Change search
Refine search result
1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brunklaus, Birgit
    et al.
    Chalmers University, dep of Environmental Systems analysis.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Baumann, Henrikke
    Chalmers University, dep of Environmental Systems Analysis.
    Managing Stakeholders or the Environment?: The Challenge of Relating Indicators in Practice2008In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 27-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many organizations present their environmental work in the form of annual reports and use the indicators in them for follow-up. However, internal communication and management is needed for environmental improvements. The indicators found in reports may be suitable for external communication, but are they also suitable internally and operationally?

    This article reviews the existing literature on environmental indicators.  With the help of an operational approach, from organisation theory, and a life-cycle approach, indicators are analysed. The analysis shows that formulating indicators for internal management is not an easy task; available guidelines are of little help. It is concluded that the environment can be managed internally by relating indicators. Therefore, an additional set of indicators for internal management and a wider responsibility for the life cycle are recommended. The analysis and recommendations are illustrated with examples drawn from the field of property management.

  • 2.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hensbergen, Marleen
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Zadayannaya, Liudmila
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Exploring Diffusion and Dynamics of Corporate Social Responsibility2015In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 129-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the evolution of the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in academia. The process of evolution is conceptualised to consist of diffusion and dynamics. Bibliometrics were applied for data collection and visualisation of the evolution of CSR. The findings show increasing complexity and progression in the research on the concept of CSR fuelled not only by the efforts for intellectual refinement in the field but also reflecting the changing priorities of society and businesses. The growth of this field of research both in number of publications (i.e. diffusion) and in terms of different fields in academic usage (i.e. dynamics), is an indicator for growing complexity and widening acceptance of the CSR concept across various academic disciplines in the future. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 3.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Management and Methods2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article gives an overview of recent Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) handbooks to illustrate that the fi eld is of immediate interest and relevance for scholars and practitio- ners. It gives a background to CSR and how the fi eld relates to management and methods and introduces the four articles of this special issue.

  • 4.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Halme, Minna
    Aalto Univ, Helsinki Sch Econ, Helsinki, Finland.
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Developing Countries2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 237-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws attention to several corporate social responsibility (CSR) questions in developing countries. (1) Illustrations from, for example, South America and Africa, includ- ing African voices critical to foreign aid, show that societies are different in many respects. This implies different capacities of organizations and their managers to understand and address pressing CSR issues in different cultural contexts. (2) Weak institutional environ- ments, such as in developing countries, often harbor illicit fi nancial outfl ow from poor countries to rich ones. This strips developing nations of critical resources and contributes to failed states, a point hardly ever discussed in the CSR literature. We argue for corporate actions in areas such as enhancing capacity in detecting tax fraud, antitrust and the unveil- ing of corruption cases. Obviously, legislation is a task of politicians, governments and international governmental bodies. However, if business enterprises can ‘legally misuse’ the system, then the matter should be seen as a CSR issue also. There is thus an urgency for concerted efforts by the private sector, public sector and non-governmental organiza- tions to develop structures and institutions that contribute to social justice, environmental protection and poverty eradication.

  • 5.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Springett, Delyse
    Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Discourse, Narratives and Communication2010In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problematic and contestable nature of discourses on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has driven the commissioning of this special issue on discourses, narratives, and communication about CSR. While CSR may be seen as sharing normative goals with the concept of sustainable development, there are fundamental questions to be asked about the nature and purpose of CSR, how it has been constructed and framed, and whether it promotes the normative goals of sustainable development in order to effect change to the business-as-usual model. The teasing out of the different discourses of CSR has become an important theme in academic research in recent years. In this issue, that discourse is developed. The authors discover gaps between CSR as understood by civil society groups and radical non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the CSR norms promoted at corporate level. The latter fail to impact on business-as-usual, even though the same lan- guage may be used. The link between Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) reporting and market-value is explored; and CSR principles and actions promoted by business are cri- tiqued from the perspective of the norms of sustainable development, one conclusion being that the parameters of sustainable development as a concept need to be extended to include the dimension of culture.

