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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Mozhgan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Svensson, Erik Elm
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Application of Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) as a Tar Sampling Method2013In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 3853-3860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the result of an investigation of the potential use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) as a tar sampling method. The SPME stationary phase used was 50 mu m of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated on a fused silica fiber. Tar model compounds normally present in a producer gas from gasifiers, benzene, toluene, indane, indene, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene, were used in the investigation. The adsorbed compounds were analyzed by injection into gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector (GC- FID). The amount of adsorbed tar on the SPME fiber determined the detection and quantification limits for the method. The results showed that adsorption of tar model compounds on the SPME fiber increased with decreasing polarity. The adsorption of compounds increased with a decreasing temperature, enabling a possibility to tune the sensitivity of the method by changing the sampling temperature. Conclusively, SPME has a very high potential as a tar sampling method and, in combination with GC- FID trace analysis of tar, is a feasible application.

  • 2. Albertazz, S.
    et al.
    Basile, F.
    Brandin, Jan
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Einvall, Jessica
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Fornasar, G.
    Hulteberg, C.
    Sanati, M.
    Trifir, F.
    Vaccari, A.
    Pt/Rh/MgAl(O) Catalyst for the Upgrading of Biomass-Generated synthesis gases.2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 573-579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Arrhenius, Karine
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor.
    Podien, Doris
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Yaghooby, Haleh
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Smajovic, Nijaz
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Optimization of an Analytical Method for the Measurement of Oil Carryover from a Compressor in Compressed Natural Gas Refueling Stations2015In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 2416-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to determine the best method for extracting oil absorbed on coalescing filters at compressed natural gas (CNG) refueling stations and to compare the mass spectrometer (MS) and flame ionization detector (FID) for the quantification of the oil recovered in the extracts. Dichloromethane and heptane as solvents gave slightly higher recovery yields than pentane. The preferred extraction method with regard to time and solvent consumption consisted of an ultrasonic extraction, followed by removal of the remaining solvent under a stream of nitrogen. The FID and MS were found to be equally suitable for quantifying oil carryover, if the sample only contained the target oil when the instruments of analysis have been properly calibrated. If the sample is contaminated by compounds other than the target oil, MS and FID will provide different valuable information: MS may give information on the structure of the contaminants, while FID will give a more reliable quantification without proper calibration. The work discusses issues with the reusability of the filters and how to handle the memory effects.

  • 4.
    Atongka Tchoffor, Placid
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Förbrännings- och aerosolteknik.
    Davidsson, Kent
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Förbrännings- och aerosolteknik.
    Thunman, Henrik
    Effects of Steam on the Release of Potassium, Chlorine, and Sulfur during Char Conversion, Investigated under Dual Fluidized Bed Gasification Conditions2014In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 6953-6965Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Atongka Tchoffor, Placid
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Förbrännings- och aerosolteknik.
    Davidsson, Kent
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Förbrännings- och aerosolteknik.
    Thunman, Henrik
    Transformation and Release of Potassium, Chlorine, and Sulfur from Wheat Straw under Conditions Relevant to Dual Fluidized Bed Gasification2013In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 7510-7520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bagampadde, Umaru
    et al.
    Faculty of Technology, Makerere University, Kampala.
    Isacsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Characterization of chemical reactivity of liquid antistripping additives using potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy2006In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 2174-2180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical reactivity of two liquid antistripping additives mixed with two bitumens of diverse acid numbers was evaluated. Additives present in the blends were detected by use of potentiometric titration and infrared spectroscopy. Tests were done at dosages of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0%; storage temperatures of 25, 100, 140, and 150 degrees C; and storage times of 1, 24, and 72 h. At 0.5% dosage, close to typical field values, the more basic additive mixed with bitumen of high acid number almost ceased to be detected after 24 h of storage at 140 degrees C. The less basic additive could be detected beyond these conditions, irrespective of the bitumen used. At higher dosages, reactions with the bitumens were found to be more pronounced with the more basic additive. The reactions between the additives and bitumens studied seemed to be higher in the bitumen with higher acid number, irrespective of the dosage. Statistical analysis indicated that all the parameters studied significantly affected change in amount of additives detected in the blends. A correlation was established between potentiometric titration and infrared spectroscopy in detecting amine additives. This correlation notwithstanding, infrared spectroscopy was found to not be a good tool for measuring amines in the blends, especially at low concentrations.

  • 7.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå university.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå university.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Characterization of inorganic particulate matter from residential combustion of pelletized biomass fuels2004In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 338-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased focus on potential adverse health effects associated with exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) motivates a careful characterization of particle emissions from different sources. Combustion is a major anthropogenic source of fine PM, and, in urban areas, traditional residential wood combustion can be a major contributor. New and upgraded biomass fuels have become more common, and fuel pellets are especially well-suited for the residential market. The objective of the present work was to determine the mass size distributions, elemental distributions, and inorganic-phase distributions of PM from different residential combustion appliances and pelletized biomass fuels. In addition, chemical equilibrium model calculations of the combustion process were used to interpret the experimental findings. Six different typical pellet fuels were combusted in three different commercial pellet burners (10-15 kW). The experiments were performed in a newly designed experimental setup that enables constant-volume sampling. Total-PM mass concentrations were measured using conventional filters, and the fractions of products of incomplete combustion and inorganic material were thermally determined. Particle mass size distributions were determined using a 13-step low-pressure cascade impactor with a precyclone. The PM was analyzed for morphology (using environmental scanning electron microscopy, ESEM), elemental composition (using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, EDS), and crystalline phases (using X-ray diffractometry, XRD). For complementary chemical structural characterization, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy XPS and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were also used. The emitted particles were mainly found in the fine ( less than or equal 1 μm) mode with mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.20 - 0.39 μm and an average PM1 of 89.5% ± 7.4% of total PM. Minor coarse-mode fractions (>1 μm) were present primarily in the experiments with bark and logging residues. Relatively large and varying amounts (28%-92%) were determined to be products of incomplete combustion. The inorganic elemental compositions of the fine particles were dominated by potassium, chlorine, and sulfur, with minor amounts of sodium and zinc. The dominating alkali phase was KCl, with minor but varying amounts of K3Na(SO4)2 and, in some cases, also K2SO4. The results showed that zinc is almost fully volatilized, subsequently and presumably forming a more complex solid phase than that previously suggested (ZnO). However, the formation mechanism and exact phase identification remain to be elucidated. With some constrains, the results also showed that the amounts and speciation of the inorganic PM seemed to be quite similar to that predicted by chemical equilibrium calculations.

  • 8. Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Pettersson, Esbjorn
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Bostrom, Dan
    Nordin, Anders
    Stove Performance and Emission Characteristics in Residential Wood Log and Pellet Combustion, Part 1: Pellet Stoves2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, p. 307-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stove performance, characteristics, and quantities of gaseous and particulate emissions were determined for two different pellet stoves, varying fuel load, pellet diameter, and chimney draft. This approach aimed at covering variations in emissions from stoves in use today. The extensive measurement campaign included CO, NO(x), organic gaseous carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total particulate matter (PM(tot)) as well as particle mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and inorganic composition. At high load, most emissions were similar. For stove B, operating at high residual oxygen and solely with primary air, the emissions of PM,, and particle numbers were higher while the particles were smaller. Lowering the fuel load, the emissions of CO and hydrocarbons increased dramatically for stove A, which operated continuously also at lower fuel loads. On the other hand for stove B, which had intermittent operation at lower fuel loads, the emissions of hydrocarbons increased only slightly lowering the fuel load, while CO emissions increased sharply, due to high emissions at the end of the combustion cycle. Beside methane, dominating VOCs were ethene, acetylene, and benzene and the emissions of VOC varied in the range 1.1-42 mg/MJ(fuel). PAH emissions (2-340 mu g/MJ(fuel)) were generally dominated by phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The PM(tot) values (15-45 mg/MJ(fuel)) were in all cases dominated by fine particles with mass median diameters in the range 100-200 nm, peak mobility diameters of 50-85 nm, and number concentrations in the range 4 x 10(13) to 3 x 10(14) particles/MJ(fuel). During high load conditions, the particulate matter was totally dominated by inorganic particles at 15-25 mg/MJ(fuel) consisting of potassium, sodium, sulfur, and chlorine, in the form of K(2)SO(4), K(3)Na(SO(4))(2), and KCl. The study shows that differences in operation and modulation principles for the tested pellet stoves, relevant for appliances in use today, will affect the performance and emissions significantly, although with lower scattering in the present study compared to compiled literature data.

  • 9. Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Westerholm, R.
    Bostrom, D.
    Nordin, Anders
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Stove performance and emission characteristics in residential wood log and pellet combustion: Part 1: Pellet stoves2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 307-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stove performance, characteristics, and quantities of gaseous and particulate emissions were determined for two different pellet stoves, varying fuel load, pellet diameter, and chimney draft. This approach aimed at covering variations in emissions from stoves in use today. The extensive measurement campaign included CO, NOx, organic gaseous carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total particulate matter (PMtot) as well as particle mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and inorganic composition. At high load, most emissions were similar. For stove B, operating at high residual oxygen and solely with primary air, the emissions of PMtot and particle numbers were higher while the particles were smaller. Lowering the fuel load, the emissions of CO and hydrocarbons increased dramatically for stove A, which operated continuously also at lower fuel loads. On the other hand for stove B, which had intermittent operation at lower fuel loads, the emissions of hydrocarbons increased only slightly lowering the fuel load, while CO emissions increased sharply, due to high emissions at the end of the combustion cycle. Beside methane, dominating VOCs were ethene, acetylene, and benzene and the emissions of VOC varied in the range 1.1-42 mg/MJfuel. PAH emissions (2-340 μg/MJfuel) were generally dominated by phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The PM tot values (15-45 mg/MJfuel) were in all cases dominated by fine particles with mass median diameters in the range 100-200 nm, peak mobility diameters of 50-85 nm, and number concentrations in the range 4 × 1013 to 3 × 1014 particles/MJfuel. During high load conditions, the particulate matter was totally dominated by inorganic particles at 15-25 mg/MJfuel consisting of potassium, sodium, sulfur, and chlorine, in the form of K2SO4, K 3Na(SO4)2, and KCl. The study shows that differences in operation and modulation principles for the tested pellet stoves, relevant for appliances in use today, will affect the performance and emissions significantly, although with lower scattering in the present study compared to compiled literature data. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  • 10.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå, Sweden.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Stove performance and emission characteristics in residential wood log and pellet combustion: Part 1: Pellet stoves2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 307-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stove performance, characteristics, and quantities of gaseous and particulate emissions were determined for two different pellet stoves, varying fuel load, pellet diameter, and chimney draft. This approach aimed at covering variations in emissions from stoves in use today. The extensive measurement campaign included CO, NOx, organic gaseous carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total particulate matter (PMtot) as well as particle mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and inorganic composition. At high load, most emissions were similar. For stove B, operating at high residual oxygen and solely with primary air, the emissions of PMtot and particle numbers were higher while the particles were smaller. Lowering the fuel load, the emissions of CO and hydrocarbons increased dramatically for stove A, which operated continuously also at lower fuel loads. On the other hand for stove B, which had intermittent operation at lower fuel loads, the emissions of hydrocarbons increased only slightly lowering the fuel load, while CO emissions increased sharply, due to high emissions at the end of the combustion cycle. Beside methane, dominating VOCs were ethene, acetylene, and benzene and the emissions of VOC varied in the range 1.1−42 mg/MJfuel. PAH emissions (2−340 μg/MJfuel) were generally dominated by phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The PMtot values (15−45 mg/MJfuel) were in all cases dominated by fine particles with mass median diameters in the range 100−200 nm, peak mobility diameters of 50−85 nm, and number concentrations in the range 4 × 1013 to 3 × 1014 particles/MJfuel. During high load conditions, the particulate matter was totally dominated by inorganic particles at 15−25 mg/MJfuel consisting of potassium, sodium, sulfur, and chlorine, in the form of K2SO4, K3Na(SO4)2, and KCl. The study shows that differences in operation and modulation principles for the tested pellet stoves, relevant for appliances in use today, will affect the performance and emissions significantly, although with lower scattering in the present study compared to compiled literature data.

  • 11.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Analytical Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University.
    Boström, Dan
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Nordin, Anders
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Stove performance and emission characteristics in residential wood log and pellet combustion: Part 1: Pellet stoves2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 307-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stove performance, characteristics and quantities of gaseous and particulate emissions were determined for two different pellet stoves, varying fuel load, pellet diameter and chimney draught. This approach aimed at covering variations in emissions from stoves in use today. The extensive measurement campaign included CO, NOx, organic gaseous carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total particulate matter (PMtot) as well as particle mass and number concentrations, size distributions and inorganic composition. At high load, most emissions were similar. For stove B, operating at high residual oxygen and solely with primary air, the emissions of PMtot and particle numbers were higher while the particles were smaller. Lowering the fuel load, the emissions of CO and hydrocarbons increased dramatically for stove A, which operated continuously also at lower fuel loads. On the other hand for stove B, which had intermittent operation at lower fuel loads, the emissions of hydrocarbons increased only slightly lowering the fuel load, while CO emissions increased sharply, due to high emissions at the end of the combustion cycle. Beside methane, dominating VOCs were ethene, acetylene and benzene and the emissions of VOC varied in the range 1.1-47 mg/MJfuel. PAH emissions (2-340 µg/MJfuel) were generally dominated by phenantrene, fluoranthene and pyrene. PMtot (15-45 mg/MJfuel) were in all cases dominated by fine particles with mass median diameters in the range 100-200 nm, peak mobility diameters of 50-85 nm and number concentrations in the range 4×1013- 3×1014 particles/MJfuel. During high load conditions the particulate matter was totally dominated by inorganic particles at 15-25 mg/MJfuel consisting of potassium, sodium, sulfur and chlorine, in the form of K2SO4, K3Na(SO4)2 and KCl. The study shows that differences in operation and modulation principles for the tested pellet stoves, relevant for appliances in use today, will affect the performance and emissions significantly, although with lower scattering in the present study compared to compiled literature data.

  • 12.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå university.
    Trace element enrichment and behavior in wood pellet production and combustion processes2006In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 993-1000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extensive and well-documented concerns regarding environmental dispersion of toxic trace metals constitute solid motives for a special focus of their fate and forms in fuel treatment and conversion processes. The potential enrichment of trace elements during fuel pellet production processes and behavior during combustion was, therefore, studied in a combined field sampling and chemical equilibrium modeling work. Raw materials, pellet fuels, and particulate matter in the drying gases in two different pelletizing plants were sampled and analyzed. In addition, chemical equilibrium model calculations were performed with variations in the content of trace elements, moisture, sulfur, and chlorine, at both oxidizing and reducing conditions. A significant enrichment of Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb was documented when using bark combustion gases for direct drying of the sawdust and was also supported by the chemical equilibrium results. This is presumably caused by the volatilization of these elements from the bark fuel during combustion, subsequently forming fine particles in the flue gases and being captured by the sawdust during drying. The magnitude and importance for these trace elements were, however, found to be relatively small, regarding concentrations in different fuels as well as potential increased emissions to air during combustion compared to national total emission estimations. In addition, some alternative measures for prevention of trace metal contamination during fuel pellet production were suggested, including fuel quality aspects, high-temperature particle separation, and indirect drying processes.

  • 13.
    Borén, Eleonora
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Industrial Doctoral School for Research and Innovation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Larsson, Sylvia H.
    Biomass Technology Centre, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Andreas, Averheim
    Mikael, Thyrel
    Biomass Technology Centre, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Reducing VOC off-gassing during the production of pelletized steam-exploded bark: impact of storage time and controlled ventilation2018In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 5181-5186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) off-gassing behavior of thermally treated biomass intended for bioenergy production has recently been shown to be vastly different from that of untreated biomass. Simple measures to reduce emissions, such as controlled ventilation and prolonged storage time, have been suggested but not yet studied in detail. In the present study, we monitored how VOC off-gassing was reduced over time (24–144 h) in enclosed storage with and without ventilation. Steam-exploded bark was collected directly from a pilot-scale steam explosion plant as well as before and after subsequent pelletizing. Active Tenax-TA absorbent sampling of VOCs was performed from the headspaces of a bench-scale sample storage setup. The impact of storage time and ventilation on VOC levels was evaluated through multivariate statistical analysis. The results showed that relative VOC concentrations in the headspace were reduced by increased storage time, with heavier VOCs reduced at a higher rate. VOC composition was neither reduced nor shifted by controlled intermittent ventilation during storage; instead, VOC levels equilibrated at the same levels as those stored without ventilation, and this was independent of the process step, storage time, or number of ventilations.

  • 14.
    Borén, Eleonora
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University Industrial Doctoral School for Research and Innovation.
    Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh
    Lindahl, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Schilling, Christoph
    Chandra, Richard P.
    Ghiasi, Bahman
    Tang, Yong
    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Larsson, Sylvia H.
    Off-gassing of VOCs and permanent gases during storage of torrefied and steam exploded wood2017In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 10954-10965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal treatment for upgrading of low-value feedstocks to improve fuel properties has gained large industrial interest in recent years. From a storage and transport perspective, hazardous off-gassing could be expected to decrease through the degradation of reactive biomass components. However, thermal treatment could also shift chemical compositions of volatile organic components, VOCs. While technologies are approaching commercialization, off-gassing behavior of the products, especially in terms of VOCs, is still unknown. In the present study, we measured off-gassing of VOCs together with CO, CO2, CH4, and O2 depletion from torrefied and steam exploded softwood during closed storage. The storage temperature, head space gas (air and N2), and storage time were varied. VOCs were monitored with a newly developed protocol based on active sampling with Tenax TA absorbent analyzed by thermal desorption-GC/MS. High VOC levels were found for both untreated and steam exploded softwood, but with a complete shift in composition from terpenes dominating the storage gas for untreated wood samples to an abundance of furfural in the headspace of steam exploded wood. Torrefied material emitted low levels of VOCs. By using multivariate statistics, it was shown that for both treatment methods and within the ranges tested, VOC off-gassing was affected first by the storage temperature and second by increasing treatment severity. Both steam exploded and torrefied biomass formed lower levels of CO than the reference biomass, but steam explosion caused a more severe O2 depletion.

  • 15. Bostrom, Dan
    et al.
    Grimm, Alejandro
    Boman, Christoffer
    Björnbom, Emilia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Ohman, Marcus
    Influence of Kaolin and Calcite Additives on Ash Transformations in Small-Scale Combustion of Oat2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, p. 5184-5190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing interest has been observed for the use of cereal grains in small- and medium-scale heating. Previous studies have been performed to determine the fuel quality of various cereal grains for combustion purposes. The present investigation was undertaken in order to elucidate the potential abatement of low-temperature corrosion and deposits formation by using fuel additives (calcite and kaolin) during combustion of oat. Special emphasis was put on understanding the role of slag and bottom ash composition on the volatilization of species responsible for fouling and emission of fine particles and acid gases. The ash fractions were analyzed with scanning electron micro scopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), for elemental composition, and with X-ray diffraction (XRD) for identification of crystalline phases. The previously reported K and Si capturing effects of kaolin additive were observed also in the present study using P-rich biomass fuels. That is, the prerequisites for the formation of low melting K-rich silicates were reduced. The result of using kaolin additive on the bottom ash was that no slag was formed. The effect of the kaolin additive on the formation of submicrometer flue gas particles was an increased share of condensed K-phosphates at the expense of K-sulfate and KCl. The latter phase was almost completely absent in the particulate matter. Consequently, the levels of HCl and SO2 in the flue gases increased somewhat. The addition of both calcite assortments increased the amount of farmed slag, although to a considerably higher extent for the precipitated calcite. P was captured to a higher degree in the bottom ash, compared to the combustion of pure oat. The effect of the calcite additives on the fine particle emissions in the flue gases was that the share of K-phosphate decreased considerably, while the content of K-sulfate and KCl increased. Consequently, also the flue-gas levels of acidic HCl and SO2 decreased. This implies that the low-temperature corrosion observed in small-scale combustion of oat possibly can be abated by employing calcite additives. Alternatively, if problems with slagging and deposition of corrosive matter at heat convection surfaces are to be avoided, kaolin additive can be utilized, on the condition that the higher concentrations of acidic gases can be tolerated.

  • 16.
    Boström, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Gunnar
    Division of Energy Engineering, Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Luleå Technical University.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Division of Energy Engineering, Department of Applied Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Luleå Technical University.
    Ash transformations in fluidized-bed combustion of rapeseed meal2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 2700-2706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global production of rapeoil is increasing. A byproduct is rapeseed meal that is a result of the oil extraction process. Presently the rapeseed meal mainly is utilized as animal feed. An interesting alternative use is, however, energy conversion by combustion. This study was undertaken to determine the combustion properties of rapeseed meal and bark mixtures in a bubbling fluidized bed, with emphasis on gas emissions, ash formation, -fractionation and -interaction with the bed material. Due to the high content of phosphorus in rapeseed meal the fuel ash is dominated by phosphates, in contrast to most woody biomass where the ash is dominated by silicates. From a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) point of view, rapeseed meal could be a suitable fuel. Considering FBC agglomeration effects, pure rapeseed meal is in level with the most suitable fuels, as earlier tested by the methods utilized in the present investigation. The SO2 emission, however, is higher than most woody biomass fuels as a direct consequence of the high levels of sulfur in the fuel. Also the particulate matter emission, both submicron and coarser particles, is higher. Again this can be attributed the high ash content of rapeseed meal. The high abundance of SO2 is apparently effective for sulfatization of KCl in the flue gas. Practically no KCl was observed in the particulate matter of the flue gas. A striking difference in the mechanisms of bed agglomeration for rapeseed meal compared to woody biomass fuels was also observed. The ubiquitous continuous layers on the bed grains found in FBC combustion of woody biomass fuels was not observed in the present investigation. Instead very thin and discontinuous layers were observed together with isolated partly melted bed ash particles. The latter could occasionally be seen as adhered to the quartz bed grains. Apparently the bed agglomeration mechanism, that obviously demanded rather high temperatures, involved more of adhesion by partly melted ash derived potassium -calcium phosphate bed ash particles/droplets than direct attack of gaseous alkali on the quartz bed grains forming potassium -calcium silicate rich bed grain layers. Am explanation could be found in the considerable higher affinity for base cations of phosphorus than silicon. This will to a great extent withdraw the present basic oxides from attacking the quartz bed grains with agglomeration at low temperatures as a result.

  • 17.
    Boström, Dan
    et al.
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Umea University.
    Eriksson, Gunnar
    Boman, Christoffer
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Umea University.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Ash transformations in fluidized-bed combustion of rapeseed meal2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 2700-2706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global production of rapeoil is increasing. A byproduct is rapeseed meal that is a result of the oil extraction process. Presently the rapeseed meal mainly is utilized as animal feed. An interesting alternative use is, however, energy conversion by combustion. This study was undertaken to determine the combustion properties of rapeseed meal and bark mixtures in a bubbling fluidized bed, with emphasis on gas emissions, ash formation, -fractionation and -interaction with the bed material. Due to the high content of phosphorus in rapeseed meal the fuel ash is dominated by phosphates, in contrast to most woody biomass where the ash is dominated by silicates. From a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) point of view, rapeseed meal could be a suitable fuel. Considering FBC agglomeration effects, pure rapeseed meal is in level with the most suitable fuels, as earlier tested by the methods utilized in the present investigation. The SO2 emission, however, is higher than most woody biomass fuels as a direct consequence of the high levels of sulfur in the fuel. Also the particulate matter emission, both submicron and coarser particles, is higher. Again this can be attributed the high ash content of rapeseed meal. The high abundance of SO2 is apparently effective for sulfatization of KCl in the flue gas. Practically no KCl was observed in the particulate matter of the flue gas. A striking difference in the mechanisms of bed agglomeration for rapeseed meal compared to woody biomass fuels was also observed. The ubiquitous continuous layers on the bed grains found in FBC combustion of woody biomass fuels was not observed in the present investigation. Instead very thin and discontinuous layers were observed together with isolated partly melted bed ash particles. The latter could occasionally be seen as adhered to the quartz bed grains. Apparently the bed agglomeration mechanism, that obviously demanded rather high temperatures, involved more of adhesion by partly melted ash derived potassium-calcium phosphate bed ash particles/droplets than direct attack of gaseous alkali on the quartz bed grains forming potassium-calcium silicate rich bed grain layers. An explanation could be found in the considerable higher affinity for base cations of phosphorus than silicon. This will to a great extent withdraw the present basic oxides from attacking the quartz bed grains with agglomeration at low temperatures as a result.

  • 18.
    Boström, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Grimm, Alejandro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Björnbom, Emilia
    Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Division of Energy Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, SE- 971 87 Luleå, Sweden.
    Influence of kaolin and calcite additives on ash transformations in small-scale combustion of oat2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 5184-5190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing interest has been observed for the use of cereal grains in small- and medium-scale heating. Previous studies have been performed to determine the fuel quality of various cereal grains for combustion purposes. The present investigation was undertaken in order to elucidate the potential abatement of low-temperature corrosion and deposits formation by using fuel additives (calcite and kaolin) during combustion of oat. Special emphasis was put on understanding the role of slag and bottom ash composition on the volatilization of species responsible for fouling and emission of fine particles and acid gases. The ash fractions were analyzed with scanning electron micro scopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), for elemental composition, and with X-ray diffraction (XRD) for identification of crystalline phases. The previously reported K and Si capturing effects of kaolin additive were observed also in the present study using P-rich biomass fuels. That is, the prerequisites for the formation of low melting K-rich silicates were reduced. The result of using kaolin additive on the bottom ash was that no slag was formed. The effect of the kaolin additive on the formation of submicrometer flue gas particles was an increased share of condensed K-phosphates at the expense of K-sulfate and KCl. The latter phase was almost completely absent in the particulate matter. Consequently, the levels of HCl and SO2 in the flue gases increased somewhat. The addition of both calcite assortments increased the amount of farmed slag, although to a considerably higher extent for the precipitated calcite. P was captured to a higher degree in the bottom ash, compared to the combustion of pure oat. The effect of the calcite additives on the fine particle emissions in the flue gases was that the share of K-phosphate decreased considerably, while the content of K-sulfate and KCl increased. Consequently, also the flue-gas levels of acidic HCl and SO2 decreased. This implies that the low-temperature corrosion observed in small-scale combustion of oat possibly can be abated by employing calcite additives. Alternatively, if problems with slagging and deposition of corrosive matter at heat convection surfaces are to be avoided, kaolin additive can be utilized, on the condition that the higher concentrations of acidic gases can be tolerated.

  • 19.
    Boström, Dan
    et al.
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Grimm, Alejandro
    Boman, Christoffer
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Björnbom, Emilia
    Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Influence of kaolin and calcite additives on ash transformations in small-scale combustion of oat2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 5184-5190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing interest has been observed for the use of cereal grains in small- and medium-scale heating. Previous studies have been performed to determine the fuel quality of various cereal grains for combustion purposes. The present investigation was undertaken in order to elucidate the potential abatement of low-temperature corrosion and deposits formation by using fuel additives (calcite and kaolin) during combustion of oat. Special emphasis was put on understanding the role of slag and bottom ash composition on the volatilization of species responsible for fouling and emission of fine particles and acid gases. The ash fractions were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), for elemental composition, and with X-ray diffraction (XRD) for identification of crystalline phases. The previously reported K and Si capturing effects of kaolin additive were observed also in the present study using P-rich biomass fuels. That is, the prerequisites for the formation of low melting K-rich silicates were reduced. The result of using kaolin additive on the bottom ash was that no slag was formed. The effect of the kaolin additive on the formation of submicrometer flue gas particles was an increased share of condensed K-phosphates at the expense of K-sulfate and KCl. The latter phase was almost completely absent in the particulate matter. Consequently, the levels of HCl and SO2 in the flue gases increased somewhat. The addition of both calcite assortments increased the amount of formed slag, although to a considerably higher extent for the precipitated calcite. P was captured to a higher degree in the bottom ash, compared to the combustion of pure oat. The effect of the calcite additives on the fine particle emissions in the flue gases was that the share of K-phosphate decreased considerably, while the content of K-sulfate and KCl increased. Consequently, also the flue-gas levels of acidic HCl and SO2 decreased. This implies that the low-temperature corrosion observed in small-scale combustion of oat possibly can be abated by employing calcite additives. Alternatively, if problems with slagging and deposition of corrosive matter at heat convection surfaces are to be avoided, kaolin additive can be utilized, on the condition that the higher concentrations of acidic gases can be tolerated.

  • 20.
    Boström, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Grimm, Alejandro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå universitet.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå universitet.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå universitet.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå universitet.
    Ash transformation chemistry during combustion of biomass2012In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is relatively extensive knowledge available concerning ash transformation reactions during combustion of woody biomass. In recent decades, the use of these energy carriers has increased, from a low-technology residential small-scale level to an industrial scale. Along this evolution, ash chemical-related phenomena for woody biomass have been observed and studied. Therefore, presently the understanding for these are, if not complete, fairly good. However, because the demand for CO2-neutral energy resources has increased recently and will continue to increase in the foreseeable future, other biomasses, such as, for instance, agricultural crops, have become highly interesting. The ash-forming matter in agricultural biomass is rather different in comparison to woody biomass, with a higher content of phosphorus as a distinctive feature. The knowledge about the ash transformation behavior in these systems is far from complete. Here, an attempt to give a schematic but general description of the ash transformation reactions of biomass fuels is presented in terms of a conceptual model, with the intention to provide guidance in the understanding of ash matter behavior in the use of any biomass fuel, primarily from the knowledge of the concentrations of ash-forming elements. The model was organized in primary and secondary reactions. Restrictions on the theoretical model in terms of reactivity limitations and physical conditions of the conversion process were discussed and exemplified, and some principal differences between biomass ashes dominated by Si and P, separately, were outlined and discussed.

  • 21.
    Boström, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Grimm, Alejandro
    Luleå Univ Technol, Div Energy Sci, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Luleå Univ Technol, Div Energy Sci, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Ash Transformation Chemistry during Combustion of Biomass2012In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is relatively extensive knowledge available concerning ash transformation reactions during combustion of woody biomass. In recent decades, the use of these energy carriers has increased, from a low-technology residential small-scale level to an industrial scale. Along this evolution, ash chemical-related phenomena for woody biomass have been observed and studied. Therefore, presently the understanding for these are, if not complete, fairly good. However, because the demand for CO2-neutral energy resources has increased recently and will continue to increase in the foreseeable future, other biomasses, such as, for instance, agricultural crops, have become highly interesting. The ash-forming matter in agricultural biomass is rather different in comparison to woody biomass, with a higher content of phosphorus as a distinctive feature. The knowledge about the ash transformation behavior in these systems is far from complete. Here, an attempt to give a schematic but general description of the ash transformation reactions of biomass fuels is presented in terms of a conceptual model, with the intention to provide guidance in the understanding of ash matter behavior in the use of any biomass fuel, primarily from the knowledge of the concentrations of ash-forming elements. The model was organized in primary and secondary reactions. Restrictions on the theoretical model in terms of reactivity limitations and physical conditions of the conversion process were discussed and exemplified, and some principal differences between biomass ashes dominated by Si and P, separately, were outlined and discussed.

  • 22.
    Branca, Carmen
    et al.
    Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, C.N.R., P.le V. Tecchio, 80125 Napoli, Italy.
    Di Blasi, Colomba
    Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, P.le V. Tecchio, 80125 Napoli, Italy.
    Galgano, Antonio
    Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, C.N.R., P.le V. Tecchio, 80125 Napoli, Italy.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Effects of the Torrefaction Conditions on the Fixed-Bed Pyrolysis of Norway Spruce2014In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 5882-5891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fixed-bed pyrolysis of Norway spruce wood previously subjected to torrefaction at temperatures between 533 and 583 K and retention times between 8 and 25 min was studied. Although the thermal pretreatment always results in an increased production of char at the expense of volatile products, appropriate torrefaction conditions give rise to maximum percentages of anhydrosugars, guaiacols possessing a carbonyl group, and phenols in the liquid fraction. Other carbohydrates (e.g., acetic acid, formic acid, hydroxyacetaldehyde, hydroxypropanone, furfural, and furfuryl alcohol) and the large majority of guaiacols show continuously decreasing values. The percentages of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in the gas product remain approximately the same, but that of methane slightly increases. The pyrolysis temperatures of torrefied wood are lower than those of the raw material, mainly because of the partial or complete absence of the exothermic contribution associated with extractives and hemicellulose degradation.

  • 23. Brus, E.
    et al.
    Ohman, M.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Nordin, Anders
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Bostrom, D.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Eklund, A.
    Bed agglomeration characteristics of biomass fuels using blast-furnace slag as bed material2004In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1187-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems during fluidized bed combustion. The attack or coating layers that are formed on the bed particles during combustion play an important role in the agglomeration process. To reduce bed agglomeration tendencies, alternative bed materials may be used. In this paper, bed agglomeration characteristics during the combustion of biomass fuels using a relatively new bed material (iron blast-furnace slag) as well as ordinary quartz sand were determined. Controlled agglomeration tests lasting 40 h, using five representative biomass fuels (bark, olive residue, peat, straw, and reed canary grass) were conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed. The bed materials and agglomerates were analyzed using SEM/EDS and X-ray diffraction. Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to interpret the experimental findings. The results showed that blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to agglomerate than quartz sand for most of the fuels. The quartz particles showed an inner attack layer more often than did the blast-furnace slag. The blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to react with elements from the fuel. The outer coating layer had similar characteristics and thickness for both bed materials when the same fuel was combusted. However, the inner attack layer thickness was larger for quartz particles. SEM/EDS analyses of the agglomerates showed that the inner Ca-K-silicate-rich attack layer was responsible for the agglomeration of quartz sand. The composition of blast-furnace slag agglomerate was similar to the outer coating layer. Chemical equilibrium calculations showed that the original composition of the blast-furnace slag was close to the equilibrium composition, and hence there was no major driving force for reactions between that bed material and K and Ca from the fuel. The homogeneous silica-rich attack layer (with a low melting temperature) was not formed to the same extent for blast-furnace slag, thus explaining the lower bed agglomeration tendency. © 2004 American Chemical Society.

  • 24.
    Brus, Elisabet
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå university.
    Mechanisms of bed agglomeration during fluidized-bed combustion of biomass fuels2005In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 825-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major ash-related problem encountered in fluidized beds is bed agglomeration, which, in the worst case, may result in total defluidization of the bed and unscheduled downtime. Because of the special ash-forming constituents of biomass fuels, several of these fuels have been shown to be especially problematic. Despite the frequent reporting, a precise and quantitative knowledge of the bed agglomeration process during fluidized bed combustion of biomass fuels has not yet been presented. Bed sampling versus operation time was performed in four different biomass-fired full-scale fluidized beds, as well as during controlled fluidized bed agglomeration tests in bench-scale testing of five representative biomass fuels. The bed materials and agglomerates were further analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy SEM/EDS, to determine the characteristics of the formed bed particle layers. For typical wood fuels, coating-induced agglomeration with subsequent attack reaction and diffusion by calcium into the quartz was identified to be the dominating bed agglomeration mechanism. Low-melting calcium-based silicates (including minor amounts of, for example, potassium) were formed with subsequent viscous-flow sintering and agglomeration. For high-alkali-containing biomass fuels, direct attack of the quartz bed particle by potassium compounds in a gas or aerosol phase formed a layer of low-melting potassium silicate. Thus, formation and subsequent viscous-flow sintering and agglomeration seemed to be the dominating agglomeration mechanism for these fuels.

  • 25.
    Brus, Elisabet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Mechanisms of bed agglomeration during fluidized-bed combustion of biomass fuels2005In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 825-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major ash-related problem encountered in fluidized beds is bed agglomeration, which, in the worst case, may result in total defluidization of the bed and unscheduled downtime. Because of the special ash-forming constituents of biomass fuels, several of these fuels have been shown to be especially problematic. Despite the frequent reporting, a precise and quantitative knowledge of the bed agglomeration process during fluidized bed combustion of biomass fuels has not yet been presented. Bed sampling versus operation time was performed in four different biomass-fired full-scale fluidized beds, as well as during controlled fluidized bed agglomeration tests in bench-scale testing of five representative biomass fuels. The bed materials and agglomerates were further analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy SEM/EDS, to determine the characteristics of the formed bed particle layers. For typical wood fuels, coating-induced agglomeration with subsequent attack reaction and diffusion by calcium into the quartz was identified to be the dominating bed agglomeration mechanism. Low-melting calcium-based silicates (including minor amounts of, for example, potassium) were formed with subsequent viscous-flow sintering and agglomeration. For high-alkali-containing biomass fuels, direct attack of the quartz bed particle by potassium compounds in a gas or aerosol phase formed a layer of low-melting potassium silicate. Thus, formation and subsequent viscous-flow sintering and agglomeration seemed to be the dominating agglomeration mechanism for these fuels.

  • 26.
    Brus, Elisabet
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå university.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå university.
    Hedman, Henry
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå.
    Eklund, Anders
    ÅF Energi & Miljö AB.
    Bed agglomeration characteristics of biomass fuels using blast-furnace slag as bed material2004In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1187-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems during fluidized bed combustion. The attack or coating layers that are formed on the bed particles during combustion play an important role in the agglomeration process. To reduce bed agglomeration tendencies, alternative bed materials may be used. In this paper, bed agglomeration characteristics during the combustion of biomass fuels using a relatively new bed material (iron blast-furnace slag) as well as ordinary quartz sand were determined. Controlled agglomeration tests lasting 40 h, using five representative biomass fuels (bark, olive residue, peat, straw, and reed canary grass) were conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed. The bed materials and agglomerates were analyzed using SEM/EDS and X-ray diffraction. Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to interpret the experimental findings. The results showed that blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to agglomerate than quartz sand for most of the fuels. The quartz particles showed an inner attack layer more often than did the blast-furnace slag. The blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to react with elements from the fuel. The outer coating layer had similar characteristics and thickness for both bed materials when the same fuel was combusted. However, the inner attack layer thickness was larger for quartz particles. SEM/EDS analyses of the agglomerates showed that the inner Ca-K-silicate-rich attack layer was responsible for the agglomeration of quartz sand. The composition of blast-furnace slag agglomerate was similar to the outer coating layer. Chemical equilibrium calculations showed that the original composition of the blast-furnace slag was close to the equilibrium composition, and hence there was no major driving force for reactions between that bed material and K and Ca from the fuel. The homogeneous silica-rich attack layer (with a low melting temperature) was not formed to the same extent for blast-furnace slag, thus explaining the lower bed agglomeration tendency.

  • 27.
    Brus, Elisabet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Hedman, Henry
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anders
    Bed agglomeration characteristics of biomass fuels using blast-furnace slag as bed material2004In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1187-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems during fluidized bed combustion. The attack or coating layers that are formed on the bed particles during combustion play an important role in the agglomeration process. To reduce bed agglomeration tendencies, alternative bed materials may be used. In this paper, bed agglomeration characteristics during the combustion of biomass fuels using a relatively new bed material (iron blast-furnace slag) as well as ordinary quartz sand were determined. Controlled agglomeration tests lasting 40 h, using five representative biomass fuels (bark, olive residue, peat, straw, and reed canary grass) were conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed. The bed materials and agglomerates were analyzed using SEM/EDS and X-ray diffraction. Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to interpret the experimental findings. The results showed that blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to agglomerate than quartz sand for most of the fuels. The quartz particles showed an inner attack layer more often than did the blast-furnace slag. The blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to react with elements from the fuel. The outer coating layer had similar characteristics and thickness for both bed materials when the same fuel was combusted. However, the inner attack layer thickness was larger for quartz particles. SEM/EDS analyses of the agglomerates showed that the inner Ca-K-silicate-rich attack layer was responsible for the agglomeration of quartz sand. The composition of blast-furnace slag agglomerate was similar to the outer coating layer. Chemical equilibrium calculations showed that the original composition of the blast-furnace slag was close to the equilibrium composition, and hence there was no major driving force for reactions between that bed material and K and Ca from the fuel. The homogeneous silica-rich attack layer (with a low melting temperature) was not formed to the same extent for blast-furnace slag, thus explaining the lower bed agglomeration tendency.

  • 28. Capablo, Joaquin
    et al.
    Arendt Jensen, Peter
    Hougaard Pedersen, Kim
    Hjuler, Klaus
    Nikolaisen, Lars
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Frandsen, Flemming
    Ash properties of alternative biomass2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, p. 1965-1976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ash behavior during suspension firing of 12 alternative solid biofuels, such as pectin waste, mash from a beer brewery, or waste from cigarette production have been studied and compared to wood and straw ash behavior. Laboratory suspension firing tests were performed on an entrained flow reactor and a swirl burner test rig, with special emphasis on the formation of fly ash and ash deposit. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed to support the interpretation of the experiments. To generalize the results of the combustion tests, the fuels are classified according to fuel ash analysis into three main groups depending upon their ash content of silica, alkali metal, and calcium and magnesium. To further detail the biomass classification, the relative molar ratio of Cl, S, and P to alkali were included. The study has led to knowledge on biomass fuel ash composition influence on ash transformation, ash deposit flux, and deposit chlorine content when biomass fuels are applied for suspension combustion.

  • 29.
    Capone, Isaac
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Mat, Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH, England.
    Hurlbutt, Kevin
    Univ Oxford, Dept Mat, Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH, England.
    Naylor, Andrew J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Xiao, Albert W.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Mat, Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH, England.
    Pasta, Mauro
    Univ Oxford, Dept Mat, Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH, England.
    Effect of the Particle-Size Distribution on the Electrochemical Performance of a Red Phosphorus-Carbon Composite Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries2019In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 4651-4658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Red phosphorus (RP) is a promising candidate as an anode for sodium-ion batteries because of its low potential and high specific capacity. It has two main disadvantages. First, it experiences 490% volumetric expansion during sodiation, which leads to particle pulverization and substantial reduction of the cycle life. Second, it has an extremely low electronic conductivity of 10(-14) S cm(-1). Both issues can be addressed by ball milling RP with a carbon matrix to form a composite of electronically conductive carbon and small RP particles, less susceptible to pulverization. Through this procedure, however, the resulting particle-size distribution of the RP particles is difficult to determine because of the presence of the carbon particles. Here, we quantify the relationship between the RP particle-size distribution and its cycle life for the first time by separating the ball-milling process into two steps. The RP is first wet-milled to reduce the particle size, and then the particle-size distribution is measured via dynamic light scattering. This is followed by a dry-milling step to produce RP-graphite composites. We found that wet milling breaks apart the largest RP particles in the range of 2-10 mu m, decreases the Dv90 from 1.85 to 1.26 mu m, and significantly increases the cycle life of the RP. Photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the successful formation of a carbon coating, with longer milling times leading to more uniform carbon coatings. The RP with a Dv90 of 0.79 mu m mixed with graphite for 48 h delivered 1354 mA h g(-1) with high coulombic efficiency (>99%) and cyclability (88% capacity retention after 100 cycles). These results are an important step in the development of cyclable, high-capacity anodes for sodium-ion batteries.

  • 30.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Iisa, K
    Gebart, Rikard
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Computational fluid dynamics simulations of raw gas composition from a black liquor Gasifier: Comparison with experiments2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 4122-4128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressurized entrained flow high temperature black liquor gasification can be used as a complement or a substitute to the Tomlinson boiler used in the chemical recovery process at kraft pulp mills. The technology has been proven on the development scale, but there are still no full scale plants. This work is intended to aid in the development by providing computational tools that can be used in scale up of the existing technology. In this work, an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model describing the gasification reactor is refined. First, one-dimensional (1D) plug flow reactor calculations with a comprehensive reaction mechanism are performed to judge the validity of the global homogeneous reaction mechanism used in the CFD simulations in the temperature range considered. On the basis of the results from the comparison, an extinction temperature modification of the steam-methane reforming reaction was introduced in the CFD model. An extinction temperature of 1400 K was determined to give the best overall agreement between the two models. Next, the results from simulations of the flow in a 3 MW pilot gasifier with the updated CFD model are compared to experimental results in which pressure, oxygen to black liquor equivalence ratio, and residence time have been varied. The results show that the updated CFD model can predict the main gas components (H 2, CO, CO2) within an absolute error of 2.5 mol %. CH 4 can be predicted within an absolute error of 1 mol %, and most of the trends when process conditions are varied are captured by the model. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  • 31.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Iisa, Kristiina
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
    Gebart, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Computational fluid dynamics simulations of raw gas composition from a black liquor gasifier: comparison with experiments2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 4122-4128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressurized entrained flow high temperature black liquor gasification can be used as a complement or a substitute to the Tomlinson boiler used in the chemical recovery process at kraft pulp mills. The technology has been proven on the development scale, but there are still no full scale plants. This work is intended to aid in the development by providing computational tools that can be used in scale up of the existing technology. In this work, an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model describing the gasification reactor is refined. First, one-dimensional (1D) plug flow reactor calculations with a comprehensive reaction mechanism are performed to judge the validity of the global homogeneous reaction mechanism used in the CFD simulations in the temperature range considered. On the basis of the results from the comparison, an extinction temperature modification of the steam-methane reforming reaction was introduced in the CFD model. An extinction temperature of 1400 K was determined to give the best overall agreement between the two models. Next, the results from simulations of the flow in a 3 MW pilot gasifier with the updated CFD model are compared to experimental results in which pressure, oxygen to black liquor equivalence ratio, and residence time have been varied. The results show that the updated CFD model can predict the main gas components (H2, CO, CO2) within an absolute error of 2.5 mol %. CH4 can be predicted within an absolute error of 1 mol %, and most of the trends when process conditions are varied are captured by the model.

  • 32.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Ma, C.
    Molinder, Roger
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Ohman, M.,
    Öhrman, Olov .G.W
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Slag formation during oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasification of stem wood2014In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 6941-6952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stem wood powders were fired in a mullite-lined pilot-scale oxygen-blown pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. During repeated campaigns involving increases in fuel load and process temperature, slag formations that eventuated in the blockage of the gasifier outlet were observed. These slags were retrieved for visual and chemical characterization. It was found that the slags had very high contents of Al and, in particular, high Al/Si ratios that suggest likely dissolution of the mullite-based refractory of the gasifier lining due to interactions with the fuel ash. Possible causes for the slag formation and behavior are proposed, and practical implications for the design of future stem wood entrained-flow gasifiers are also discussed.

  • 33.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå.
    Ma, Charlie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Molinder, Roger
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    Öhman, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Öhrman, Olov
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå.
    Slag Formation During Oxygen Blown Entrained-Flow Gasification of Stem Wood2014In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 6941-6952, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stem wood powders were fired in a mullite-lined pilot-scale oxygen-blown pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. During repeated campaigns involving increases in fuel load and process temperature, slag formations that eventuated in the blockage of the gasifier outlet were observed. These slags were retrieved for visual and chemical characterization. It was found that the slags had very high contents of Al and, in particular, high Al/Si ratios that suggest likely dissolution of the mullite-based refractory of the gasifier lining due to interactions with the fuel ash. Possible causes for the slag formation and behavior are proposed, and practical implications for the design of future stem wood entrained-flow gasifiers are also discussed

  • 34. Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Ma, Charlie
    Luleå University of Technology, Energy Engineering, Division of Energy Science, SE-971 87, Luleå, Sweden.
    Molinder, Roger
    Weiland, Fredrik
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    Öhman, Marcus
    Öhrman, Olov
    Slag Formation During Oxygen Blown Entrained-Flow Gasification of Stem Wood2014In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 6941-6952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stem wood powders were fired in a mullite-lined pilot-scale oxygen-blown pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. During repeated campaigns involving increases in fuel load and process temperature, slag formations that eventuated in the blockage of the gasifier outlet were observed. These slags were retrieved for visual and chemical characterization. It was found that the slags had very high contents of Al and, in particular, high Al/Si ratios that suggest likely dissolution of the mullite-based refractory of the gasifier lining due to interactions with the fuel ash. Possible causes for the slag formation and behavior are proposed, and practical implications for the design of future stem wood entrained-flow gasifiers are also discussed

  • 35.
    Cuvilas, Carlos Alberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Spruce pretreatment for thermal application: Water, alkaline, and diluted acid hydrolysis2012In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 6426-6431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrolysis a process that involves a separation of the main components of lignocellulosic material (LCM) primarily developed for ethanol production was applied in this work to upgrade biomass for thermal application. The purpose of the pretreatment was to remove hemicellulose and alkali metals and consequently increase the energy content of the biomass and improve the fuel properties. Freshly chopped (2-10 mm) spruce (Picea abies) samples were hydrolyzed (liquid/solid ratio of 800 mL/80 g), using water, diluted acid, and sodium hydroxide in a rotating autoclave at 180 2 ̊C for 150 and 350 min. Several analyses, such as proximate and ultimate analyses, ash composition and fusibility characteristics, and thermogravimetric analysis under pure nitrogen, were performed. Despite the reduction of mass and energy yields with increment of the severity factor, a significant increment of the higher heating value and ash quality was achieved, revealing that hydrolysis using water or diluted acid is a promising method to upgrade biomass as fuel. For alkaline treatment, a huge degradation on the quality of the ash was observed.

  • 36.
    Dai, B.
    et al.
    China Rural Technology Development Center, Beijing, China.
    Zhu, W.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
    Mu, Liwen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Guo, X.
    Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, China .
    Qian, H.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
    Liang, X.
    Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Kontogeorgis, G.M.
    Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Effect of the composition of biomass on the quality of syngas produced from thermochemical conversion based on thermochemical data prediction2019In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 5253-5262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Syngas produced from thermochemical conversion of biomass has been given more attention because it can be converted to a variety of fuels and chemicals as substitutes for petroleum-based chemicals via the Fischer–Tropsch process. In this study, one wheat straw and its element content fluctuation in the feasible range are selected as samples first to study the effect of the biomass composition on the quality of syngas produced. Then, the thermochemical data (standard molar enthalpy of formation, standard molar entropy, and heat capacity) of samples are predicted by highly accurate prediction models. Thermochemical conversions of the samples are simulated by the Gibbs energy minimization method based on the results of thermochemical data prediction. At last, the effect of the biomass composition on the resource index (amounts of CO and H2 and ratio of H2/CO) and energy index (lower heat value) of syngas is calculated and analyzed. This study provides a method to obtain the relationship between the composition of biomass and the quality of syngas produced.

  • 37. D'Alessandro, Fabrizio
    et al.
    Pacchiarotta, Giovanna
    Rubino, Alberto
    Sperandio, Mauro
    Villa, Pierluigi
    Carrera, Arturo Manrique
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Fakhrai, Reza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Marra, Gianluigi
    Congiu, Annalisa
    Lean Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-low Emissions at High Temperature in Gas-Turbine Burners2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, p. 136-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalytic systems for methane combustion, with Rh and Pt in a BaZrO3-based perovskite, were synthesized at the University of L'Aquila and tested at close to industrial conditions at the KTH Energy Centre in Stockholm. Because of the resistance to high temperature of BaZrO3 (up to similar to 2600 degrees C), such systems are suitable for resolving stability problems frequently encountered with high-temperature operations. Furthermore, these perovskites contain the noble metal in a high oxidation state, giving rise to very active compounds. They also result in ultra-low emissions, compatible with legislation in such places as southern California and Japan.

  • 38. Davidsson, K.O.
    et al.
    Åmand, L.-E.
    Elled, A.-L.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Leckner, B.
    Effect of Cofiring Coal and Biofuel with sewage Sludge on Alkali Problems in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilder2007In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 3180-3188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cofiring experiments were performed in a 12 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler. The fuel combinations were biofuel (wood+straw), coal+biofuel, coal+sewage sludge+biofuel, and sewage sludge+biofuel. Limestone or chlorine (PVC) was added in separate experiments. Effects of feed composition on bed ash and fly ash were examined. The composition of flue gas was measured, including on-line measurement of alkali chlorides. Deposits were collected on a probe simulating a superheater tube. It was found that the fuel combination, as well as addition of limestone, has little effect on the alkali fraction in bed ash, while chlorine decreases the alkali fraction in bed ash. Sewage sludge practically eliminates alkali chlorides in flue gas and deposits. Addition of enough limestone to coal and sludge for elimination of the SO2 emission does not change the effect of chlorine. Chlorine addition increases the alkali chloride in flue gas, but no chlorine was found in the deposits with sewage sludge as a cofuel. Cofiring of coal and biofuel lowers the alkali chloride concentration in the flue gas to about a third compared with that of pure biofuel. This is not affected by addition of lime or chlorine. It is concluded that aluminum compounds in coal and sludge are more important than sulfur to reduce the level of KCl in flue gas and deposits.

  • 39.
    de Geyter, Sigrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Morgan
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Effects of non-quartz minerals in natural bed sand on agglomeration characteristics during fluidized bed combustion of biomass fuels2007In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 2663-2668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the previous literature on fluidized bed agglomeration during biomass combustion is based on quartz as a bed material. Full-scale installations however often use natural sand, which apart from quartz may contain a high fraction of non-quartz minerals such as potassium feldspar and plagioclase. The objective of the present study was therefore to elucidate the effects of non-quartz minerals occurring in natural sand on the agglomeration behavior during fluidized bed combustion of biomass fuels. Three fuels typical for previously determined agglomeration mechanisms were chosen as model fuels: calcium-rich bark, potassium-rich olive residues, and silica- and potassium-rich wheat straw. Two different feldspar minerals were used: a potassium feldspar and a plagioclase, labradorite, which both occur in many commercial bed materials. Furthermore, olivine was used as a bed material as this mineral represents another type of bed material used in some fullscale installations. Quartz was used as a reference bed material. The effects of non-quartz minerals in natural sand on initial defluidization temperature were assessed during carefully controlled, bench-scale fluidized bed agglomeration experiments. Bed material samples and agglomerates were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in order to explore the occurrence and chemical composition of coating and attack layers on the bed particles and necks between agglomerated particles. Significant differences in agglomeration characteristics were found for the different minerals when bark and olive residue were combusted. Potassium-feldspar was shown to lower the initial defluidization temperature for combustion of bark and olive residues. Plagioclase and olivine on the other hand were found to increase the initial defluidization temperature as compared to quartz for the combustion of olive residue, but for bark combustion, they did not differ significantly from quartz. During combustion of wheat straw, all bed materials agglomerated shortly after the startup of the experiment. For bark and olive residue samples, attack layers were found on all bed materials and the composition of the inner attack layer and agglomerate necks differed significantly with the fuel/bed material combination. For wheat straw however, no continuous attack layers were found, and the bed material composition was concluded not to influence the agglomeration characteristics for this biomass. The results were used to suggest possible mechanisms involved in layer formation for the different minerals.

  • 40.
    Diaz-Ramirez, Maryori
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Sebastian, Fernando
    Royo, Javier
    Xiong, Shaojun
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Ash Characterization and Transformation Behavior of the Fixed-Bed Combustion of Novel Crops: Poplar, Brassica, and Cassava Fuels2012In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 3218-3229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New biofuel raw materials for energy pellet production are now being studied as potential energy sources for the heating market. Because of the complexity of the chemical and physical properties of novel fuels, such as some agricultural residues and energy crops, the study of their ash-related aspects is crucial for the sustainable development of this potential energy sector. Ash fractions formed during fixed-bed combustion of different pelletized novel crops; i.e., two Mediterranean crops (one herbaceous, brassica, and one woody species, poplar) and three Chinese cassava stems (cassava species from three different Chinese regions), and three Chinese cassava stems (cassava species from three different Chinese regions), were characterized, and their formation paths assessed in this study. Special emphasis was placed on elucidating the role of major ash-forming elements in the fractionation and transformation behavior, leading to the formation of bottom ash, deposits, and particulate emissions (fine and coarse ash particle fractions) on the basis of experimental data. In the Mediterranean fuels, the predominant ash fraction obtained was bottom ash, mainly characterized by silicates. Phosphates were found to be the main crystalline phases in the Chinese fuels. The slagging tendency was low for all of the fuels, although more significant for the cassava species under the studied conditions. Further, combustion of the studied Chinese energy crops resulted in a considerably finer particle fraction compared to the Mediterranean fuels. Deposits and particulate matter were dominated by K-sulfates as well as K-chloride in all fuels (except poplar), with the occurrence of K-phosphates for cassava pellets. Overall, this study showed fundamental differences in ash transformation behavior during combustion of P-rich fuels (i.e., cassava mixtures) compared to Si-rich fuels (i.e., poplar and brassica mixtures). Of major importance is the experimental verification of the higher thermodynamic stability of phosphates in relation to silicates. Furthermore, in P-rich fuels at high (K + Na)/(Ca + Mg) ratios, a significant degree of alkali metal volatilization occurs, which forms larger amounts of particulate matter, whereas this ratio has no/low effect in Si-rich fuels at high alkali metal ratios.

  • 41.
    Donaj, Pawel J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Izadpanah, Mohammad Reza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Blasiak, Wlodzimierz
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Effect of Pressure Drop Due to Grate-Bed Resistance on the Performance of a Downdraft Gasifier2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 5366-5377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The grate-bed resistance coefficient appears to be an important operating parameter having a strong influence on the overall performance during downdraft fixed-bed gasification- it affects, directly, the velocity profile, temperature distribution, and height of the bed. To date no information on the pressure drop due to the grate-bed resistance has been found. The objective of this paper is to propose a correlation that can predict the total effectof pressure drop (caused by bed resistance and grate-bed resistance), through a grate of a certain surface porosity (open area/total area) covered by the porous bed. The term related to the grate-bed resistance is based on the effective grate porosity, which combined surface bed porosity with geometrical criteria of the grate. Based on this a new term has been integrated into the Ergun’s equation. The prediction has been validated within the experimental work conducted on a 0.7MW downdraft fixed-bed gasifier fueled with wood pellets. In this study, three grates of different porosities and thicknesses have been tested using various operating conditions. The predicted values of pressure drop showed a good agreement within the experimental results with ±7.10% of uncertainty. Although, the lower grate porosity, the higher conversion of fuel and heating value of gas is produced, the stability of the process is disturbed; therefore the grate porosity reduction below 20% is not recommended.

  • 42.
    dos Santos, Victor Hugo J. M.
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz F.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Classification of Fuel Blends Using Exploratory Analysis with Combined Data from Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Analysis2017In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 523-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemometric tools were applied for exploratory analysis and classification of fuel blends using the combined information on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope analysis through isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Principal component analysisand hierarchical clustering analysis were applied for exploratory analysis, while support vector machine (SVM) was used to classify the biodiesel/diesel blends. All of the chemometric models used present better results from the combination of spectral information with isotopic data for biodiesel contents of over 10% in the mixture, with the best results being Obtained from the SVM classification. Therefore, the development presented in this paper could become an important technique to improve the discrimination of the feedstock used in biodiesel production and a resource for quality control in industry.

  • 43.
    Edwards, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Redelius, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Rheological effects of waxes in bitumen2003In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 511-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheological effects of adding two bitumen waxes (isolated from SEC-II fraction) to three bitumens were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Also, a commercially available slack wax was used in the study. The results show that the magnitude and type of effect on bitumen rheology depend on the bitumen and type of crystallizing fraction in the bitumen. Effects due to wax content shown in DMA temperature sweeps are well related to the corresponding effects shown in DSC thermograms. The slope of the logarithm of the complex modulus between 25 degreesC and 60 degreesC is introduced as a possible proper factor for predicting rutting sensitivity due to wax content.

  • 44.
    Edwards, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Tasdemir, Yuksel
    Yozgat Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Erciyes University, Yozgat, Turkey.
    Isacsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Influence of commercial waxes on bitumen aging properties2005In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 2519-2525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging properties of wax-modified 160/220 bitumens and the influence of wax on these properties were evaluated using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), bending beam rheometer (BBR) analysis, force ductility testing, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thin-layer chromatography (TLC-FID). The binders were aged by means of the rolling thin-film oven test (RTFOT) and a pressure aging vessel (PAV). It was observed that aging resulted in oxidation of the bitumen (increase in carbonyl absorbance and in resin and/or asphaltene content by TLC-FID.) Changes in rheological properties of aged wax-modified binders depended on the base bitumen as well as on the type and amount of wax additive. Aging increased the complex modulus as well as elasticity, indicated by a decrease in phase angle at medium temperatures. For the polyethylene wax (PW)-modified binders, originally showing a large decrease in phase angle at higher temperature, this decrease was markedly reduced by aging, indicating network damage. Results and aging indexes obtained in this study indicate no or marginally positive influence of wax on bitumen aging properties.

  • 45.
    Einvall, Jessica
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Albertazzi, Simone
    Bologna University, Italy.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    Catator AB.
    Malik, Azhar
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Basile, Francesco
    Bologna University, Italy.
    Larsson, Ann-Charlotte
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Brandin, Jan
    Catator AB.
    Sanati, Mehri
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Investigation of reforming catalyst deactivation by exposure to fly ash from biomass gasification in laboratory scale2007In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 2481-2488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of synthesis gas by catalytic reforming of product gas from biomass gasification can lead to catalyst deactivation by the exposure to ash compounds present in the flue gas. The impact of fly ash from biomass gasification on reforming catalysts was studied at the laboratory scale. The investigated catalyst was Pt/Rh based, and it was exposed to generated K2SO4 aerosol particles and to aerosol particles produced from the water-soluble part of biomass fly ash, originating from a commercial biomass combustion plant. The noble metal catalyst was also compared with a commercial Ni-based catalyst, exposed to aerosol particles of the same fashion. To investigate the deactivation by aerosol particles, a flow containing submicrometer-size selected aerosol particles was led through the catalyst bed. The particle size of the poison was measured prior to the catalytic reactor system. Fresh and aerosol particle exposed catalysts were characterized using BET surface area, XRPD (X-ray powder diffraction), and H2 chemisorption. The Pt/Rh catalyst was also investigated for activity in the steam methane reforming reaction. It was found that the method to deposit generated aerosol particles on reforming catalysts could be a useful procedure to investigate the impact of different compounds possibly present in the product gas from the gasifier, acting as potential catalyst poisons. The catalytic deactivation procedure by exposure to aerosol particles is somehow similar to what happens in a real plant, when a catalyst bed is located subsequent to a biomass gasifier or a combustion boiler. Using different environments (oxidizing, reducing, steam present, etc.) in the aerosol generation adds further flexibility to the suggested aerosol deactivation method. It is essential to investigate the deactivating effect at the laboratory scale before a full-scale plant is taken into operation to avoid operational problems.

  • 46.
    Elled, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Åmand, Lars-Erik
    Eskilsson, David
    The fate of zinc during combustion of demolition wood in a fluidized bed boiler2007In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 22, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demolition wood can be used as a fuel in heat and power plants. However, it may contain elevated amounts of zinc, originating from white paint, which can cause problems related to deposit formation and corrosion on heat transfer surfaces. In this work, combustion tests with zinc addition were carried out in a fluidized bed boiler to investigate its effect on deposit formation. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed to complement the experimental data. The results show that combustion of demolition wood only contaminated with zinc generates a modest amount of deposit. Combustion of demolition wood contaminated with both zinc and chlorine promotes the deposit formation due to the increased amount of submicron particles in the flue gas. The thermodynamic equilibrium analyses show further that reducing conditions increase the release of zinc to the flue gas. On the other hand, in the case of oxidizing conditions, the retention of zinc in the ash is strong. Zinc, in combination with chlorine, gives rise to formation of zinc chloride in the flue gas. The formation is, at reducing conditions, thermodynamically favored between 450 and 850 °C. At oxidizing conditions, the formation is initiated at 400 °C and gradually increased with the temperature.

  • 47.
    Elliott, Douglas C.
    et al.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Meier, Dietrich
    Thünen Institute of Wood Research, Germany.
    Oasmaa, Anja
    VTT Technical Research Center of Finland, Finland.
    van De Beld, Bert
    BTG Biomass Technology Group BV, The Netherlands.
    Bridgwater, Anthony V.
    Aston University, UK.
    Marklund, Magnus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Results of the International Energy Agency Round Robin on Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil Production2017In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 5111-5119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An international round robin study of the production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil was undertaken. A total of 15 institutions in six countries contributed. Three biomass samples were distributed to the laboratories for processing in fast pyrolysis reactors. Samples of the bio-oil produced were transported to a central analytical laboratory for analysis. The round robin was focused on validating the pyrolysis community understanding of production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil by providing a common feedstock for bio-oil preparation. The round robin included: distribution of three feedstock samples, hybrid poplar, wheat straw, and a blend of lignocellulosic biomasses, from a common source to each participating laboratory, preparation of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in each laboratory with the three feedstocks provided, and return of the three bio-oil products (minimum of 500 mL) with operational description to a central analytical laboratory for bio-oil property determination. The analyses of interest were CHN, S, trace element analysis, water, ash, solids, pyrolytic lignin, density, viscosity, carboxylic acid number, and accelerated aging of bio-oil. In addition, an effort was made to compare the bio-oil components to the products of analytical pyrolysis through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The results showed that clear differences can occur in fast pyrolysis bio-oil properties by applying different process configurations and reactor designs in small scale. The comparison to the analytical pyrolysis method suggested that pyrolysis (Py)-GC/MS could serve as a rapid qualitative screening method for bio-oil composition when produced in small-scale fluid-bed reactors. Gel permeation chromatography was also applied to determine molecular weight information. Furthermore, hot vapor filtration generally resulted in the most favorable bio-oil product, with respect to water, solids, viscosity, and carboxylic acid number. These results can be helpful in understanding the variation in bio-oil production methods and their effects on bio-oil product composition.

  • 48.
    Enestam, Sonja
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Niemi, Jere
    Metso Power.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Mäkele, Kari
    Metso Power.
    Hupa, Mikko
    Åbo Akademi.
    Occurrence of zinc and lead in aerosols and deposits in the fluidized bed combustion of recovered waste wood:  Part 1: Samples from boilers2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1396-1404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combustion of recovered waste wood (RWW) has led to increased fouling and corrosion of furnace walls, superheaters, and economizers. These problems have been associated mainly with chlorine, zinc, and lead in the deposits but also with sodium and titanium. The presence of lead and zinc compounds, especially lead and zinc chlorides, has been shown to increase the corrosivity of the deposits even at relatively low metal temperatures (230−450 °C). The present work determined experimentally the distribution and speciation of zinc and lead compounds in aerosol particles and deposits in the fluidized-bed combustion of RWW. Measurements were conducted in both a full-scale (20 MWth) plant with as-received RWW and in a pilot-scale (2 MWth) setup with as-received RWW and RWW doped with zinc and lead. The results show that the amount and speciation of zinc and lead in the deposits vary depending upon the fuel composition, flue gas temperature, and metal temperature. Both lead and zinc chlorides are found in temperature ranges typical for the primary superheater area. A caracolite-type compound [Na3Pb2(SO4)3Cl] was identified in deposits from the economizer area and K2ZnCl4 in the sub-micrometer aerosol particle fraction.

  • 49. Enestam, Sonja
    et al.
    Mäkelä, Kari
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Hupa, Miko
    Occurrence of Zinc and Lead in Aerosols and Deposits in the Fluidized-Bed Combustion of Recovered Waste Wood. Part 2: Thermodynamic Considerations2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1970-1977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, which is the second part in a series of two, multi-phase, multi-component equilibrium calculations were used to study the chemistry and deposition behavior of lead and zinc in the combustion of recovered waste wood (RWW). Particular attention was paid to the deposition behavior in different parts of the boiler under varying flue gas and material temperature conditions. In addition, the influence of fuel composition was considered by studying three different fuel compositions. The results from the calculations were compared to experimental results from two measurement campaigns, whose goal was to experimentally determine the distribution and speciation of zinc and lead compounds in aerosol particles and deposits in the fluidized-bed combustion of RWW. The results from the experimental work are presented in part 1 (10.1021/ef101478n) of this work.

  • 50. Eriksson, G.
    et al.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Bostrom, D.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Backman, Rainier
    Ohman, M.
    Combustion characterization of rapeseed meal and possible combustion applications2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 3990-3939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A future shortage of biomass fuel can be foreseen. The production of rapeseed oil for a number of purposesis increasing, among others, for biodiesel production. A yproduct from the oil extraction process is rapeseed meal (RM), presently used as animal feed. Further increases in supply will make fuel use an option. Several energy companies have shown interest but have been cautious because of the scarcity of data on fuel properties, which led to the present study. Combustion-relevant properties of RM from several producers have been determined. The volatile fraction (74 ± .06%wt ds) is comparable to wood; the moisture content (6.2-11.8%wt) is low; and the ash content (7.41 ± 0.286%wt ds) is high compared to most other biomass fuels. The lower heating value is 18.2 ± 0.3 MJ/kg (dry basis). In comparison to other biomass fuels, the chlorine content is low (0.02-0.05%wt ds) and the sulfur content is high (0.67-0.74%wt ds). RM has high contents of nitrogen (5.0-6.4%wt ds), phosphorus (1.12-1.23%wt ds), and potassium (1.2-1.4%wt ds). Fuel-specific combustion properties of typical RM were determined through combustion tests, with an emphasis on gas emissions, ash formation, and potential ash-related operational problems. Softwood bark was chosen as a suitable and representative co-combustion (woody) fuel. RM was added to the bark at two levels: 10 and 30%wt ds. These mixtures were pelletized, and so was RM without bark (for durability mixed with cutter shavings, contributing 1%wt of the ash). Each of these fuels was combusted in a 5 kWfluidized bed and an underfed pellet burner (to simulate grate combustion). Pure RM was combusted in a powder burner. Emissions of NO and SO2 were high for all combustion tests, requiring applications with flue gas cleaning, economically viable only at large scale. Emissions of HCl were relatively low. Temperatures for initial bed agglomeration in the fluidized-bed tests were high for RM compared to many other agricultural fuels, thereby indicating that RM could be an attractive fuel from a bed agglomeration point of view. The results of grate combustion suggest that slagging is not likely to be severe for RM, pure or mixed with other fuels. Fine-mode particles from fluidized-bed combustion and grate combustion mainly contained sulfates of potassium, suggesting that the risk of problems caused by deposit formation should be moderate. The chlorine concentration of the particles was reduced when RM was added to bark, potentially lowering the risk of high-temperature corrosion. Particle emissions from powder combustion of RM were 17 times higher than for wood powder, and the fine-mode fraction contained mainly K-phosphates known to cause deposits, suggesting that powder combustion of RM should be used with caution. A possible use of RM is as a sulfur-containing additive to biomass fuels rich in Cl and K for avoiding ash-related operational problems in fluidized beds and grate combustors originated from high KCl concentrations in the flue gases © 2009 American Chemical Society.

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