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  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Ordinary Player: Teenagers talk about digital games2012In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 961-977Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Abiala, Kristina
    et al.
    Hernwall, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tweens negotiating identity online – Swedish girls' and boys' reflections on online experiences2013In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 951-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do Swedish tweens (10–14 years old) understand and experience the writing of their online identities? How are such intertwined identity markers as gender and age expressed and negotiated? To find some answers to these questions, participants in this study were asked to write a story about the use of online web communities on pre-prepared paper roundels with buzzwords in the margins to inspire them. Content analysis of these texts using the constant comparative method showed that the main factors determining how online communities are understood and used are the cultural age and gender of the user. Both girls and boys chat online, but girls more often create blogs while boys more often play games. Gender was increasingly emphasised with age; but whereas boys aged 14 described themselves as sexually active and even users of pornography, girls of the same age described themselves as shocked and repelled by pornography and fearful of sexual threats. In this investigation an intersectionalist frame of reference is used to elucidate the intertwined power differentials and identity markers of the users' peer group situation.

  • 3.
    Abiala, Kristina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Hernwall, Patrik
    Stockholm University.
    Tweens negotiating identity online: Swedish girls and boys write about their online experiences2013In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 951-969Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Alm, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Dreams meeting reality? A gendered perspective on the relationship between occupational preferences in early adolescence and actual occupation in adulthood2015In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1077-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of longitudinal data from Sweden (n = 15,211), the article offers a gendered perspective on the relationship between occupational preferences during early adolescence and actual occupations in adulthood. Theoretically the study is based on socialisation theory and devaluation theory. The analyses show that preferences for one's future occupation were stronger among those who came to make gender-typical choices, than among those who chose a gender-atypical occupation. However, a gender difference was also found in that girls who came to choose a male dominated occupation showed a stronger preference for their future occupation in adolescence, than boys who came to choose a female dominated occupation. Results also showed that at a general level, the occupations in adulthood were even more gender segregated than the preferences in adolescence. This was particularly true for girls, who in adolescence expressed a stronger preference to work in a male dominated occupations, than they would later actually do.

  • 5. Alm, Susanne
    et al.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Cause for concern or moral panic? The prospects of the Swedish mods in retrospect2011In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 777-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish mods of the 1960s frightened the parental generation like few other youth cultures. Was the concern justified – was the mod culture a hotbed of social maladjustment? Or would the mods come to live conventional lives to the same extent as their peers? We present analyses from a large longitudinal study allowing for a follow-up of individuals identifying with the Swedish mod culture in the late 1960s. Overall, the results point in the least dramatic direction: In mid-life, the vast majority of the former mods lived ordinary lives with work and family. When considering identification with the mod culture only, we do find an over-risk for becoming a social dropout. However, an elaborated analysis identifies the foundations of these problems already in early childhood, i.e. prior to the identification with the mod culture. Social problems in the family may have encouraged these youngsters to turn to a youth culture, but this identification in itself did not contribute to vulnerability. Although the results should be generalised with caution, they could serve as argument against moral panic over teenage identification with youth cultures, and instead shift focus to structures that give some children a disadvantaged start in life.

  • 6.
    Ander, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Arbete i skolan (AiS).
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Jönköping University.
    'It is ok to be drunk, but not too drunk': party socialising, drinking ideals, and learning trajectories in Swedish adolescent discourse on alcohol use2017In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 841-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores adolescent reasoning behind the use of alcohol at different types of parties, often house parties, and about the strategies to achieve maturity and prevent losing control. The data consist of semi-structured interviews with 23 adolescents aged 16-18 years (16 males and seven females). The interview transcripts were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. All informants had personal experience with drinking at parties in different social settings. Our results suggest that the process of learning how to drink, often through failure in terms of being intoxicated, is important for adolescents' who strive to control their alcohol intake resulted in a good time and a break from everyday life. Furthermore, the results indicate that different social settings and party types engender different drinking patterns. Maturity and controlled conduct come across as desired ideals that provide a person with symbolic capital and thus, social status.