  • 6.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Springett, Delyse
    Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Discourse, Narratives and Communication2010In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problematic and contestable nature of discourses on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has driven the commissioning of this special issue on discourses, narratives, and communication about CSR. While CSR may be seen as sharing normative goals with the concept of sustainable development, there are fundamental questions to be asked about the nature and purpose of CSR, how it has been constructed and framed, and whether it promotes the normative goals of sustainable development in order to effect change to the business-as-usual model. The teasing out of the different discourses of CSR has become an important theme in academic research in recent years. In this issue, that discourse is developed. The authors discover gaps between CSR as understood by civil society groups and radical non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the CSR norms promoted at corporate level. The latter fail to impact on business-as-usual, even though the same lan- guage may be used. The link between Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) reporting and market-value is explored; and CSR principles and actions promoted by business are cri- tiqued from the perspective of the norms of sustainable development, one conclusion being that the parameters of sustainable development as a concept need to be extended to include the dimension of culture.

  • 7.
    Emilsson (Gustafsson), Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mapping Environmental Management Systems Initiatives in Swedish Local authorities - a national survey2002In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly half of all Swedish local authorities use environmental management systems (EMSs) in their environmental work. This was shown in the postal survey that is the basis for this paper. The survey was conducted in September 2000 among all 289 local authorities in Sweden, generating an 81% return rate. It was performed in order to gain an understanding of how common it is to implement EMSs in local authorities, how far in the EMS process they have come and what organizations are objects of EMS implementation. It proved to be primarily the technical organizations that have adopted this kind of work and it is most common that these kinds of organization use a third party validation. ISO 14001 is the most frequently used standard but, in general, standards are used only as guidelines when designing EMSs, which means that certification/registration is not an overall objective among Swedish local authorities.

  • 8.
    Faith-Ell, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    The introduction of environmental requirements for trucks and construction vehicles used in road maintenance contracts in Sweden2005In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 62-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the development and implementation of environmental requirements for trucks and construction vehicles in Swedish road maintenance contracts. The process in which the road administration involved relevant organizations in the development of a model for emission-based payment for the vehicles was analysed in a participatory study. Intentions behind the requirements were investigated using interviews and questionnaires. The results point to the importance of actively involving, informing and training all relevant parties. Transparency towards sub-contractors and the public is needed to justify the requirements. The payment model, based on environmental performance, is also suggested for use in other types of requirement in road maintenance contracts. To make green procurement an effective policy instrument, the model needs further development, e.g. systematic information, training of clients and contractors, and follow-up of the requirements.

  • 9.
    Guziana, Bozena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalens högskola.
    How Sustainability Leaders Communicate Corporate Activities of Sustainable Development2013In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the corporate quest for sustainable development, production- and product-related environmental impacts of a company can form a basis for de fining the corporate environmental profile, as well as for de fining environmental leaders. Awareness of the production- and productrelated dimensions of the environmental profile varied among companies. This paper studied descriptions and reporting of environmental issues among 19 companies ranked as Global Supersector Leaders in 2009/2010 by the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI). The results show that all of these companies are aware of production- and product-related environmental aspects. There are also examples, both as headings on websites and as sections in sustainability reports, where companies structure their environmental initiatives separately with respect to production (or their own operations) and the product. The paper ends with a proposed modelof corporate environmental profile.

  • 10.
    Guziana, Bozena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    How Sustainability Leaders Communicate Corporate Activities of Sustainable Development.2013In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the corporate quest for sustainable development, production- and product-related environmental impacts of a company can form a basis for de fining the corporate environmental profile, as well as for de fining environmental leaders. Awareness of the production- and productrelated dimensions of the environmental profile varied among companies. This paper studied descriptions and reporting of environmental issues among 19 companies ranked as Global Supersector Leaders in 2009/2010 by the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI). The results show that all of these companies are aware of production- and product-related environmental aspects. There are also examples, both as headings on websites and as sections in sustainability reports, where companies structure their environmental initiatives separately with respect to production (or their own operations) and the product. The paper ends with a proposed modelof corporate environmental profile.

