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  • 1. Aidis, R.
    et al.
    Welter, Friederike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
    Smallbone, D.
    Isakova, N.
    Female Entrepreneurship in Transi­tion Economies: The Case of Lithuania and Ukraine2007In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 157-183Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Anxo, Dominique
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Mencarini, Letizia
    University of Turin.
    Pailhe, Ariane
    INED Paris.
    Solaz, Annae
    INED Paris.
    Tanturri, Maria Letizia
    University of Padua.
    Gender Differences in Time-Use over the Life Course: a Comparative Analysis of France, Italy, Sweden, and the United States2011In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 159-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution analyzes how men  and  women in France,  Italy, Sweden, and the  United  States  use  their  time  over  the  life cycle and  the  extent  to  which societal  and  institutional contexts  influence the  gender division  of labor.  Inorder  to test the hypothesis that contextual factors play a crucial role in shaping time allocation,  this study considers countries  that diverge considerably  in terms of  welfare  state  regime,  employment and  paid  working  time  systems, familypolicies, and social norms. Using national  time-use surveys for the late 1990s andearly 2000s and  regression  techniques, the  study not  only finds  large  gender discrepancies in time use in each country at all stages of life but also determinesthat   institutional  contexts,   in  particular  the   design  of  family  policies  and employment regimes, do shape gender roles in different ways, and that Sweden displays the  lowest gender gap in time allocation  across the  life course.

  • 3.
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    Uppsala universitet.
    Money With a Mission, Volume 1: Microfinance and Poverty Reduction, by James Copestake, Martin Greely, Susan Johnson, Naila Kabeer, and Anton Simanowitz. Warwickshire, UK: Practical Action, 2006. 272 pp. ISBN-13: 978-1853396144 (pbk).2009In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 103-106Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Money With a Mission, Volume 1, Microfinance and Poverty Reduction, by James Copestake, Martin Greely, Susan Johnson, Naila Kabeer, and Anton Simanowitz. Warwickshire, UK: Practical Action, 2006. 272 pp. ISBN-978-18533961442009In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 103-106Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Does Hiring Discrimination Cause Gender Segregation in the Swedish Labor Market?2011In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 71-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies gender discrimination at hiring in the Swedish labor market. It examines data compiled from an experiment conducted in 2005–6 in which two qualitatively identical applications, one with a woman's name on it and the other with a man's name, were sent to employers advertising positions in Stockholm and Gothenburg (the two largest labor markets in Sweden). The study adds to previous international field experiments by providing additional analysis of the Swedish labor market to determine whether hiring discrimination is a primary cause of occupational gender segregation. The results show that, on average, women have a somewhat higher callback rate to interview in female-dominated occupations, while in male-dominated occupations there is no evidence of gender difference. These findings suggest that the bulk of the prevailing gender segregation in Sweden cannot be explained by discrimination in hiring.

  • 6.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Johansson, Mats
    Does Fathers' Care Spill Over? Evaluating Reforms in the Swedish Parental Leave Program2019In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 67-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of reserving months for fathers in the Swedish parental leave system was to increase fathers' use of leave as well as encourage gender equality in the home and labor market. Using data from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency, this study investigates the effects of the reform - reserving one month of leave for fathers in 1995 and a second month in 2002 - on gender equality in the home. The study uses the take up of the parental benefit for the care for sick children (CFSC) as a proxy for gender equality and follows parents' use of CFSC for twelve years for the first reform and ten years for the second reform. Results indicate the first reform led to more equal leave sharing, mainly because use of the benefit decreased among mothers with low education, and at least in part fulfilled the aim of increasing gender equality in the home.

  • 7. Folbre, N.
    et al.
    Shaw, L. B.
    Stark, Agneta
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Business Administration and Management.
    Introduction: Gender and aging2005In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume focuses on gendered differences in the economic resources of the elderly and the individuals charged with meeting the day-to-day care needs of the elderly. Often the burden of care falls on women, who themselves have less access to care as they age. The introduction gives an overview of the public policy initiatives, social insurance and welfare programs, and family provisions for care that are thoroughly examined in the following contributions. The volume highlights both cross-national contrasts and common challenges to meeting the economic and care needs of the growing elderly population.

  • 8.
    Hammarstedt, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Economics and Statistics, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ahmed, Ali
    Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aldén, Lina
    Linnaeus University, Economics and Statistics, Växjö, Sweden.
    Sexual prejudice and labor market outcomes for gays and lesbians: Evidence from Sweden2015In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 90-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from a study of sexual prejudice and differentials in labor market outcomes due to sexual orientation. It uses data from a nationwide Swedish survey on public attitudes toward homosexuals, conducted in 1999, and combines them with register data for 2007, which include information about sexual orientation, employment status, and yearly earnings for the total population in Sweden. It finds that prejudice against homosexuals negatively affects the relative employment and relative earnings of gay men. Lesbians are affected negatively by prejudice against homosexuals in terms of employment, but the relationship is less clear in regard to earnings. Discrimination against homosexuals, as well as social norms, occupational sorting and self-selection in, geographic mobility are presented as explanations for the results.

  • 9.
    Hammarstedt, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Ahmed, Ali
    Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Uppsala.
    Aldén, Lina
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Sexual prejudice and labor market outcomes of gays and lesbians: Evidence from Sweden2015In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 90-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from a study of sexual prejudice and differentials in labor market outcomes due to sexual orientation. It uses data from a nationwide Swedish survey on public attitudes toward homosexuals, conducted in 1999, and combines them with register data for 2007, which include information about sexual orientation, employment status, and yearly earnings for the total population in Sweden. It finds that prejudice against homosexuals negatively affects the relative employment and relative earnings of gay men. Lesbians are affected negatively by prejudice against homosexuals in terms of employment, but the relationship is less clear in regard to earnings. Discrimination against homosexuals, as well as social norms, occupational sorting and self-selection in, geographic mobility are presented as explanations for the results.

  • 10. Hassani-Nezhad, Lena
    et al.
    Sjögren, Anna
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Unilateral Divorce for Women and Labor Supply in the Middle East and North Africa: The Effect of Khul Reform2014In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 113-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution investigates whether the introduction of Khul, Islamic unilateral divorce rights for women, helps to explain recent dramatic increases in women's labor supply in Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) countries over the 1980-2008 period. It shows, using data for eighteen countries, that Khul reform increased the labor force participation of women relative to men. Furthermore, we find evidence that the effect of Khul is larger for younger women (ages 24-34) compared to older women (ages 35-55). Younger women increased their labor force participation by 6 percent, which accounts for about 10 percent of the increase in their labor force participation from 1980 to 2008.

  • 11.
    Jakobsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    kotsadam, Andreas
    Gender Equity and Prostitution: An Investigation of Attitudes in Norway and Sweden2011In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 31-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution assesses attitudes toward prostitution in Norway and Sweden, where it is illegal to buy sex. Sweden's law was put into place in 1999, and Norway followed in 2009. These laws were embedded in different market structures and discourses when enacted. This study uses a 2008 Internet survey to shed light on attitudes toward various aspects of prostitution while controlling for other socio-demographic factors. Findings include that men and sexual liberals of either gender are more likely positive toward prostitution and men and women who are conservative or support gender equality are more negative. Holding anti-immigration views correlates with more positive attitudes toward buying, but not selling, sex. Norwegians are more positive than Swedes toward prostitution. Supporting gender equality has more explanatory power in Sweden than in Norway, which may be due to the use of gender equality to frame the Swedish debate.

  • 12.
    Stark, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Gender equality and occupational segregation in Nordic labour markets2002In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 133-137Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Stark, Agneta
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Business Administration and Management.
    Warm hands in cold age: on the need of a new world order of care2005In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 7-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world is aging as fertility and mortality are both decreasing. This article focuses on practical care work for the elderly. Such work is done primarily by women even though a larger portion than previously is paid rather than unpaid. All over the world, most elderly care work is organized within the family, most often unpaid. Men receive more care from partners than women, while women receive more care from female relatives. When care work is paid, the payment is generally low. A comparison between Germany, Spain, and Sweden demonstrates similar gender patterns, even though the role of the state in supporting care differs considerably as do care workers' conditions. The sustainability of today's distribution and organization of care work is questioned as the need for care increases, and the possibility of more equal sharing of care work between women and men is explored.

  • 14.
    Stark, Agneta
    Dalarna University.
    Warm Hans in Cold Age - on the Need of a New World Order of Care2005In: Feminist Economics, ISSN 1354-5701, E-ISSN 1466-4372, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 7-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world is aging as fertility and mortality are both decreasing. This article focuses on practical care work for the elderly. Such work is done primarily by women even though a larger portion than previously is paid rather than unpaid. All over the world, most elderly care work is organized within the family, most often unpaid. Men receive more care from partners than women, while women receive more care from female relatives. When care work is paid, the payment is generally low. A comparison between Germany, Spain, and Sweden demonstrates similar gender patterns, even though the role of the state in supporting care differs considerably as do care workers' conditions. The sustainability of today's distribution and organization of care work is questioned as the need for care increases, and the possibility of more equal sharing of care work between women and men is explored.

1 - 14 of 14
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