  • 7.
    Ander, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    'It is ok to be drunk, but not too drunk': party socialising, drinking ideals, and learning trajectories in Swedish adolescent discourse on alcohol use2017In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 841-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores adolescent reasoning behind the use of alcohol at different types of parties, often house parties, and about the strategies to achieve maturity and prevent losing control. The data consist of semi-structured interviews with 23 adolescents aged 16–18 years (16 males and seven females). The interview transcripts were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. All informants had personal experience with drinking at parties in different social settings. Our results suggest that the process of learning how to drink, often through failure in terms of being intoxicated, is important for adolescents’ who strive to control their alcohol intake resulted in a good time and a break from everyday life. Furthermore, the results indicate that different social settings and party types engender different drinking patterns. Maturity and controlled conduct come across as desired ideals that provide a person with symbolic capital and thus, social status.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Situational political socialization: a normative approach to young people’s adoption and acquisition of political preferences and skills2015In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 967-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on young people’s political socialization has had an adult-centered top–down bias in which young people are considered incomplete and in need of the right upbringing. The article attempts to balance this bias. The aim is to introduce and argue for another normative approach – situational political socialization. Four theoretical elements constitute its basis: (1) the political, (2) contingency (the principle of the public sphere), (3) space and place, and (4) situation. In the contingent western digital media society marked by cultural dissemination, individualism, and the erosion of traditional institutions, situational political socialization represents a normative basis for a research approach which is open, action-oriented and contextualized, viewing young people as political actors in their own right.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Erik
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Situational political socialization: a normative approach to young people’s adoption and acquisition of political preferences and skills2015In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 967-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on young people’s political socialization has had an adult-centered top–down bias in which young people are considered incomplete and in need of the right upbringing. The article attempts to balance this bias. The aim is to introduce and argue for another normative approach – situational political socialization. Four theoretical elements constitute its basis: (1) the political, (2) contingency (the principle of the public sphere), (3) space and place, and (4) situation. In the contingent western digital media society marked by cultural dissemination, individualism, and the erosion of traditional institutions, situational political socialization represents a normative basis for a research approach which is open, action-oriented and contextualized, viewing young people as political actors in their own right.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The pedagogical political participation model (the 3P-M) for exploring, explaining and affecting young people’s political participation2017In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1346-1361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In young people’s political participation in public decision-making, research and youth policy may benefit from a participation model that is pedagogical and sensitive to context. Due to the limitations of established participation models, the pedagogical political participation model (referred to here as the 3P-M) is suggested. The 3P-M is a theoretical and methodologically embedded model that builds on three observations: (1) that young people (as a category) are always presented as dependent on and subordinate to adults (decision-makers) in public decision-making, (2) that participation cannot be quantitatively measured without being normative and insensitive to context and (3) that different types of pedagogical leadership determine what kind of political participation is possible. The 3P-M offers an analytical framework for practitioners, policymakers and researchers to identify, explain and affect public pedagogical settings and situations in which young people politically participate.

  • 11.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholms universitet.
    The competent drinker, the authentic person and the strong person: Lines of reasoning in Swedish young people's discussions about alcohol2006In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 515-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines young people's discussions about alcohol in an Internet chat room. I study how alcohol is meaningful to the young people through specifically focusing their understandings of the concepts control/loss of control, conscientiousness and maturity. I also study what relations of power are constructed among them. The results point to four different lines of reasoning about alcohol: the 'teetotaller argument', the 'age-distinction argument', the 'moderate drinking argument' and the 'getting drunk argument'. From each of these lines of reasoning to the next, there is a shift in the definition of 'the Others' - of those who are said to be immature. In three of the lines of reasoning - the teetotaller argument, the moderate drinking argument and the getting drunk argument - the young people describe the characteristics of what for them appears as an ideal person with ideal views on alcohol consumption and intoxication: the strong person, the competent drinker and the authentic person. In the concluding section of the paper, I discuss and compare these different lines of reasoning with each other and with previous research on young people and drinking.

  • 12.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Competent Drinker, the Authentic Person and the Strong Person: Lines of Reasoning in Young People’s Discussions About Alcohol2006In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 515-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines young people's discussions about alcohol in an Internet chat room. I study how alcohol is meaningful to the young people through specifically focusing their understandings of the concepts control/loss of control, conscientiousness and maturity. I also study what relations of power are constructed among them. The results point to four different lines of reasoning about alcohol: the 'teetotaller argument', the 'age-distinction argument', the 'moderate drinking argument' and the 'getting drunk argument'. From each of these lines of reasoning to the next, there is a shift in the definition of 'the Others'—of those who are said to be immature. In three of the lines of reasoning—the teetotaller argument, the moderate drinking argument and the getting drunk argument—the young people describe the characteristics of what for them appears as an ideal person with ideal views on alcohol consumption and intoxication: the strong person, the competent drinker and the authentic person. In the concluding section of the paper, I discuss and compare these different lines of reasoning with each other and with previous research on young people and drinking.

