Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål Andre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Forsberg, Lucas
    Producing children’s corporeal privacy: ethnographic video recording as material-discursive practice2010In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the use of video cameras in participant observation drawing on approximately 300 hours of video data from an ethnographic study of Swedish family life. Departing from Karen Barad's post-humanistic perspective on scientific practices, the aim is to critically analyse how researchers, research participants and technology produce and negotiate children's corporeal privacy. Ethnographic videotaping is understood as a material-discursive practice that creates and sustains boundaries between private and public, where videotaping is ideologically connected to a public sphere that may at times 'intrude' on children's corporeal privacy. The limits of corporeal privacy are never fixed, but open for negotiation; ethnographers may therefore unintentionally transgress the boundary and thus be faced with ethical dilemmas. The fluidity of privacy calls for ethical reflexivity before, during and after fieldwork, and researchers must be sensitive to when ethical issues are at hand and how to deal with them.

  • 2. Aarsand, Pål
    et al.
    Forsberg [Gottzén], Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Producing children's corporeal privacy: ethnographic video recording as material-discursive practice2010In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the use of video cameras in participant observation drawing on approximately 300 hours of video data from an ethnographic study of Swedish family life. Departing from Karen Barad’s post-humanistic perspective on scientific practices, the aim is to critically analyse how researchers, research participants and technology produce and negotiate children’s corporeal privacy. Ethnographic videotaping is understood as a material-discursive practice that creates and sustains boundaries between private and public, where videotaping is ideologically connected to a public sphere that may at times ‘intrude’ on children’s corporeal privacy. The limits of corporeal privacy are never fixed, but open for negotiation; ethnographers may therefore unintentionally transgress the boundary and thus be faced with ethical dilemmas. The fluidity of privacy calls for ethical reflexivity before, during and after fieldwork, and researchers must be sensitive to when ethical issues are at hand and how to deal with them.

  • 3.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Wettergren, Åsa
    The emotional labour of gaining and maintaining access to the field2015In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 688-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of emotions in qualitative research receives increasing attention. We argue for an activerather than a reactive approach towards emotions to improve the quality of research; emotionsare a vital source of information and researchers use emotions strategically. Analysing the emotionwork of researchers in the process of gaining, securing and maintaining access to the Swedishjudiciary, we propose that the emotion work involved is a type of emotional labour, requiredby the researcher in order to successfully collect data. The particular case of researching elitesis highlighted. Emotional labour is analysed along three dimensions: 1. Strategic emotion work– building trust outwards and self-confidence inwards; 2. Emotional reflexivity – attentiveness toemotional signals monitoring one’s position and actions in the field; and 3. Emotion work to copewith emotive dissonance – inward-directed emotion work to deal with the potentially alienatingeffects of strategic emotion work.

  • 4.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Wettergren, Åsa
    The emotional labour of gaining and maintaining access to the field2015In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 688-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of emotions in qualitative research receives increasing attention. We argue for an activerather than a reactive approach towards emotions to improve the quality of research; emotionsare a vital source of information and researchers use emotions strategically. Analysing the emotionwork of researchers in the process of gaining, securing and maintaining access to the Swedishjudiciary, we propose that the emotion work involved is a type of emotional labour, requiredby the researcher in order to successfully collect data. The particular case of researching elitesis highlighted. Emotional labour is analysed along three dimensions: 1. Strategic emotion work– building trust outwards and self-confidence inwards; 2. Emotional reflexivity – attentiveness toemotional signals monitoring one’s position and actions in the field; and 3. Emotion work to copewith emotive dissonance – inward-directed emotion work to deal with the potentially alienatingeffects of strategic emotion work.

  • 5.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Member checking: A feminist participatory analysis of the use of preliminary results pamphlets in cross-cultural, cross-language research2016In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 305-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation and reflexivity have become buzzwords that are seldom discussed in terms of their practical employment. Against this backdrop, with a specific focus on geography, this article presents and analyzes the advantages and limitations of a methodological tool that seeks to enhance both reflexivity and participation. The tool was a pamphlet written in local languages that contained several pictures and summarized the data gathered in previous fieldwork sessions. This tool was used in a four-year research project on the gender division of labor in smallholder irrigation farming in Kenya and Tanzania. The pamphlet showed participants their contributions to the research process and offered them the opportunity to correct, improve and further discuss previously collected data. It not only ensured research validity but also allowed for a shift in the research power hierarchy. Finally, the pamphlet effectively created a space for inclusion, discussion and reciprocal learning, leading to collective reflexivity and catalytic validity by empowering participants and re-orienting the researcher.

  • 6.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Situated knowledge in cross-cultural, cross-language research: a collaborative reflexive analysis of researcher, assistant and participant subjectivities2014In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 489-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes situated knowledge through the lens of the author and her three field assistants. This work is written self-reflexively and is based on geographical fieldwork in Eastern Africa. It seeks to capitalize on the personal and professional relationships of the researcher and her field assistants to improve both research outcomes and working arrangements. Reflecting on episodes of failure, anxiety and misunderstanding, it disentangles the power geometry of situated knowledge and sheds light on the vital role played by the assistant/interpreter and by his/her positionality ‘in the making’ of cross-cultural, cross-language research. Grounded in a feminist epistemological perspective, this article shows that methodological reflexivity should engage not only the researcher or the participants but also the field assistants. This praxis is crucial to enhancing the validity of studies conducted in a cross-cultural, cross-language environment across social science.

  • 7.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Riano, Yvonne
    Feminist participatory methodologies in geography: creating spaces of inclusion2016In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction prefaces a special issue on the topic of feminist participatory methodologies in geography. Drawing upon the experiences of the contributors in developing new tools and methods to facilitate interaction with participants and working with groups that tend to be forgotten, subordinated and/or alienated, we argue for the methodological significance of instating a feminist perspective to participatory research. Although much theoretical debate has taken place among feminist and post-colonial scholars on unequal research relationships between “researchers” and “research subjects”, the literature on how to operationalize greater equality remains quite limited. We attempt to fill this research gap by bringing together scholars working in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres in order to illuminate the multifaceted ways in which these methods can be used not only to debunk hierarchical research relationships, but also to produce new scientific insights with greater validity.  

  • 8.
    Demir, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. The Ratio Institute, Sweden.
    Lychnell, Lars-Olof
    Mangling the process: a meta-theoretical account of process theorizing2015In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 85-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process approaches are increasingly applied in qualitative studies in many fields within social sciences.Yet, few studies have seriously elaborated on the ontological premises of process theorizing.This study addresses this void by suggesting a process philosophical framework. The frameworkis ontologically grounded with the concepts of causality, spatiality, and temporality in processtheorizing. We use these tenets for developing three process theorizing techniques – articulating,relating, and conjugating. Articulating denotes to effectively expressing the potential identifying andgenerative properties of the process. Relating is the technique by which one maintains continuousconnections within and between reified properties of a process. Conjugating is the technique bywhich a process’ identifying and generative properties are pulled together from various temporaland spatial sites in order to form a novel nexus. Each of these techniques builds on processphilosophy and process theory and is illustrated through examples from prior process studies.

  • 9.
    Gustafson, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Book review of The Hidden Life of Girls. Games, of Stance, Status and Exclusion, Goodwin, Marjorie Harness (2006) Blackwell Publishing: Oxford, UK / Malden, MA, USA /Victoria, Australia2011In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 465-466Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Doing age: Methodological reflections on interviewing2013In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 668-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is not only to discuss how the interview method has implications for the construction of aged identities, but also how the research area conditions the positionings that are made within the interview. Drawing on a set of qualitative semi-structured interviews with persons identifying as, and having experiences of volunteering as ‘class grandparents’ in schools for children, this article highlights and investigates three regimes that proved central in these interviews and that affected the construction of the data: the ‘confessional mode’, the ‘use of life scripts’ and the ‘theoretical identifications’ affecting the interview conversations.

