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  • 1.
    Albani, Giorgia
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy; INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy.
    Perelli Cippo, Enrico
    Istituto di Fisica Del Plasma (IFP-CNR), Via Cozzi 53, Milano, Italy.
    Croci, Gabriele
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy; INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy.
    Muraro, Andrea
    Istituto di Fisica Del Plasma (IFP-CNR), Via Cozzi 53, Milano, Italy.
    Schooneveld, Erik
    STFC-ISIS Facility, RAL, Didcot, United Kingdom.
    Scherillo, Antonella
    STFC-ISIS Facility, RAL, Didcot, United Kingdom.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard J.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund.
    Kanaki, Kalliopi
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund.
    Höglund, Carina
    European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund; Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping.
    Hultman, Lars
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping.
    Birch, Jens
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping.
    Claps, Gerardo
    INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Fermi 40, Frascati, Italy.
    Murtas, Fabrizio
    INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Fermi 40, Frascati, Italy.
    Rebai, Marica
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy; INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy.
    Tardocchi, Marco
    Istituto di Fisica Del Plasma (IFP-CNR), Via Cozzi 53, Milano, Italy.
    Gorini, Giuseppe
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy; INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano, Italy; Istituto di Fisica Del Plasma (IFP-CNR), Via Cozzi 53, Milano, Italy.
    Evolution in boron-based GEM detectors for diffraction measurements: From planar to 3D converters2016In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 27, no 11, article id 115902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The so-called '3He-crisis' has motivated the neutron detector community to undertake an intense R&D programme in order to develop technologies alternative to standard 3He tubes and suitable for neutron detection systems in future spallation sources such as the European spallation source (ESS). Boron-based GEM (gas electron multiplier) detectors are a promising '3He-free' technology for thermal neutron detection in neutron scattering experiments. In this paper the evolution of boron-based GEM detectors from planar to 3D converters with an application in diffraction measurements is presented. The use of 3D converters coupled with GEMs allows for an optimization of the detector performances. Three different detectors were used for diffraction measurements on the INES instrument at the ISIS spallation source. The performances of the GEM-detectors are compared with those of conventional 3He tubes installed on the INES instrument. The conceptual detector with the 3D converter used in this paper reached a count rate per unit area of about 25% relative to the currently installed 3He tube. Its timing resolution is similar and the signal-to-background ratio (S/B) is 2 times lower.

  • 2.
    Albani, Giorgia
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Perelli Cippo, Enrico
    CNR, Italy.
    Croci, Gabriele
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Muraro, Andrea
    CNR, Italy.
    Schooneveld, Erik
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Scherillo, Antonella
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallat Source ERIC, Sweden; Mittuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Kanaki, Kalliopi
    European Spallat Source ERIC, Sweden.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Claps, Gerardo
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Murtas, Fabrizio
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Rebai, Marica
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Tardocchi, Marco
    CNR, Italy.
    Gorini, Giuseppe
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; CNR, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Evolution in boron-based GEM detectors for diffraction measurements: from planar to 3D converters2016In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 27, no 11, article id 115902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The so-called He-3-crisis has motivated the neutron detector community to undertake an intense Ramp;D programme in order to develop technologies alternative to standard He-3 tubes and suitable for neutron detection systems in future spallation sources such as the European spallation source (ESS). Boron-based GEM (gas electron multiplier) detectors are a promising He-3-free technology for thermal neutron detection in neutron scattering experiments. In this paper the evolution of boron-based GEM detectors from planar to 3D converters with an application in diffraction measurements is presented. The use of 3D converters coupled with GEMs allows for an optimization of the detector performances. Three different detectors were used for diffraction measurements on the INES instrument at the ISIS spallation source. The performances of the GEM-detectors are compared with those of conventional He-3 tubes installed on the INES instrument. The conceptual detector with the 3D converter used in this paper reached a count rate per unit area of about 25% relative to the currently installed He-3 tube. Its timing resolution is similar and the signal-to-background ratio (S/B) is 2 times lower.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Manuilskiy, Anatoliy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Evaluation of an Integrated Fourier-Transform Spectrometer Utilizing a Lateral Effect Position Sensitive Detector with a Multi-Channel Fabry-Perot Interferometer2008In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 045306-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basis of this paper is the evaluation of an integrated multi-channel Fourier-transform (FT) spectrometer based on a multi-channel wedge Fabry-Perot interferometer and a one-dimensional lateral effect position sensitive detector (PSD). The use of a PSD for an interferogram readout allows for a simple scanning mechanism with no requirement for any position reference. The use of a wedge-shaped interferometer makes it possible to integrate it directly onto the PSD surface, thus producing a very compact spectrometer. The capabilities of the spectrometer are demonstrated by absorption spectral measurements using a reference sample. In addition, spectral measurements on 532 nm DPSS and 632.8 nm He-Ne lasers are presented. The resolution of the spectrometer is approximately 5 nm. The evaluated spectrometer set-up can be used in applications where compact and low cost spectrometers are required, such as in process control and in education. Further, it is shown that there are deteriorations in very high accuracy position measurements, which are caused by changes in incident light intensity. A model describing the above-mentioned nonlinearities was developed based on analysing the equivalent circuit for PSDs and parameters such as leakage current and serial resistance. Additionally, a method is proposed to assist in the reduction of the nonlinearity caused by this effect.

  • 4.
    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis
    et al.
    Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany.
    Persijn, Stefan
    VSL Dutch Metrology Institute, The Netherlands.
    Arrhenius, Karine
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Bohlen, Haleh
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Werhahn, Olav
    Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany.
    Ebert, Volker
    Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany.
    Metrological quantification of CO in biogas using laser absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography2018In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 29, no 9, article id 095010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas has a vital role in the future market of renewable energy. When upgraded to biomethane, it can be injected into natural gas grids if the level of certain impurities complies with the specifications in EN16723. For some of these impurities, suitable measurement methods are lacking which hampers the quality control of biomethane to be injected into natural gas networks. Here, we report the evaluation of three detection methods suitable for carbon monoxide (CO) in biogas and biomethane applications for which EN16723 specifies an upper limit of 0.1% (1000 µmol/mol). Two of these methods are based on laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) and one on gas chromatography (GC). Both LAS spectrometers are employing direct absorption spectroscopy and operating at 4.6µm, probing a single CO absorption line in the fundamental CO band: One – called dTDLAS (direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy)- is based on a new Interband Cascade Laser specially designed for biogas and biomethane applications, while the other is based on Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (QCLAS). The GC is equipped with two packed columns (Hayesep Q and Molecular Sieve 5A) and a thermal conductivity detector. Carbon monoxide amount fraction results in biogas matrices derived using these three measurement methods are compared to amount fraction values of different, gravimetrically prepared reference gas standards of CO in biogas. These were used to validate the measurement capabilities. The measured CO amount fraction results from LAS and GC covered 10 µmol/mol to 30000 µmol/mol (system measurement ranges, LAS: 3 µmol/mol - 1000 µmol/mol, GC: 500 µmol/mol - 30000 µmol/mol) and were in excellent agreement with the gravimetric values of the gas standards. At 400 µmol/mol, the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) compliant relative standard uncertainties of our calibration-free dTDLAS and the gas-calibrated QCLAS systems are estimated to be 1.4 % vs 0.5 %, respectively. The relative standard uncertainty of the GC CO measurements at 5075 µmol/mol is 1.3 %. This work demonstrates that, by means of GC and LAS, relative standard uncertainties of 1.4 % and below can be reached for CO measurements in biogas and that cost-optimized calibration-free approaches not requiring frequent use of gas standards have become available.

