and burnout and depressive symptoms respectively, by studying the moderation influences of performance-based self-esteem (PBSE), a form of contingent self-esteem. A population-based sample with 4145 twins was used. The results showed that job insecurity was significantly associated with both burnout and depressive symptoms, and that PBSE acted as a moderator, so that the associations were stronger for individuals with high PBSE than for individuals with low PBSE. The study contributes by including a personality characteristic to gain more knowledge about the mechanisms of job insecurity on mental ill-health, and by illustrating that job insecurity has an impact on severe health outcomes in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms.

  • 18. Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Richter, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Svedberg, Pia
    The associations between job insecurity, depressive symptoms and burnout: The role of performance-based self-esteem2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite agreement on the negative effects of job insecurity, more knowledge needs to be generated on the health effects in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms and for whom job insecurity has these negative effects. The present study aims to investigate the associations between job insecurity and burnout and depressive symptoms respectively, by studying the moderation influences of performance-based self-esteem (PBSE), a form of contingent self-esteem. A population-based sample with 4145 twins was used. The results showed that job insecurity was significantly associated with both burnout and depressive symptoms, and that PBSE acted as a moderator, so that the associations were stronger for individuals with high PBSE than for individuals with low PBSE. The study contributes by including a personality characteristic to gain more knowledge about the mechanisms of job insecurity on mental ill-health, and by illustrating that job insecurity has an impact on severe health outcomes in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms.

  • 19.
    Bolin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Härenstam, Annika
    Göteborgs universitet.
    An empirical study of bureaucratic and post-bureaucratic characteristics in 90 workplaces2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 541-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore bureaucratic and post-bureaucratic characteristics of organizational structure. A further aim was to investigate whether differences were related to types of industries. Eight organizational characteristics were measured, based on interviews with local managers at 90 workplaces in a broad sample of industries in mid-Sweden. The study showed that post-bureaucratic as well as bureaucratic characteristics coexisted in most workplaces. The results are not in accordance with the rhetoric that considers bureaucracy obsolete in contemporary organizations. Significant differences were revealed between industries in seven of the eight characteristics.

  • 20.
    Bolin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Härenstam, Annika
    Göteborgs universitet.
    An empirical study of bureaucratic and post-bureaucratic characteristics in 90 workplaces2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 541-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore bureaucratic and post- bureaucraticcharacteristics of organizational structure. A further aim was to investigate whether differences were related to types of industries. Eight organizational characteristics were measured, based on interviews with local managers at 90 workplaces in a broad sample of industries in mid-Sweden. The study showed that post-bureaucratic as well as bureaucratic characte ristics coexisted in most workplaces. The results are not in accordance with the rhetoric that considers bureaucracy obsolete in contemporary organizations. Significant differences were revealed between industries in seven of the eight characteristics.

  • 21.
    Dackert, Ingrid
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Lööv, Lars-Åke
    Mårtensson, Malin
    Leadership and climate for innovation in teams2004In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 301-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of teamworking is common in many organizations. More or less self-directed teams are organized, often with the aim to achieve continuous improvements at work beyond the daily activities. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation between leader behaviour and team climate for innovation in teams. The Team Climate Inventory devised by Anderson and West and Ekvall and Arvonen’s leadership questionnaire were used to capture the leadership pattern and the team processes characterizing a team climate for innovation in 14 manufacturing teams (N1/4 98). The results indicate a positive relation between a leadership style that combines employee-and change-orientation and a team climate for innovation as a whole. However, innovative team processes such as participation and clarity of objectives were more associated with team membership than leadership in this setting.

  • 22. De Witte, Hans
    et al.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    ‘Objective’ vs. ‘Subjective’ job insecurity: Consequences of temporary work for job satisfaction and organizational commitment in four European countries2003In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 149-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution analyses whether temporary work and (the subjective perception of) job insecurity are associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment, as proposed in the literature. An interaction between temporary work and job insecurity is also tested. Data from four European countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy and Sweden) are used to test the robustness of the hypotheses. The results show that temporary work is not associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Job insecurity is associated with a lower score on both outcome variables, as hypothesized. In two countries, an interaction was found: job insecurity was only associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment among workers with a permanent contract, suggesting that the psychological contract was violated for this category of workers.

  • 23.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    The interaction between organizational justice and job characteristics: Associations with work attitudes and employee health cross-sectionally and over time2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 549-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates to what extent main and interactive effects of overall organizational justice and job characteristics shape employees’ work attitudes (organizational commitment, intention to stay) and health (mental health, somatic health) cross-sectionally and after a period of one year. Questionnaire data from 429 Swedish accountants show that generally both organizational justice and job characteristics had main effects on all outcomes at both time points. Interactions between organizational justice and job characteristics were found for every job characteristic studied (demand, control, support), for both time points but mainly for intention to stay and somatic health. The results show that perceptions of organizational justice and job characteristics can have additive and multiplicative synergetic effects for work attitudes and employee health.

  • 24.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, North-West University.
    The interaction between organizational justice and job characteristics: Associations with work attitudes and employee health cross-sectionally and over time2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 549-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates to what extent main and interactive effects of overall organizational justice and job characteristics shape employees’ work attitudes (organizational commitment, intention to stay) and health (mental health, somatic health) cross-sectionally and over the time of one year. Questionnaire data from 429 Swedish accountants show that generally both organizational justice and job characteristics had main effects on all outcomes at both time points. Interactions between organizational justice and job characteristics were found for every studied job characteristic (demand, control, support), for both time points but mainly for intention to stay and somatic health. The results show that perceptions of organizational justice and job characteristics can have additive and multiplicative synergetic effects for work attitudes and employee health.

  • 25.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, North-West University.
    The interaction between organizational justice and job characteristics: Associations with work attitudes and employee health cross-sectionally and over time2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 549-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates to what extent main and interactive effects of overall organizational justice and job characteristics shape employees’ work attitudes (organizational commitment, intention to stay) and health (mental health, somatic health) cross-sectionally and over the time of one year. Questionnaire data from 429 Swedish accountants show that generally both organizational justice and job characteristics had main effects on all outcomes at both time points. Interactions between organizational justice and job characteristics were found for every studied job characteristic (demand, control, support), for both time points but mainly for intention to stay and somatic health. The results show that perceptions of organizational justice and job characteristics can have additive and multiplicative synergetic effects for work attitudes and employee health.

  • 26.
    Eliaeson, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of Wolfgang Schluchter: The Rise of Western Rationalism. Max Weber's Developmental History1987In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 8, p. 572-574Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Falkenberg, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Chandola, Tarani
    Head, Jenny
    Do gender and socioeconomic status matter when combining work and family: Could control at work and at home help? Results from the Whitehall II study2020In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 29-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work and family are sources of both satisfaction and conflicting demands. A challenge is to identify individuals at risk for conflict and factors that potentially reduce conflict. This study investigated how gender and socioeconomic status (SES) were associated with work–family interference (WFI) and family–work interference (FWI) and how control at work and at home related to WFI and FWI. Data from 1991–1993 and 1997–1999 of the Whitehall II study of British civil servants, including 3484 (827 women and 2657 men) employees in three SES-levels, were analysed. Women reported a higher risk for WFI and FWI. High SES employees reported higher WFI. Less control at home increased risks for WFI and FWI as did low control at work but only for WFI. This suggests that high SES women are especially at risk for conflict and that aspects from the spheres of both work and home should be considered in further research and practice.

  • 28.
    Gonäs, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandlund, Erica
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Centrum för genusforskning.
    Capturing Change - Approaching gender relations in working life.: Guest editors introduction2013In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 471-482Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Griep, Yannick
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of Calgary, Canada.
    Bankins, Sarah
    The ebb and flow of psychological contract breach in relation to perceived organizational support: Reciprocal relationships over time2020In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perceived organizational support (POS) is commonly treated as a consequence of perceived psychological contract breach (PCB). However, because both concepts assume a mutual exchange relationship in which each party makes assessments of, and then decides how to reciprocate, the other party's contributions, this article propounds that the PCB-POS relationship is recursive. By drawing on Conservation of Resources (COR) Theory, the authors argue that following an initial PCB, low levels of POS may then increase the likelihood of perceiving further PCBs through reduced management trust, thus generating a resource loss spiral. By estimating a two-level time-lagged mediation model on weekly data from 338 Canadian employees (1215 observations), the findings support the reciprocal PCB-POS relationship, and show that POS and PCB form a vicious cycle of resource loss. The authors suggest avenues for future research and practical implications relating to the role of time and resources in preventing further exchange deterioration.

  • 30.
    Guest, D. E.
    et al.
    King’s College London, United Kingdom.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Temporary employment contracts and employee well-being during and after the financial crisis: Introduction to the special issue2019In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary employment has become a feature of the contemporary labour market, although its extent varies considerably across European countries. It is widely assumed that the experience of temporary work is likely to lower worker well-being. However, a major European study in 2005 found that temporary workers reported higher well-being than permanent workers. Since then, the financial crisis of 2008 and the resulting shedding of labour seems likely to have had a damaging effect on the well-being of temporary workers. The introductory article outlines these issues and introduces the subsequent articles in this special issue which explore the well-being and employment security of temporary workers in the aftermath of the financial crisis. In drawing them together, it is noted that temporary workers appear to have fared no worse than permanent workers. Indeed, job insecurity seems to have spread to permanent workers, particularly in the Mediterranean countries, creating a renewed emphasis on the role of employability.

  • 31. Hasanen, Lars
    et al.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Hansson, Magnus
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Goal setting and plant closure: when bad things turn good2011In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 135-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that closedowns seem to result in increased productivity even though all productivity targets have been abandoned. The closedown case analysed in this article is different from previous research since management came to employ high goals for productivity and efficiency throughout the entire closedown process (29 months). The article argues that individuals gradually accept the demise and detach themselves from the dying organization by adopting new career goals which they can start pursuing after the actual closure, thus the closure becomes a subgoal. This study examines change in the dependent variables’ mean values, and the relationships between goal setting, job performance, goal commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour, job satisfaction and job-induced tension. A longitudinal design (N = 151) based on two data points (T1: February 2006, T2: February 2007) were tapped into the annual goal setting process. The results support that goal setting was effective in this specific closedown scenario.

  • 32.
    Hofmaier, Bernd
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Organizational participation - Myth and reality1999In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 489-492Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hofmaier, Bernd
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Reviews: Walter Müller-Jentsch, Hans Joachim Sperling and Irmgard Weyrather (1997) Neue Technologien in der Verhandlungsarena2000In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 407-409Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Holth, Line
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Almasri, Abdullah
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Gonäs, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Career patterns for IT engineering graduates2013In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 519-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Women constitute a clear minority in the field of information and communications technology (ICT) in higher education as well as in the job market. At the same time, this field is expected to have a shortage of qualified people in the future. Do women and men engineering graduates have the same career opportunities? This article problematizes the relationship between higher education in engineering and opportunities on the job market. The results show that men reach higher positions to a greater extent than women, and that women remain in low-qualification jobs to a greater extent than men.

  • 35.
    Härenstam, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pousette, Anders
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Improving organizational and working conditions for managers in the Swedish public sector: A conceptual model and evaluation of interventions2019In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demands on managers seem to have increased as a consequence of management reforms. This study evaluates interventions aimed at improving working conditions and performance of managers in the Swedish public sector by changing organizational conditions. Six intervention organizations were compared to 34 reference organizations. Organizational conditions relevant for managerial work were surveyed and the results presented to the management teams who decided on the action plans and implemented changes. Fidelity to the intentions and contextual circumstances were documented. A psychometrically tested questionnaire was used for pre- and post-measurements of effects among a sample of 303 managers. The results showed that the interventions were associated with changes in managers' quality of work and performance. The evaluation design made it possible to show that organizational conditions can be changed in order to improve the operations managers' situation if there is fidelity to the intentions and support from the strategic level management.

  • 36.
    Häsänen, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hansson, Magnus
    Örebro universitet.
    Goal setting and plant closure: When bad things turn good2011In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 135-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that closedowns seem to result in increased productivity even though allproductivity targets have been abandoned. The closedown case analysed in this article is differentfrom previous research since management came to employ high goals for productivity and efficiencythroughout the entire closedown process (29 months). The article argues that individuals gradually accept the demise and detach themselves from the dying organization by adopting new careergoals which they can start pursuing after the actual closure, thus the closure becomes a subgoal.

    This study examines change in the dependent variables’ mean values, and the relationships betweengoal setting, job performance, goal commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), jobsatisfaction and job-induced tension. A longitudinal design (N = 151) based on two data points (T1:February 2006, T2: February 2007) were tapped into the annual goal setting process. The resultssupports that goal setting was effective in this specific closedown scenario.

  • 37.
    Höckertin, Chatrine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Härenstam, Annika
    Arbetslivinstitutet.
    The impact of ownership on psychosocial working conditions: A multilevel analysis of 60 workplaces2006In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 245-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the expansion of the service sector, working conditions have changed during recent decades and it has become more relevant to highlight psychosocial factors as a complement to physical aspects of work. The main scope of this article concerns legal forms of ownership (i.e. the public sector, public enterprises, private enterprises and cooperatives), different types of operations within the service sector, and whether these organizational characteristics create differences in psychosocial working conditions for the individual employee. A total of 1384 employees in 60 workplaces within 25 establishments participated, and the data consisted of both a survey answered by the employees and structured interviews conducted with the local managers in each participating organization. Multilevel analysis showed that a rather high degree of variance in working conditions could be attributed to factors outside/above the individual level, and furthermore, that both ownership and type of operation were significant and relevant variables in order to explain differences in working conditions.

  • 38.
    Jansson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Re-inventing the self: Implications of trade union revitalization2020In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although trade union revitalization processes have been thoroughly examined by industrial relations scholars, less is known about the implications of such processes on unions’ self-image. This article addresses that gap in knowledge by investigating how the self-image of a major Swedish public-sector trade union, the SKTF/Vision, changed after a thorough revitalization process took place. The findings indicate that due to pressure resulting from public-sector privatization, the union abandoned much of its former self-image and replaced ideas of ‘the collective’ with individualism. This article analyzes these changes and discusses the implications for the union movement.

  • 39.
    Kalyal, Hina Jawaid
    et al.
    NUST Business School, National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Baraldi, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating role of employability on the relationship between job insecurity and commitment to change2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 327-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of commitment to change is an underresearched area especially in non-western settings. The aim of the present study was to determine whether employability can moderate the negative effects of job insecurity on individuals’ commitment to change. A survey method approach was used to collect 149 responses from managers of a large public sector organization in Pakistan undergoing restructuring. Hierarchical multiple regression results suggest that employability is an important coping resource during organizational change as it helps mitigate the negative effects of job insecurity on the most desirable form of commitment to change, namely affective commitment to change. Theoretical and practical implications of the study are discussed.

  • 40.
    Karlsson, Jan Ch
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Looking good and sounding right: aesthetic labour2012In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Karlsson, Jan Ch
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Kirchhoff, Jörg
    Högskolan i Östfold, Norge.
    Expansion of Output: Organizational Misbehaviour in Public Enterprises2013In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 107-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term ‘restriction of output’ is a basic category in research on resistance and organizational misbehaviour and it has many synonyms, but seems to lack antonyms. The term means, of course, that employees do less work than they are expected to by management. The opposite behaviour is in the management literature regarded as organization citizenship behaviour, a term with several synonyms as well as antonyms. This article argues that ‘expansion of output’ can be a form of organizational misbehaviour and an antonym to restriction of output. The study bases its argument on empirical findings from the public sector: workers doing more than they are expected to do in order to resist management control. A typology of different kinds of expansion of output is suggested.

  • 42.
    Larsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT.
    Huzell, Henrietta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT.
    Aesthetic and Athletic Employees: The Negative Outcome of Employers Assuming Responsibility for Sickness Benefits2012In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 103-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research into employers’ aesthetic demands regarding labour has found that hiring good-looking workers has become a conscious recruitment strategy among service companies intending to increase sales. In this article, aesthetic demands are divided into different categories, one of which is related to health issues. This category is labelled athletic demands, which entail employers’ search for healthy-looking workers. It is argued that the use of athletic labour is used as a proxy to avoid future costs for workers’ sickness absence and rehabilitation. This suggests that aesthetic labour is far more important and extensive than hitherto acknowledged.

  • 43.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    The roles of shared perceptions of individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate for work- and health-related outcomes: A multilevel approach2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 422-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and to investigate the roles of two types of job insecurity - job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity - for work-related attitudes and health outcomes. It further explores the role of the workgroup - as a social context - in shaping job insecurity perceptions. Data were collected from white-collar employees in a Swedish organization, with 126 participants nested in 18 groups. The results show that 19% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions, and none of the variance in individual job insecurity perceptions, could be attributed to group membership. Further, compared to other members of their group, those perceiving a stronger job insecurity climate reported lower levels of negative self-rated health and higher burnout scores. These results imply that the workgroup is an important social context for job insecurity climate perceptions.

  • 44.
    MacKenzie, Robert
    Leeds University Business School, United Kingdom.
    Union responses to restructuring and the growth of contingent labour in the Irish telecommunications sector2009In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 539-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores union responses to subcontracting in the context of the Irish telecommunications sector. Through a longitudinal case study the development of strategy is traced over a number of years as the union moved away from a policy of exclusion towards one of engagement. As the findings show, a three-tiered approach brought successes in terms of the retention and recruitment of workers on non-standard contracts. Yet this brought tensions over the role of the union in the regulation of the subcontracting process. © The Author(s), 2009.

  • 45.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Editorial introduction2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 163-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Editorial introduction2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 307-308Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Editorial introduction2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 5-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Editorial introduction2012In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 3-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Editorial introduction2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 435-436Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Editorial Introduction2009In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 482-483Article in journal (Other academic)
1234 1 - 50 of 163
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