  • 11.
    Mondada, Lorenza
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Video analysis and the temporality of inscriptions within social interaction: the case of architects at work2012In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 304-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article shows how artefacts - and more specifically documents and visualizations such as images, maps and plans - can be analysed in detail within an ethnomethodological and conversation analytic perspective focusing on the way in which they are manipulated within social activities. The aim is double. On the one hand, the article deals with the way in which the temporal and interactional feature of inscriptions in interaction can be preserved and analysed on the basis of video data, highlighting some of the challenges of producing adequate video recordings and video transcriptions of these phenomena. On the other hand, the article offers an empirical study of a professional activity in which participants manipulate texts, plans and other visualizations. Thus, it analyses in detail a meeting video recorded in an architectural office, in which three architects read, discuss, and draw plans, as well as explore and discover ideas by formulating, gesticulating, and sketching them.

  • 12. Roach Anleu, Sharyn
    et al.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    Stockholms universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Mack, Kathy
    Wettergren, Åsa
    Observing judicial work and emotions: using two researchers2016In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 375-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observation is an important component of research to examine complex social settings and iswell-established for studying courtroom dynamics and judicial behaviour. However, the manyactivities occurring at once and the multiple participants, lay and professional, make it impossiblefor a sole researcher to observe and understand everything occurring in the courtroom. Thisarticle reports on the use of two researchers to undertake court observations, in two differentstudies, each nested in a different research design. The social nature of data collection and thevalue of dialogue between the two researchers in interpreting observed events, especially whenstudying emotion, are readily apparent in both studies.

  • 13. Roach Anleu, Sharyn
    et al.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mack, Kathy
    Wettergren, Åsa
    Observing judicial work and emotions: using two researchers2016In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 375-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observation is an important component of research to examine complex social settings and iswell-established for studying courtroom dynamics and judicial behaviour. However, the manyactivities occurring at once and the multiple participants, lay and professional, make it impossiblefor a sole researcher to observe and understand everything occurring in the courtroom. Thisarticle reports on the use of two researchers to undertake court observations, in two differentstudies, each nested in a different research design. The social nature of data collection and thevalue of dialogue between the two researchers in interpreting observed events, especially whenstudying emotion, are readily apparent in both studies.

  • 14.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Design and Anthropology2015In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 125-126Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    a participant and interacting with them. The chapters on data handling and coding and data analysis are informative about how to think about the analysis as well as how to carry it out. Following this, the chapter on data interpretation pulls the book around malmost full circle, as the different approaches re-emerge as topics, and the process is shown to be coherent and complete. The final section, ‘Writing about the research’ develops ideas about the presentation of the research, the story that will be told. All the chapters in the book are helpfully self-referential, so if an idea emerges in one that is dealt with in great depth in another a link is made. This produces a conceptual web, and reading the book becomes an exploration of thoughts and ideas across the different chapters, epistemologies and paradigms. Qualitative Research: The Essential Guide to Theory and Practice makes a big claim in its title. Whether it is he essential guide I cannot say, but it is definitely the textbook I will be directing my undergraduate and postgraduate research students towards when they are looking for answers to the difficult questions every researcher encounters.

  • 15.
    Sjöstedt Landén, Angelika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences. Umeå Universitet.
    From ethnographic 'self'-discovery to processes of identification2011In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 536-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Descriptions of the research experience are vital to ethnography and have often been mediated through the writings about the researcher 'self'. Consequently, the concept of self has taken up a central position in literature on ethnographic work. In order to renew the discussion on the ethnographic researcher position, I intend to explore further what status is given to such descriptions and notions of self. In this article I analyse how researcher identity claims were made through the practice of ethnographic description drawn from field notes produced during a study of a Swedish workplace. Building on the results of the analysis, I suggest that the ethnographic researcher will not be able to discover her self in the process of research. Rather, I argue, researcher identity is constructed in ethnographic research practice where the researcher goes into processes of identification.