  • 5.
    Babushkin, O.
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Harrysson, Ralph
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Lindbäck, Ture
    Tegman, R.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    High-temperature graphite furnace for X-ray powder diffraction1993In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 4, no 8, p. 816-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modified computer-controlled high-temperature x-ray diffractometer with good stability and an upper temperature limit of more than 2300 K is described. A critical test of the system, determining the thermal expansion of Pt, Ni and AlN, showed close agreement with dilatometric and literature data. Lattice thermal expansion data of CrB2 and TiB2 up to 2100 K were also determined

  • 6.
    Belyayev, Serhiy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics. Lviv Center of Institute of Space Research, NASU/NSAU, S-A Naukova St., Lviv, Ukraine.
    Ivchenko, Nickolay
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Digital fluxgate magnetometer: design notes2015In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 26, no 12, article id 125901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We presented an approach to understanding the performance of a fully digital fluxgate magnetometer. All elements of the design are important for the performance of the instrument, and the presence of the digital feed-back loop introduces certain peculiarities affecting the noise and dynamic performance of the instrument. Ultimately, the quantisation noise of the digital to analogue converter is found to dominate the noise of the current design, although noise shaping alleviates its effect to some extent. An example of magnetometer measurements on board a sounding rocket is presented, and ways to further improve the performance of the instrument are discussed.

  • 7.
    Belyayev, Serhiy
    et al.
    KTH. Lviv Center of Institute of Space Research, NASU/SSAU, Ukraine.
    Ivchenko, Nickolay
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Effect of second harmonic in pulse-width-modulation-based DAC for feedback of digital fluxgate magnetometer2018In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 29, no 4, article id 045008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital fluxgate magnetometers employ processing of the measured pickup signal to produce the value of the compensation current. Using pulse-width modulation with filtering for digital to analog conversion is a convenient approach, but it can introduce an intrinsic source of nonlinearity, which we discuss in this design note. A code shift of one least significant bit changes the second harmonic content of the pulse train, which feeds into the pick-up signal chain despite the heavy filtering. This effect produces a code-dependent nonlinearity. This nonlinearity can be overcome by the specific design of the timing of the pulse train signal. The second harmonic is suppressed if the first and third quarters of the excitation period pulse train are repeated in the second and fourth quarters. We demonstrate this principle on a digital magnetometer, achieving a magnetometer noise level corresponding to that of the sensor itself. 

  • 8.
    Binder, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. Scania CV AB.
    Henrik, Feuk
    Lund University.
    Richter, Mattias
    Lund University.
    Phosphor Thermometry for In-Cylinder Surface Temperature Measurements in Diesel Engines2019In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface temperature measurements in technically relevant applications can be very  hallenging and yet of great importance. Phosphor thermometry is a temperature measurement technique that has previously been employed in technically relevant applications to obtain surface temperature. The technique is based on temperature-dependent changes in a phosphor’s luminescence. To improve the accuracy and precision of temperature measurements with this technique, the present study considers, by way of example, the impact of conditions inside the cylinder of a diesel engine on decay time based phosphor thermometry. After an initial, general assessment of the effect of prevailing measurement conditions, this research investigates errors caused by soot luminosity, extinction, signal trapping and changes of phosphors’ luminescence properties due to exposure to the harsh environment. Furthermore, preferable properties of phosphors which are suitable for in-cylinder temperature measurements are discussed. 16 phosphors are evaluated, including four which – to the authors’ knowledge –have previously not been used in thermometry. Results indicate that errors due to photocathode bleaching, extinction, signal trapping and changes of luminescence properties may cause an erroneous temperature evaluation with temperature errors in the order of serval tens of Kelvin.

  • 9.
    Bitaraf Haghighi, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Behi, Mohammadreza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Mirmohammadi, Seyed Aliakbar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Poth, H.
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Shelf stability of nanofluids and its effect on thermal conductivity and viscosity2013In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 105301-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a method and apparatus to estimate shelf stability of nanofluids. Nanofluids are fabricated by dispersion of solid nanoparticles in base fluids, and shelf stability is a key issue for many practical applications of these fluids. In this study, shelf stability is evaluated by measuring the weight of settled solid particles on a suspended tray in a colloid versus time and correlated with the performance change of some nanofluid systems. The effects of solid particle concentration and bath sonication time were investigated for selected nanofluids. The results show the applicability of this simple method and the apparatus to evaluate nanofluid shelf stability. Furthermore, it shows that Stokes' law is not valid for determining the settling time of the tested nanoparticles probably due to their complicated shape and presence of surface modifiers. The effect of shelf stability on thermal conductivity and viscosity was illustrated for some nanofluids. Experimental results show that water-based Al2O3 nanofluids have quite good shelf stability and can be good candidates for industrial applications.

  • 10.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Experimental validation of a method for removing the capacitive leakage artifact from electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Often when performing electrical bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy measurements, the obtained EBI data present a hook-like deviation, which is most noticeable at high frequencies in the impedance plane. The deviation is due to a capacitive leakage effect caused by the presence of stray capacitances. In addition to the data deviation being remarkably noticeable at high frequencies in the phase and the reactance spectra, the measured EBI is also altered in the resistance and the modulus. If this EBI data deviation is not properly removed, it interferes with subsequent data analysis processes, especially with Cole model-based analyses. In other words, to perform any accurate analysis of the EBI spectroscopy data, the hook deviation must be properly removed. Td compensation is a method used to compensate the hook deviation present in EBI data; it consists of multiplying the obtained spectrum, Z meas (ω), by a complex exponential in the form of exp(–jωTd). Although the method is well known and accepted, Td compensation cannot entirely correct the hook-like deviation; moreover, it lacks solid scientific grounds. In this work, the Td compensation method is revisited, and it is shown that it should not be used to correct the effect of a capacitive leakage; furthermore, a more developed approach for correcting the hook deviation caused by the capacitive leakage is proposed. The method includes a novel correcting expression and a process for selecting the proper values of expressions that are complex and frequency dependent. The correctness of the novel method is validated with the experimental data obtained from measurements from three different EBI applications. The obtained results confirm the sufficiency and feasibility of the correcting method.

  • 11.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Seoane Martínez, Fernando
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Gil-Pita, R.
    Experimental Validation of a Method for Removing the Capacitive Leakage Artifact from Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy Measurements2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 115802-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Often when performing electrical bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy measurements, the obtained EBI data present a hook-like deviation, which is most noticeable at high frequencies in the impedance plane. The deviation is due to a capacitive leakage effect caused by the presence of stray capacitances. In addition to the data deviation being remarkably noticeable at high frequencies in the phase and the reactance spectra, the measured EBI is also altered in the resistance and the modulus. If this EBI data deviation is not properly removed, it interferes with subsequent data analysis processes, especially with Cole model-based analyses. In other words, to perform any accurate analysis of the EBI spectroscopy data, the hook deviation must be properly removed. Td compensation is a method used to compensate the hook deviation present in EBI data; it consists of multiplying the obtained spectrum, Zmeas(ω), by a complex exponential in the form of exp(–jωTd). Although the method is well known and accepted, Td compensation cannot entirely correct the hook-like deviation; moreover, it lacks solid scientific grounds. In this work, the Td compensation method is revisited, and it is shown that it should not be used to correct the effect of a capacitive leakage; furthermore, a more developed approach for correcting the hook deviation caused by the capacitive leakage is proposed. The method includes a novel correcting expression and a process for selecting the proper values of expressions that are complex and frequency dependent. The correctness of the novel method is validated with the experimental data obtained from measurements from three different EBI applications. The obtained results confirm the sufficiency and feasibility of the correcting method.