  • 13.
    Bouchard, Karen
    et al.
    Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Smith, David J
    Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Showing friendship. fighting back, and getting even: resisting bullying victimisation within adolescent girls´friendships2018In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1141-1158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that about a quarter of bullying incidences occur within friendships. Yet little attention is given to the underlying social processes and wider macro-system forces that shape friendship victimization experiences. Guided by constructivist grounded theory and Wade's work on resistance, this research explored the phenomenon of victimization within adolescent girls’ friendships. Canadian women reflecting on their school-based victimization experiences were interviewed for this study. Results suggest that participants resisted victimization in important ways but that their resistance strategies were negotiated within gender expectations and ambient discursive constructions of resistance and victimization. Our findings illuminate the ways that discourses concealing women's resistance and privileging overt responses to bullying run counter to gendered expectations for resistance, leaving women in a double bind. Consequently, we found that retaliatory relational aggression allowed girls to deny their victim status while complying with gendered expectations for resistance but led to their bullying experiences being normalized and overlooked.

  • 14.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Students' accounts of school-performance stress: a qualitative analysis of a high-achieving setting in Stockholm, Sweden2013In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 932-949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine students' experiences of school performance as a stressor. Accounts of school-performance stress at both the individual level and in relation to group mechanisms are studied through qualitative interviews with eighth-grade students in a high-performing school in Stockholm, Sweden (n=49). Using qualitative content analysis, three overarching themes emerged. Students' aspirations include accounts of students whose own high standards are a source of stress, in particular among girls. High performance as a part of their identity is a recurring topic, as well as striving for high marks for the future. External expectations comprise students' views of parents' and teachers' expectations. Generally, students feel that parents are supportive and have reasonable expectations. Students often compare themselves with high-performing siblings, which may be seen as a way of meeting indirect parental expectations. Few students mention teachers' expectations as a source of stress. The high-performing context shows that respondents bear witness to an MVG culture' meaning that many students aim for the highest possible marks. Girls in particular tend to drive up stress levels by talking to each other about pressure at school. Students also compare themselves with each other, which is experienced as competitive and stressful.

  • 15.
    Coe, Anna-Britt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Goicolea, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    How gender hierarchies matter in youth activism: young people's mobilizing around sexual health in Ecuador and Peru2013In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 695-711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing body of research on youth activism, few studies examine how this intersects with gender. Our study aimed to explore whether and how young activists themselves perceived gender hierarchies as needing to be addressed through their collective action on sexual health in Peru and Ecuador. Using Grounded Theory, qualitative data was collected and analyzed from young activists across four cases. Cases ranged in complexity from a single youth organization operating at the district level to numerous youth organizations articulating at the national level. We linked the GT analysis to a conceptual framework based on Tayor’s (1999) theorizing of gender and social movements. Accordingly, young activists perceived gender, and even class, “race” and age, as salient to their collective actions. These actions corresponded to the social movement concept of mobilizing structures that consist of pre-existing structures, tactics and organizations. Young activists understood gender and other social categories as imbued by power differentials and therefore as social hierarchies, within which their activism was embedded. The paper thereby demonstrates the need for an enhanced conceptual framework for the study of youth activism and its intersection with gender hierarchies.

  • 16.
    Coe, Anna-Britt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Rönnblom, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Collective caring: creating safety through interactions between young activist groups and young adults in Sweden2019In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 839-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing research explores safety among young adults as a complex phenomenon in diverse social spaces. Nonetheless, it largely approaches perceptions of unsafety and safety strategies as discrete individual action. In this paper, we show how safety is created through the social interactions between young activist groups and their main target or audience, young adults. Our study aimed to explore how young adults created meanings and actions of safety within their activism. Grounded Theory method was use to collect and analyze qualitative interviews with young adults often social change groups located in two medium-size cities inSweden. To interpret our findings, we drew upon interactionist concepts of shared definitions and joint action [Blumer, Herbert.1966. “Sociological Implications of the thought of George Herbert Mead.” American Journal of Sociology 71 (5): 535–544]. Shared definitions challenged narrow notions of unsafety by identifying uniform categories and harmful stereotypes as the source of the problem, and thereby locating constraints upon the capacity ofdifferent groups of young adults to define situations as (un)safe. Joint action combined an immediate response of moving to where young adults were with an enduring response of being there for young adults. Combined, these constituted an overarching social process of collective caring, which we linked to Isabel Lorey’s [2015. State of Insecurity. London: Verso] concept of practices of caring.

  • 17.
    Coe, Anna-Britt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Uttjek, Margaretha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nygren, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Youth politics as multiple processes: how teenagers construct political action in Sweden2016In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1321-1337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alternative approaches to power in youth politics are needed to overcome the conceptual dichotomy between youth political action that is either linked to – or delinked from – state institutions. This paper offers an alternative drawn from a study that sought to empirically explore, and build theory upon, how teenagers construct their political action. Our qualitative study among 10 activists aged between 17 and 19 in a medium-size city in Northern Sweden found that youth constructed their political action as four different processes: moving from consciousness to action, moving from personal experience to shared goals, moving from social activities to political activities, and moving from single to multiple arenas. We integrated these processes in the concept Youth Politics as Multiple Processes. Youth efforts to bring about these processes were not always fruitful because, as their political action gained complexity, youth faced greater constraints for recognizing, addressing and challenging power from age-based exclusion, state-centered definitions of politics, and adult disinterest in youth demands. According to our findings, youth constructed political action based in an approach to power that was not state-centered. We linked our findings to youth politics research and social movement theory that similarly proposed alternative approaches to power.

  • 18.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The contextual definition of harm: 11-to 15-year-olds perspectives on social incidents and bullying2019In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bullying remains a problem in schools, affecting the health of many young people. In this study, the focus is on exploring how 11- to 15-year-olds talk about their social worlds and social incidents such as bullying. Through semi-structured interviews, analyzed with constructivist grounded theory, the conceptualization of the participants perspectives reveals that three types of incidents take place in their social worlds: Diffuse incidents, Quarrel incidents and Bullying. Incidents are framed differently, which reveals how the social context plays an integral part in how different incidents and interactions were defined and considered as harmful bullying or not. Four contextual aspects are taken into consideration: (1) Iteration, (2) Type of target, (3) Social and emotional harm for the target, (4) Social relationship to target. Even if not all type of incidents are framed as harmful bullying, they interact by being grounded in normative identity constructions that use both social categories such as gender and sexuality and locally produced social categories.

  • 19. Franzén, Anna Gradin
    et al.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The beauty of blood?: Self-injury and ambivalence in an Internet community2011In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 279-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyzes how young self-injuring women and men construct themselves as ‘cutters.’ The study draws on observations of a Swedish Internet community connected to self-injurious behavior and departs from a poststructuralist framework in order to analyze how members position themselves and others in relation to cultural discourses on self-injury. Two main discourses are identified in the Web community: the ‘normalizing’ and the ‘pathologizing’ discourses, which give contrasting versions of self-injury, self-cutters, and their scarred bodies. Within the normalizing discourse, self-injurious behavior is regarded as a legitimate practice for dealing with mental health problems, ‘cutters’ are resilient, and their blood and scars are beautiful. In contrast, within the pathologizing discourse self-injurious behavior is understood as morally reprehensible, self-cutters are pathological, and their bodies are repulsive. In the Web community, members invoke both discourses, which leads to ambivalent subject positions. This study shows that the seemingly contradictory subject positions of the two discourses in fact are interdependent on each other as members draw on both the normalizing and the pathologizing discourses in order to become ‘authentic cutters.’

  • 20.
    Gradin Franzen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The beauty of blood?: Self-injury and ambivalence in an Internet community2011In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 279-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyzes how young self-injuring women and men construct themselves as 'cutters.' The study draws on observations of a Swedish Internet community connected to self-injurious behavior and departs from a poststructuralist framework in order to analyze how members position themselves and others in relation to cultural discourses on self-injury. Two main discourses are identified in the Web community: the 'normalizing' and the 'pathologizing' discourses, which give contrasting versions of self-injury, self-cutters, and their scarred bodies. Within the normalizing discourse, self-injurious behavior is regarded as a legitimate practice for dealing with mental health problems, 'cutters' are resilient, and their blood and scars are beautiful. In contrast, within the pathologizing discourse self-injurious behavior is understood as morally reprehensible, self-cutters are pathological, and their bodies are repulsive. In the Web community, members invoke both discourses, which leads to ambivalent subject positions. This study shows that the seemingly contradictory subject positions of the two discourses in fact are interdependent on each other as members draw on both the normalizing and the pathologizing discourses in order to become 'authentic cutters.'

  • 21.
    Johansson [Tinnfält], Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Adolescent girls' and boys' perceptions of mental health2007In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 183-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study are to analyse the concept of mental health from the perspective of adolescent girls and boys and to describe what adolescent girls and boys regard as important determinants of mental health. Interviews with 48 children, 13 and 16 years old, in Sweden were held individually or in focus groups. The adolescents perceived mental health as an emotional experience, where positive as well as negative health is part of the concept. Family is the most important determinant for young people's mental health, closely followed by friends. Neither girls nor boys believed that there were any large differences in mental health between girls and boys. Age differences seemed to be more important than gender in the perception of mental health by children.

  • 22.
    Kasselias Wiltgren, Layal
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Youth using national symbols in constructing identities2014In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 308-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artefacts containing national or ethnic symbols, such as flags and maps, are frequently used by 14-year-old youth in a multiethnic, suburban municipality in Stockholm. Appearing as ornaments or trinkets to outsiders, to the initiated they are distinctive group markers displaying multiple political and ideological affiliations. As visual symbols these artefacts invoke communicative, but non-verbal, processes: they interpellate viewers who answer with their reactions. Thus these objects serve to both banally reproduce nationalism and ethnicity and to serve as identity markers. These identities are primarily inclusive and non-aggressive. The symbols do not seem to be a sign of resistance to mainstream Swedish society in line with much work in the field of youth culture. Instead, they are used as a proud, visual display of additional identities complementing a Swedish identity. Ethnicity research often covers linguistic markers or ethnic and national identities. In contrast, the area of youth consumption of nationalism, in the form of objects featuring national, ethnic and religious symbols, is as yet not well documented. Based on a year-long fieldwork in a junior high school, this paper documents ways in which minority group students handle material artefacts and what these symbols involved mean to them.

  • 23.
    Kassman, Anders
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Institute for Civil Society Studies.
    Franzen, Eva
    Longer-term Labour-market Consequences of Economic Inactivity during Young Adulthood: a Swedish National Cohort Study2005In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 403-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Coffey, Julia
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Nygren, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mental health in young Australians: a longitudinal study2016In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses patterns in mental health of young Australians from age 19 through 25 and explores changes in mental health over these years. Data are derived from five waves of the Australian Life Patterns longitudinal study. The outcome variable in focus was self-reported mental health. Analyses were conducted in two steps using linear mixed models with both fixed and random effects. The analysis shows a negative linear trend in mental health status. The mental health of women was worse than that of men though a negative trend was found in both men and women. Though high socio-economic status (SES) individuals reported best mental health compared to their mid and low-SES peers, a negative trend was identified for them as well as for mid-SES participants. There is weak support for a negative trend among those of low-SES backgrounds. The study adds to evidence that there is a negative trend in mental health in young Australians but that this trend is not uniform across all young people. In light of this we argue the need for further research that analyses patterns of poor mental health in relation to social systems and institutions.

  • 25.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin. Youth Research Centre, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, the University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Coffey, Julia
    Nygren, Maria
    Mental health in young Australians: a longitudinal study2016In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses patterns in mental health of young Australians from age 19 through 25 and explores changes in mental health over these years. Data are derived from five waves of the Australian Life Patterns longitudinal study. The outcome variable in focus was self-reported mental health. Analyses were conducted in two steps using linear mixed models with both fixed and random effects. The analysis shows a negative linear trend in mental health status. The mental health of women was worse than that of men though a negative trend was found in both men and women. Though high socio-economic status (SES) individuals reported best mental health compared to their mid and low-SES peers, a negative trend was identified for them as well as for mid-SES participants. There is weak support for a negative trend among those of low-SES backgrounds. The study adds to evidence that there is a negative trend in mental health in young Australians but that this trend is not uniform across all young people. In light of this we argue the need for further research that analyses patterns of poor mental health in relation to social systems and institutions.

  • 26.
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    From childhood to young adulthood: the importance of self-esteem during childhood for occupational achievements among young men and women2018In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1392-1410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of self-esteem during childhood on men’s and women’s occupational prestige in young adulthood. By combining first-hand information from parents in the Swedish Level-of-Living surveys (LNU) 2000 and their children in the Child-LNU in 2000 and the follow-up study in LNU-2010, we are able to assess how self-esteem during adolescence is related to occupational prestige in adulthood. Multivariate analyses were used to determine whether associations between self-esteem (global and domain-specific) in childhood (aged 10–18 years) and occupational prestige in young adulthood (aged 20–28) exist and, if so, what the magnitudes of these associations are for each respective gender.

    For women, there is a positive association between confidence in mathematics and prestige, even when accounting for actual math grades. Global self-esteem is positively related to later occupational prestige as well. For men, self-esteem is unrelated to occupational prestige. Only actual performance in mathematics is important for men’s occupational achievements.

    These results indicate the importance of taking gender differences into account when investigating how self-esteem is related to outcomes in young adulthood. A possible implication is the importance of focusing on the development of self-esteem among children, particularly girls, in school.

  • 27.
    Manhica, Hélio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Berg, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rostila, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden and the potential of education: a national cohort study2019In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 533-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This register-based study examined the importance of education on labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden. The study population consisted of unaccompanied (n = 1606) and accompanied refuges (n = 4142), aged 23–26 years in 2006–2010, after 7 years of residence in Sweden. Native Swedish, aged 24 years (n = 347,255) constituted the comparison population, with intercountry adoptees (n = 6689) as an alternative reference group. Gender-stratified multinomial regression models indicated that unaccompanied and accompanied male and female young refugees had higher risks of being in insecure work force and NEET compared to native Swedes with comparable levels of education. However, young refugees and intercountry adoptees with primary education had similar risks of poor labour market outcomes. The educational differences within each group concerning the risk of being in insecure work force were comparable. With the exception of unaccompanied females, secondary education seemed to be less protective against being in NEET among young refugees compared to native Swedes and intercountry adoptees. We conclude that while young refugees face employment disadvantages, education has the potential of mitigating poor labour market outcomes in this group.

  • 28.
    Manhica, Hélio
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University.
    Berg, Lisa
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University.
    Almquist, Ylva B
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University.
    Rostila, Mikael
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University.
    Hjern, Anders
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University / Karolinska Institutet.
    Labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden and the potential of education: a national cohort study2019In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 533-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This register-based study examined the importance of education on labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden. The study population consisted of unaccompanied (n?=?1606) and accompanied refuges (n?=?4142), aged 23?26 years in 2006?2010, after 7 years of residence in Sweden. Native Swedish, aged 24 years (n?=?347,255) constituted the comparison population, with intercountry adoptees (n?=?6689) as an alternative reference group. Gender-stratified multinomial regression models indicated that unaccompanied and accompanied male and female young refugees had higher risks of being in insecure work force and NEET compared to native Swedes with comparable levels of education. However, young refugees and intercountry adoptees with primary education had similar risks of poor labour market outcomes. The educational differences within each group concerning the risk of being in insecure work force were comparable. With the exception of unaccompanied females, secondary education seemed to be less protective against being in NEET among young refugees compared to native Swedes and intercountry adoptees. We conclude that while young refugees face employment disadvantages, education has the potential of mitigating poor labour market outcomes in this group.

  • 29.
    Ojala, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Adolescents’ worries about environmental risks: subjective well-being, values, and existential dimensions. 2005In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 331-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies concerning the association between macrosocial worries and well-being

    have shown diverse results. In this study a person-oriented approach was employed. Two

    subgroups of adolescents experiencing a high degree of worry about environmental risks

    but displaying varying levels of subjective well-being were identified. One scored low on

    well-being while the other scored high. Thereafter, the assumption that the two subgroups

    would differ on theoretically relevant comparison measures was investigated. The group

    high on both worry and well-being scored significantly higher on meaningfulness, trust in

    environmental organizations, and on anger and hope in relation to environmental risks

    than the group high on worry but low on well-being. Finally, environmental worry was

    mainly predicted by biospheric and altruistic values, but also by high levels of trust in

    science and environmental organizations. These results are discussed in relation to

    existential, emotion, and identity theories.

  • 30.
    Ojala, Maria
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Adolescents’ worries about environmental risks: subjective well-being, values, and existential dimensions2005In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 331-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies concerning the association between macrosocial worries and well-being have shown diverse results. In this study a person-oriented approach was employed. Two subgroups of adolescents experiencing a high degree of worry about environmental risks but displaying varying levels of subjective well-being were identified. One scored low on well-being while the other scored high. Thereafter, the assumption that the two subgroups would differ on theoretically relevant comparison measures was investigated. The group high on both worry and well-being scored significantly higher on meaningfulness, trust in environmental organizations, and on anger and hope in relation to environmental risks than the group high on worry but low on well-being. Finally, environmental worry was mainly predicted by biospheric and altruistic values, but also by high levels of trust in science and environmental organizations. These results are discussed in relation to existential, emotion, and identity theories.

  • 31.
    Ojala, Maria
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Climate change skepticism among adolescents2015In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1135-1153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people relate to one of the most serious social problems, global climate change, in different ways. This study focuses on adolescents (Time 1: mean age = 16.6 years) who de-emphasize the seriousness of this problem. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to investigate what factors predict climate skepticism cross-sectionally and what factors predict climate skepticism one year later. Two waves of data were collected (Time 1: n = 870; Time 2: n = 684). Factors important for explaining skepticism among adults (values, knowledge, conservative political orientation, gender, media use), a cluster of variables related to societal powerlessness (distrust, disinterest in societal issues, low environmental efficacy, low tolerance toward immigrants), and descriptive social norms (social influence from parents and peers) were included in the study. With the exception of media use in cross-sectional analyses, and of media use and a conservative political orientation in bivariate longitudinal analyses, all of these factors were significantly associated with skepticism. However, only perceiving parents as having climate skeptical attitudes and low tolerance toward immigrants predicted an increase in climate change skepticism over the one-year period. Results are discussed in relation to earlier studies about climate change skepticism and socialization theories. Implications for climate change education are also discussed.

  • 32.
    Ojala, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Climate change skepticism among adolescents2015In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1135-1153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people relate to one of the most serious social problems, global climate change, in different ways. This study focuses on adolescents (Time 1: mean age = 16.6 years) who de-emphasize the seriousness of this problem. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to investigate what factors predict climate skepticism cross-sectionally and what factors predict climate skepticism one year later. Two waves of data were collected (Time 1: n = 870; Time 2: n = 684). Factors important for explaining skepticism among adults (values, knowledge, conservative political orientation, gender, media use), a cluster of variables related to societal powerlessness (distrust, disinterest in societal issues, low environmental efficacy, low tolerance toward immigrants), and descriptive social norms (social influence from parents and peers) were included in the study. With the exception of media use in cross-sectional analyses, and of media use and a conservative political orientation in bivariate longitudinal analyses, all of these factors were significantly associated with skepticism. However, only perceiving parents as having climate skeptical attitudes and low tolerance toward immigrants predicted an increase in climate change skepticism over the one-year period. Results are discussed in relation to earlier studies about climate change skepticism and socialization theories. Implications for climate change education are also discussed.

  • 33.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    For Activists, For Potential Voters, For Consumers: Three Modes of Pro­ducing the Civic Web2008In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 497-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, numerous studies of the internet's civic dimensions have taught us a considerable amount about the form of new technologies. They have, for instance, analysed how the internet's interactive character, its multimodality and its open character create civic opportunities, not least for young people. The field has, however, rather neglected a number of important issues. For instance, the category of 'producers' of civic content has received little attention. Hence, research has neglected questions such as the following. What interests inspire producers of civic websites? How is the production being carried through? What views of the internet inspire their work? This article begins to redress this neglect by analysing the producers of three different websites. The three websites are brought from different spheres of civil society - party politics, commercial media and activism - and they are analysed through producer interviews. The article reveals and critically discusses differences and similarities between different modes of producing civic web resources.

  • 34.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    For Activists, for Potential Voters, for Consumers: Three Modes of Producing the Civic Web2008In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 497-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, numerous studies of the internet's civic dimensions have taught us a considerable amount about the form of new technologies. They have, for instance, analysed how the internet's interactive character, its multimodality and its open character create civic opportunities, not least for young people. The field has, however, rather neglected a number of important issues. For instance, the category of ‘producers’ of civic content has received little attention. Hence, research has neglected questions such as the following. What interests inspire producers of civic websites? How is the production being carried through? What views of the internet inspire their work? This article begins to redress this neglect by analysing the producers of three different websites. The three websites are brought from different spheres of civil society – party politics, commercial media and activism – and they are analysed through producer interviews. The article reveals and critically discusses differences and similarities between different modes of producing civic web resources.