  • 11.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Networks as a means of supporting the adoption of organizational innovations in SMEs: the case of Environmental Management Systems (EMSs) based on ISO 140012007In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 167-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of their large numbers, most SMEs have little knowledge of or interest in environmental questions and generally have difficulties when it comes to integrating environmental aspects into their activities. One way for SMEs to shift from a reactive to a proactive environmental behavior is to adopt environmental innovations. Environmental innovations consist of new or modified processes, techniques, practices, systems and products to avoid or reduce environmental harms. In this study, I focus on a particular type of innovation: organizational environmental innovations, such as an EMS in accordance with ISO 14001.

    One objective of this study was to understand and describe how SMEs can use a network as a basis for initiating environmental work. Another objective was to develop a model that can be used as a guideline for the adoption of an ISO 14001 EMS by SMEs collaborating in a network.

  • 12.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Managing Death: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tragedy2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the true story of the actions of a middle manager in a major industrial company after the unexpected death of one of his employees, while participating in one of the most important social rituals to humans and society - the creation of meaning of death - we take an analytical approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR). This is done by discussing the overlap between CSR and human resource management (HRM). The story induces us to question the upholding of CSR an HRM as separate theoretical fields, since the managerial practice seems to indicate that these have merged into one. Also, the story indicates that the borders between the 'private' and 'public' roles in managerial practice are blurred and that to be a middle manager today is quite complicated. The article finishes with a discussion on why the writing of policies may not be the answer to this problem.

  • 13.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Managing Death: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tragedy2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the true story of the actions of a middle manager in a major industrial company after the unexpected death of one of his employees, while participating in one of the most important social rituals to humans and society - the creation of meaning of death - we take an analytical approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR). This is done by discussing the overlap between CSR and human resource management (HRM). The story induces us to question the upholding of CSR an HRM as separate theoretical fields, since the managerial practice seems to indicate that these have merged into one. Also, the story indicates that the borders between the 'private' and 'public' roles in managerial practice are blurred and that to be a middle manager today is quite complicated. The article finishes with a discussion on why the writing of policies may not be the answer to this problem.

  • 14.
    Hedberg, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Miljöteknikprogrammet Linköpings universitet.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    The Global Reporting Initiative and Corporate Sustainability Reporting in Swedish Companies2003In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 10, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Hedberg, C.-J.
    et al.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management .
    The global reporting initiative and corporate sustainability reporting in Swedish companies2003In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With empirical evidence from Swedish companies, this paper analyses the phenomenon of corporate sustainability reporting (CSR) in general and the use of CSR guidelines developed by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) in particular. The main questions at issue are why companies have chosen to use the GRI guidelines and how this has affected corporate social responsibility and environmental management. From interviews with all Swedish companies that use the guidelines, we have found that companies produce CSRs mainly to seek organizational legitimacy, and that the main reason for use of the GRI guidelines is an expectation of increasing credibility of the CSR, but also that it provides a template for how to design a report. Moreover, we have found that the CSR report and the GRI guidelines are of more help for internal than external communication at this stage of development. It could help corporations to learn about themselves and to see what has actually been done in the organization. In all, the GRI guidelines would have the potential for gaining visibility and control of the triple bottom line on a corporate level, but they are in need of further development, not least in relation to the issue of verification. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 16.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Economic sustainability and the cost of poor quality2005In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development (SD) on the organizational level is often measured using the triple bottom line, which divides performance reporting into the economic, environmental and social dimensions. Since total quality management (TQM) over the years has proven to contribute to good economic performance, it is interesting to review synergies of the two concepts TQM and SD. Indicators commonly used in the triple bottom line are compared with quality related measurements and a synthesis is proposed. Focus is on the economic dimension and indicators in the form of cost of poor quality (CPQ). The CPQ as a sustainability indicator is discussed and exemplified. The results indicate that existing economic sustainability performance measurements based on distribution of surplus should be complemented with indicators for internal losses. A sound profit is in most cases necessary, but it is not the sole condition for economic sustainability.

  • 17.
    Johnstone, Leanne
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Environmental management decisions in CSR-based accounting research2018In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary presents conceptualisations of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the realm of environmental accounting. By asking what the main theoretical perspectives are within CSR-based environmental accounting research, and how have these been used, it finds that there have been three clear theoretical waves. These are based on legitimacy, stakeholder and institutional theories, which evidently build upon one another as CSR1 (responsibility), CSR2 (responsiveness) and CSR3 (proactiveness) respectively. Nevertheless, such perspectives are weak as they remain at the strategic level and do not confront the operational levels of management accounting and control. Thus, structuration theory is proposed as the fourth wave of CSR-based research by emphasising that CSR rests neither with the organisations as agents, nor the institutions as social structures, but is the product of both. This informs managers by illustrating that environmental accounting decisions are shaped from not only the external environment, but also from within.

  • 18. Lee, Ki-Hoon
    et al.
    Herold, David M.
    Yu, Ae-Li
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Small and Medium Enterprises and Corporate Social Responsibility Practice: A Swedish Perspective2016In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of corporate social responsibility (CSR) practice in Swedish small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). A case study approach is used to investigate the CSR perception, motivation, and activities of two Swedish SMEs. This paper indicates that two Swedish SMEs studied adopt a profit-seeking rather than a profit-sacrificing CSR approach. Furthermore, the paper argues that the perception, the motivation, and part of the CSR activities are well incorporated in the decision to engage in CSR. However, the Swedish SMEs in our case studies are often limited in communicating their CSR activities due to a lack of resources and management skills. This communication gap between intended and actual communication drives the overall CSR impact on business performance from marginal to non-existent. As a result, looking at the overall business impact, a meant-to-be profit-seeking strategy is actually turned into a profit-sacrificing activity.

  • 19.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the use of tools, initiatives, and approaches to promote sustainability in corporations2019In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in sustainability from the corporate sector is evidenced by over 13,000 companiesin 160 countries that have signed the United Nations Global Compact. In thiscontext, a number of tools, initiatives, and approaches (TIAs), e.g., circular economy,corporate social responsibility, eco-efficiency, life cycle assessment, and sustainabilityreporting have been developed by and for corporations to engage and promote sustainabilitywithin their systems. Each of the TIAs has advantages when addressingsustainability issues and the company system's elements, but it has disadvantages indealing with their complexities and interactions. Relying only on one TIA results in alimited contribution to sustainability, whereas using too many TIAs wastes resourcesand energy. The Corporate and Industrial Voluntary Initiatives for Sustainability(CIVIS) has been proposed to better combine the TIAs. A survey was developed toinvestigate the use of 24 TIAs. The survey was sent to a database of 5,299 organisations(of which 3,603 were companies), from which 202 responses were obtained.The responses were analysed using ratio analysis, principal component analysis, andcluster analysis. The responses show that some TIAs are well known and providegood results when used, for example, corporate social responsibility, corporate sustainability,and Global Reporting Initiative reports. The analyses show a number ofgroups of the TIAs that can help to better combine them. The paper updates theCIVIS framework in order to provide clearer guidance on how to combine the TIAs. Acombination of between four and six initiatives appears to be most effective way topromote sustainability. The TIAs can help to promote sustainability in corporations,but they need to be combined correctly in order to address holistically the fourdimensions of sustainability, the system elements, and stakeholders, while avoidingduplication of tasks and wasting resources.

  • 20.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd, Cardiff, UK.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reinforcing the Holistic Perspective of Sustainability: Analysis of the Importance of Sustainability Drivers in Organizations2018In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 508-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although several sustainability drivers have been recognized for different organizations, there has been limited research on analyzing which are considered to be the most important. A survey was sent to more than 1,502 organizations, of which 108 completed all the questions. The survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, rankings in order of importance, comparison between types of organizations, and analyses of the interlinkages between drivers. This paper provides depth to the sustainability drivers’ discussion by: (1) expanding it to the three types of organizations; (2) providing the importance of each driver; (3) offering a ranking of the drivers; (4) analyzing the relations between drivers to categorize them; and (5) assessing the relations between the drivers’ categories. This research highlights the importance of recognizing the drivers that have the highest importance and influence for each type of organization, in order to foster them and make organizations more sustainable.