  • 12.
    Båvall, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Determination of the thickness of copper coatings on steel by measuring the impedance of a thin elliptic coil2002In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 510-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a thin elliptically shaped coil is placed above a flat plate with a coat of metal, the magnetic fields in the vicinity of the coil is altered by eddy currents in the plate and the coat. The thickness of the coat influences the magnetic field and can be determined by measuring the coil impedance. An electromagnetic model utilizing an elliptic cylinder coordinate system accounting for the coil impedance with different values on the numerical eccentricity and the coating thickness is described. The model is based on a potential formulation of the problem from which the magnetic vector potential and hence the impedance is evaluated. The derivation utilizes a proper choice of the transversal field, giving a scalar Helmholtz equation in which the solution to the boundary value problem is separated. The resulting integral equation is expressed in closed form in terms of Mathieu functions. Numerical calculations and experimental measurements show how the model can be used to model a steel surface with a coat of copper to find expected impedance as function of the coating thickness.

  • 13.
    Båvall, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Capacitive detection of humans for safety in industry: a numerical and experimental investigation1998In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 505-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The detection of humans for their own safety in an industrial environment is vital, especially with increases in the flexibility and velocity of automated working machines. A capacitive detector for the detection of humans in guarded zones has been designed. An electromagnetic model accounting for bodies of different permittivity in the vicinity of the sensor is described. Numerical calculations based on the electromagnetic model have been made and experimental measurements have been taken. An example shows how the electromagnetic model can be used to model the output of the person detector.

  • 14.
    Candefjord, Stefan
    et al.
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Lindahl, Olof
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleå University of Technology.
    Combining fibre optic Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance measurement for tissue characterization2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 125801, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue characterization is fundamental for identification of pathological conditions. Raman spectroscopy (RS) and tactile resonance measurement (TRM) are two promising techniques that measure biochemical content and stiffness, respectively. They have potential to complement the golden standard-–histological analysis. By combining RS and TRM, complementary information about tissue content can be obtained and specific drawbacks can be avoided. The aim of this study was to develop a multivariate approach to compare RS and TRM information. The approach was evaluated on measurements at the same points on porcine abdominal tissue. The measurement points were divided into five groups by multivariate analysis of the RS data. A regression analysis was performed and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the RS and TRM data. TRM identified one group efficiently (area under ROC curve 0.99). The RS data showed that the proportion of saturated fat was high in this group. The regression analysis showed that stiffness was mainly determined by the amount of fat and its composition. We concluded that RS provided additional, important information for tissue identification that was not provided by TRM alone. The results are promising for development of a method combining RS and TRM for intraoperative tissue characterization.

  • 15.
    Candefjord, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Nyberg, Morgan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University. Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Lindahl, Olof
    Combining fibre optic Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance measurement for tissue characterization2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue characterization is fundamental for identification of pathological conditions. Raman spectroscopy (RS) and tactile resonance measurement (TRM) are two promising techniques that measure biochemical content and stiffness, respectively. They have potential to complement the golden standard-–histological analysis. By combining RS and TRM, complementary information about tissue content can be obtained and specific drawbacks can be avoided. The aim of this study was to develop a multivariate approach to compare RS and TRM information. The approach was evaluated on measurements at the same points on porcine abdominal tissue. The measurement points were divided into five groups by multivariate analysis of the RS data. A regression analysis was performed and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the RS and TRM data. TRM identified one group efficiently (area under ROC curve 0.99). The RS data showed that the proportion of saturated fat was high in this group. The regression analysis showed that stiffness was mainly determined by the amount of fat and its composition. We concluded that RS provided additional, important information for tissue identification that was not provided by TRM alone. The results are promising for development of a method combining RS and TRM for intraoperative tissue characterization.

  • 16.
    Chandran, Praneeth
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Rantatalo, Matti
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Odelius, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Lind, Håkan
    Bombardier Transportation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Famurewa, Stephen M.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Train-based differential eddy current sensor system for rail fastener detection2019In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 30, no 12, article id 125105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the crucial components in rail tracks is the rail fastening system, which acts as a means of fixing rails to the sleepers to maintain the track gauge and stability. Manual inspection and 2D visual inspection of fastening systems have predominated over the past two decades. However, both methods have drawbacks when visibility is obscured and are found to be relatively expensive in terms of cost and track possession. The present article presents the concept of a train-based differential eddy current (EC) sensor system for fastener detection. The sensor uses the principle of electromagnetic induction, where an alternating-current-carrying coil is used to create an EC on the rail and other electrically conductive material in the vicinity and a pick-up coil is used to measure the returning field. This paper gives an insight into the theoretical background and application of the proposed differential EC sensor system for the condition monitoring system of rail fasteners and shows experimental results from both laboratory and field measurements. The field measurements were carried out along a heavy-haul railway line in the north of Sweden. Results obtained from both the field measurements and from the lab tests reveal that that the proposed method was able to detect an individual fastening system from a height of 65 mm above the rail. Furthermore, missing clamps within a fastening system are detected by analysing a time domain feature of the measurement signal.

  • 17. Chrysostomou, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Gasteratos, Antonios
    Nalpantidis, Lazaros
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Sirakoulis, Georgios C.
    Multi-view 3D scene reconstruction using ant colony optimization techniques2012In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 114002-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a new method performing high-quality 3D object reconstruction of complex shapes derived from multiple, calibrated photographs of the same scene. The novelty of this research is found in two basic elements, namely: (i) a novel voxel dissimilarity measure, which accommodates the elimination of the lighting variations of the models and (ii) the use of an ant colony approach for further refinement of the final 3D models. The proposed reconstruction procedure employs a volumetric method based on a novel projection test for the production of a visual hull. While the presented algorithm shares certain aspects with the space carving algorithm, it is, nevertheless, first enhanced with the lightness compensating image comparison method, and then refined using ant colony optimization. The algorithm is fast, computationally simple and results in accurate representations of the input scenes. In addition, compared to previous publications, the particular nature of the proposed algorithm allows accurate 3D volumetric measurements under demanding lighting environmental conditions, due to the fact that it can cope with uneven light scenes, resulting from the characteristics of the voxel dissimilarity measure applied. Besides, the intelligent behavior of the ant colony framework provides the opportunity to formulate the process as a combinatorial optimization problem, which can then be solved by means of a colony of cooperating artificial ants, resulting in very promising results. The method is validated with several real datasets, along with qualitative comparisons with other state-of-the-art 3D reconstruction techniques, following the Middlebury benchmark.

  • 18. Corman, Thierry
    et al.
    Enoksson, Peter
    Noren, Kjell
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    A low-pressure encapsulated resonant fluid density sensor with feedback control electronics2000In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a fully low-pressure encapsulated and closed-loop operated resonant fluid density sensor. The device consists of a tube in silicon, which is vibrating in a selected balanced torsion mode. The resonance frequency changes with the density of the fluid in the tube due to the change of the inertial mass of the vibrating system. The sensor is fabricated and encapsulated at wafer level using silicon micromachining techniques. The encapsulation is performed by anodically bonding the silicon densitometer in vacuum between two glass lids with metal electrodes for electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection. The sample volume is only 0.035 mi and the size of the encapsulated device is 14 mm x 23 mm x 1.85 mm. The measurements were performed using a novel excitation and detection technique based on discontinuous, 'burst' excitation. This principle enabled us to eliminate the electrical crosstalk between excitation and detection. The electrodes could be placed on top of the glass lids without using electrical feedthroughs, and a cavity gap of 100 mu m could be formed between the recessed glass lid surface and the silicon tube to reduce squeeze-film damping. The closed-loop 'burst' technology enabled us to make continuous measurements of fluid densities. The sensor showed high density sensitivities of the order of -200 ppm (kg m(-3))(-1), a high mechanical e-factor of 3400 for air in the tube and low temperature sensitivities of -29 ppm degrees C-1 in the range 20-100 degrees C.

  • 19.
    Delsing, Jerker
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Lindgren, Per
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Sensor communication technology towards ambient intelligence2005In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 16, no 4, p. R37-R46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a review of the fascinating development of sensors and the communication of sensor data. A brief historical introduction is given, followed by a discussion on architectures for sensor networks. Further, realistic specifications on sensor devices suitable for ambient intelligence and ubiquitous computing are given. Based on these specifications, the status and current frontline development are discussed. In total, it is shown that future technology for ambient intelligence based on sensor and actuator devices using standardized Internet communication is within the range of possibilities within five years.

  • 20. Dörr, H.
    et al.
    Koturbash, Taras
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. GasQuaL AB, Brinellvägen 68, 114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kutcherov, Vladimir G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Review of impacts of gas qualities with regard to quality determination and energy metering of natural gas2019In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 30, no 2, article id 022001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diversification of gas supply via the liberalization of the gas trade, the discovery of new fossil gas sources, and the increasing use of renewable gases, are favoring pronounced and more frequent fluctuations in gas quality. The knowledge of gas quality is crucial for custody transfer, and safe, efficient and low-emission operation of gas-driven processes. The onsite measurement of gas quality by the operators of gas production facilities, gas grids, gas storage and gas utilization facilities is an emerging requirement. This paper describes several different approaches for determining gas quality by direct, indirect and inferential methods based on the physicochemical properties of gas. Special emphasis is devoted to a discussion on the miniaturization of gas quality sensors and the incorporation of hydrogen detection and measurement into these sensors, due to potential hydrogen admixture to natural gas. In addition, an overview and analysis of the regulatory and normative requirements for gas quality measurements are presented. Furthermore, an overview of gas quality measurement devices and sensors, recent developments as well as challenges and benefits associated with gas quality measurement instrumentation, are provided.

  • 21.
    Ekberg, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Daemi, Bita
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    3D precision measurements of meter sized surfaces using low cost illumination and camera techniques2017In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 28, no 4, article id 045403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using dedicated stereo camera systems and structured light is a well-known method for measuring the 3D shape of large surfaces. However the problem is not trivial when high accuracy, in the range of few tens of microns, is needed. Many error sources need to be handled carefully in order to obtain high quality results. In this study, we present a measurement method based on low-cost camera and illumination solutions combined with high-precision image analysis and a new approach in camera calibration and 3D reconstruction. The setup consists of two ordinary digital cameras and a Gobo projector as a structured light source. A matrix of dots is projected onto the target area. The two cameras capture the images of the projected pattern on the object. The images are processed by advanced subpixel resolution algorithms prior to the application of the 3D reconstruction technique. The strength of the method lays in a different approach for calibration, 3D reconstruction, and high-precision image analysis algorithms. Using a 10 mm pitch pattern of the light dots, the method is capable of reconstructing the 3D shape of surfaces. The precision (1 sigma repeatability) in the measurements is < 10 mu m over a volume of 60 x 50 x 10 cm(3) at a hardware cost of similar to 2% of available advanced measurement techniques. The expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) is estimated to be 83 mu m, with the largest uncertainty contribution coming from the absolute length of the metal ruler used as reference.

  • 22.
    Ekberg, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Traceable X,Y self-calibration at single nm level of an optical microscope used for coherence scanning interferometry2018In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 29, no 3, article id 035005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coherence scanning interferometry used in optical profilers are typically good for Z-calibration at nm-levels, but the X,Y accuracy is often left without further notice than typical resolution limits of the optics, i.e. of the order of similar to 1 mu m. For the calibration of metrology tools we rely on traceable artefacts, e.g. gauge blocks for traditional coordinate measurement machines, and lithographically mask made artefacts for microscope calibrations. In situations where the repeatability and accuracy of the measurement tool is much better than the uncertainty of the traceable artefact, we are bound to specify the uncertainty based on the calibration artefact rather than on the measurement tool. This is a big drawback as the specified uncertainty of a calibrated measurement may shrink the available manufacturing tolerance. To improve the uncertainty in X, Y we can use self-calibration. Then, we do not need to know anything more than that the artefact contains a pattern with some nominal grid. This also gives the opportunity to manufacture the artefact in-house, rather than buying a calibrated and expensive artefact. The self-calibration approach we present here is based on an iteration algorithm, rather than the traditional mathematical inversion, and it leads to much more relaxed constrains on the input measurements. In this paper we show how the X, Y errors, primarily optical distortions, within the field of view (FOV) of an optical coherence scanning interferometry microscope, can be reduced with a large factor. By self-calibration we achieve an X, Y consistency in the 175 x 175 mu m(2) FOV of similar to 2.3 nm (1 sigma) using the 50x objective. Besides the calibrated coordinate X, Y system of the microscope we also receive, as a bonus, the absolute positions of the pattern in the artefact with a combined uncertainty of 6 nm (1s) by relying on a traceable 1D linear measurement of a twin artefact at NIST.

  • 23.
    Ekberg, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics. Micronic Laser Systems, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stiblert, Lars
    Micronic Laser Systems, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    A Large-area ultra-precision 2D geometrical measurement technique based on statistical random phase detection2012In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 23, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing of high-quality chrome masks used in the display industry for the manufacturing of liquid crystals, organic light emission diodes and other display devices would not be possible without high-precision large-area metrology. In contrast to the semiconductor industry where 6' masks are most common, the quartz glass masks for the manufacturing of large area TVs can have sizes of up to 1.6 x 1.8 m(2). Besides the large area, there are demands of sub-micrometer accuracy in 'registration', i.e. absolute dimensional measurements and nanometer requirements for 'overlay', i.e. repeatability. The technique for making such precise measurements on large masks is one of the most challenging tasks in dimensional metrology today. This paper presents a new approach to two-dimensional (2D) ultra-precision measurements based on random sampling. The technique was recently presented for ultra-precise one-dimensional (1D) measurement. The 1D method relies on timing the scanning of a focused laser beam 200 mu m in the Y-direction from an interferometrically determined reference position. This microsweep is controlled by an acousto-optical deflector. By letting the microsweep scan from random X-positions, we can build XY-recordings through a time-to-space conversion that gives very precise maps of the feature edges of the masks. The method differs a lot from ordinary image processing methods using CCD or CMOS sensors for capturing images in the spatial domain. We use events grabbed by a single detector in the time domain in both the X-and Y-directions. After a simple scaling, we get precise and repeatable spatial information. Thanks to the extremely linear microsweep and its precise power control, spatial and intensity distortions, common in ordinary image processing systems using 2D optics and 2D sensors, can be practically eliminated. Our 2D method has proved to give a standard deviation in repeatability of less than 4 nm (1 sigma) in both the X-and Y-directions over an area of approximately 0.8 x 0.8 m(2). Only feature edges are recorded, so all irrelevant information in areas containing constant intensity are filtered out already by the hardware. This relaxes the demands and complexity of the data channel dramatically compared to conventional imaging systems.

  • 24.
    Ekberg, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Stiblert, Lars
    Micronic Laser Systems, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    A new general approach for solving the self-calibration problem on large area 2D ultra-precision coordinate measurement machines2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 055001-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing of flat panel displays requires a number of photomasks for the placement of pixel patterns and supporting transistor arrays. For large area photomasks, dedicated ultra-precision writers have been developed for the production of these chromium patterns on glass or quartz plates. The dimensional tolerances in X and Y for absolute pattern placement on these plates, with areas measured in square meters, are in the range of 200-300 nm (3 sigma). To verify these photomasks, 2D ultra-precision coordinate measurement machines are used having even tighter tolerance requirements. This paper will present how the world standard metrology tool used for verifying large masks, the Micronic Mydata MMS15000, is calibrated without any other references than the wavelength of the interferometers in an extremely well-controlled temperature environment. This process is called self-calibration and is the only way to calibrate the metrology tool, as no square-meter-sized large area 2D traceable artifact is available. The only parameter that cannot be found using self-calibration is the absolute length scale. To make the MMS15000 traceable, a 1D reference rod, calibrated at a national metrology lab, is used. The reference plates used in the calibration of the MMS15000 may have sizes up to 1 m(2) and a weight of 50 kg. Therefore, standard methods for self-calibration on a small scale with exact placements cannot be used in the large area case. A new, more general method had to be developed for the purpose of calibrating the MMS15000. Using this method, it is possible to calibrate the measurement tool down to an uncertainty level of <90 nm (3 sigma) over an area of (0.8 x 0.8) m(2). The method used, which is based on the concept of iteration, does not introduce any more noise than the random noise introduced by the measurements, resulting in the lowest possible noise level that can be achieved by any self-calibration method.

  • 25.
    Ekberg, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Stiblert, Lars
    Micronic Laser Systems, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Ultra-precision geometrical measurement technique based on a statistical random phase clock combined with acoustic-optical deflection2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 125103-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mask writers and large area measurements systems are key systems for production of large liquid crystal displays (LCD) and image devices. With position tolerances in the sub-mu m range over square meter sized masks, the metrology challenges are indeed demanding. Most systems used for this type of measurement rely on a microscope camera imaging system, provided with a charge coupled device, a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor or a time delay and integration sensor to transform the optical image to a digital gray-level image. From this image, processing algorithms are used to extract information such as location of edges. The drawback of this technique is the vast amount of data captured but never used. This paper presents a new approach for ultra-high-precision lateral measurement at nm-levels of chrome/glass patterns separated by centimeters, so called registration marks, on masks used for the LCD manufacturing. Registration specifications demand a positioning accuracy <200 nm and critical dimensions, i.e. chrome line widths, which need to be accurate in the 80 nm range. This accuracy has to be achieved on glass masks of 2.4 x 1.6 m(2) size. Our new measurement method is based on nm-precise lateral scanning of a focused laser beam combined with statistical random phase sampling of the reflected signal. The precise scanning is based on an extremely accurate time measuring device controlling an acousto optic deflector crystal. The method has been successfully applied in measuring the 4 mu m pitch of reference gratings at standard deviations sigma of 0.5 nm and registration marks separated by several cm at standard deviations of 23 nm.

  • 26.
    Ekberg, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Stiblert, Lars
    Micronic Laser Systems, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Z-correction, a method for achieving ultraprecise self-calibration on large area coordinate measurement machines for photomasks2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 055002-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-quality photomasks are a prerequisite for the production of flat panel TVs, tablets and other kinds of high-resolution displays. During the past years, the resolution demand has become more and more accelerated, and today, the high-definition standard HD, 1920 x 1080 pixels(2), is well established, and already the next-generation so-called ultra-high-definition UHD or 4K display is entering the market. Highly advanced mask writers are used to produce the photomasks needed for the production of such displays. The dimensional tolerance in X and Y on absolute pattern placement on these photomasks, with sizes of square meters, has been in the range of 200-300 nm (3 sigma), but is now on the way to be <150 nm (3 sigma). To verify these photomasks, 2D ultra-precision coordinate measurement machines are used with even tighter tolerance requirements. The metrology tool MMS15000 is today the world standard tool used for the verification of large area photomasks. This paper will present a method called Z-correction that has been developed for the purpose of improving the absolute X, Y placement accuracy of features on the photomask in the writing process. However, Z-correction is also a prerequisite for achieving X and Y uncertainty levels <90 nm (3 sigma) in the self-calibration process of the MMS15000 stage area of 1.4 x 1.5 m(2). When talking of uncertainty specifications below 200 nm (3 sigma) of such a large area, the calibration object used, here an 8-16 mmthick quartz plate of size approximately a square meter, cannot be treated as a rigid body. The reason for this is that the absolute shape of the plate will be affected by gravity and will therefore not be the same at different places on the measurement machine stage when it is used in the self-calibration process. This mechanical deformation will stretch or compress the top surface (i.e. the image side) of the plate where the pattern resides, and therefore spatially deform the mask pattern in the X- and Y-directions. Errors due to this deformation can easily be several hundred nanometers. When Z-correction is used in the writer, it is also possible to relax the flatness demand of the photomask backside, leading to reduced manufacturing costs of the plates.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Powell, John
    Kaplan, Alexander
    Signal overlap in the monitoring of laser welding2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser weld monitoring is usually based on the feedback from three photodiodes which are intended to provide independent information about the thermal condition of the melt (the T signal), the radiation from the plume of a heated gas above the melt (the P signal) and the amount of reflected laser light (the R signal). This work demonstrates that, in fact, the plume of the hot gas above the weld pool contributes a large part of the thermal signal, which has hitherto been assumed to come only from the melt itself. It is suggested that the correlation between the T and P signals is so strong that a T-P signal would be more useful than the raw T signal in identifying the fluctuations in infrared radiation from the melt pool

  • 28.
    Ford, C. L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Winroth, Marcus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Development of a pressure based vortex-shedding meter: measuring unsteady mass-flow in variable density gases2016In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 27, no 8, article id 085901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An entirely pressure-based vortex-shedding meter has been designed for use in practical time-dependent flows. The meter is capable of measuring mass-flow rate in variable density gases in spite of the fact that fluid temperature is not directly measured. Unlike other vortex meters, a pressure based meter is incredibly robust and may be used in industrial type flows; an environment wholly unsuitable for hot-wires for example. The meter has been tested in a number of static and dynamic flow cases, across a range of mass-flow rates and pressures. The accuracy of the meter is typically better than about 3% in a static flow and resolves the fluctuating mass-flow with an accuracy that is better than or equivalent to a hot-wire method.

  • 29.
    Forsberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Siviour, Clive R
    University of Oxford.
    3D deformation and strain analysis in compacted sugar using x-ray microtomography and digital volume correlation2009In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 20, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the displacement of granular beds under compaction is important for a range of industrial, geological and civil engineering applications. Such materials exhibit inhomogeneous internal displacements including strain localization, which mean that a method for the in situ evaluation of internal 3D displacement fields at high spatial resolutions would be a major development. This paper presents results from the compaction of a cylindrical bed of sugar, with diameter 7.0 mm and height 8.2 mm, using x-ray microtomography to evaluate the internal structure and digital volume correlation to calculate 3D displacement information from these data. In contrast to previous studies, which generally track a small number of marker particles, the research here uses the natural structure of the sugar to provide a random pattern for 3D image correlation, allowing full-field information to be captured. The results show good agreement when compared with a well-established 2D image correlation technique; moreover, they indicate structural features associated with deformation of granular materials that would not necessarily be observed in a 2D slice.

  • 30.
    Forsberg, Thomas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Grip, Niklas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Sabourova, Natalia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Non-iterative calibration for accelerometers with three non-orthogonal axes, reliable measurement setups and simple supplementary equipment2013In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 24, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The input-output relationship of an accelerometer depends on parameters that are sensitive to temperature and air humidity. High accuracy field measurements therefore require simple in-field estimation of these parameters.We present an extension of a simple non-iterative six-parameter calibration method for triaxial accelerometers with orthogonal input axes to a nine-parameter method that also handles non-orthogonal axes and cross-axis interference.We derive necessary and sufficient conditions on the accelerometer output that guarantee that the nine parameters can be uniquely determined from the calibration measurements in an idealized scenario with no noise or quantization errors. The method is based on measurements of the Earth gravity with the accelerometer placed at rest in at least nine different orientations.The choice of orientations is important for measurement accuracy. We compare two different setups, one called A090-45, which is based on 90 and 45 degree rotations of the accelerometer and one called A0max sep that has maximized smallest angle between any two of the orientations. For the A090-45 setup we have constructed a simple test equipment for quick positionings of the accelerometer. For the A0max sep setup, a similar equipment is more complicated to construct, but equally simple to use.We have done Monte Carlo simulations with accelerometer orientations deviating at most D degrees from the desired A090-45 or A0max sep and with D ranging from 1◦ to 30◦. For real-world noisy environments and D up to 18◦, our simulations showed slightly smaller errors for the A0max sep than for the A090-45 setup. For noise standard deviation typical for our field measurements, the measurement errors after nine-parameter calibration were about 100 times smaller than those for six-parameter calibration both for the A0max sep setup and, as long as D ≤ 13◦ for the A090-45 setup. For the A090-45 setup, however, we found that combinations of large noise levels and/or large D can makesix-parameter calibration the better choice.

  • 31. Forslund, Åke
    et al.
    Belyayev, Serhiy
    Ivchenko, Nickolay V.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Olsson, Göran
    Edberg, Terry
    Miniaturized digital fluxgate magnetometer for small spacecraft applications2008In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel design of an Earth field digital fluxgate magnetometer is presented, the small magnetometer in low-mass experiment (SMILE). The combination of a number of new techniques results in significant miniaturization of both sensor and electronics. The design uses a sensor with volume compensation, combining three dual rod cores in a Macor (R) cube with the side dimension of 20 mm. Use of volume compensation provides high geometrical stability of the axes and improved performance compared to component compensated sensors. The sensor is operated at an excitation frequency of 8 kHz. Most of the instrument functionality is combined in a digital signal processing core, implemented in a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The pick-up signal is digitized after amplification and filtering, and values of compensation currents for each of the axes are determined by a digital correlation algorithm, equivalent to a matched filter, and are fed to a hybrid pulse-width modulation/delta-sigma digital-to-analogue converter driving the currents through the compensation coils. Using digital design makes the instrument very flexible, reduces power consumption and opens possibilities for the customization of the operation modes. The current implementation of the design is based on commercial off-the-shelf components. A calibration of the SMILE instrument was carried out at the Nurmijarvi Geophysical Observatory, showing high linearity (within 6 nT on the whole +/- 50 mu T scale), good orthogonality (22 arcmin) and very good temperature stability of the axes.

  • 32.
    Gamstedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Mechanics.
    Bommier, Florian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Mechanics.
    Madsen, B.
    Estimation of axial stiffness of plant fibres from compaction of non-woven mats2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 035601-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant fibres are known to show a large variability in stiffness, which makes it time-consuming to experimentally characterize this property by conventional tensile testing. In this work, an alternative method is used, where the average fibre stiffness is back-calculated from compaction tests of in-plane randomly oriented fibre mats. The model by Toll is used to relate the load-displacement curve from the test to the Young modulus of the fibre, taking into account the natural variability in fibre cross section. Several tests have been performed on hemp fibre mats and compared with results from single-fibre tensile testing. The average back-calculated Young's modulus of the fibres was 45 GPa, whereas the average value from tensile testing ranged from 30 to 60 GPa. The straightforward compaction test can be useful in ranking of fibre stiffness, provided that the mat is composed of well-separated fibres and not of twisted yarns.

  • 33. Gren, P.
    et al.
    Tatar, K.
    Granström, J.
    Molin, N. E.
    Jansson, Erik V.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Laser vibrometry measurements of vibration and sound fields of a bowed violin2006In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 635-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser vibrometry measurements on a bowed violin are performed. A rotating disc apparatus, acting as a violin bow, is developed. It produces a continuous, long, repeatable, multi-frequency sound from the instrument that imitates the real bow-string interaction for a 'very long bow'. What mainly differs is that the back and forward motion of the real bow is replaced by the rotating motion with constant velocity of the disc and constant bowing force (bowing pressure). This procedure is repeatable. It is long lasting and allows laser vibrometry techniques to be used, which measure forced vibrations by bowing at all excited frequencies simultaneously. A chain of interacting parts of the played violin is studied: the string, the bridge and the plates as well as the emitted sound field. A description of the mechanics and the sound production of the bowed violin is given, i.e. the production chain from the bowed string to the produced tone.

  • 34.
    Gren, Per
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Tatar, Kourosh
    Granström, Jan
    Molin, Nils-Erik
    Jansson, E.V.
    Department of Speech, Music and Hearing, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Laser vibrometry measurements of vibration and sound fields of a bowed violin2006In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 635-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser vibrometry measurements on a bowed violin are performed. A rotating disc apparatus, acting as a violin bow, is developed. It produces a continuous, long, repeatable, multi-frequency sound from the instrument that imitates the real bow-string interaction for a 'very long bow'. What mainly differs is that the back and forward motion of the real bow is replaced by the rotating motion with constant velocity of the disc and constant bowing force (bowing pressure). This procedure is repeatable. It is long lasting and allows laser vibrometry techniques to be used, which measure forced vibrations by bowing at all excited frequencies simultaneously. A chain of interacting parts of the played violin is studied: the string, the bridge and the plates as well as the emitted sound field. A description of the mechanics and the sound production of the bowed violin is given, i.e. the production chain from the bowed string to the produced tone

  • 35.
    Grip, Niklas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Sabourova, Natalia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Simple non-iterative calibration for triaxial accelerometers2011In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 22, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For high precision measurements, accelerometers need recalibration between different measurement occasions. In this paper we derive a simple calibration method for triaxial accelerometers with orthogonal axes. Just like previously proposed iterative methods, we compute the calibration parameters (biases and gains) from measurements of the Earth gravity for six different unknown orientations of the accelerometer. However, our method is non-iterative, so there are no complicated convergence issues depending on input parameters, round-off errors etc.The main advantages of our method are that only from the accelerometer output voltages it gives a complete knowledge of whether it is possible, with any method, to recover the accelerometer biases and gains from the output voltages, and when this is possible, we have a simple explicit formula for computing them with a smaller number of arithmetic operations than previous iterative approaches. Moreover, we show that such successful recovery is guaranteed if the six calibration measurements deviate with angles smaller than some upper bound from a natural setup with two horizontal axes. We provide an estimate from below of this upper bound that, for instance, allows 5 degree deviations in arbitrary directions for the Colibrys SF3000L accelerometers in our lab.

  • 36.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    Chalmers.
    Emissivity compensated spectral pyrometry for varying emissivity metallic measurands2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 025010-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel method for converting electromagnetic spectral radiance information into emperature measurements is presented. It allows for varying spectral emissivity of the metallic measurand during the course of the measurement. Such variations are due to e.g. thermal oxidation or temperature dependent emissivity. Based on the assumption that emissivity changes with time and temperature in a continuous manner, it is further assumed that an emissivity estimate at one sample instance can be derived from the estimated emissivity found at the previous samples together with updated spectral information. This leads to successive recalculations of spectral emissivity together with corresponding temperature values. The proposed algorithm has been proven to give accurate temperature estimates from a measurement based on data captured by a standard UV-Vis spectrophotometer even for an oxidizing Ti-6Al-4V specimen in a temperature range between 900K and 1400K. The method however, is not limited to these wavelength- or temperature-ranges.

  • 37.
    Hagqvist, Petter
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    Chalmers.
    Emissivity compensated spectral pyrometry-algorithm and sensitivity analysis2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 025011-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to solve the problem of non-contact temperature measurements on an object with varying emissivity, a new method is herein described and evaluated. The method uses spectral radiance measurements and converts them to temperature readings. It proves to be resilient towards changes in spectral emissivity and tolerates noisy spectral measurements. It is based on an assumption of continuous changes in emissivity and uses historical values of spectral emissivity and temperature for estimating current spectral emissivity.

    The algorithm, its constituent steps and accompanying parameters are described and discussed. A thorough sensitivity analysis of the method is carried out through simulations. No rigorous instrument calibration is needed for the presented method and is therefore industrially tractable.

  • 38.
    Haloua, Frederique
    et al.
    LNE Laboratoire national de métrologie et d'essais, France.
    Bacquart, Thomas
    NPL National Physical Laboratory, UK.
    Arrhenius, Karine
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Delobelle, Benoit
    MAHYTEC, France.
    Ent, Hugo
    VSL Van Swinden Laboratorium, The Netherlands.
    Metrology for hydrogen energy applications: a project to address normative requirements2018In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 29, no 3, article id Special Section on the 18th International Congress of Metrology (CIM 2017)Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen represents a clean and storable energy solution that could meet worldwide energy demands and reduce greenhouse gases emission. The joint research project (JRP) ‘Metrology for sustainable hydrogen energy applications’ addresses standardisation needs through pre- and co-normative metrology research in the fast emerging sector of hydrogen fuel that meet the requirements of the European Directive 2014/94/EU by supplementing the revision of two ISO standards that are currently too generic to enable a sustainable implementation of hydrogen. The hydrogen purity dispensed at refueling points should comply with the technical specifications of ISO 14687-2 for fuel cell electric vehicles. The rapid progress of fuel cell technology now requires revising this standard towards less constraining limits for the 13 gaseous impurities. In parallel, optimized validated analytical methods are proposed to reduce the number of analyses. The study aims also at developing and validating traceable methods to assess accurately the hydrogen mass absorbed and stored in metal hydride tanks; this is a research axis for the revision of the ISO 16111 standard to develop this safe storage technique for hydrogen. The probability of hydrogen impurity presence affecting fuel cells and analytical techniques for traceable measurements of hydrogen impurities will be assessed and new data of maximum concentrations of impurities based on degradation studies will be proposed. Novel validated methods for measuring the hydrogen mass absorbed in hydrides tanks AB, AB2 and AB5 types referenced to ISO 16111 will be determined, as the methods currently available do not provide accurate results. The outputs here will have a direct impact on the standardisation works for ISO 16111 and ISO 14687-2 revisions in the relevant working groups of ISO/TC 197 ‘Hydrogen technologies’.

  • 39.
    Hedlund, E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics.
    Pendrill, L. R.
    Addendum to ‘Improved determination of the gas flow rate for UHV and leak metrology with laser refractometry’2007In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 3661-3663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clarification is provided for certain expressions quoted in Hedlund and Pendrill (2006 Meas. Sci. Technol. 17 2767-72).

  • 40.
    Hedlund, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics.
    Pendrill, L. R.
    Improved determination of the gas flow rate for UHV and leak metrology with laser refractometry2006In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 17, no 10, p. 2767-2772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A system often used for vacuum metrology purposes in order to calibrate vacuum gauges in the UHV region and to calibrate gas leak rates is the throughput system, employing the continuous ( or dynamic) expansion method. An important component in such systems is the flowmeter, which has to deliver a pure and well-determined gas flow into the system. To determine the generated gas flow, a number of factors including the pressure inside the flowmeter have to be determined. However, it has turned out that the calibration uncertainty when measuring the pressure in the flowmeter gives a main contribution to the total uncertainty (of typically about 0.1%) for the generated flow, thereby limiting the accuracies of the generated vacuum pressure as well as gas leak rates in UHV metrology. A feasibility study is reported in this paper about the possibility of using laser refractometry to monitor dynamic gas density in situ in the flowmeter, as an alternative and possibly more accurate means of determining the generated gas flow, thereby potentially improving the calibration gas leak rates in the range 10(-8) - 10(-4) Pa m(3) s(-1).

  • 41.
    Hessling, Peter
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Mätteknik, Kommunikation.
    Propagation of dynamic measurement uncertainty2011In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 105105-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Holmin, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Krantz-Rülcher, Christina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Drift correction of electronic tongue responses2001In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1348-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, drift correction algorithms were used in order to remove linear drift in multivariate spaces of two data sets obtained by an electronic tongue based on voltammetry. The electronic tongue consisted of various metal electrodes (Au, Ir, Pt, Rh) combined with pattern recognition tools, such as principal component analysis. The first data set contained different types of liquid, from well defined to more complex solutions. The second data set contained different black and green teas. Component correction (CC) was compared to a simple additive correction. In CC, the drift direction of measured reference solutions in a multivariate space was subtracted from other types of solution. In additive correction, responses from reference samples were subtracted from other samples. CC showed similar or better performance in reducing drift compared to additive correction for the two data sets. The additive correction method was dependent on the fact that the differences in between samples of a reference solution were similar to the changes in between samples of other liquids, which was not the case with CC.

  • 43.
    Huntley, J.M.
    et al.
    Loughborough University.
    Saldner, Henrik O.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Shape measurement by temporal phase unwrapping: comparison of unwrapping algorithms1997In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 8, p. 986-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Projected fringes can be used to measure surface profiles unambiguously, even in the presence of surface discontinuities, if the fringe pitch is changed over time. We investigate by numerical, analytical and experimental means the reliability of two recently proposed algorithms for unwrapping the resulting phase histories. The first, which unwraps through a sequence of phase maps produced with a linear change in spatial frequency with time, is found to be superior to the second, which uses only the first and last maps in the sequence. A new method is proposed in which the spatial frequency is changed exponentially with time. It is shown to be significantly more robust than either of the other algorithms under most conditions...

  • 44. Hägglund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Carlson, Johan E.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Andersson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Ultrasonic classification of thin layers within multi-layered structures2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods for non-destructive inspection of layered materials are becoming more and more popular as a way of assuring product integrity and quality. In this paper, we present a model-based technique using ultrasonic measurements for classification of thin bonding layers within three-layered materials. This could be, for example, an adhesive bond between two thin plates, where the integrity of the bonding layer needs to be evaluated. The method is based on a model of the wave propagation of pulse-echo ultrasound that first reduces the measured data to a few parameters for each measured point. The model parameters are then fed into a statistical classifier that assigns the bonding layer to one of a set of predefined classes. In this paper, two glass plates are bonded together with construction silicone, and the classifiers are trained to determine if the bonding layer is intact or if it contains regions of air or water. Two different classification methods are evaluated: nominal logistic regression and discriminant analysis. The former is slightly more computationally demanding but, as the results show, it performs better when the model parameters cannot be assumed to belong to a multivariate Gaussian distribution. The performance of the classifiers is evaluated using both simulations and real measurements.

  • 45.
    Jalkanen, Ville
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurements: a theoretical and experimental analysis2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 055801, p. 8pp-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A piezoelectric transducer in a feedback circuit operating in a resonance state is the basis of a resonance sensor. Upon contact with a soft object a change in the resonance frequency reflects the acoustic impedance. Together with force measurement it is possible to obtain the elastic stiffness of the object. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurement. A time derivative analysis of the force and the frequency change showed that a stiffness-sensitive parameter was independent of the impression speed. Soft tissue phantoms of gelatin were used in an experimental validation of the theory. A force indentation method was used as a reference method for assessing the gelatin's elastic stiffness. Results from the hand-held measurements showed that the stiffness parameter accurately measured the elastic stiffness of the gelatin (R2 = 0.94, p < 0.05). The stiffness parameter was weakly (on average R2 = 0.15) and non-significantly (p > 0.05, 14 out of 17) dependent on an impression speed parameter. On average, a small amount of the total variance was explained by the impression speed. In conclusion, soft tissue stiffness can be objectively measured with free-hand measurement with a resonance sensor. This study contributes a theoretical analysis and an experimental demonstration of the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for stiffness measurements.

  • 46.
    Jansson, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Nafari, Alexandra
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hedfalk, Kristina
    Göteborgs Universiet.
    Olsson, Eva
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Svensson, Krister
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Sanz-Velasco, Anke
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Monitoring the osmotic response of single yeast cells through force measurements in the environmental scanning electron microscope2014In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 25, article id 025901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a measurement system that combines an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and an atomic force microscope (AFM). This combination enables studies of static and dynamic mechanical properties of hydrated specimens, such as individual living cells. The integrated AFM sensor provides direct and continuous force measurement based on piezoresistive force transduction, allowing the recording of events in the millisecond range. The in situ ESEM-AFM setup was used to study Pichia pastoris wild-type yeast cells. For the first time, a quantified measure of the osmotic response of an individual yeast cell inside an ESEM is presented. With this technique, cell size changes due to humidity variations can be monitored with nanometre accuracy. In addition, mechanical properties were extracted from load–displacement curves. A Young's modulus of 13–15 MPa was obtained for the Ppastoris yeast cells. The developed method is highly interesting as a complementary tool for the screening of drugs directed towards cellular water transport activity and provides new possibilities of studying mechanosensitive regulation of aquaporins.

  • 47.
    Jansson, Anton
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Non-linear dual-energy method development and evaluation for industrial computed tomography2019In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 30, no 6, article id 065006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial computed tomography of multi-material objects can be problematic due to difficulties in optimising the x-ray spectra of the scan. A possible solution to the problem is to use two x-ray spectra when scanning objects. The results from such scans can be fused into a single data-set that contains enhanced information. This practice is known as dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). In this work, the aim was to investigate two DECT methods ability to improve measurements in multi-material phantoms. To determine the performance of the methods three different phantoms containing precision spheres as measurement objects were investigated. To improve measurements in this work was defined as improving the measurement consistency of diameter measurements. The phantoms were also scanned with a single setting for comparison. The fusion of the data-sets was done using two methods, a linear fusion, and a novel non-linear fusion. Both of the methods relies on pre-reconstruction fusion of data-sets. The results show that both of the DECT methods improved measurement results significantly compared to the reference method. Further, the results show that the novel non-linear DECT method produces more accurate measurement results compared to the linear method.

  • 48.
    Jansson, Anton
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pejryd, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A dual-energy approach for improvement of the measurement consistency in computed tomography2016In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 27, no 11, article id 115013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computed tomography is increasingly adopted by industries for metrological and material evaluation. The technology enables new measurement possibilities, while also challenging old measurement methods in their established territories. There are, however, uncertainties related with the computed tomography method. Investigation of multi-material components with, in particular, varying material thickness can result in unreliable measurements. In this paper the effects of multi-materials, and differing material thickness, on computed tomography measurement consistency has been studied. The aim of the study was to identify measurement inconsistencies and attempt to correct these with a dual-energy computed tomography approach. In this pursuit, a multi-material phantom was developed, containing reliable measurement points and custom-ability with regards to material combinations. A dual-energy method was developed and implemented using sequential acquisition and pre-reconstruction fusing of projections. It was found that measurements made on the multi-material phantom with a single computed tomography scan were highly inconsistent. It was also found that the dual-energy approach was able to reduce the measurement inconsistencies. However, more work is required with the automation of the dual-energy approach presented in this paper since it is highly operator dependant.

  • 49.
    Johansen, Knut
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Stalberg, R.
    Stålberg, R., Høgskolen i Telemark, Hallvard Eikas plass, 3800 Bø, Norway.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Surface plasmon resonance: Instrumental resolution using photo diode arrays2000In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 1630-1638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors are used to study biomolecular interactions. We have performed a theoretical analysis of a SPR instrument using a convergent beam, a linear detector with various numbers of pixels and various analogue-to-digital converters (ADCs) with a corresponding resolution ranging from 8 to 16 bits. Studies of small molecules at low concentrations or with low affinities are limited by the instrumental set-up, e.g. by the resolution, linearity and noise. The amplitudes of these parameters are highly dependent on the detector, ADC and dip-finding algorithm used. We have studied several dip-finding algorithms, e.g. intensity measurements, second- and third-order polynomial fits and centroid algorithms. Each algorithm used with the ADC and the detector has a resolution associated with it. Some algorithms also have an intrinsic algorithm error that is dependent on the number of pixels and the shape of the dip. A weighted centroid algorithm that has an excellent overall performance is described. If an accuracy of 10-6 refractive index units (RIU) is satisfactory, a 12-bit ADC and a 64-pixel detector are appropriate. Theoretically, by using a 16-bit ADC and a 1024-pixel detector, a resolution of better than 10-9 RIU is obtainable.

  • 50.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Andersson, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Physics.
    Investigations of the low and high frequency response of 3w-sensors used in dynamic heat capacity measurements1998In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, no 9, p. 1873-Article in journal (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 108
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