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  • 1.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    Stockholms universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Emotional Participation: the use of the observer’s emotions as a methodological tool when studying professional stage actors rehearsing a role for the stage2009In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 21, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution aims to identify and clarify emotional aspects of conducting observation studies. The researcher, in most cases, does not want to interfere with or influence the phenomenon under observation, but uses her/himself as a tool to collect material. Even if the observer does not participate verbally, s/he can be emotionally participative using her/his emotions as a methodological tool, generating reflections and insights relative to the situations and persons that are the object of observation. Earlier contributions from social anthropology and psychotherapy are discussed and compared to examples from observations on the rehearsals of two theatre productions. One crucial point is that the researcher’s emotions can be more or less congruent with the situation at hand; a match as well as a mis-match can be used as information in the research process. Furthermore, the emotional expressions displayed by professional actors can be more or less emotionally anchored within them. Do the observer’s feelings correlate with the research subjects’ felt emotions or their portrayed emotions? Reflections on these issues can be used in interviews with research subjects to attain a more nuanced and tangible interpretation of the studied phenomenon.

  • 2.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Emotional Participation: the use of the observer’s emotions as a methodological tool when studying professional stage actors rehearsing a role for the stage2009In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 21, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution aims to identify and clarify emotional aspects of conducting observation studies. The researcher, in most cases, does not want to interfere with or influence the phenomenon under observation, but uses her/himself as a tool to collect material. Even if the observer does not participate verbally, s/he can be emotionally participative using her/his emotions as a methodological tool, generating reflections and insights relative to the situations and persons that are the object of observation. Earlier contributions from social anthropology and psychotherapy are discussed and compared to examples from observations on the rehearsals of two theatre productions. One crucial point is that the researcher’s emotions can be more or less congruent with the situation at hand; a match as well as a mis-match can be used as information in the research process. Furthermore, the emotional expressions displayed by professional actors can be more or less emotionally anchored within them. Do the observer’s feelings correlate with the research subjects’ felt emotions or their portrayed emotions? Reflections on these issues can be used in interviews with research subjects to attain a more nuanced and tangible interpretation of the studied phenomenon.

  • 3.
    Bork Petersen, Franziska
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies, Musicology and Performance Studies. Free University of Berlin, Germany.
    On Multiple Appearances: An Analysis of the Performing Body in Kitt Johnson's Drift2012In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 24, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On Multiple Appearances: An Analysis of the Performing Body in Kitt Johnson's Drift In the article, I challenge the prevalent use of phenomenology in dance scholarship, which focusses on the dancer's experience of her body when dancing. This approach often implies the problematic assumption that the dancer's experience is immediately transferred to the spectators who, in turn, are universally 'moved' by her dancing body. Instead of acknowledging that dance is a product of historically and culturally specific circumstances, such an analytical perspective ultimately tends to mystify dance. In this article I propose a different use of analytical tools in dance scholarship: I employ phenomenological reduction and epoche to focus on how dancing bodies appear in a stage context. To test the ability of these tools to explore dancing bodies from a third-person perspective, I analyze Danish choreographer Kitt Johnson's solo performance Drift (2011), focussing on her variable physical appearance. While phenomenology helps me to describe the multiple and radically different guises Johnson assumes in her piece, my analysis does not, ultimately, aim to distil a truer, more real being from her appearances, as is often the case in phenomenological analyses. Instead, I complement my analytical approach with the Deleuzian notion of becoming animal, suggesting that Johnson stages what, in Judith Butler's terms, could be called a critical contingency of bodily appearance.

  • 4.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Emotional Tropes in the Courtroom: On Representation of Affect and Emotion in Legal Court Proceedings2009In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 21, p. 129-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotional Tropes in the Courtroom: On Representation of Affect and Emotion in Legal Court Proceedings The modern legal courtroom is a peculiar place. Like the theatre it is a space open for many kinds of drama, verbal re-enactments of events and forced resolutions of human conflicts. There are often strong emotions at play in the courtroom: desire and love, jealousy and anger, but also sadness and remorse, fear and suffering. These emotions are controlled and tempered by the physical design of the courtroom, by legal procedure and the rule-bound rationality of law, but also by the serious attitude of the judge(s) and lay judges. Although in legal proceedings the parties are restrained from giving voice to emotions, in reality feelings and affects show through: in glances, timber of voice, flushes, crying, laughter and smell of sweat. The expressions of emotion and affect may be involuntary or staged, but in either case they are very much part of what is said and done in the courtroom. However, in the legal representation of court proceedings in the transcripts and the rulings these human emotions and affects become invisible, the emotions have been filtered away or have sunk to the bottom of legal space. In my essay I explore the peculiar emotive social space constructed and enacted in the courtroom, in particular the ambiguous attitude towards human emotions in law: on the one hand as disturbing and dangerous, and on the other as the true basis of human character and social conflict. The study is based on an ethnographic study of the lower level court in Stockholm (Stockholms tingsreitt). The study is part of a larger study on "Legal Spaces. The construction and representation of legal spaces in law, literature and political philosophy."

  • 5.
    Enström, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Orienting Towards the Phenomenal Woman: Presenting Mia Skaringer in Her Stage Show Horny as Hell and Really Holy2012In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 24, p. 34-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orienting Towards the Phenomenal Woman: Presenting Mia Skaringer in Her Stage Show Horny as Hell and Really Holy The article presents the Swedish comedian Mia Skaringer and analyzes her one-woman stage show Horny as Hell and Really Holy from 2010. The analysis combines feminist scholar Sara Ahmed's theory of emotion with Simone de Beauvoir's theory of the situated body, but is also influenced by one of the early theatre phenomenologists, Bert O. States, who combined phenomenology and semiotics in a 'binocular vision'. The article scrutinizes the way Skaringer narrates her personal story in the performance, employing such concepts as personal genealogy and intermedial bricolage. Above all, it addresses Skaringer's ironical treatment of the hardships of being and becoming a woman, which Simone de Beauvoir problematized back in 1949 when she declared that woman is the 'second sex'. Drawing on Ahmed's theories of stickiness and circulating objects of emotion, the article investigates how Skaringer uses her situated body in the performance.

  • 6.
    Ernst, Manilla
    et al.
    Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Centre for the study of children's culture.
    Sauter, Willmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Antigone’s diary – Young Audiences as Co-creators of GPS-guided Radio Drama2015In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 32-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The play, Antigone’s Diary, is a re-written version of Sophocles’ classical play, developed with teenage schoolchildren in the riot-ridden suburb Husby, a 30-minute subway ride away from the centre of Stockholm. Rebecca Forsberg of RATS Theatre adapted the plot into an interactive radio performance with a mobile audience, walking through the suburb and responding via text messages to Antigone’s questions after each of the twelve scenes. Young audiences were of especial interest for this project. Therefore, school performances for teenagers are the focus of this survey. The responses of pupils were studied during and after performances by means of observations, qualitative interviews and quantitative analysis of the text messages that the participants sent in response to Antigone’s questions. The seriousness and enthusiasm of young audiences were one of the stunning outcomes of this survey and a number of quotations illustrate the immersive power of this production. Furthermore, this experiment also served as a text bed for the Department of Computer and System Science, to which Rats Theatre is closely tied. The multimedia performance, combining radio drama, mobile audiences in a local environment and the options of interactive participation, demonstrated the potential of participatory experiences to engage audiences in democratic processes that can be applied to issues of political interest and decision making in the public sphere.

  • 7.
    Gindt, Dirk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Fashion Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies, Musicology and Performance Studies.
    Anxious Nation and White Fashion: Suddenly Last Summer in the Swedish folkhem2009In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 98-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how Tennessee Williams’ play Suddenly Last Summer, as staged in Sweden in 1959, communicated sexual and racial anxieties. It aims to tease out the importance of fashion for the articulation of the closet and the expression of the simultaneous absence and presence of the queer subject in the play. Looking at the omnipresent use of whiteness of certain key costumes, the essay further proposes the concept of white Gothic fashion and argues that this assumed a whole new meaning when staged in a social and historical context that was not only characterized by institutionalized homophobia, but also promoted white hegemony and the control of women’s bodies. Placing particular emphasis on the socio-historical context of Sweden in the 1950s, the article demonstrates how performance studies and fashion theory can engage in a critical cultural analysis and help us understand national emotions, concerns and anxieties.

  • 8.
    Hammergren, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Embodied Spectatorship? Interpreting dance reviews around 19002017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 8-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article intertwines historiographical analyses with research methods focusing on embodied responses to performances. It argues that dance reviews can be interpreted from a sensorial viewpoint, analyzing ways in which language articulates so-called kinaesthetic, or affective responses. The argument is based on theories of agency and embodiment (Noland). Swedish reviews from performances by Isadora Duncan (Stockholm, 1906), Artemis Colonna (Stockholm, 1903), and Loïe Fuller (Gothenburg, 1907) are investigated, and it is concluded that these kinaesthetic sensations are visible mainly in the language of female writers and spectators. Moreover, in arguing that an embodied spectatorship is important in order to understand the view of the period as a turning point in dance aesthetics, an emphasis is put on the importance of including the practice of dancing by both professionals and amateurs in this historical narrative. Besides embracing the emergence of the professional dance avant-garde, the interpretation focuses on the importance of a corporeal education of the audience. In particular, female audience members seem to, via a dance performance, identify with forms of sensory experience in tandem with visually evaluated objects of art. It is argued that the change in the female viewers’ perceptions had a potential political effect in that it gave voice to both corporeal sensations and women’s experiences in ways new to the public arena. Thus, it is in these experiences the important turning point in dance history emerges, rather than merely in the performances themselves.

  • 9.
    Hoogland, Rikard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies, Department for Musicology and Performance Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies.
    Introduction: Theatrical Emotions2009In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 21, p. 5-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hoogland, Rikard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    The Valuation of Popular Theatre Performances: The Forgotten Success Story of Ljungby horn2017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 6-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Albert Ranft started as an actor in touring theatre companies in the 1880’s, but soon became responsible for one of the most important groups. Twenty-five years later, he ran a big company with about 2500 employees, owned theatres in Stockholm and Gothen­burg as well as a couple of touring companies.

    His repertoire was based on popular entertainment plays, revues, operettas, historical plays, contemporary dramas etc. Simultaneously, his companies could offer ‘highbrow’ and ‘lowbrow’ productions. Even the actors could, during just one week, work in differ­ent genres. The way of programing was for Ranft an art form by itself, and sometimes he even acted in and directed the plays.

    In November 1893, at Stora Teatern in Gothenburg, he premiered a fairy tale play, and the staging was filled with spectacular effects. The play was, from the beginning, a stun­ning success with the production running for several hundred nights. Moreover, the pro­duction of Ljungby Hornbecame the ground stone for Ranft’s theatrical enterprise.

    The article describes how this success was established through mediatization and its base on rural oral history. The performance is analyzed and discussed as a popular theatre production (McConachie, Price, Röttger, Schecter). The author proposes that a more inclusive definition of popular theatre should be used; one which also takes into account the productions that had commercial success. Popular theatre needs to be in­cluded in theatre history writing to enable a better understanding of how the theatre system has developed.

  • 11.
    Hoogland, Rikard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    What Do Theatre Autobiographies Conceal?2017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 64-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autobiographies by actors and directors are considered to be somewhat of an unreliable source of information where research on theatre history is concerned. Researchers have made a great deal of effort to validate facts in autobiographies, but then have often neglected other forms of information that the written source gives. In this article, four different autobiographies are analysed with a specific focus on autobiographical strategies (Gardner), the embodied act of writing (Schneider), Hegemonic processes in society (Bratton), and audiences (Singleton). The article discusses if it is possible to place autobiographies in both the repertoire and the archive in Taylor’s sense, and if they can be seen as a possible link between them.

  • 12.
    Kristoffersson, Eleonor
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Comparative studies of national law in the EU harmonized VAT2016In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    BEYOND THE GAZE TRANSLATIONS AS A NORM-CRITICAL PRAXIS IN THEATRE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH2016In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 94-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on the project Experimental theatre: Intersectional encounters between dramatic art, school and academia, financed by the Swedish Research Council. It is an action research project on interactive dramatic art based at ung scen/ost (Ostgotateatern), an experimental theatre group for children and young people. Malin Axelsson is the groups artistic director. Project manager Anna Lundberg has a background in drama studies and gender studies. The troika of dramatic art-school academia provides an empirical focus, coupled with a closer analysis of the artistic processes between children and adults based on productions by ung scen/ost. What happens with the staging when the method involves open collaboration and shared learning? How is knowledge and meaning negotiated in artistic endeavors? The project includes two performances and a publication. The project received financial support from the Swedish Research Council for the period 2012-2013. This article focuses on translation practices at ung scen/ost, the creative processes within the project built by the group as a form, i.e. director, ensemble (actors), researcher and other members of the artistic team exploring ideas and expressions and creating theatre together.

  • 14.
    Mattsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Editor’s Introduction: Turning Points and Continuity: Reformulating questions to the archives2017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Näslund, Lovisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The Employment Contract as Materialization of Social Order Contracts at Albert Ranft's Stockholm theatres, 1895-19262017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 81-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the archive, the materialized traces of theatrical organization and performances remain. In this paper, we focus on the employment contract, as a type of source material commonly found but rarely studied in theatre studies. Empirically, the paper is based on a study of contracts from Albert Ranft's Stockholm theatres, 1895-1926. Ranft built his commercially funded theatrical empire in Stockholm in a period when the competition from subsidized theatre was minimal, and for a time dominated the Stockholm theatres. The study demonstrates how the study of employment contracts allows us to form an understanding of power relations between managers on the one hand, and artists and directors on the other, and also the formal and social aspects of the employment contracts. In the case of Albert Ranft, the contracts bear evidence of his dominant position in Stockholm theatre, which in turn afforded him an unusually powerful position in relation to his employees. The relationship between the formal and social contract is explored, and it is suggested that the formal contract could be seen as a photographic negative of the social contract: if there is an extensive social contract, the formal contract will be more elaborate, and vice versa. The extensive formal contracts of the studied period might therefore be seen as evidence of a relatively thin social contract, implying that industry norms were, at the time, not institutionalized enough to be taken for granted.

  • 16.
    Ohlsson, Hélène
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Representing Pariah Femininity: Sexuality, gender, and class at the fin-de-siècle2017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 44-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the representation of an actress’s sexuality, femininity, and class at the fin-de-siècle with an emphasis on pariah femininity. The central empirical sources for this study are the correspondence between King Oscar II (1829-1907) and Baroness Henriette Coyet (1859-1941) about the famous actress Ellen Hartman (1860-1945). Tracy C. Davis’s feminist historiographical methodology is put to use in the analysis in combination with Mimi Shipper’s notion pariah femininity. The analysis of the correspondence shows how the actress Ellen Hartman’s femininity was discursively constructed as pariah femininity embodying asexuality, excessive sexuality, and of a degenerate moral. It is argued that Hartman’s specific kind of pariah femininity is based on a perceived threat triggered by her public profession, sexual history and social ambition. Her body was sexualized, her sexuality demonized, and her appearance downgraded to defuse the threatening presence of her profession, femininity, and class. The historical sources also show a change of attitudes toward intersections of femininities and class.

  • 17.
    Rosenberg, Tiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Teatervetenskapliga institutionen. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Center for Gender Studies.
    You Can See It Now: Wrapped Reichstag as Performance1996In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 49-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Sauter, Willmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Deconstructing Turning Points A postscript on the canonization of the avant-garde 19002017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 162-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deconstructing Turning Points is an attempt to understand why and how the period around the turn of the nineteenth century has been described as a breakthrough of modern theatre. Texts by Gösta M. Bergman, Christopher Innes and Erika Fischer-Lichte about this period are examined in order to see how these authors construct periodization. Leaning towards Thomas Postlewait's concept of periods and Jacques Derrida's deconstructive approach to discourse, the article points out some paradigmatic assumptions in the discussed texts. The three authors are not compared - writing in different languages and for different purposes - but some of the underlying paradigms become visible, namely their relation to historical development and their view of theatre as the work of the director. As an alternative, the article turns to archival possibilities. New concepts of what an archive is and can do, as Derrida sees them, open up for a living and challenging relation to archival sources, not just as evidence of prefabricated hypotheses, but as inspiring traces of the past.

  • 19.
    Sauter, Willmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies, Musicology and Performance Studies.
    Interference between Present and Absent Performers: Time-Specific Performance as Phenomenal Experience2012In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 24, p. 76-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interference between Present and Absent Performers: Time-Specific Performance as Phenomenal Experience The performance of the play Lise & Otto employed digital technology in an innovative and surprising way. Two performers presented their characters in two locations that were connected by fibre optic cables. The audiences, situated in two suburbs in Stockholm, saw either the actress or the actor live in front of them, while the other performer's image and voice were transmitted digitally. The simultaneous actions emphasized a cleavage of space - symbolic in a play about atomic fission - and created a yearning for the absent performer. This phenomenon can be described as time-specific performance, analogous to site-specific performance, while at the same time questioning the paradigm of presence as as a condition of theatrical events. The article argues for an extension of the theoretical concepts of theatre studies in order to cope with contemporary technological innovations, time-specificity, and unexpected theatrical experiences.

  • 20.
    Sauter, Willmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies. International Federation For Theatre Research, Canada.
    The Digital Enchantment of Drottningholm2014In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 92-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we relate to a historical playing culture? In this essay, a counter-factual visit to the palaces and parks of Drottningholm outside Stockholm is presented. By means of digital technologies, this World Heritage Site could be animated with historical figures from the eighteenth century, thus giving a living picture of past playing. Even though such an encounter with the past is fully possible from a technical point of view, the realization of this project poses a number of practical and theoretical questions: How can the picture of eighteenth-century court life be broadened to include social perspectives of class, gender and ethnicity? What artistic decisions have to be taken to visualize the activities around the park and in the palace? What forms of interactions provided by the technology are suitable for various groups of visitors? Some answers to these questions are hinted at in this essay, but the general question of a poetics of playing remains in the abyss between the historical period and the contemporary access to it. Neither Friedrich von Schiller's treatise on the aesthetic education of man nor Emanuel Kant's rational view of judgment bridge the gap of historical distance. Could Hans-Georg Gadarner's idea of the melting of historical horizons ever become a reality in the experiences of future visitors? Eventually, this project might only provide some pleasures of a poetry of playing.

  • 21.
    Sauter, Willmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies, Musicology and Performance Studies.
    The Drottningholm court theatre and the historicity of performance2012In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Skjoldager-Nielsen, Kim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Skjoldager-Nielsen, Daria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Theatre, Science, and the Popular: Two Contemporary Examples From Scandinavia2017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 137-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores relations between theatre, science, and the popular, which have largely been overlooked by Nordic theatre studies. The aim here is to introduce and understand the variety of ways theatre may communicate science to the public, the point of departure informed by the historical development of the relations between the three concepts and Edmund Husserl’s phenomenological critique of modern science. The two analytical examples are Swedish Charlotte Engelkes’ and Peder Bjurman’s Svarta hål – en kvantfysisk vaudeville (2014) and Danish Hotel Pro Forma’s adult performance for children Kosmos+ En Big Bang forestilling om universets vidundre (2014).

    History of science reveals complex combinations of science and the popular in theatrical events that raises the question if the audience’s understanding of the scientific subject matter itself always was – or has to be – the purpose of the popular science performance, or if it rather was – and is – about spurring interest by inspiring sentiments of wonder and reflection on science’s impact on life and outlooks. Newer conceptual developments also suggest that it is not always the case that theatre is a tool for science popularisation, as a specific genre science theatre, but that scientific information and concepts are artistically interpreted by theatre, and not always in ways affirmative of the science. This later variant is called science-in-theatre. The two genres are demonstrated through the analyses of Svarta hål and Kosmos+, the claim being that the first was an ambiguous exposition of science, i.e. science-in-theatre, whereas the second established an artistically visionary affirmation, as regular science theatre.

  • 23.
    Stenius, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Actors of Violence: Staging the Arena in Mixed Martial Arts2011In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 23, p. 86-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Actors of Violence: Staging the Arena in Mixed Martial Arts Through ethnographic participation in a Swedish mixed martial arts club, this article investigates the interrelationship between theatre and mixed martial arts. Concepts taken from theatre are applied to an analysis of what is constructed in the mixed martial arts arena. Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a growing sport where competitors, in a ring or a cage, utilize elbows and knees as well as kicks and other strikes and submission techniques to defeat opponents. The constituents of MMA are similar to those of American wrestling; the main similarity being a staged fight. The distinction is that MMA involves 'authentic' fights. Yet the activity surrounding the event is staged, like in American wrestling, structured and constructed as a public happening, thus, a directed play of sorts. Mixed martial arts competitions (galas) are full of cheering crowds of fans. Music plays and the fighters' artistic handlers are presented as the fighters enter the arena, dancing down the ramp while advancing towards the centre of the stage - the ring. Through data gathered from fieldwork with MMA practitioners as well as participant observation in an MMA club, I explain in this study, interviewing ten key informants, the components of acting and drama-performance that are integral to the production of an MMA fighter's entrance into the arena. I explore how fighters' bodies, through acting and re-enactment of performative staging, become sites of meta-theatrical happenings. I also look at how MMA fighters transform themselves into bodily artists while dramatizing their performance of violence. A fighter's character is transformed into a concept of a warrior-figure in that the fighter's habitus is modelled and then reconstructed in relation to the audience and the eventness of the happening; that is to say, the show and the violent performance on stage.

  • 24.
    von Schantz, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Drama og skapende prosesser i barnehagen. Edited by Anita Hammer and Guru Strømsøe. Bergen: Fagbokforlaget, 20152017In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 221-226Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    von Schantz, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Education in Arts and Professions.
    From Circus Princess to Gender Aunt – A Story about Construction of Identities2002In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 15, p. 28-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerning constructions of identities among stucents and teachers at a Swedish University College of Acting, written during a time of fieldwork, treats the delicate role of being 'the participant observer'. Setting out from the concepts of 'anthropology as biography' and 'authority in ethnography' through a brief outline of certain feminist ideas to a double-acting use of Brechtian thought, the discussion ends up stressing the value of narrativity as a form of alternative argumentation. A heading like Acting-Life strikingly points to the blurred borders between life and acting in the every day life of a person involved in actor  education. Identities are, at least partly, constructed in interaction; and at a place like this, the immediate resources available in identitywork, are the features of fictive, dramatic characters. Masks and role-playing are at stake everywhere in every day life of society, but here the use of them is as congenial as of urgent necessity- surely displayed by the text. In this  context, the notions of sex and gender, tightly interwoven in traditional, artistic and historical thought, mixed with old myhs and rebellion ideas, will be as complicated as it is challenging to elaborate.

  • 26.
    Wagner, Meike
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Expanding the Canon, Creating Alternative Knowledge, Marketing the Field?: Performance Practices in Theatre Studies2016In: Nordic Theatre Studies, ISSN 0904-6380, E-ISSN 2002-3898, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from examples of German theatre study programs (University of Giessen, University of Hildesheim, University of Bochum), which include performance practice, my contribution discusses specific roles and functions of practical experience in the academic context. I will present and discuss three discursive fields in relation to performance practice as part of academic education: 1) Performance practice as a way of taking a political stance with the aim of changing academic education and to promote alternative forms of theatre. 2) Performance practice as a marketable good within humanities to promote study programs. 3) Performance practice as a means of acquiring alternative knowledge for theatre education and research.

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