  • 21. Oskarsson, K.
    et al.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management .
    Integrated management systems as a corporate response to sustainable development2005In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of sustainable development has become widespread amongst government agencies, politicians, corporations and other organizations throughout the world. As a response to the challenge of sustainable development, Swedish corporations have shown a growing interest in integrating their efforts regarding management of environmental, quality related and social issues. Companies in the engineering industry are particularly active in this area. This paper describes the paths three world leading Swedish engineering corporations have taken in their striving towards sustainable development, and analyses why and how they are integrating their different management systems. We finally analyse and discuss, from a theoretical point of view with focus on subjects as well as methods of management, whether these integrated management systems in use can support the companies in their management of sustainability. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 22.
    Packalén, Sture
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Culture and Sustainability2010In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 118-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is only attainable if we regard it as a culture-transforming, creative project for the entire society. It is therefore important to discuss the potential of art and culture for shaping a desirable future. A vital culture and sustainable development go hand in hand. Sustainability can be seen as a constant, ongoing process of searching and self-reflection about our present and our future. The search must consist of a constant review of social norms, values, and practical approaches. The search and reflection need culture as a medium to give shape to the communication that is necessary in order for sustainable development to come about in the economic, ecological and social spheres. 

  • 23. Paulsson, F.
    et al.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Carbon dioxide emission trading, or not? An institutional analysis of company behaviour in Sweden2004In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 211-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kyoto Protocol opens up for market based solutions in climate change mitigation. A number of companies in Europe, North America and Asia have already practiced carbon dioxide emission trading. Sweden and Swedish companies have a tradition of being proactive in environmental policy and management. However, Swedish companies are acting reactively or even passively when it comes to emission trading. This paper aims to elucidate and explain the Swedish companies' behaviour on this matter. From our study, which focuses primarily on the energy and forestry sectors, it was found that companies are principally in favour of emission trading, but they have not developed initiatives for emission trading in practice. The study indicates that the institutional arrangements in which companies are situated do not encourage emission trading. Ambiguous government policies are claimed to prevent the companies from making long-term strategies on climate change mitigation in general and emission trading in particular. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 24.
    Schwartz, Birgitta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Tilling, Karina
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    'ISO-lating' Corporate Social Responsibility in the Organizational Context: A Dissenting Interpretation of ISO 260002009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 289-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development is frequently an object of standardization, and over 100,000 organizations hold ISO 14001 certificates proving they have legitimate environmental management systems. Guidelines for social responsibility are now the object of standardization, resulting in the upcoming ISO 26000 standard. This paper examines the rationale behind developing ISO 26000, highlighting the tendency to decouple complex CSR issues in the organizational context. This is relevant to current problems of poor working conditions, weak regulatory compliance, and corruption often encountered in the production context in low-income countries. In addition, existing codes of conduct are frequently decoupled from actual organizational performance. We highlight how CSR standardization risks isolating complex and contested social issues, more radical attempts at change conflicting with striving for legitimacy. Like the decontexualizing tendency proceeding from the standardized treatment of complex sustainable development issues in organizations, CSR issues also risk becoming decontextualized with the application of standardized approaches such as the ISO 26000 standard.

  • 25.
    Svane, Örjan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Situations of Opportunity: Hammarby Sjöstad and Stockholm City’s Process of Environmental Management2006In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 76-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hammarby Sjöstad is a large brownfield development in Stockholm guided by extensive environmental objectives. This case study focuses on the environmental management of the city's project team. A main aim was methodology development related to the concept of situations of opportunity - how to study those periods when the team had great influence over the process. Goal conflicts on for example energy use and the lake view were identified. The team used policy instruments such as development contracts and design competitions. Some of the situations identified contributed little to the environmental management, for example the detailed planning. Others were more successful, for example the integration of infrastructural systems. Success situations were unique or created by the team, and had less formal power. Other situations had more power, but were burdened with a prehistory of routines and agreements. The methodology should also be applicable to other processes of environmental management.

