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  • 1.
    Amadei, Damien
    et al.
    Lab Chim & Biol Membranes & Nanoobjets (CBMN), UMR 5248, Univ Bordeaux, Pessac, France.
    Chatzidaki, Maria D.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Inst Theoret & Phys Chem, Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Natl Hellen Res Fdn, Athens, Greece.
    Devienne, Julia
    Lab Chim & Biol Membranes & Nanoobjets (CBMN), UMR 5248, Univ Bordeaux, Pessac, France.
    Monteil, Julien
    Lab Chim & Biol Membranes & Nanoobjets (CBMN), UMR 5248, Univ Bordeaux, Pessac, France.
    Cansell, Maud
    Lab Chim & Biol Membranes & Nanoobjets (CBMN), UMR 5248, Univ Bordeaux, Pessac, France.
    Xenakis, Aristotelis
    Inst Theoret & Phys Chem, Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Natl Hellen Res Fdn, Athens, Greece.
    Leal-Calderon, Fernando
    Lab Chim & Biol Membranes & Nanoobjets (CBMN), UMR 5248, Univ Bordeaux, Pessac, France.
    Low shear-rate process to obtain transparent W/O fine emulsions as functional foods2014In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 62, p. 533-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Edible transparent emulsions of the water-in-oil (W/O) type are highly sought after and currently not available. In such materials, the water droplets can be advantageously used as reservoirs to encapsulate biologically active hydrophilic substances (minerals, antioxidants, etc.). The emulsions must remain transparent, fluid and kinetically stable to meet consumers' requirements. In this paper, we describe a simple yet versatile process to fabricate food grade transparent W/O emulsions. Our method involves the preparation of coarse emulsions which are submitted to shear under laminar flow conditions to reduce their average droplet size. The process generates negligible heat and consequently, it preserves the integrity of thermally sensitive compounds. The obtained emulsions contain between 5 and 10 wt.% of aqueous droplets whose average droplet size is lower than 200 nm. They are kinetically stable for at least 2 months. Transparency results from the relatively low droplet size and the incorporation in the aqueous phase of hydrophilic solutes that decrease the refractive index mismatch between the two immiscible phases.

  • 2. Bernin, D.
    et al.
    Steglich, Thomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Roding, M.
    Moldin, A.
    Topgaard, D.
    Langton, M.
    Multi-scale characterization of pasta during cooking using microscopy and real-time magnetic resonance imaging2014In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 66, p. 132-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macroscopic properties of pasta, such as the texture, are formed during cooking by a complex interplay of water and heat with the structuring agents starch and gluten. The impact of the starch-to-gluten ratio on microstructure and water distribution in pasta was analyzed by a multi-scale approach combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and light microscopy. The cooking process and thus the water distribution was monitored non-invasively using 1H MRI in real-time with a temporal resolution of 45s. Our MRI set-up allowed following the water ingress by imaging the reduction of the uncooked core. The water ingress rate was neither dependent on pasta composition nor on the presence of salt in the cooking media (0.7% NaCl). Starch-rich samples showed a more homogeneous water distribution in the gelatinized zone, which was mirrored in a more homogeneous microstructure. In contrast, gluten-rich samples showed both a heterogeneous water distribution and microstructure. Thus, the gluten content affected local water content in the gelatinized zone but not the water ingress.

  • 3.
    Bosha, Abraham
    et al.
    Haramaya University, Ethiopia; Wolaita Sodo University, Ethiopia.
    Lagibo Dalbato, Abitew
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Tana, Tamado
    Haramaya University, Ethiopia.
    Mohammed, Wassu
    Haramaya University, Ethiopia.
    Tesfaye, Buzayew
    Hawassa University, Ethiopia.
    Karlsson, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Nutritional and chemical properties of fermented food of wild and cultivated genotypes of enset (Ensete ventricosum)2016In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 89, p. 806-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multipurpose crop enset (Ensete ventricosum) has been traditionally cultivated in Ethiopia since ancient times. The main food product is the starch-rich fermented kocho made from the pseudostem and corm. There are many vegetatively propagated landraces utilised by farmers, but no concisions breeding have taken place, and there are requests for improved cultivars. There are also populations of wild ensets which propagate sexually, and the variation in characteristics among the wild is not studied. We suggest investigating the variation among the wild, in order utilise the most proper combinations of parent plants when breeding for different purposes. We analysed kocho, after 30 and 90 days of fermentation, from three wild genotypes and three cultivars, to compare how and how much they differ in components and perceived food quality. The three cultivars scored generally higher than all the three wild genotypes for protein, fat, sugar and minerals, while the wild had larger fraction of starch. On average, panellists rated all the cultivated significantly higher than all the wild regarding the investigated characteristics (colour, texture, taste and overall). However, there were nine out of 25 panellists who rated at least one wild genotype higher or equal to at least one cultivar regarding taste, showing that people can be open for unfamiliar kocho. Therefore, we conclude that further investigations of the variation among wild plants should be done, aiming to get a larger gene pool with improved characteristics as e.g. disease tolerance or superior mineral uptake; by careful selection of parent plants, desired combinations can be achieved. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Both, E M
    et al.
    Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.
    Nuzzo, Marine
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Millqvist-Fureby, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Boom, R M
    Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.
    Schutyser, M A I
    Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.
    Morphology development during single droplet drying of mixed component formulations and milk2018In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 109, p. 448-454, article id S0963-9969(18)30328-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the influence of selected components and their mixtures on the development of the morphology during drying of single droplets and extend the results to the morphology of whole milk powder particles. Sessile single droplet drying and acoustic levitation methods were employed to study single droplet drying. The influence of carbohydrates (lactose and maltodextrin DE12) and proteins (micellar casein or whey protein) on morphology development is very different, since upon concentration protein systems will jam and undergo a colloidal glass transition, whereas carbohydrate systems will gradually increase in viscosity as a consequence of the concentration. Whey protein gives relatively rigid shells due to jamming of the "hard sphere" proteins, while casein micelles behave as "soft spheres" that can deform after jamming, which gives flexibility to the shell during drying. The influence of the carbohydrates on the final morphology was found much larger than the influence of the proteins. Caseins influenced morphology only in mixtures with lactose at higher concentrations due to its high voluminosity. Similar observations were done for whole milk, where fat appeared to have no influence. With maltodextrin the influence of the casein was again observed in the shape and smoothness of wrinkles. Both sessile and levitated droplet drying methods provide a similar and consistent view on morphology development.

  • 5.
    Concina, Isabella
    et al.
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia.
    Bornsek, M
    Pivovarna Union Dd, Ljubljana.
    Baccilliere, S
    ARPAV, Dipartimento Reg, Lab SL di Padova.
    Falasconi, Matteo
    CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab, University of Brescia.
    Gobbi, Emanuela
    Biodivers SPA, Brescia,, Univ Udine.
    Sberveglieri, Giorgio
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, University of Brescia.
    Alicyclobacillus spp Detection in soft drinks by Electronic Nose2010In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 2108-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the skill of an electronic nose to early diagnose the natural contamination by Alicyclobacillus spp in commercial flavoured drinks is presented The instrument was able to identify contaminated products at very low bacterial loads (tens of copies/ml) with an excellent classification rate (almost 100%) The identification of Alicyclobacillus spp by means of the electronic nose was not based on the analysis of the secondary metabolites as it is done by classical analytical techniques thus allowing a surprising capability in recognising the contaminated products at early stage of growth This study strongly suggests the use of the Electronic Noses as screening tools in industrial quality control laboratories but at the same time it underlines some limits still present in the technology

  • 6.
    Dalvi-Isfahan, Mohsen
    et al.
    Isfahan University of Technology, Iran.
    Hamdami, Nasser
    Isfahan University of Technology, Iran.
    Le-Bail, Alain
    CNRS, France; University of Nantes, France.
    Xanthakis, Epameinondas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience.
    The principles of high voltage electric field and its application in food processing: A review2016In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 89, p. 48-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food processing is a major part of the modern global industry and it will certainly be an important sector of the industry in the future. Several processes for different purposes are involved in food processing aiming at the development of new products by combining and/or transforming raw materials, to the extension of food shelf-life, recovery, exploitation and further use of valuable compounds and many others. During the last century several new food processes have arisen and most of the traditional ones have evolved. The future food factory will require innovative approaches food processing which can combine increased sustainability, efficiency and quality. Herein, the objective of this review is to explore the multiple applications of high voltage electric field (HVEF) and its potentials within the food industry. These applications include processes such as drying, refrigeration, freezing, thawing, extending food shelf- life, and extraction of biocompounds. In addition, the principles, mechanism of action and influence of specific parameters have been discussed comprehensively.

  • 7.
    Davis, Jenny
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Baumgartner, D.U.
    Nemecek, T.
    Environmental impact of four meals with different protein sources: Case studies in Spain and Sweden2010In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1874-1884Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hickey, C. D.
    et al.
    Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ireland; University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Diehl, B. W. K.
    Spectral service AG, Germany.
    Nuzzo, Marine
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Millqvist-Feurby, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Wilkinson, M. G.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Sheehan, J. J.
    Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ireland.
    Influence of buttermilk powder or buttermilk addition on phospholipid content, chemical and bio-chemical composition and bacterial viability in Cheddar style-cheese2017In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 102, p. 748-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of buttermilk powder addition post-curd formation or buttermilk addition to cheese milk on total and individual phospholipid content, chemical composition, enzyme activity, microbial populations and microstructure within Cheddar-style cheese was investigated. Buttermilk or buttermilk powder addition resulted in significant increases in total phospholipid content and their distribution throughout the cheese matrix. Addition of 10% buttermilk powder resulted in higher phospholipid content, moisture, pH and salt in moisture levels, and lower fat, fat in dry matter, L. helveticus and non-starter bacteria levels in cheeses. Buttermilk powder inclusion resulted in lower pH 4.6/Soluble Nitrogen (SN) levels and significantly lower free amino acid levels in 10% buttermilk powder cheeses. Buttermilk addition provided a more porous cheese microstructure with greater fat globule coalescence and increased free fat pools, while also increasing moisture and decreasing protein, fat and pH levels. Addition of buttermilk in liquid or powdered form offers potential for new cheeses with associated health benefits. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 9.
    Jha, Piyush Kumar
    et al.
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Chevallier, Sylvie
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Jury, Vanessa
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Xanthakis, Epameinondas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Le-Bail, Alain
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Assessment of freeze damage in fruits and vegetables2019In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 121, p. 479-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Freezing is an efficient and widely used method of food preservation. However, it can also cause irreversible damages at cellular level which in turn degrade the overall quality of the frozen food products. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative methods and technologies that will be able to evaluate with accuracy the freeze damage are of great importance. This review paper provides a comprehensive study of the methods that have been used to evaluate the freeze damage in fruits and vegetables. Further than the principles and the applications of those methods, the advantages and the limitations are also being discussed.

  • 10.
    Kalaitzaki, Argyro
    et al.
    National Hellen Research Foundation, Institute for Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Athens 11635, Greece ; MTM Res Ctr, Sch Sci & Technol, Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Emo, Melanie
    Structure et Réactivité des Systèmes Moléculaires Complexes (SRSMC), Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Univ Lorraine, Vandoeuvre Les Nancy, France.
    Stebe, Marie Jose
    Structure et Réactivité des Systèmes Moléculaires Complexes (SRSMC), Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Univ Lorraine, Vandoeuvre Les Nancy, France.
    Xenakis, Aristotelis
    Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology, National Hellen Resaearch Foundation, Athens, Greece; School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Papadimitriou, Vassiliki
    Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology, National Hellen Resaearch Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Biocompatible nanodispersions as delivery systems of food additives: a structural study2013In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 1448-1454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanodispersions based on food grade biocompatible materials were developed and structurally characterized to be used as carriers of bioactive compounds with specific nutritional value. The main idea was to formulate concentrated solutions of specific food components at the nanoscale to be consumed either on their own or as integrating parts of classic foods, upon aqueous dilution. For this purpose microemulsions consisting of (R)-(+)-limonene/ethanol/Tween 40/water/propylene glycol were formulated in the presence and in the absence of squalene, gallic acid and octyl gallate. The limits of the single-phase region as described by pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were related to the nature of the food additive. The more extended monophasic region was obtained when octyl gallate was added in the system. Interfacial properties of the microemulsions were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy employing the nitroxide spin probe 5-doxylstearic acid (5-DSA). In general guest molecules decreased the flexibility of the surfactant monolayer as manifested from the calculation of rotational correlation time (T-R) and order parameter S of 5-DSA. Particle size measurements were performed using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and oil droplet diameters in the range of 11.7 to 17.4 nm were observed. The addition of squalene resulted in the formulation of larger oily droplets whereas octyl gallate formed smaller ones. Finally SAXS experiments provided qualitative information of o/w microemulsions showing squalene solubilization in the dispersed oily phase, octyl gallate localization on the membrane and gallic acid solubilization in the continuous aqueous phase. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Muneer, Faraz
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Plivelic, Tomas S.
    Lund Univ, MAX Lab 4, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Markedal, Keld Ejdrup
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Food Sci, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Petersen, Iben Lykke
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Food Sci, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Sorensen, Jens Christian
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Food Sci, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Kuktaite, Ramune
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    The impact of newly produced protein and dietary fiber rich fractions of yellow pea (Pisum sativum L.) on the structure and mechanical properties of pasta-like sheets2018In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 106, p. 607-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two fractions from pea (Pisum sativum L.), protein isolate (PPI) and dietary fiber (PF), were newly produced by extraction-fractionation method and characterized in terms of particle size distribution and structural morphology using SEM. The newly produced PPI and PF fractions were processed into pasta-like sheets with varying protein to fiber ratios (100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30 and 50/50, respectively) using high temperature compression molding. We studied protein polymerization, molecular structure and protein-fiber interactions, as well as mechanical performance and cooking characteristics of processed PPI-PF blends. Bi-modal particle size distribution and chemical composition of the PPI and PF fractions influenced significantly the physicochemical properties of the pasta-like sheets. Polymerization was most pronounced for the 100 PPI, 90/10 and 80/20 PPI-PF samples as studied by SE-HPLC, and polymerization decreased with addition of the PF fraction. The mechanical properties, as strength and extensibility, were likewise the highest for the 100 PPI and 90/10 PPI-PF blends, while the E-modulus was similar for all the studied blends (around 38 MPa). The extensibility decreased with the increasing amount of PF in the blend. The highest amounts of beta-sheets were found in the pasta-like sheets with high amounts of PPI (100, 90 and 80%), by FT-IR. An increase in PF fraction in the blend, resulted into the high amounts of unordered structures as observed by FT-IR, as well as in an increase in the molecular scattering distances observed by SAXS. The water uptake increased and cooking loss decreased with increased proportions of the PF fraction, and the consistency of 10 min cooked pasta-like sheets were alike al dente texture. The new knowledge obtained in this study on the use of extraction-fractionation method to produce novel PPI and PF fractions for developing innovative high nutritious food can be of a great importance. The obtained knowledge on the pea protein and fiber processing behaviour could greatly contribute to a better control of functional properties of various temperature-processed products from yellow pea.

  • 12.
    Steglich, Thomas
    et al.
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Bernin, D.
    Roding, M.
    Nyden, M.
    Moldin, A.
    Topgaard, D.
    Microstructure and water distribution of commercial pasta studied by microscopy and 3D magnetic resonance imaging2014In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 62, p. 644-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing pasta is a rather well known process, but it is still challenging to tailor pasta products with new raw materials. In this study, we evaluated the effects of raw materials on the microstructure and water distribution in cooked pasta using 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as bright field and polarized light microscopy. The MRI parameters initial intensity (I0) and transverse dephasing time (T2 *) serve as indicators of the local water concentration and water-macromolecule interactions through chemical exchange, respectively. These parameters were mapped throughout the whole pasta volume with a spatial resolution of 78?m in all three dimensions. MRI was combined with light microscopy to link I0 and T2 * to microstructure components such as fiber particles and the extent of starch gelatinization. Four commercial spaghetti samples were analyzed which were made of durum wheat flour, both plain and enriched with wheat fiber, as well as with wholegrain and soft wheat flour. Although all pasta samples showed similar macroscopic water absorption as measured by weight increase, the sample structures differed at the microscopic scale. Compared to durum wheat spaghetti, the presence of fiber particles decreased T2 *, while spaghetti enriched with soft wheat flour increased T2 *. In addition, light microscopy showed that large fiber particles partly acted as barriers against water migration and protected starch granules from swelling. Smaller wheat fiber particles did not affect local starch swelling. Thus, the combination of light microscopy and MRI is a powerful tool to study the microstructure and water distribution in pasta. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 13.
    Svanberg, Lina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Windhab, E.
    Effect of pre-crystallization process and solid particle addition on microstructure in chocolate model systems2011In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 1339-1350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microstructure of chocolate model systems was investigated at the meso (~. 10. ?m), micro (~. 50. ?m), and macro (0.1-1 mm) scales simultaneously, to examine effect of pre-crystallization process and/or solid particle addition on the formation of a dense structure. The structure density was quantified by measuring the diffusion rate of small molecules at different length scales. At the meso scale, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was utilized to quantify local diffusion rate solely in the fat phase, whereas high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements were made to assess the global diffusion of the same molecules at the macro scale. Both techniques were used in combination with microstructure characterization using confocal laser scanning microscopy (micro scale) and supported by differential scanning calorimeter melting curves for estimating cocoa butter polymorphism. Both FRAP and HPLC analysis generated relevant information on the effect of pre-crystallization and solid particle addition on the structure density. FRAP measurements gave detailed information on microstructure heterogeneity or homogeneity in the cocoa butter, whereas HPLC clearly revealed the impact of solid particles on the structure density. Combining the two techniques revealed that a compact and homogeneous structure obtained through optimized pre-crystallization is required at all times, i.e., immediately after cooling and throughout the product's shelf life, to retard global diffusion in confectionery systems. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 14.
    Sánchez-Rivera, Laura
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ménard, O.
    Recio, I.
    Dupont, D.
    Peptide mapping during dynamic gastric digestion of heated and unheated skimmed milk powder2015In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of heat treatment on the hydrolysis kinetics of cow milk proteins and on the peptide release during in vitro dynamic gastric digestion. SDS-PAGE and ELISA techniques were employed to assess the hydrolysis of proteins over time of digestion. The evolution of the peptidome generated through dynamic digestion of heated and non-heated milk was studied at different times, using MS-based techniques (ion trap and MALDI-TOF/TOF) coupled to liquid chromatography. The peptide homology value between both samples at the end of digestion (48%) confirmed the impact of heat treatment on the identity of peptides generated during digestion, despite their identical initial protein content and being the same matrix in both cases. Heat treatment produced an increased resistance to hydrolysis by pepsin in the casein fraction. However, β-lactoglobulin was found to be more susceptible to hydrolysis. Although differences on the pattern of peptide release were found between both samples, also some common traits after digestion were observed. The regions comprised between the residues 76-93 of β-casein, where several binding epitopes are included, as well as the β-casein domains 126-140 and 190-209 were found to be resistant to pepsin.

  • 15. Ture, H.
    et al.
    Gällstedt, M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Hedenqvist, M.S.
    Antimicrobial compression-moulded wheat gluten films containing potassium sorbate2012In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, no 1, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Türe, Hasan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Gallstedt, Mikael
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Antimicrobial compression-moulded wheat gluten films containing potassium sorbate2012In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial glycerol-plasticized wheat gluten (WG) films containing potassium sorbate (PS) were successfully produced by compression moulding; a thermoplastic process involving high temperature and high pressure. Antifungal properties of the films were tested against Aspergillus niger and Fusarium incarnatum by the agar diffusion assay. The results indicated that films containing more than 10 wt.% PS showed antimicrobial activity against A. niger while films containing 2.5 wt.% or more of PS showed antimicrobial activity against F. incarnatum. It was also found that when the film was exposed to an absorbing medium (the agar solution), most of the PS was released, an interesting feature for edible active packaging. Despite the loss, a very promising result was that, without seeding of spores, the films resisted microbial growth for at least one week when the films were left in the agar solution. X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that the PS crystals were dissolved in the wheat gluten material. In addition to the antimicrobial properties, dynamic mechanical, tensile, PS loss, water vapour transmission rate and oxygen permeability data also indicated that PS acted as a plasticiser in the wheat gluten film.

  • 17.
    Vetrani, C.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, “Federico II” University, Naples, Italy.
    Rivellese, A. A.
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, “Federico II” University, Naples, Italy.
    Annuzzi, G.
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, “Federico II” University, Naples, Italy.
    Mattila, I.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Meudec, E.
    INRA, UMR1083, Sciences pour l'Oenologie, Plateforme Polyphénols, Montpellier, France.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Oresic, Matej
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Aura, A. -M.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Phenolic metabolites as compliance biomarker for polyphenol intake in a randomized controlled human intervention2014In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 63, no B, p. 233-238Article in journal (Refereed)
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