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  • 1.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    The University of Nottingham.
    von Koch, Christopher
    School of Economics and Commercial Law, Department of Business Administration, Göteborg.
    Löfsten, Hans
    Chalmers universitet.
    Corporate governance and performance of small high-tech firms in Sweden2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 955-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach uses data from a sample of 183 small high-tech firms, new technology-based firms (small high-tech firms) in Sweden (54 variables under the headings of work experience, board and advice, financing, motivation—performance priorities, technological innovation and strategy). This study identifies some core areas of importance in corporate governance. Few managers in this study had a strong background and experience of finance and the preparation of business. Only 64 per cent of the managers have had previous work experience before starting the firm. The survey makes it clear that the small high-tech firms are likely to have a strong link with banking institutions. The consequence of these links is that most of the firm's capital supply is from banks, and that there are strong ownership links between banks and industry. The background of the founder does seem to have had an effect on the problem of financing and ownership issues. It is private sector organizations (banks) and families that are most frequently consulted by small high-tech firms (However, low means). It is also the private and public sector organizations, in connection with external board membership, regional development agencies and banks that are most frequently consulted. In the future, it is reasonable to search for factor patterns that can begin to explain and predict the direction of corporate governance in small new technology-based firms.

  • 2. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    von Koch, Christopher
    Löfsten, Hans
    Corporate governance and performance of small high-tech firms in Sweden2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 955-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach uses data from a sample of 183 small high-tech firms, new, technology-based firms (small high-tech firms) in Sweden (54 variables under the headings of work experience, board and advice, financing, motivation-performance priorities, technological innovation and strategy). This study identifies some core areas of importance in corporate governance. Few managers in this study had a strong background and experience of finance and the preparation of business. Only 64 per cent of the managers have had previous work experience before starting the firm. The survey makes it clear that the small high-tech firms are likely to have a strong link with banking institutions. The consequence of these links is that most of the firm's capital supply is from banks, and that there are strong ownership links between banks and industry. The background of the founder does seem to have had an effect on the problem of financing and ownership issues. It is private sector organizations (banks) and families that are most frequently consulted by small high-tech firms (However, low means). It is also the private and public sector organizations, in connection with external board membership, regional development agencies and banks that are most frequently consulted. In the future, it is reasonable to search for factor patterns that can begin to explain and predict the direction of corporate governance in small new technology-based firms.

  • 3.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ingemansson Havenvid, Malena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History, Science and Technology Studies Center.
    Identifying new dimensions of business incubation: a multi-level analysis of Karolinska Institute’s incubation system2016In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 50-51, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relying on an in-depth case study of the incubator related to the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institute's (KI), this paper identifies new analytical and strategic dimensions of incubation. Departing from the current literature's prevalent focus on incubators as organizations performing a predefined set of activities for incubatees (facility renting, coaching, training and connecting), we perform a multilevel analysis embracing, next to the organizational and the project-specific levels, also the broader institutional and inter-organizational level. Our analysis relies on seven key components of incubation, namely its time, place, sources, resources, control/governance, activities/services and outcomes. Further, we view incubators as strategic actors engaged in value creation on a broader arena than the strict incubation context, even an international arena, where incubators' choices and interactions can be analyzed with the help of concepts from various streams in the business strategy literature. The specific strategic drivers of business incubation that we identify in the KI incubator's case are six: positioning in the value chain, risk taking/time perspective, revenue model, governance/control, internationalization, and cooperation/competition. The paper concludes with managerial implications urging incubators to take more of a strategic perspective rather than focussing only on the established components of their operations.

  • 4.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Nadin, Giancarlo
    The challenges in digitalizing business relationshisp: The construction of an IT infrastructure for a textile-related business network2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1111-1126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the phenomenon of the digitalisation of buyer–seller relationships. We discuss and systematise the challenges of constructing an IT infrastructure capable of sustaining the inter-firm interactions necessary in a business network. In particular, we deal with two relevant main questions (1) how are IT tools constructed and introduced into business networks to sustain relationships and (2) what type of challenges emerge during such attempts to construct and introduce IT. Relying on the case of an IT project for the “Stella” network (an Italian home-textile network), we highlight the challenges related to resource heterogeneity and process complexity. Furthermore, we analyse the relevance of such issues as inter-firm trust, power and dependence in similar IT projects. Particular emphasis is then given to the possibility of the IT system representing not only the formal, but also the informal interactions among firms, and consequently, to the intrinsic limits to codifying relationships into rigid models. Even if the purpose of this paper is not to suggest generalised solutions to the above challenges, we describe how each of them was faced by the project team in the “Stella” network and we propose an indicative list of managerial implications relevant for all IT projects that stretch to whole business networks.

  • 5.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norrman, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Incubator best practice: A framework2008In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incubators have become a ubiquitous phenomenon in many parts of the world and are viewed as a tool for promoting the development of technology-based growth firms. Considering the large faith and the considerable amounts of money invested in incubators, the identification of best practice incubator models is of importance. Previous incubator assessment literature has tended to emphasise the measurement of incubator outcomes. In this paper, we argue that best practice identification requires a holistic approach, where the goals of the incubators are taken into account and the performance of different incubators are put in relation to their incubator models. In this context, the aim of this paper is to develop a framework that can serve as a basis for identifying best practice incubator models and for more rigorous evaluations of incubator performance. The framework suggested includes three distinguishing model components: selection, business support and mediation. We distinguish between idea-focused selection and entrepreneur-focused selection as well as between “picking-the-winners” and “survival-of-the-fittest” selection. Business support is seen as a continuum from “laissez-faire” to “strong intervention”. Mediation strategies vary in terms of the type of innovation system in focus: technological, regional or cluster. The framework is applied to 16 Swedish incubators.

  • 6.
    Borg, Erik A
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 4.
    Knowledge, Information and Intellectual Property: implications for marketing relationships2001In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 515-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge and information have become an essential asset determining the profitability of technology-intensive enterprises. In knowledge-based industries, knowledge and information can be marketed to potential partners or clients separately from the products and services that are based on the application of specific knowledge. In the new, global computer-intensive economy, the knowledge base of the economy can determine the approval of an enterprise as a producer of future solutions. This means that it is crucial that enterprises identify and develop their knowledge base, not least in their market relationships. Knowledge emerges in network relationships between an enterprise and its surrounding organisations, and can be legally protected as intellectual property (IP). A clearer notion of the way IP can be analysed may improve the economic outcome of investments in innovation. Relationship marketing clearly has a role in the marketing of technological innovation and product development. A high-tech enterprise faces several decisions influencing its position in the market when developing its knowledge base. Key decisions determining the relationships established in a knowledge-intensive market include (i) make or buy decisions; (ii) organisational association or isolation; (iii) the innovation or adaptation of new technology; (iv) the protection or exploitation of knowledge; (v) public or private research funding; (vi) safeguarding or sharing of IP; and (vii) pioneering advantages or disadvantages.

  • 7.
    Bäck, Ivari
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, Department of Management.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Boundaries of R&D collaboration2015In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 45-46, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on organizational boundary theories (competence, efficiency, power, and identity), this study examines the boundaries of R&D collaboration, based on a qualitative, comparative case analysis of six long-term R&D relationships within the supplier network of a leading multinational corporation that manufactures electrical devices and systems. The results reveal that competence development, facilitated by trust, enables joint learning and the creation of tacit knowledge in long-term partnerships, and has a central role in boundary formation. Competence and accumulated experience also improve the efficiency of the relationship, which has a central impact on decisions to continue or end the collaboration. Power conception, drawing on resource dependency theory, is dominant in boundary setting only in cases where trust or mutual dependence between partners is low. The boundaries set by identity are based on managerial sensemaking and prior experience, and they tend to be dominant for as long as external demands force managers to re-consider them. First, the study contributes to supplier involvement literature by utilizing firm boundary theories in the context of R&D collaboration. Second, the study contributes to firm boundary literature by complementing the theory with trust and joint learning approaches, and by examining the interplay between different theories. The results also suggest practices that should be at the forefront of managers' thinking when they consider their firms' relational development needs in the context of R&D collaboration. The results also highlight the importance of long-term experience and trust in facilitating collaboration in the relationship.

  • 8.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    University Carlos III, Madrid.
    Usero, Belén
    University Carlos III, Madrid.
    Fernández, Zulima
    University Carlos III, Madrid.
    The role of complementary products on platform adoption: Evidence from the video console market2013In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 405-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the importance of the interdependences within platform-based markets. Specifically, the work examines the influence of complementary product portfolios on the adoption of platforms by individuals. The study analyzes data from a panel of 17 video game platforms in three regions (the US, Japan and Europe) for the period between 1989 and 2011. The results suggest that platform adoption is driven by the availability and users of complementary products. The study also finds that this impact is stronger when platform providers jointly manage the in-house complementary product portfolio and the platform. These findings reveal that decisions on complementary products act as strategic drivers of adoption in platform-based markets. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 9. Dettwiler, Paul
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Löfsten, Hans
    Utility of location: A comparative survey between small new technology-based firms located on and off Science Parks - Implications for facilities management2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 506-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to highlight the role of facilities management (FM) for new technology-based firms (NTBFs) that are located on respectively off Science Parks. It incorporates FM as a contributory background element in the enhancement of the entrepreneurial environment, which is one explanatory factor of the superior performance and growth of NTBFs located inside Science Parks. Differences in location preferences between on and off park NTBFs are brought into evidence in this paper by means of an extensive quantitative survey. This resulted in the finding that the proximity to university is especially significant among NTBFs inside parks. Furthermore, infrastructure has high significance in both groups whereas significance of facilities cost differs in range of significance. In a model it is argued that FM indirectly contributes to beneficial scenarios for interaction, interfirm relations and networks that can be found particularly in Science Parks. A discussion and a set of hypotheses in the conclusive part link FM and location, issues to the performance for NTBFs.

  • 10.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Kristensson, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Magnusson, Peter R
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Sundström, Erik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Customer integration within service development: A review of methods and an analysis of insitu and exsitu contributions2012In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 32, no 7-8, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to contribute to a better understanding of how to integrate customerswithinservicedevelopment by assessing different methods of obtaining use information. The article reviews and classifies methods for customerintegration and it also presents a new framework that suggests four modes of customerintegration in which data is classified either as insitu (data captured in a customer's use situation) or exsitu (data captured outside the use situation) and as either incontext or excontext. Context is defined as a resource constellation that is available for customers to enable value co-creation. Accordingly, incontext refers to methods in which the customer is in the actual use context and has access to various resources, while excontext refers to a situation in which the customer is outside the use context and, therefore, has no direct access to the resources.

  • 11.
    Ellonen, Hanna-Kaisa
    et al.
    Lappennranta University of Technology.
    Wikström, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Jantunen, Ari
    Lappennranta University of Technology.
    Linking dynamic-capability portfolios and innovation outcomes2009In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 29, no 11, p. 753-762Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Determinants of the continued use of self-service technology: The case of Internet banking2007In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on buyers' continued use of self-service technology (SST). This area is often neglected because most studies focus on buyers' adoption or acceptance of SST. In comparison to new buyer acquisition, continued use is a cost-effective market strategy aimed at retaining buyers. Based on a sample of 1831 Estonian Internet banking customers, we find that continued use of SST is positively affected by buyers' perceived usefulness. We also find that continued use of SST is negatively affected by multichannel satisfaction. As our results show, two important issues are facing developers of SSTs and sellers using SSTs: First, continued use of SST is achieved when the buyer finds the SST useful. Second, SSTs need to be considered in the context of all channels in the buyer-seller interface because the buyer does not separate the service offering of an SST from other channels. The benefits associated with using SSTs will increase if these strategic issues are taken into account.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Sören
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Technology spillover from the aircraft industry: the case of Volvo Aero2000In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 653-664Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericsson, Kristian
    TRUMPF Machine Tools International.
    Patel, Pankaj
    Miller College of Business, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana.
    The dark side of knowledge transfer: Exploring knowledge leakage in joint R&D projects2015In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 41-42, p. 75-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge leakage refers to loss of technological knowledge intended to stay within a firm׳s boundaries and may cause a “weakened state” in which a focal firm loses its competitive advantage and industry position. Based on multiple case studies of knowledge leakage in joint research and development (R&D) projects in large firms in Sweden, this paper makes two contributions. First, in contrast to the uni-dimensional dyadic leakage process assumed in the literature, we find that the knowledge leakage process is multi-dimensional and exists in three varieties: i) a process whereby an external party assimilates knowledge from a focal firm, ii) a process whereby an external party assimilates knowledge from another external party, and iii) a process whereby the focal firm uses knowledge already shared with an external party in such a way that it becomes sensitive. Second, where the prior literature suggests that core knowledge must be protected from leakage, we find that some core knowledge can leak without negative effects, whereas some knowledge, being non-core to a focal firm, can have severe negative effects. These insights provide novel theoretical implications and new insights into how firms can manage knowledge leakage in practice.

  • 15.
    Kapsali, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    How to implement innovation policies through projects successfully2011In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 615-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the types of policy instruments responsible for the success of policy implementation through projects. Based on evidence from 12 comparative multiple case-studies, the paper provides an analytical insight from real practice on how and why different types of instruments lead to either successful or unsuccessful projects. In particular, the key finding is that in order for projects to implement policy successfully, policy instruments have to be designed based on specific systems thinking constructs related to flexibility. The findings provide the crucial but missing holistic conceptual direction for the development of implementation theory, which needs to overcome conceptual fragmentation and polarization. The findings also provide the insight as to how instruments really function which is essential to policy makers and project managers involved in public innovation programs. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Compatibility before completeness - Identifying intrinsic conflicts in concept decision making for technical systems2012In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the practice of concept decision-making, i.e. making decisions on technical solutions in early product development stages. An empirical study was conducted in a Swedish automotive company, using a qualitative approach. The study reveals that a major challenge in concept decision-making is to achieve compatibility between systems in the product before the system solutions are completely developed. Managers and product developers need to know that conceptual solutions are good enough to progress into detailed development without performing detailed analysis. In the concept-decision process a number of intrinsic conflicts that these actors have to address are identified: understanding of the overall development process as iterative or stepwise; developing satisfying or optimized solutions; using defined or interpreted criteria when comparing solutions; and composing a complete car from different systems solutions, prioritizing project targets or long-term system targets. Consequences of these intrinsic conflicts, omnipresent in the process, are characterized and discussed. The authors suggest a number of means to address these intrinsic conflicts, such as enhancing actors' awareness of psychological biases. The authors also suggest to have clear and well-communicated visions regarding both product and development process, in order to guide individuals' daily judgments and trade-offs that have to be made.

  • 17.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jones-Evans, Dylan
    University College, Dublin.
    Stimulation of technology-based small firms—A case study of university-industry cooperation1996In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that owner-managers of technology-based firms usually have superior technical skills but are less competent in the area of business development. Consequently, in order to address these weaknesses, it has been suggested that an important part of support activities for these firms should be oriented towards the development of their management and business competences. As such, this paper describes a successful model which has been developed over a 10-year period to stimulate the growth and development of small technology-based firms. Four types of interrelated activities are in operation: entrepreneurship and new business development programmes, development programmes, management groups, and club/networking activities. The success of these stimulating activities can, above all, be related to five factors: an ability to meet real needs, a core group, a clear focus, credibility, and close relations between the stimulation organization and the university. One important task for researchers and practitioners is to understand the mechanisms behind these criteria for success.

  • 18.
    Kohler, Thomas
    et al.
    Univ Innsbruck, Sch Management, Dept Strateg Management Mkt & Tourism, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Matzler, Kurt
    Univ Innsbruck, Sch Management, Dept Strateg Management Mkt & Tourism, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Fueller, Johann
    HYVE AG, Munich, Germany..
    Avatar-based innovation: Using virtual worlds for real-world innovation2009In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 29, no 6-7, p. 395-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore the opportunities virtual worlds offer for real-world innovations. By integrating users of virtual worlds into in interactive new product development process, companies can tap customers innovative potential using the latest technology. Connecting the emerging technology of virtual Worlds With a customer-centric perspective of open innovation allows unique and inventive opportunities to capitalize oil users' innovative potential and knowledge. The concept of avatar-based innovation serves as a point of origin to reveal these possibilities and represents the first attempt to systematically take advantage of virtual worlds for innovation management. In doing so, this paper argues that latest advances of information and communication technologies enrich the interaction process and can improve new product development process. Further, characteristics are presented that suggest that the digital environment is especially conducive to innovation and creative tasks. Based oil theoretical insights, the analysis of eight cases (Coca-Cola, Steelcase, Osram, Alcatel-Lucent, Toyota Scion, Endemol, Aloft, and Mazda), participant observation directly within the virtual world and 23 interviews with both managers and customers, this paper demonstrates how virtual worlds allow producers and consumers to swarm together with like-minded individuals to create new products and permits companies to find an audience to test, use, and provide feedback on the content and products they create. We highlight the active roles avatars can play throughout the whole innovation process, and demonstrate the opportunities of how manufactures and Customers could collaborate to innovate from idea to launch. A few pathfinding companies experiment with avatars as a source of innovation. Specifically, the initiatives of Osram, Steelcase, Mazda, and Toyota truly link the concepts of open innovation and virtual worlds to employ the interactive technology for new product development. These efforts are critically analyzed to examine the hypothesized potential of avatar-based innovation. The cases pinpoint practical implications and reveal both preconditions and challenges of this new approach to interactive new product development. The results suggest that in order to fully realize the potential of avatar-based innovation, companies need to create a compelling open innovation experience and consider the peculiarities of Virtual worlds.

  • 19.
    Kurkkio, Monika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    University of Mannheim.
    Where process development begins: a multiple case study of fuzzy front-end activities in process firms2011In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 490-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fuzzy front end stage is known to be critical to overall product development success, but few if any studies have examined the front end in process development. By means of a multiple case study of process firms, this article aims to bridge this knowledge gap. Our results show that substantial differences in front end activities exist between the product development and process development domains. We conceptualize the front end in process development to be an iterative trial-and-error process, dominated by activities such as idea generation and refinement, literature reviews, anticipation of end-product changes, and various forms of experiments in bench scale, lab scale, and full-scale production. In addition, we highlight key problems in the FFE process, and managerial remedies for how to mitigate them. While these findings provide theoretical implications for research into product development, process development and production management, the findings are particularly relevant to process development managers, plant managers, and development engineers interested in increasing the efficiency of production processes.

  • 20.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Innovation Management in the Knowledge Economy: Series on Technology Management, vol. 7; Ben Dankbaar (Ed); Imperial College Press, London, 20032004In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 593-595Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Technology and the market - demand, users and innovation2003In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 23, p. 781-783Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Technology and the Market - Demand, Users and Innovation2003In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 782-783Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Co-locating NPD? The need for combining project focus and organizational integration2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 807-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies of new product development practices focus on comparisons of individual projects, to identify factors contributing to their success or failure. This paper builds on an in-depth field study of the interaction of one single NPD project with the organizational context of the firm. The project typified many recommended practices for new-design projects: a co-located, cross-functional project team, close collaboration with external system suppliers, a hard-driving project manager and strong top management support. However, when evaluated in their organizational context as to their consequences for other on-going projects, these attributes turned out to have a deeply ambivalent character. By combining results from the case study and evidence from the literature several implications for NPD-organizing are suggested: the value of alternating co-location and physical separation according to the requirements of specific project phases, to take project duration into account in location decisions, and to address both interaction within the project and mechanisms for its interaction and integration with other departments and projects. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Landström, H.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Informal investors as entrepreneurs1998In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scarcity of risk capital for start-ups and technology-oriented small firms is an ever-recurring theme in the economic debate. In recent years interest in the informal risk capital market, i.e., private individuals who invest their own capital in small unlisted firms, has grown significantly, but our knowledge about this market is relatively limited. Against this background, the aim of this study is to describe and explain the decision-making criteria used by informal investors when assessing new investment proposals. In the study a conjoint method is used in order to measure quantitatively the relative importance of one decision-making criterion in relation to another, In total 34 general decision-making criteria and 35 leadership criteria were identified. A subjective sample of 44 informal investors in Sweden answered either a questionnaire relating to general decision-making criteria or one relating to leadership criteria. The data were coded into a conjoint model in order to process the relative ranking between the decision-making criteria. Earlier research has regarded informal investors as the financiers of small firms, looking at their investments as objects, in this study another interpretation is made and the informal investors are themselves regarded as entrepreneurs, that is they see their investments as subjects. This means that the relationship between the investor and the entrepreneur in the firm in which they invest can be characterised by using the concepts "business creator" and "co-creator", i.e., informal investors look for future business opportunities, and they want to participate in the creation process. This is expressed in their assessment of new investment proposals. For example, the informal investors attach a great deal of weight to decision-making criteria related to the business potential of the investment, the relationship between the entrepreneur and investor, as well as the entrepreneur's own ability to develop his/her firm. Furthermore, informal investors do not have the opportunity to play an executive role in the portfolio firms, and they therefore regard the entrepreneur in the portfolio firm as their stand-in, i.e., co-entrepreneur. This is also expressed in the decision-making criteria used by the informal investors, in that it is entrepreneurs who can be characterised as having entrepreneurial ability, which seems to be what the investors are looking for. Looking at informal investors as entrepreneurs themselves may have several implications for policy-makers as well as for entrepreneurs seeking capital. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 25. Löfsten, Hans
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Determinants for an entrepreneurial milieu: Science Parks and business policy in growing firms2003In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to understand the "added value" of a Science Park location there is need for detailed research exploring the characteristics and performance of firms located on and off Science Parks. The analysis distinguishes between new technology-based firms on and off Science Parks (273 firms) in Sweden during 1996-1998 in an effort to identify any element of added value which the park provides for the new technology-based firms (NTBFs). The problem of obtaining finance is one of the major difficulties faced by NTBFs (Latent construction: Resources 1). Self-financing is the dominant characteristic of funding in the small-firms sector. The attitudes and motivation of the firm founders and managers is another key factor in the ability to raise funds and achieve high growth and profitability. Information on the location of customers shows whether firms are linked to local, national or international markets, and thus their potential for growth (Latent construction: market innovation). One significant variable is geographical markets (global market). NTBFs (on-Park) have much wider market distribution throughout Sweden and abroad than is typical for small firms.

  • 26. Löfsten, Hans
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Environmental hostility, strategic orientation and the importance of management accounting: an empirical analysis of new technology-based firms2005In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 725-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports empirical analysis of two research propositions which arise from different variables from the contingency theory of management accounting. The approach uses data from a sample of 183 new technology-based firms (NTBFs) in Sweden. The contingency variables were considered under the headings of environmental hostility, and strategic orientation. While we might have expected to see here some evidence of correlations between variables of environmental hostility-management accounting and between strategic orientation-management accounting, only a few variables are apparent for the sample available. We note that the importance of standard methods in management accounting (general, costing, budgeting, investment calculation) does not seen to be precipitated by the contingencies such as environmental hostility and strategic orientation. Previous research has identified technology as one of the most important contingency factors. However, our technology variables will not seem to have an impact on the importance of management accounting practices in the NTBFs. We also conclude that the correlation analysis indicates that earlier work experience and different types of management problems in small high-tech firms is of importance for development of the cost management approach.

  • 27. Löfsten, Hans
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    R&D networks and product innovation patterns: academic and non-academic new technology-based firms on Science Parks2005In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1025-1037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research has explored the R&D networks and product innovation patterns made by the NTBFs (University spin offs, USOs and corporate spin-offs, CSOs) located on Science Parks. It seems resonable to believe that firms established by those with an academic background might be expected both to perform differently and respond to different incentives from those founded by personnel from the industry. The two research propositions were empirically tested on the basis of 134 new technology-based firms (NTBFs) on Science Parks in Sweden, USOs from the academy (74 small firms) and CSOs from the private sector (60 small firms). There were no significant differences regarding growth (sales) and profitability (profit margin) between the two groups. In order to separate the performance due to the firms capability and the impact of the environment, a control variable was created. This paper, building on the resource-based theory and empirical evidence, argues that NTBFs have an interest in co-operation between the university and the Science Park firms. The survey makes it clear that the proportion of USOs and CSOs on Science Parks with links with universities is comparatively high. Seventy percent of USOs cooperates with universities and 59 percent of the CSOs. This is surprisingly high percentages of the CSOs. One finding from this research is that USOs are not able to channel investments into greater R&D outputs (Patents) than comparable firms.

  • 28.
    Magnusson, Peter R
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Netz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Wästlund, Erik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Exploring holistic intuitive idea screening in the light of formal criteria2014In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 315-326Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ottosson, S.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Pilot your organization using cash flow planning with frequent feedback1997In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 513-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For enterprises which are growing, developing products or facing tough competition, cash flow is often a limiting factor which determines their success or failure. This article is based on action research in a small enterprise with liquidity shortage whose sales grew at a rare of 20% while R&D amounted to 15% and profits to 8% of turnover From the investigation it appeared that the most important managing/financial activity consisted of weekly cash flow planning with frequent feedback Discrepancies between estimates and outcomes suggested what action was to be taken. Some benefits of continuous liquidity planning include better knowledge of revenue and expenses, better total quality, greater personnel involvement, better liquidity, smaller inventory, better earning capacity, and so forth. In the article a model for continuous liquidity planning is presented based on the study's findings. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 30.
    Ottosson, S.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Strategic considerations of the interplay between R&D and M&S1998In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 235-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes some of the complex relationships that exist between R&D (research and development) and M&S (marketing and sales). Factors impacting R&D and M&S are analysed such as company size, company age, wishes for changes in the individual company, etc. Seven propositions are presented. One specific finding from the study is that, for different product life cycles (PLCs), R&D and M&S often counteract so that when R&D spendings are allowed to increase, M&S spendings are reduced and vice versa. Management of technology (MoT) is not an exact science, and therefore the paper focuses on magnitudes of order instead of decimals in R&D and M&S expenditures for individual companies depending on branch, and differing situations. One important result of the investigation is that short PLCs means larger R&D spendings, and vice versa. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Ottosson, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Dynamic product development of a new Intranet platform2003In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 669-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method of using dynamic product development (DPD) described for hardware product development has now also been tested for software development. This project was the development of a new Intranet platform called e-Professor. The e-Professor has a new mindset compared to the common pyramidal architecture used in most portals. The new mindset is spherical in nature which means that transfer of information and links from/to different parts of the portal are much more quickly achieved when compared to traditional portals. This new function saves a lot of time and effort especially, say, for teachers and lecturers who could have large numbers of students attending classes and courses. In order to test it as an application, the new portal e-Professor, has been tested as an e-learning portal in the course "Product Development" at three different universities in Sweden in 2002. Another application in 2002 has been to test it as a net portal for 30-50 unemployed persons in the city of Karlstad, Sweden. The investigations show that the technical objective, which was to make a simple, clear and user-friendly flexible portal, has been accomplished most satisfactorily. Thus, DPD has also been shown to work well for software development. © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Ottosson, Stig
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Dynamic product development - DPD2004In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To be competitive on an increasingly competitive global market, companies must be better at quickly developing innovations and new product platforms. Particularly for companies with short product life cycles, it is important to quickly and safely develop new products and new product platforms that fulfill reasonable demands on quality, performance, and cost. Unfortunately, classical methods such as Integrated Product Development (IPD), Concurrent Engineering (CE), and Simultaneous Engineering (SE) were developed for re-engineering of existing products, and have written reports and project reviews at discrete points (at the gates) as feedback principles, which for all types of development means fragmented information, delayed information, and reactive management. Dynamic Product Development (DPD) has a different mindset and is the product concept developed as long as a project runs and not just before engineering starts. Feedback is in DPD based on management participation for immediate and qualitative information, which facilitates control and guidance in real time, reducing unwanted surprises to low levels. Frequent solution iteration (making almost right and quickly testing the solutions) is in DPD important, which is opposite to classical methods. High demands on creativity, development time, usability, cost, and quality have in practical tests shown to be satisfied using DPD. © 2002 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 33.
    Ottosson, Stig
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Participation action research - A key to improved knowledge of management2003In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 87-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Only by actively taking part inside ongoing processes in organisations for most of the time and occasionally moving out of the system to view it from a distance, and also to compare it with other systems and processes, can the optimal situation arise for a deeper understanding of the complexity of management and teamwork. This view of study and research is the basic principle of Participation (PAR), demanding that researchers act simultaneously as researchers and entrepreneurs, project leaders or team members. PAR is an extension of Action Research, which has mainly been used in social studies during the second part of the 20th century. In this article it is shown (for the first time?) that action research has a strong scientific support in modem science from quantum physics and chaos/complexity theory while in many ways it contradicts the classical (Newtonian) view of how 'good' science should be performed. In this paper a model is shown of how PAR can be used to combine industrial work with university resources in a fruitful way so that scientific findings can also be useful findings for practitioners. Our tests have shown that PAR has revealed important information on change management, project management, innovation management, and the development of (new) user-friendly products. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Ottosson, Stig
    Halmstad University.
    Planetary organizations1998In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 81-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a new organizational concept (the `Planetary Organization'). The aim of this new concept is to increase the flexibility and involvement of every individual associated with a project or a process. With regards to product development, and especially innovative product development, the aim is also to shorten the time needed to successfully complete tasks as well as to cut costs, encourage inventive solutions, and increase product quality. In the `Planetary Organization', the manager/project leader is in the center with sub-managers/sub-project leaders around him/her, in direct contact with one another. Grouped around each sub-manager/sub-project leader are associates, also in direct contact with each other. The management style for the managers/project leaders and the sub-managers/sub-project leaders should - for maximum efficiency - be Management by Walking Around (MBWA). An important characterization of such a planetary organization is the way in which experts and senior managers act as comets, pollinating and influencing others in the organization in a positive way.

  • 35.
    Ottosson, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Bjork, E.
    Björk, E., Halmstad University, Box 823, S-30118 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Research on dynamic systems - Some considerations2004In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 24, no 11, p. 863-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic systems are systems within which changes occur all the time. Such systems are organisations, innovation projects, etc. It is a well-known fact that interaction and commitment from a range of professions is needed to achieve competitive results in product development projects. Especially when innovative development is carried out, it is of the utmost importance that product developers interact intensively in every link from sub-suppliers to customers, users and society if they are not to lose important signals from any part of the chain or be unaware of important and unforeseen events that will inevitably take place during a development process. Dealing with product development therefore means dealing with complex adaptive systems for which unpredictability increases with the number of people involved and the longer the development process takes. As a consequence, researchers must consider different approaches to research in order to improve their knowledge of practical product development and to produce useful theories for practitioners acting in a dynamic world. This paper deals with such considerations. One conclusion is that the most information-intense situation is reached if researchers act as project leaders of product development projects, which is called performing Participation or Insider Action Research (IAR). This line of action does, however, present a complication in that performing IAR often demands that researchers have some practical industrial experience in advance. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Ottosson, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, S-60174 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Björk, Eva-Stina
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Research on dynamic systems: some considerations2004In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 24, no 11, p. 863-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic systems are systems within which changes occur all the time. Such systems are organisations, innovation projects, etc. It is a well-known fact that interaction and commitment from a range of professions is needed to achieve competitive results in product development projects. Especially when innovative development is carried out, it is of the utmost importance that product developers interact intensively in every link from sub-suppliers to customers, users and society if they are not to lose important signals from any part of the chain or be unaware of important and unforeseen events that will inevitably take place during a development process. Dealing with product development therefore means dealing with complex adaptive systems for which unpredictability increases with the number of people involved and the longer the development process takes. As a consequence, researchers must consider different approaches to research in order to improve their knowledge of practical product development and to produce useful theories for practitioners acting in a dynamic world. This paper deals with such considerations. One conclusion is that the most information-intense situation is reached if researchers act as project leaders of product development projects, which is called performing Participation or Insider Action Research (IAR). This line of action does, however, present a complication in that performing IAR often demands that researchers have some practical industrial experience in advance.

  • 37.
    Persson Ridell, Oscar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Teigland, Robin
    Department of Marketing and Strategy, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Facilitating knowledge sharing between consumer communities and hosting firms: Expanding the solution space to a virtual innovation platformIn: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer communities, such as in the video game industry, are settings where knowledge sharing and innovation abound as consumers dedicate their own resources to innovate upon firm-developed solutions. Researchers have focused extensively on investigating how toolkits facilitate knowledge sharing for innovation between firms and consumer communities. However, we suggest that toolkits are only one such means to achieve knowledge sharing. As such, we investigate in this article how knowledge sharing vis-à-vis innovation is facilitated between a consumer community and its hosting firm. Applying concepts from the communities of practice literature to an in-depth study of a video game developer and its global gaming community, our findings suggest that the boundary process between the consumer community and the hosting firm envelops a complete virtual innovation platform – a sequence of innovation practices each accompanied by a tailored yet emergent combination of brokers and boundary objects, which is further supported by moderators.

  • 38.
    Pitt, Leyland
    et al.
    Simon Fraser University.
    Merwe, Rian van der
    User Experience Research, eBay.
    Berthon, Pierre
    Department of Marketing, Bentley College.
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Division of Industrial Marketing and e-commerce, Lulea University of Technology.
    Barnes, Bradley R.
    Leeds University Business School.
    Swedish BioTech SMEs: The veiled values in online networks2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 5-6, p. 553-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many years, sociologists have conceptualized and debated the value of "social capital", the resources embedded in an actor’s social network. The notions of network organizations and strategic alliances have become important forms of entrepreneurial venture, yet often the value in these networks is veiled by network complexity. These associations of individuals and organizations are typically undocumented, difficult to identify by third parties, and even pass unrecognized by their constituent members. They consist of informal Internet networks that are extremely valuable because of the strategic social capital embedded in them. Drawing on social network theory, this paper outlines a methodology for viewing and valuing informal Internet networks, using small-to-medium sized enterprises in the Swedish biotechnology arena as a backdrop. It demonstrates that networks can be constructed from the links between the web sites of actor firms, and that it is possible to use social network theory to identify the most prominent actors. Then, using structural hole analysis, the entrepreneurial opportunities surrounding these actors can be unveiled.

  • 39. Pitt, Leyland
    et al.
    Merwe, Rian van der
    User Experience Research - e-Bay, San Jose, CA.
    Berthon, Pierre
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Barnes, Bradley R
    Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds.
    Swedish BioTech SMEs: The veiled values in online networks2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 5-6, p. 553-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many years, sociologists have conceptualized and debated the value of ‘social capital', the resources embedded in an actor's social network. The notions of network organizations and strategic alliances have become important forms of entrepreneurial venture, yet often the value in these networks is veiled by network complexity. These associations of individuals and organizations are typically undocumented, difficult to identify by third parties, and even pass unrecognized by their constituent members. They consist of informal Internet networks that are extremely valuable because of the strategic social capital embedded in them. Drawing on social network theory, this paper outlines a methodology for viewing and valuing informal Internet networks, using small-to-medium sized enterprises in the Swedish biotechnology arena as a backdrop. It demonstrates that networks can be constructed from the links between the web sites of actor firms, and that it is possible to use social network theory to identify the most prominent actors. Then, using structural hole analysis, the entrepreneurial opportunities surrounding these actors can be unveiled.

  • 40.
    Rovira Nordman, Emilia
    et al.
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Dept Mkt & Strategy, POB 6501, S-11383 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tolstoy, Daniel
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Dept Mkt & Strategy, POB 6501, S-11383 Stockholm, Sweden..
    The impact of opportunity connectedness on innovation in SMEs’ foreign market relationships.2016In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 57-58, p. 47-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) use of business networks has grown significantly during the last decades, partly due to increasingly complex innovation processes. This article investigates how different kinds of networks, depending on location, contextualize innovation in specific foreign market business relationships. Building on internationalization, network, and innovation research we develop a model that views opportunity connectedness in specific host-markets, home-markets, and other international markets as prerequisites to innovative collaboration and innovation outcomes in foreign business relationships. The resultsof ourlinear structural relations (LISREL) analysis of Swedish SMEs provide empirical evidence that the effect of opportunity connectedness on innovation outcomes in foreign business relationships is mediated by the level of innovative collaboration. These results indicate that SMEs need a relatively higher level of innovative collaboration in their partnerships with foreign market customers to convert opportunities conceived in home- and international- market networks into innovative outcomes in comparison to opportunities conceived in host-market networks. This finding implies that as opportunities become increasingly contextually remote, the importance of collaborative business relationships increases. By showing these results, the study contributes to research in the international small-business domain that seeks to identify important prerequisites of SME innovation.

  • 41.
    Saemundsson, Rögnvaldur
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Candi, Marina
    Reykjavik University Center for Research on Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Absorptive Capacity and the Identification of Opportunities in New Technology-Based Firms2017In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 64-65, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this work is to investigate relationships between knowledge and opportunities in new ventures. More specifically, this work proposes and empirically tests how potential absorptive capacity is related with the identification of opportunities in new technology-based firms (NTBFs). To take into account the unique nature of NTBFs we divide potential absorptive capacity into problem absorptive capacity, i.e. the ability to identify and acquire knowledge of the goals, aspirations and needs of current and potential customers, and solution absorptive capacity, i.e. the ability to identify and acquire external knowledge of solutions to fulfill them. We develop three hypotheses, which predict that both problem absorptive capacity and solution absorptive capacity will be positively related with the identification of opportunities in NTBFs and that they will reinforce each other. The findings support the importance of making a distinction between the two proposed dimensions of potential absorptive capacity and shed light on their effectiveness and interaction for the identification of opportunities. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 42.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A two-way relationship between multi-level technological change and organisational characteristics: cases involving the development of heavy hybrid buses2012In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 32, no 7-8, p. 477-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses inter- and intra-organisational interaction in cases of product development, which involves significantly new technologies that affect core product sub-systems. The analysis shows that in such cases, there is a need to collaborate with suppliers to learn about the new technology. Moreover, provided that the firm's existing technology is still relevant, there is a need to integrate the new technology with existing technologies. Therefore, close supplier interaction has to be associated with close intra-organisational interaction. However, even a case where there is a limited need to integrate the new technology with existing technologies, there is a need to justify the new technology internally and negotiate the process of adopting it within the organisation. The paper thus demonstrates a two-way relationship between organisational characteristics and multi-level technological change. On the one hand, different types of technological changes demand different kinds of R&D organisations and supplier relationships. On the other hand, decisions to implement technological changes are influenced by existing organisational structures and product development philosophies.

  • 43.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration.
    The Business of Projects, by Andrew Davies and Mike Hobday2008In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 28, p. 709-710Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration.
    The Business of Projects, by Andrew Davies and Mike Hobday2008In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. Book ReviewArticle, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 45.
    Theodorakopoulos, Nicholas
    et al.
    Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Sanchez Preciado, Deycy Janeth
    University of Cauca, Popayán, Colombia.
    Bennett, David
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of South Australian Business School, Adelaide, Australia.
    Transferring technology from university to rural industry within a developing economy context: The case for nurturing communities of practice2012In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 32, no 9-10, p. 550-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this paper is to demonstrate how technology transfer between universities and rural industries in developing countries can be achieved effectively, using independent research and advisory centres as intermediaries. It draws on a longitudinal action research study, which experiments with the process of nurturing and bridging communities of practice amongst recipients of technology and stakeholders concerned with technology diffusion, productivity and economic development. Its empirical evidence is from an academic-related, non-government intervention initiative targeting two small-scale industries, namely fish farming and coffee production, in the Cauca region of Colombia. Results demonstrate how barriers to transfer can be overcome. The interventionist considered as instrumental; its key components and outcomes are discussed in detail. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Tongur, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    The business model dilemma of technology shifts2014In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 525-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology shifts are lethal to many manufacturing companies. Previous research indicates that this is not purely a problem of technological innovation, but is also closely related to the inertia of business models and business model innovation. This paper inquires into the dynamics of this intersection between technology and business models. Anchored in a case study in the automotive industry, it reveals how a potential technology shift constitutes a business model dilemma for firms leading in the existing technology. The paper illustrates why technology shifts are so difficult to master and contributes to theory by suggesting that managing technology shifts does not require either technology or service innovation in order to create a viable business model, but instead a compound of both. Furthermore, the paper applies a business model perspective to illustrate the explanatory power of analyzing the challenges of technology shifts faced by incumbent firms.

  • 47.
    Tynnhammar, Marcus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Kokshagina, Olga
    MINES ParisTech.
    Schneider, Sabrina
    University of Kassel.
    Composing the innovation management symphony: A note on the 2017 ISPIM Innovation Conference in Vienna2018In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 74-75, p. 66-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Verdegem, Pieter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    De Marez, Lieven
    Ghent University ,Department of Communication Studies.
    Rethinking determinants of ICT acceptance: Towards an integrated and comprehensive overview2011In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 411-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the contemporary ICT environment, we are confronted with a growing number of failing innovations.New technological innovations often fail because too much attention is still given to (technical)product-related features without taking into account the most important parameters of useracceptance. In addition, suppliers of ICT products often lack accurate insight into the distinguishedprofiles of their (potential) target audience. In this article theoretical considerations and empiricalresults on this matter are highlighted. First of all, an approach is proposed in which more traditionaland often scattered vision(s) on adoption determinants are broadened into an integrated framework.The approach provides a stronger base for better targeting of (new) users of technologies. Secondly, theauthors elaborate on this by rethinking these determinants with regard to later adopters. Later adopters(or even non-adopters/users) are often ignored in technology acceptance research. However, especiallyfor policy purposes, the understanding of why people do not adopt or do not use ICT is strongly relevantin the light of the development of an inclusive information society. Both approaches are illustrated bycase studies starting from a common list of nineteen ICT appropriation determinants. This frameworkenables to better profile both earlier and later adopters as well as it allows to formulate recommendationshow to bring innovations in the market. Summarizing, this contribution offers an integratedapproach on technology acceptance research by bridging the gap between a market and a policyorientedpoint of view.

  • 49.
    Visintin, Francesca
    et al.
    Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Udine, Italy.
    Pittino, Daniel
    Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Udine, Italy.
    Founding team composition and early performance of university-based spin-off companies2014In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The start-up of business ventures (university spin-offs-USOs) is an important channel that universities can use to transfer the results of public research to the economic system. Several empirical investigations however show that the majority of public-research spin-offs perform rather poorly (see for example Mustar et al., 2008. Science and Public Policy 35(2), 67-80). Therefore, identifying and analysing the obstacles that limit the success of this type of high-tech start-ups appears extremely important to better understand and, where possible, leverage their potential contributions in terms of innovation and growth. The existing literature on the performance of USOs studies these companies as any other high-tech start up, overlooking the peculiarities related to the presence of academic personnel in the entrepreneurial/management team. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap by analysing the relationship between founding teams and USO performance through a multi-level approach to the team demography. In particular, we try to account for some of the peculiar features which may shape the functioning of USO founding teams and arise mostly from the need to properly balance the scientific and commercial orientation with one another. The empirical analysis, carried out on a sample of 103 Italian USOs, shows that founding teams with a composition that promotes simultaneously differentiation and integration of academic and non-academic profiles, exhibit superior levels of performance in terms of growth.

  • 50.
    Visnjic, Ivanka
    et al.
    ESADE Business School.
    Neely, Andy
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The path to outcome delivery: Interplay of service market strategy and open business models2018In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 72-73, no April - May 2018, p. 46-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms in a variety of manufacturing sectors as well as the software industry have increasingly embraced services alongside their product portfolios in order to improve financial performance. Yet, the key question “How do service market strategy change and the accompanying business model change interact, and how does their interplay affect value creation?” remains open. Relying on twelve case studies of firms that have shifted towards providing highly advanced services (e.g. outcome-based contracts), theoretical propositions concerning the interplay of market strategy and business model on value creation are derived. The firms studied report two interdependent changes: first, they evolve the market strategy from provision of pure products to provision of services and then outcomes, in order to achieve a better fit with customer needs and to grow their service businesses. Second, they rely increasingly on partners and suppliers to provide new activities that are outside their competence base. This 'open business model' allows them to grow their new service businesses effectively and efficiently. At the same time, however, the shift to a service market strategy requires enhanced accountability to customers and increases the threat of penalties in the case of failure, while reliance on partners and suppliers leads to loss of control over the activity system and increases the threat of failure due to third party dependency. Thus, this paper finds that the success of firms that shift to services and outcomes hinges on their ability to balance the trade-off between increased value (i.e. growth, efficiency and effectiveness) and increased uncertainty associated with service market strategy/open business model interplay.

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