  • 35.
    Pitti, Ilaria
    Department of Sociology and Business Law, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    What does being an adult mean?: Comparing young people's and adults' representations of adulthood2017In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1225-1241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at exploring the representations young people and adults attribute to the concept of adulthood in order to analyse the effects these ideas have on their reciprocal perception and recognition. In so doing, it draws upon data collected through a grounded theory study, which has been conducted in Italy involving young people and adults in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Data show that an outdated traditional model is still used by both the samples to determine who is an adult and when the adult status is acquired without discussing its validity in front of a changed social scenario. An evaluative function is added to traditional transitional markers of adulthood, which are used by both young people and adults to accuse each other of being not mature enough'. A discrepancy between the shared ideal representations of adulthood and the actual possibility the two generations have to meet those social expectations in their lives emerge. The implications of these results for youth transitions to adulthood are discussed in the light of the high level of intergenerational inequality characterising the Italian context.

  • 36.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Vocational or academic track?: Study and career plans among Swedish students living in rural areas2018In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 360-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study explores how rural lower secondary school students reflect on study and career choices, focusing on the choice between vocational and academic upper secondary programs. Applying a spatial perspective, we analyze individual students’ reflections about study and career choices within a variety of rural regions, and compare patterns in the regions. The results indicate complex interactions between structural factors and individual dispositions. In places where education levels were low and the local labor market predominantly offered unskilled manual and service work, there was a stronger tendency to choose vocational programs than in places with higher education levels and access to a more varied labor market. Likewise, there was an association between strongly gendered labor markets and gender-typical choices. However, individual students positioned themselves actively in relation to the local place, its local labor market and social relations; their choices were place-bound to varying degrees, and chose upper secondary programs and presented ideas about prospective careers that were harmonious with the local labor market in some cases, but discordant in other cases. The results are discussed in the framework of individuals' horizon for actions. 

  • 37.
    Silvén Hagström, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Breaking the silence: parentally suicide-bereaved youths’ self-disclosure on the internet and the social responses of others related to stigma2017In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1077-1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide stigma’ contributes to the silencing of parental suicide within family and social networks. This article departs from a narrative theoretical framework on grief and identity to analyse suicide-bereaved youths ‘breaking the silence’ through self-disclosure in self-initiated chat threads on the Internet, which is their way of actively seeking social support, telling of their experiences and opening up space for a renegotiation of the meanings around suicide. The article investigates which narrative frameworks for the interpretation of suicide are operating in these contexts, and whether and, if so, how stigma is reproduced or counteracted. Two frameworks are identified: ‘Who is to blame for suicide?’; and ‘What caused the suicide?’. The former is utilized by the newly bereaved chat-initiators, who attribute blame for suicide to the parent and/or themselves in accordance with stigmatizing discourses. These are reproduced in the responses first and foremost of the non-suicide-bereaved, who construct a dichotomy between the deceased parent as ‘perpetrator’ and the child as ‘victim’ in order to relieve blame. A lack of contact with other suicide-bereaved youths can reinforce feelings of otherness. Identities, however, can potentially be de-stigmatized by the meanings drawn from the latter framework.

  • 38.
    Sternudd, Hans T.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Photographs of self-injury: Production and reception in a group of self-injurers2012In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 421-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photographs of self-injury (SI) on the Internet, according to the literature and the wider media, spread and encourage self-destructive behaviour, although very little is known about these effects. A group of self-injurers was questioned about the reasons for producing and looking at photos of SI, and were asked about their reaction to exposure of them. The informants confirmed that the effects were alleviating rather than the opposite, and the production of the images was often related to notions about memory and proof. To publish them was apprehended as a way of sharing experiences with others and to give and/or receive help. Photographs of self-injuries were described as one resource of a SI community culture. Informants often emphasised that the outcome of watching these photos varies due to individual and situational differences. The results of the study are inconsistent with unfounded presumptions about photographs of SI, which are replaced with a nuanced and contradictory picture.

  • 39.
    Westberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Forever Young?: Young People's Conception of Adulthood2004In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 7, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Westberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Forever young?: Young people's conception of adulthood - the Swedish case2004In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the issue of young people's subjective conception of attainment of adulthood. Setting a process, as well as a multidimensional perspective, the analysis enables the study of both role transitions and issues of individual maturity in attainment of adulthood. Usually, after completing specific role transitions, young people are regarded as adult members of society. Due to social changes it is of interest to study whether young people themselves also put the same emphasis on these role transitions in attainment of adulthood. Drawing on data from the Swedish Board of Youth Affairs containing 3200 respondents aged 16-29, the results indicate that young people who have completed role transitions assign them less value for the importance of adult status. However, becoming a parent is a role transition that is given great importance and is also in relation to the issue of responsibility.

  • 41. Westberg, Annika
    Forever Young? Young People's Conception of Adulthood: The Swedish Case.2004In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 41 of 41
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