  • 16.
    Sjöstedt Landén, Angelika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    From ethnographic 'self'-discovery to processes of identification2011In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 536-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Descriptions of the research experience are vital to ethnography and have often been mediated through the writings about the researcher 'self'. Consequently, the concept of self has taken up a central position in literature on ethnographic work. In order to renew the discussion on the ethnographic researcher position, I intend to explore further what status is given to such descriptions and notions of self. In this article I analyse how researcher identity claims were made through the practice of ethnographic description drawn from field notes produced during a study of a Swedish workplace. Building on the results of the analysis, I suggest that the ethnographic researcher will not be able to discover her self in the process of research. Rather, I argue, researcher identity is constructed in ethnographic research practice where the researcher goes into processes of identification.

  • 17.
    Sörensson, Erika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Kalman, Hildur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Care and concern in the research process: meeting ethical and epistemological challenges through multiple engagements and dialogue with research subjectsIn: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By addressing a case of data collection strategies applied in research on Thai migration to the Swedish wild-berry industry, this article argues for how a feminist approach based on care and concern for research subjects both safeguards ethical concerns and promotes good knowing. The data collection procedures were designed in a step-by-step manner, including the research subjects as much as possible at different times and in different ways in an attempt to create preconditions for a more inclusive production of knowledge. In-depth interviews, participant observation, photo documentation and group interviews were used, which facilitated the possibility to understand the content and meanings of wild-berry picking from the workers’ points of view. Through prolonged contact, including repeated encounters and dialogue with research subjects, in-depth knowledge was produced concerning Thai migrations to Sweden, as migration was set in relation to the migrants’ life courses and living conditions.

  • 18.
    Sörensson, Erika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Kalman, Hildur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Care and concern in the research process: meeting ethical and epistemological challenges through multiple engagements and dialogue with research subjects2017In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning in focus groups: An analytical dimension for enhancing focus group research2007In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 249-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus group is a research methodology in which a small group of participants gathers to discuss a specified issue under the guidance of a moderator. The discussions are tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed. Notably, the interaction between focus group participants has seldom been evaluated, analysed or discussed in empirical research. We argue that considering the focus group in light of current research into interaction in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial groups would facilitate the deliberate exploitation of group processes in designing focus groups, staging data collection and analysing and interpreting data. When the analytical focus shifts from mere content analysis to an analysis of what the participants themselves are trying to learn, one can explore not only what the participants are talking about, but also how they are trying to understand and conceptualise the issue under discussion. © 2007 Sage Publications.

  • 20.
    Åkerström, Jeanette
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, JPS.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Young people as partners in research: experiences from an interactive research circle with adolescent girls2013In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 528-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an interactive research methodology for young people’s participation in research. A model of the research circle, based on the Scandinavian study-circle tradition with democratic ideals, was created and is described. The empirical example is from Sweden. Academic researchers invited young people to be research partners in a research circle. The asymmetrical relationship between the researchers and the young research partners made asymmetric responsibility and respect into central parts of the methodology. The interactive process in the research circle concerns research fundamentals: developing methodological knowledge, designing a study, how to formulate the research questions from the viewpoint of young people, how to analyze from a generational insider perspective, and how to handle institutionalized andasymmetric power relations in social knowledge formation.

  • 21.
    Åkerström, Jeanette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Young people as partners in research: experiences from an interactive research circle with adolescent girls2013In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 528-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an interactive research methodology for young people's participation in research. A model of the research circle, based on the Scandinavian study-circle tradition with democratic ideals, was created and is described. The empirical example is from Sweden. Academic researchers invited young people to be research partners in a research circle. The asymmetrical relationship between the researchers and the young research partners made asymmetric responsibility and respect into central parts of the methodology. The interactive process in the research circle concerns research fundamentals: developing methodological knowledge, designing a study, how to formulate the research questions from the viewpoint of young people, how to analyze from a generational insider perspective, and how to handle institutionalized and asymmetric power relations in social knowledge formation.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf