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  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    The Ordinary Player: Teenagers talk about digital games2012Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 15, nr 8, 961-977 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 2. Abiala, Kristina
    et al.
    Hernwall, Patrik
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Tweens negotiating identity online – Swedish girls' and boys' reflections on online experiences2013Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, nr 8, 951-969 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    How do Swedish tweens (10–14 years old) understand and experience the writing of their online identities? How are such intertwined identity markers as gender and age expressed and negotiated? To find some answers to these questions, participants in this study were asked to write a story about the use of online web communities on pre-prepared paper roundels with buzzwords in the margins to inspire them. Content analysis of these texts using the constant comparative method showed that the main factors determining how online communities are understood and used are the cultural age and gender of the user. Both girls and boys chat online, but girls more often create blogs while boys more often play games. Gender was increasingly emphasised with age; but whereas boys aged 14 described themselves as sexually active and even users of pornography, girls of the same age described themselves as shocked and repelled by pornography and fearful of sexual threats. In this investigation an intersectionalist frame of reference is used to elucidate the intertwined power differentials and identity markers of the users' peer group situation.

  • 3.
    Abiala, Kristina
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för historia och samtidsstudier, Samtidshistoriska institutet.
    Hernwall, Patrik
    Stockholm University.
    Tweens negotiating identity online: Swedish girls and boys write about their online experiences2013Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, nr 8, 951-969 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Alm, Susanne
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kriminologiska institutionen.
    Dreams meeting reality? A gendered perspective on the relationship between occupational preferences in early adolescence and actual occupation in adulthood2015Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, nr 8, 1077-1095 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of longitudinal data from Sweden (n = 15,211), the article offers a gendered perspective on the relationship between occupational preferences during early adolescence and actual occupations in adulthood. Theoretically the study is based on socialisation theory and devaluation theory. The analyses show that preferences for one's future occupation were stronger among those who came to make gender-typical choices, than among those who chose a gender-atypical occupation. However, a gender difference was also found in that girls who came to choose a male dominated occupation showed a stronger preference for their future occupation in adolescence, than boys who came to choose a female dominated occupation. Results also showed that at a general level, the occupations in adulthood were even more gender segregated than the preferences in adolescence. This was particularly true for girls, who in adolescence expressed a stronger preference to work in a male dominated occupations, than they would later actually do.

  • 5. Alm, Susanne
    et al.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kriminologiska institutionen.
    Cause for concern or moral panic? The prospects of the Swedish mods in retrospect2011Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, nr 7, 777-793 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish mods of the 1960s frightened the parental generation like few other youth cultures. Was the concern justified – was the mod culture a hotbed of social maladjustment? Or would the mods come to live conventional lives to the same extent as their peers? We present analyses from a large longitudinal study allowing for a follow-up of individuals identifying with the Swedish mod culture in the late 1960s. Overall, the results point in the least dramatic direction: In mid-life, the vast majority of the former mods lived ordinary lives with work and family. When considering identification with the mod culture only, we do find an over-risk for becoming a social dropout. However, an elaborated analysis identifies the foundations of these problems already in early childhood, i.e. prior to the identification with the mod culture. Social problems in the family may have encouraged these youngsters to turn to a youth culture, but this identification in itself did not contribute to vulnerability. Although the results should be generalised with caution, they could serve as argument against moral panic over teenage identification with youth cultures, and instead shift focus to structures that give some children a disadvantaged start in life.

  • 6.
    Ander, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Arbete i skolan (AiS).
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Jönköping University.
    'It is ok to be drunk, but not too drunk': party socialising, drinking ideals, and learning trajectories in Swedish adolescent discourse on alcohol use2017Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, nr 7, 841-854 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores adolescent reasoning behind the use of alcohol at different types of parties, often house parties, and about the strategies to achieve maturity and prevent losing control. The data consist of semi-structured interviews with 23 adolescents aged 16-18 years (16 males and seven females). The interview transcripts were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. All informants had personal experience with drinking at parties in different social settings. Our results suggest that the process of learning how to drink, often through failure in terms of being intoxicated, is important for adolescents' who strive to control their alcohol intake resulted in a good time and a break from everyday life. Furthermore, the results indicate that different social settings and party types engender different drinking patterns. Maturity and controlled conduct come across as desired ideals that provide a person with symbolic capital and thus, social status.

  • 7.
    Ander, Birgitta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    'It is ok to be drunk, but not too drunk': party socialising, drinking ideals, and learning trajectories in Swedish adolescent discourse on alcohol use2017Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, nr 7, 841-854 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores adolescent reasoning behind the use of alcohol at different types of parties, often house parties, and about the strategies to achieve maturity and prevent losing control. The data consist of semi-structured interviews with 23 adolescents aged 16–18 years (16 males and seven females). The interview transcripts were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. All informants had personal experience with drinking at parties in different social settings. Our results suggest that the process of learning how to drink, often through failure in terms of being intoxicated, is important for adolescents’ who strive to control their alcohol intake resulted in a good time and a break from everyday life. Furthermore, the results indicate that different social settings and party types engender different drinking patterns. Maturity and controlled conduct come across as desired ideals that provide a person with symbolic capital and thus, social status.

    Publikationen är tillgänglig i fulltext från 2018-08-07 06:00
  • 8.
    Andersson, Erik
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande.
    Situational political socialization: a normative approach to young people’s adoption and acquisition of political preferences and skills2015Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, nr 8, 967-983 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on young people’s political socialization has had an adult-centered top–down bias in which young people are considered incomplete and in need of the right upbringing. The article attempts to balance this bias. The aim is to introduce and argue for another normative approach – situational political socialization. Four theoretical elements constitute its basis: (1) the political, (2) contingency (the principle of the public sphere), (3) space and place, and (4) situation. In the contingent western digital media society marked by cultural dissemination, individualism, and the erosion of traditional institutions, situational political socialization represents a normative basis for a research approach which is open, action-oriented and contextualized, viewing young people as political actors in their own right.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Erik
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Situational political socialization: a normative approach to young people’s adoption and acquisition of political preferences and skills2015Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, nr 8, 967-983 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on young people’s political socialization has had an adult-centered top–down bias in which young people are considered incomplete and in need of the right upbringing. The article attempts to balance this bias. The aim is to introduce and argue for another normative approach – situational political socialization. Four theoretical elements constitute its basis: (1) the political, (2) contingency (the principle of the public sphere), (3) space and place, and (4) situation. In the contingent western digital media society marked by cultural dissemination, individualism, and the erosion of traditional institutions, situational political socialization represents a normative basis for a research approach which is open, action-oriented and contextualized, viewing young people as political actors in their own right.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    The pedagogical political participation model (the 3P-M) for exploring, explaining and affecting young people’s political participation2017Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, nr 10, 1346-1361 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In young people’s political participation in public decision-making, research and youth policy may benefit from a participation model that is pedagogical and sensitive to context. Due to the limitations of established participation models, the pedagogical political participation model (referred to here as the 3P-M) is suggested. The 3P-M is a theoretical and methodologically embedded model that builds on three observations: (1) that young people (as a category) are always presented as dependent on and subordinate to adults (decision-makers) in public decision-making, (2) that participation cannot be quantitatively measured without being normative and insensitive to context and (3) that different types of pedagogical leadership determine what kind of political participation is possible. The 3P-M offers an analytical framework for practitioners, policymakers and researchers to identify, explain and affect public pedagogical settings and situations in which young people politically participate.

  • 11.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The Competent Drinker, the Authentic Person and the Strong Person: Lines of Reasoning in Young People’s Discussions About Alcohol2006Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 9, nr 5, 515-538 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines young people's discussions about alcohol in an Internet chat room. I study how alcohol is meaningful to the young people through specifically focusing their understandings of the concepts control/loss of control, conscientiousness and maturity. I also study what relations of power are constructed among them. The results point to four different lines of reasoning about alcohol: the 'teetotaller argument', the 'age-distinction argument', the 'moderate drinking argument' and the 'getting drunk argument'. From each of these lines of reasoning to the next, there is a shift in the definition of 'the Others'—of those who are said to be immature. In three of the lines of reasoning—the teetotaller argument, the moderate drinking argument and the getting drunk argument—the young people describe the characteristics of what for them appears as an ideal person with ideal views on alcohol consumption and intoxication: the strong person, the competent drinker and the authentic person. In the concluding section of the paper, I discuss and compare these different lines of reasoning with each other and with previous research on young people and drinking.

  • 12.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa (CHESS).
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa (CHESS).
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa (CHESS).
    Students' accounts of school-performance stress: a qualitative analysis of a high-achieving setting in Stockholm, Sweden2013Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, nr 7, 932-949 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine students' experiences of school performance as a stressor. Accounts of school-performance stress at both the individual level and in relation to group mechanisms are studied through qualitative interviews with eighth-grade students in a high-performing school in Stockholm, Sweden (n=49). Using qualitative content analysis, three overarching themes emerged. Students' aspirations include accounts of students whose own high standards are a source of stress, in particular among girls. High performance as a part of their identity is a recurring topic, as well as striving for high marks for the future. External expectations comprise students' views of parents' and teachers' expectations. Generally, students feel that parents are supportive and have reasonable expectations. Students often compare themselves with high-performing siblings, which may be seen as a way of meeting indirect parental expectations. Few students mention teachers' expectations as a source of stress. The high-performing context shows that respondents bear witness to an MVG culture' meaning that many students aim for the highest possible marks. Girls in particular tend to drive up stress levels by talking to each other about pressure at school. Students also compare themselves with each other, which is experienced as competitive and stressful.

  • 13.
    Coe, Anna-Britt
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).
    How gender hierarchies matter in youth activism: young people's mobilizing around sexual health in Ecuador and Peru2013Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, nr 6, 695-711 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing body of research on youth activism, few studies examine how this intersects with gender. Our study aimed to explore whether and how young activists themselves perceived gender hierarchies as needing to be addressed through their collective action on sexual health in Peru and Ecuador. Using Grounded Theory, qualitative data was collected and analyzed from young activists across four cases. Cases ranged in complexity from a single youth organization operating at the district level to numerous youth organizations articulating at the national level. We linked the GT analysis to a conceptual framework based on Tayor’s (1999) theorizing of gender and social movements. Accordingly, young activists perceived gender, and even class, “race” and age, as salient to their collective actions. These actions corresponded to the social movement concept of mobilizing structures that consist of pre-existing structures, tactics and organizations. Young activists understood gender and other social categories as imbued by power differentials and therefore as social hierarchies, within which their activism was embedded. The paper thereby demonstrates the need for an enhanced conceptual framework for the study of youth activism and its intersection with gender hierarchies.

  • 14.
    Coe, Anna-Britt
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, Fysioterapi.
    Uttjek, Margaretha
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Youth politics as multiple processes: how teenagers construct political action in Sweden2016Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 19, nr 10, 1321-1337 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Alternative approaches to power in youth politics are needed to overcome the conceptual dichotomy between youth political action that is either linked to – or delinked from – state institutions. This paper offers an alternative drawn from a study that sought to empirically explore, and build theory upon, how teenagers construct their political action. Our qualitative study among 10 activists aged between 17 and 19 in a medium-size city in Northern Sweden found that youth constructed their political action as four different processes: moving from consciousness to action, moving from personal experience to shared goals, moving from social activities to political activities, and moving from single to multiple arenas. We integrated these processes in the concept Youth Politics as Multiple Processes. Youth efforts to bring about these processes were not always fruitful because, as their political action gained complexity, youth faced greater constraints for recognizing, addressing and challenging power from age-based exclusion, state-centered definitions of politics, and adult disinterest in youth demands. According to our findings, youth constructed political action based in an approach to power that was not state-centered. We linked our findings to youth politics research and social movement theory that similarly proposed alternative approaches to power.

  • 15. Franzén, Anna Gradin
    et al.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The beauty of blood?: Self-injury and ambivalence in an Internet community2011Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, nr 3, 279-294 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyzes how young self-injuring women and men construct themselves as ‘cutters.’ The study draws on observations of a Swedish Internet community connected to self-injurious behavior and departs from a poststructuralist framework in order to analyze how members position themselves and others in relation to cultural discourses on self-injury. Two main discourses are identified in the Web community: the ‘normalizing’ and the ‘pathologizing’ discourses, which give contrasting versions of self-injury, self-cutters, and their scarred bodies. Within the normalizing discourse, self-injurious behavior is regarded as a legitimate practice for dealing with mental health problems, ‘cutters’ are resilient, and their blood and scars are beautiful. In contrast, within the pathologizing discourse self-injurious behavior is understood as morally reprehensible, self-cutters are pathological, and their bodies are repulsive. In the Web community, members invoke both discourses, which leads to ambivalent subject positions. This study shows that the seemingly contradictory subject positions of the two discourses in fact are interdependent on each other as members draw on both the normalizing and the pathologizing discourses in order to become ‘authentic cutters.’

  • 16.
    Gradin Franzen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för klinisk och socialpsykologi (CS). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Socialt arbete. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    The beauty of blood?: Self-injury and ambivalence in an Internet community2011Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, nr 3, 279-294 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyzes how young self-injuring women and men construct themselves as 'cutters.' The study draws on observations of a Swedish Internet community connected to self-injurious behavior and departs from a poststructuralist framework in order to analyze how members position themselves and others in relation to cultural discourses on self-injury. Two main discourses are identified in the Web community: the 'normalizing' and the 'pathologizing' discourses, which give contrasting versions of self-injury, self-cutters, and their scarred bodies. Within the normalizing discourse, self-injurious behavior is regarded as a legitimate practice for dealing with mental health problems, 'cutters' are resilient, and their blood and scars are beautiful. In contrast, within the pathologizing discourse self-injurious behavior is understood as morally reprehensible, self-cutters are pathological, and their bodies are repulsive. In the Web community, members invoke both discourses, which leads to ambivalent subject positions. This study shows that the seemingly contradictory subject positions of the two discourses in fact are interdependent on each other as members draw on both the normalizing and the pathologizing discourses in order to become 'authentic cutters.'

  • 17.
    Johansson [Tinnfält], Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro universitet, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen.
    Adolescent girls' and boys' perceptions of mental health2007Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 10, nr 2, 183-202 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study are to analyse the concept of mental health from the perspective of adolescent girls and boys and to describe what adolescent girls and boys regard as important determinants of mental health. Interviews with 48 children, 13 and 16 years old, in Sweden were held individually or in focus groups. The adolescents perceived mental health as an emotional experience, where positive as well as negative health is part of the concept. Family is the most important determinant for young people's mental health, closely followed by friends. Neither girls nor boys believed that there were any large differences in mental health between girls and boys. Age differences seemed to be more important than gender in the perception of mental health by children.

  • 18.
    Kasselias Wiltgren, Layal
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Youth using national symbols in constructing identities2014Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 17, nr 3, 308-323 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Artefacts containing national or ethnic symbols, such as flags and maps, are frequently used by 14-year-old youth in a multiethnic, suburban municipality in Stockholm. Appearing as ornaments or trinkets to outsiders, to the initiated they are distinctive group markers displaying multiple political and ideological affiliations. As visual symbols these artefacts invoke communicative, but non-verbal, processes: they interpellate viewers who answer with their reactions. Thus these objects serve to both banally reproduce nationalism and ethnicity and to serve as identity markers. These identities are primarily inclusive and non-aggressive. The symbols do not seem to be a sign of resistance to mainstream Swedish society in line with much work in the field of youth culture. Instead, they are used as a proud, visual display of additional identities complementing a Swedish identity. Ethnicity research often covers linguistic markers or ethnic and national identities. In contrast, the area of youth consumption of nationalism, in the form of objects featuring national, ethnic and religious symbols, is as yet not well documented. Based on a year-long fieldwork in a junior high school, this paper documents ways in which minority group students handle material artefacts and what these symbols involved mean to them.

  • 19.
    Kassman, Anders
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Enheten för forskning om det civila samhället.
    Franzen, Eva
    Longer-term Labour-market Consequences of Economic Inactivity during Young Adulthood: a Swedish National Cohort Study2005Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 8, nr 4, 403-424 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 20.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Socialmedicin. Youth Research Centre, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, the University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Coffey, Julia
    Nygren, Maria
    Mental health in young Australians: a longitudinal study2016Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 19, nr 1, 74-86 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses patterns in mental health of young Australians from age 19 through 25 and explores changes in mental health over these years. Data are derived from five waves of the Australian Life Patterns longitudinal study. The outcome variable in focus was self-reported mental health. Analyses were conducted in two steps using linear mixed models with both fixed and random effects. The analysis shows a negative linear trend in mental health status. The mental health of women was worse than that of men though a negative trend was found in both men and women. Though high socio-economic status (SES) individuals reported best mental health compared to their mid and low-SES peers, a negative trend was identified for them as well as for mid-SES participants. There is weak support for a negative trend among those of low-SES backgrounds. The study adds to evidence that there is a negative trend in mental health in young Australians but that this trend is not uniform across all young people. In light of this we argue the need for further research that analyses patterns of poor mental health in relation to social systems and institutions.

  • 21.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Coffey, Julia
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Nygren, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Mental health in young Australians: a longitudinal study2016Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 19, nr 1, 74-86 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses patterns in mental health of young Australians from age 19 through 25 and explores changes in mental health over these years. Data are derived from five waves of the Australian Life Patterns longitudinal study. The outcome variable in focus was self-reported mental health. Analyses were conducted in two steps using linear mixed models with both fixed and random effects. The analysis shows a negative linear trend in mental health status. The mental health of women was worse than that of men though a negative trend was found in both men and women. Though high socio-economic status (SES) individuals reported best mental health compared to their mid and low-SES peers, a negative trend was identified for them as well as for mid-SES participants. There is weak support for a negative trend among those of low-SES backgrounds. The study adds to evidence that there is a negative trend in mental health in young Australians but that this trend is not uniform across all young people. In light of this we argue the need for further research that analyses patterns of poor mental health in relation to social systems and institutions.

  • 22.
    Ojala, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Adolescents’ worries about environmental risks: subjective well-being, values, and existential dimensions. 2005Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 8, nr 3, 331-348 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies concerning the association between macrosocial worries and well-being

    have shown diverse results. In this study a person-oriented approach was employed. Two

    subgroups of adolescents experiencing a high degree of worry about environmental risks

    but displaying varying levels of subjective well-being were identified. One scored low on

    well-being while the other scored high. Thereafter, the assumption that the two subgroups

    would differ on theoretically relevant comparison measures was investigated. The group

    high on both worry and well-being scored significantly higher on meaningfulness, trust in

    environmental organizations, and on anger and hope in relation to environmental risks

    than the group high on worry but low on well-being. Finally, environmental worry was

    mainly predicted by biospheric and altruistic values, but also by high levels of trust in

    science and environmental organizations. These results are discussed in relation to

    existential, emotion, and identity theories.

  • 23.
    Ojala, Maria
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap.
    Adolescents’ worries about environmental risks: subjective well-being, values, and existential dimensions2005Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 8, nr 3, 331-347 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies concerning the association between macrosocial worries and well-being have shown diverse results. In this study a person-oriented approach was employed. Two subgroups of adolescents experiencing a high degree of worry about environmental risks but displaying varying levels of subjective well-being were identified. One scored low on well-being while the other scored high. Thereafter, the assumption that the two subgroups would differ on theoretically relevant comparison measures was investigated. The group high on both worry and well-being scored significantly higher on meaningfulness, trust in environmental organizations, and on anger and hope in relation to environmental risks than the group high on worry but low on well-being. Finally, environmental worry was mainly predicted by biospheric and altruistic values, but also by high levels of trust in science and environmental organizations. These results are discussed in relation to existential, emotion, and identity theories.

  • 24.
    Ojala, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Climate change skepticism among adolescents2015Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, nr 9, 1135-1153 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people relate to one of the most serious social problems, global climate change, in different ways. This study focuses on adolescents (Time 1: mean age = 16.6 years) who de-emphasize the seriousness of this problem. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to investigate what factors predict climate skepticism cross-sectionally and what factors predict climate skepticism one year later. Two waves of data were collected (Time 1: n = 870; Time 2: n = 684). Factors important for explaining skepticism among adults (values, knowledge, conservative political orientation, gender, media use), a cluster of variables related to societal powerlessness (distrust, disinterest in societal issues, low environmental efficacy, low tolerance toward immigrants), and descriptive social norms (social influence from parents and peers) were included in the study. With the exception of media use in cross-sectional analyses, and of media use and a conservative political orientation in bivariate longitudinal analyses, all of these factors were significantly associated with skepticism. However, only perceiving parents as having climate skeptical attitudes and low tolerance toward immigrants predicted an increase in climate change skepticism over the one-year period. Results are discussed in relation to earlier studies about climate change skepticism and socialization theories. Implications for climate change education are also discussed.

  • 25.
    Ojala, Maria
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Climate change skepticism among adolescents2015Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, nr 9, 1135-1153 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people relate to one of the most serious social problems, global climate change, in different ways. This study focuses on adolescents (Time 1: mean age = 16.6 years) who de-emphasize the seriousness of this problem. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to investigate what factors predict climate skepticism cross-sectionally and what factors predict climate skepticism one year later. Two waves of data were collected (Time 1: n = 870; Time 2: n = 684). Factors important for explaining skepticism among adults (values, knowledge, conservative political orientation, gender, media use), a cluster of variables related to societal powerlessness (distrust, disinterest in societal issues, low environmental efficacy, low tolerance toward immigrants), and descriptive social norms (social influence from parents and peers) were included in the study. With the exception of media use in cross-sectional analyses, and of media use and a conservative political orientation in bivariate longitudinal analyses, all of these factors were significantly associated with skepticism. However, only perceiving parents as having climate skeptical attitudes and low tolerance toward immigrants predicted an increase in climate change skepticism over the one-year period. Results are discussed in relation to earlier studies about climate change skepticism and socialization theories. Implications for climate change education are also discussed.

  • 26.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Medie- och kommunikationsforskning.
    For Activists, For Potential Voters, For Consumers: Three Modes of Pro­ducing the Civic Web2008Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, Vol. 11, nr 5, 497-512 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, numerous studies of the internet's civic dimensions have taught us a considerable amount about the form of new technologies. They have, for instance, analysed how the internet's interactive character, its multimodality and its open character create civic opportunities, not least for young people. The field has, however, rather neglected a number of important issues. For instance, the category of 'producers' of civic content has received little attention. Hence, research has neglected questions such as the following. What interests inspire producers of civic websites? How is the production being carried through? What views of the internet inspire their work? This article begins to redress this neglect by analysing the producers of three different websites. The three websites are brought from different spheres of civil society - party politics, commercial media and activism - and they are analysed through producer interviews. The article reveals and critically discusses differences and similarities between different modes of producing civic web resources.

  • 27.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    For Activists, for Potential Voters, for Consumers: Three Modes of Producing the Civic Web2008Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 11, nr 5, 497-512 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, numerous studies of the internet's civic dimensions have taught us a considerable amount about the form of new technologies. They have, for instance, analysed how the internet's interactive character, its multimodality and its open character create civic opportunities, not least for young people. The field has, however, rather neglected a number of important issues. For instance, the category of ‘producers’ of civic content has received little attention. Hence, research has neglected questions such as the following. What interests inspire producers of civic websites? How is the production being carried through? What views of the internet inspire their work? This article begins to redress this neglect by analysing the producers of three different websites. The three websites are brought from different spheres of civil society – party politics, commercial media and activism – and they are analysed through producer interviews. The article reveals and critically discusses differences and similarities between different modes of producing civic web resources.

  • 28.
    Pitti, Ilaria
    Department of Sociology and Business Law, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    What does being an adult mean?: Comparing young people's and adults' representations of adulthood2017Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, nr 9, 1225-1241 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at exploring the representations young people and adults attribute to the concept of adulthood in order to analyse the effects these ideas have on their reciprocal perception and recognition. In so doing, it draws upon data collected through a grounded theory study, which has been conducted in Italy involving young people and adults in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Data show that an outdated traditional model is still used by both the samples to determine who is an adult and when the adult status is acquired without discussing its validity in front of a changed social scenario. An evaluative function is added to traditional transitional markers of adulthood, which are used by both young people and adults to accuse each other of being not mature enough'. A discrepancy between the shared ideal representations of adulthood and the actual possibility the two generations have to meet those social expectations in their lives emerge. The implications of these results for youth transitions to adulthood are discussed in the light of the high level of intergenerational inequality characterising the Italian context.

  • 29.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Vocational or academic track? Study and career plans among Swedish students living in rural areas2017Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study explores how rural lower secondary school students reflect on study and career choices, focusing on the choice between vocational and academic upper secondary programs. Applying a spatial perspective, we analyze individual students’ reflections about study and career choices within a variety of rural regions, and compare patterns in the regions. The results indicate complex interactions between structural factors and individual dispositions. In places where education levels were low and the local labor market predominantly offered unskilled manual and service work, there was a stronger tendency to choose vocational programs than in places with higher education levels and access to a more varied labor market. Likewise, there was an association between strongly gendered labor markets and gender-typical choices. However, individual students positioned themselves actively in relation to the local place, its local labor market and social relations; their choices were place-bound to varying degrees, and chose upper secondary programs and presented ideas about prospective careers that were harmonious with the local labor market in some cases, but discordant in other cases. The results are discussed in the framework of individuals’ horizon for actions. 

  • 30.
    Silvén Hagström, Anneli
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Socialt arbete. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Breaking the silence: parentally suicide-bereaved youths’ self-disclosure on the internet and the social responses of others related to stigma2017Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, nr 8, 1077-1092 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide stigma’ contributes to the silencing of parental suicide within family and social networks. This article departs from a narrative theoretical framework on grief and identity to analyse suicide-bereaved youths ‘breaking the silence’ through self-disclosure in self-initiated chat threads on the Internet, which is their way of actively seeking social support, telling of their experiences and opening up space for a renegotiation of the meanings around suicide. The article investigates which narrative frameworks for the interpretation of suicide are operating in these contexts, and whether and, if so, how stigma is reproduced or counteracted. Two frameworks are identified: ‘Who is to blame for suicide?’; and ‘What caused the suicide?’. The former is utilized by the newly bereaved chat-initiators, who attribute blame for suicide to the parent and/or themselves in accordance with stigmatizing discourses. These are reproduced in the responses first and foremost of the non-suicide-bereaved, who construct a dichotomy between the deceased parent as ‘perpetrator’ and the child as ‘victim’ in order to relieve blame. A lack of contact with other suicide-bereaved youths can reinforce feelings of otherness. Identities, however, can potentially be de-stigmatized by the meanings drawn from the latter framework.

  • 31.
    Sternudd, Hans T.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, KV.
    Photographs of self-injury: Production and reception in a group of self-injurers2012Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 15, nr 4, 421-436 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Photographs of self-injury (SI) on the Internet, according to the literature and the wider media, spread and encourage self-destructive behaviour, although very little is known about these effects. A group of self-injurers was questioned about the reasons for producing and looking at photos of SI, and were asked about their reaction to exposure of them. The informants confirmed that the effects were alleviating rather than the opposite, and the production of the images was often related to notions about memory and proof. To publish them was apprehended as a way of sharing experiences with others and to give and/or receive help. Photographs of self-injuries were described as one resource of a SI community culture. Informants often emphasised that the outcome of watching these photos varies due to individual and situational differences. The results of the study are inconsistent with unfounded presumptions about photographs of SI, which are replaced with a nuanced and contradictory picture.

  • 32.
    Westberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Forever Young?: Young People's Conception of Adulthood2004Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 7, 35-53 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 33.
    Westberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskaplig fakultet, Sociologi.
    Forever young?: Young people's conception of adulthood - the Swedish case2004Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, Vol. 7, nr 1, 35-53 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the issue of young people's subjective conception of attainment of adulthood. Setting a process, as well as a multidimensional perspective, the analysis enables the study of both role transitions and issues of individual maturity in attainment of adulthood. Usually, after completing specific role transitions, young people are regarded as adult members of society. Due to social changes it is of interest to study whether young people themselves also put the same emphasis on these role transitions in attainment of adulthood. Drawing on data from the Swedish Board of Youth Affairs containing 3200 respondents aged 16-29, the results indicate that young people who have completed role transitions assign them less value for the importance of adult status. However, becoming a parent is a role transition that is given great importance and is also in relation to the issue of responsibility.

  • 34. Westberg, Annika
    Forever Young? Young People's Conception of Adulthood: The Swedish Case.2004Ingår i: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 7, nr 1, 35-53 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
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