  • 26.
    Tagesson, Torbjorn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Blank, Veronica
    Ernst & Young, Malmö, Sweden.
    Broberg, Pernilla
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Collin, Sven-Olof
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad, Sweden.
    What Explains the Extent and Content of Social and Environmental Disclosures on Corporate Websites: A Study of Social and Environmental Reporting in Swedish Listed Corporations2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 352-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demand for information and transparency from corporations has increased over the last few years. Today, there are other information dissemination channels besides annual financial statements. One important channel is the Internet. The aim of this study is to explain the extent and content of social disclosure information on corporations' websites. The empirical data in this study is based on annual financial statements and such websites. A multi-theoretical framework is used in order to explain the extent and content of social disclosures on corporate websites. The findings support the positive correlation of size and profitability with the content of social disclosure information on these websites. In general, State-owned corporations disclose more social information on their websites than privately owned corporations do. There are significant differences between different industries. This is true regarding not only the extent of social disclosures, but also their content. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 27.
    Tagesson, Torbjorn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Blank, Veronica
    Ernst and Young, Malmö, Sweden.
    Broberg, Pernilla
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Collin, Sven-Olof
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    What Explains the Extent and Content of Social and Environmental Disclosures on Corporate Websites: A Study of Social and Environmental Reporting in Swedish Listed Corporations2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 352-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demand for information and transparency from corporations has increased over the last few years. Today, there are other information dissemination channels besides annual financial statements. One important channel is the Internet. The aim of this study is to explain the extent and content of social disclosure information on corporations' websites. The empirical data in this study is based on annual financial statements and such websites. A multi-theoretical framework is used in order to explain the extent and content of social disclosures on corporate websites. The findings support the positive correlation of size and profitability with the content of social disclosure information on these websites. In general, State-owned corporations disclose more social information on their websites than privately owned corporations do. There are significant differences between different industries. This is true regarding not only the extent of social disclosures, but also their content. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 28.
    Tagesson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Blank, Veronica
    Broberg, Pernilla
    Lunds universitet.
    Collin, Sven-Olof Yrjö
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    What  explains the extent and content of social and environmental disclosures on  corporate websites: a study of social and environmental reporting in Swedish  listed corporations,2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 352-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demand for information and transparency from corporations has increased over the

    last few years. Today, there are other information dissemination channels besides annual

    fi nancial statements. One important channel is the Internet. The aim of this study is to

    explain the extent and content of social disclosure information on corporations’ websites

    .

    The empirical data in this study is based on annual fi nancial statements and such websites.

    A multi-theoretical framework is used in order to explain the extent and content of social

    disclosures on corporate websites. The fi ndings support the positive correlation of size and

    profi tability with the content of social disclosure information on these websites. In general,

    State-owned corporations disclose more social information on their websites than privately

    owned corporations do. There are signifi cant differences between different industries. This

    is true regarding not only the extent of social disclosures, but also their content.

  • 29.
    Varnäs, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Faith-Ell, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Effectiveness of Green Procurement in the Construction Industry: A case study of the City Tunnel Project in Malmö, SwedenIn: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Oskarsson, Kristina
    Integrated Management Systems as a Corporate Response to Sustainable Development2005In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 12, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    von Malmborg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Paulsson, Fredrik
    Miljövetarprogrammet, ITUF Linköpings universitet.
    Carbon Dioxide Emission trading, or not? An Institutional Analysis of Company Behaviour in Sweden.2004In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 11, p. 211-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The 'pros' and 'cons' of joint EMS and group certification: a Swedish case study2007In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 152-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are collectively responsible for a significant portion of the total environmental burden worldwide. A common tool used by SMEs to improve their environmental performance is the environmental management system (EMS), which has the disadvantage that it has been developed with larger organizations in mind. A common approach used by Swedish SMEs to facilitate the implementation of an EMS is joint EMS and group certification. This paper evaluates this approach by means of a case study. It is found that the approach is effective for small and micro-sized companies in achieving ISO 14001 certification as fast and cost effectively as possible. A few short cuts including joint environmental policy and objectives and insufficient environmental organization are however threatening to undermine the trustworthiness of the approach. Notwithstanding these flaws, however, it must be concluded that the joint EMS approach is a good alternative for small and micro-sized companies.

1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf