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  • 1.
    Berglund, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Subjective well-being and job satisfaction among self-employed and regular employees: does personality matter differently?2016In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the importance of personality traits for subjective well-being (SWB) and job satisfaction among self-employed. The aim of this article is to investigate if the Big-Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness to experience) have different relationships with SWB and job satisfaction among self-employed compared with regular employees. Data come from a Swedish survey comprising representative samples of self-employed (n = 2483) and regular employees (n = 2642). Personality traits are measured using a 10-item personality measure. Our findings show that there are only small differences, between self-employed and regular employees, in the associations between personality traits and SWB. For job satisfaction, on the other hand, we find much stronger relationships for self-employed than the regularly employed. For self-employed, every personality trait except ‘openness to experience’ have a significant positive relationship with job satisfaction. In comparison, only ‘extraversion’ and ‘emotional stability’ are significantly correlated to job satisfaction among regular employees. The relationship between ‘extraversion’ and job satisfaction was furthermore substantially weaker among regular employees. Therefore, being self-employed seems to be particularly beneficial for individuals scoring high on ‘extraversion,’ ‘agreeableness,’ and ‘conscientiousness.’

  • 2.
    Berglund, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    Umeå universitet.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Subjective well-being and job satisfaction among self-employed and regular employees: does personality matter differently?2016In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the importance of personality traits for subjective well-being

    (SWB) and job satisfaction among self-employed. The aim of this article is to

    investigate if the Big-Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness,

    conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness to experience) have different

    relationships with SWB and job satisfaction among self-employed compared with

    regular employees. Data come from a Swedish survey comprising representative

    samples of self-employed (n D 2483) and regular employees (n D 2642). Personality

    traits are measured using a 10-item personality measure. Our findings show that there

    are only small differences, between self-employed and regular employees, in the

    associations between personality traits and SWB. For job satisfaction, on the other

    hand, we find much stronger relationships for self-employed than the regularly

    employed. For self-employed, every personality trait except ‘openness to experience’

    have a significant positive relationship with job satisfaction. In comparison, only

    ‘extraversion’ and ‘emotional stability’ are significantly correlated to job satisfaction

    among regular employees. The relationship between ‘extraversion’ and job

    satisfaction was furthermore substantially weaker among regular employees.

    Therefore, being self-employed seems to be particularly beneficial for individuals

    scoring high on ‘extraversion,’ ‘agreeableness,’ and ‘conscientiousness.’

  • 3.
    Bjuggren, Carl Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Stockholm School of Economics, EHFF, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    HUI Research, Stockholm & Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Johansson, Dan
    HUI Research, Stockholm & Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    High-growth firms and family ownership2013In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 365-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical studies demonstrate that most net job-growth originates from a small number of high-growth firms (HGFs). The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether family ownership matters for being an HGF, using data on all private firms in Sweden during 1993–2006. Our study is possible due to a tax reform that required tax authorities to identify family relations among ultimate owners of every Swedish firm. We find that family ownership at first sight decreases the probability of exhibiting high growth, but further analysis indicates a more complex relationship. The negative effect of family ownership seems to be driven primarily by small firms, and sometimes even becomes positive when firm growth is analyzed over longer time periods. In addition, the negative effect of family ownership is no longer present when we analyze firms that transferred ownership and control for unobserved time-invariant firm-specific heterogeneity.

  • 4.
    Bjuggren, Carl Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    HUI Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Dalarna University, Dalarna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Dan
    HUI Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Dalarna University, Dalarna, Sweden.
    High-Growth Firms and Family Ownership2013In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 365-385Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bjuggren, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Duggal, Rubecca
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Giang, Dinh
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Ownership Dispersion and Capital Structures in Family Firms: A Study of Closed Medium-Sized Enterprises2012In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 185-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family firms are entities contribute greatly to all economies worldwide. In the following study we investigate capital structures and ownership dispersion among Swedish family firms. In order to find concluding results, we proceed with a regression between leverage and family business, leverage and family firm age, and leverage and ownership dispersion. Our regression outcomes support a U-shaped relationship between family ownership dispersion and leverage, but do not confirm a relation between leverage and family business. Earlier studies made in the field have generated differing results; however, there are some studies that are actually in line with our findings. A unique database developed at Jönköping University is used that enables us to obtain access to firm-level data. Earlier studies in the same genre have only had access to industry-level data.

  • 6.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A founder's heritage: the development of organizational identity2019In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 73-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to understand how a former family firm strategically makes use of the founder's legacy to preserve its organizational identity. Following a single case study approach, it draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data. We show how central organizational activities are affected by a founder's heritage long after the formal exit has taken place, illustrating the central, enduring, and distinctive elements of organizational identity a founder has. Regardless of ownership forms, the family company founder's legacy is used to legitimize new owners and maintain the organization's identity. However, centripetal moves complicate the preservation of the organizational identity, whereas a high focus on value leveraging in another ownership form opens up for centrifugal approaches which strengthen the entrepreneurial dimension of organizational identity.

  • 7.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The creation, sharing and transfer of knowledge in family business2008In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 413-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This present research aims at investigating how "knowledge-related human capital" can be accumulated, i.e. created, shared and transferred, in family business over time. "Knowledge-related human capital" is viewed as pure knowledge and skill which family members have gained and developed through education and experience within and outside the organization. Two wine-producing family firms from Switzerland and a liqueur family firm from Italy are part of this research. A tentative knowledge model is presented at the end of the study. It analyses factors responsible for the accumulation process of knowledge in family business across generations.

  • 8.
    Hasche, Nina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Höglund, Linda
    School of Business, Society and Engineering (EST), Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Quadruple helix as a network of relationships: creating value within a Swedish regional innovation system2019In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A regional smart specialization initiative is investigated from a quadruple helix framework (industry, government, academia, and users/civil society). Based on a qualitative case study, we examine the interdependencies of actors, resources, and activities from a micro perspective. The aim is to understand the relationships and the value created between the different actors. From the results we conclude that the fourth helix should be viewed as a whole – an arena where triple helix actors in different value adding relationships take on different roles – where they create value to civil society, for example, new jobs or products for improved elderly care. In line with this, we state that the fourth helix is far more complex than limiting it to simply become a fourth separate helix of users or civil society. There is a complexity in that the fourth helix consists of both different users (including triple helix actors) as well as civil society. Users in the quadruple helix framework can also be defined in several ways depending on the context of the arena (the fourth helix) and what value adding activities they bring to civil society. Thus, users can be businesses, organizations, citizens, society, and many more things.

  • 9.
    Hasche, Nina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The value of failed relationships for the development of a Medtech start-up2018In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 97-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major drawback of start-ups is that they are known to have liability of newness and smallness. One way start-ups can overcome these liabilities is by forming relationships and building a network with other firms, where exchange of knowledge and resources can be facilitated. These relationships between firms can include a great deal of ambiguity, and it is not always known what type of value will come out of the relationship. This present study sets out to explore how start-ups pursue opportunities through networks, and more specifically through relationships with other firms, to co-create or co-destruct value. Based on the explorative nature of this study, a qualitative case-based research design has been developed. Contributions from the study are (1) that start-ups can gain value even from failed relationships; (2) the insight of the dynamic nature of the relationships and interaction episodes for start-ups; and (3) highlighting that interaction episodes can result in three different types of changes.

  • 10.
    Hills, Gerald E.
    et al.
    Bradley University, Peoria Il, USA.
    Hultman, Claes M.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Academic roots: the past and the present of entrepreneurial marketing2011In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in entrepreneurial marketing is about 30 years old. During this period research has followed many trajectories. Two important but divergent routes are small business marketing versus entrepreneurial marketing mirroring the discourse of small businesses versus entrepreneurial firms. Today small business marketing and entrepreneurial marketing are regarded as separate research fields, however related. EM-researches have been very open-minded towards different approaches in methodology, especially compared to research within mainstream marketing in the US. During this rather long period of time advances in other disciplines have been beneficial for our own research. One such example is the development of Effectuation theory allowing us to understand entrepreneurial decision-making and consequently, important aspects of entrepreneurial marketing behaviour. Many of the research questions, regarded as important by scholars in a panel 1986, are still regarded as important, for example new venture growth. Other issues have lost its relevance. But over all many important questions still are waiting for an answer and the whole research field of Entrepreneurial marketing offers tremendous research opportunities.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Economics.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Economics.
    Bjuggren, Carl Magnus
    High-Growth Firms and Family Ownership2013In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 365-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical studies demonstrate that most net job-growth originates from a small number of high-growth firms (HGFs). The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether family ownership matters for being an HGF, using data on all private firms in Sweden during 1993–2006. Our study is possible due to a tax reform that required tax authorities to identify family relations among ultimate owners of every Swedish firm. We find that family ownership at first sight decreases the probability of exhibiting high growth, but further analysis indicates a more complex relationship. The negative effect of family ownership seems to be driven primarily by small firms, and sometimes even becomes positive when firm growth is analyzed over longer time periods. In addition, the negative effect of family ownership is no longer present when we analyze firms that transferred ownership and control for unobserved time-invariant firm-specific heterogeneity.

  • 12.
    Kask, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Business mating: when start-ups get it right2013In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 511-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of forming business relationships is critical for the prosperity of startups; still, few studies have examined how conditions inside and around the start-uptogether lead to business mating – occurrence of a new business relationship. Toclarify the importance of proper fit among management style and invention featuresfor high mating chances, this paper tackles this need by taking a configurationalapproach. We use qualitative comparison analysis (QCA) to analyze case studies from16 invention-based start-ups seeking marketing partners. Findings indicate differentsolutions leading to high chances of forming business relationships. This studycontributes with a typology to the business relationship and start-up literature, as wellas discusses future directions to the emerging sub-domain of business mating research.

  • 13.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The impact of business advice: interplay between entrepreneur and experts2016In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 285-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During a springboard session, the entrepreneur meets an expert panel which gives himor her strategic advice. How these meetings transpire is of great importance when itcomes to the support of regional, as well as national entrepreneurship and economicgrowth. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what is verbally expressed duringthese meetings and how this can assist entrepreneurship. Eleven different springboardsare investigated via the method of content analysis. These springboards concernedentrepreneurs who merely sought strategic business advice or those who applied forventure capital. The results indicate that the entrepreneurs who applied for venturecapital had less use for the advice than the other group. This can partly be explainedby panel members’ focus on risk and the institutionalized conditions which build on arational discourse.

  • 14. Sanz-Velasco, S. A.
    Opportunity Development in Knowledge-Intensive Ventures: a case study2004In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 277-292Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Silver, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Berggren, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Vegholm, Fatima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    The impact of investment readiness on investor commitment and market accessibility in SMEs2010In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 81-95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Silver, Lars
    et al.
    Centre for Banking and Finance at the Royal Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Björn
    Vegholm, Fatima
    The impact of investment readiness on investor commitment and market accessibility in SMEs2010In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 81-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. Raising the level of investment readiness in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is seen as one of the most important strategies in public policy for promoting entrepreneurship and SME growth in Europe. This paper analyzes the impact of investment readiness on investor commitment and market accessibility in Swedish SMEs. The empirical base for the paper is a survey answered by 459 SME owners. We have analyzed the data using the linear structural relations (LISREL) method, a structural equation modeling technique. The analysis indicates that an increased level of investment readiness in SMEs results in closer working relationships with financiers and a higher level of commitment by the investors, which in turn leads to greater market accessibility for SMEs. This study supports public policy focused on programs that alleviate the problems associated with the lack of investment readiness in SMEs.

  • 17.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Social and economic ties in the freelance and sharing economies2018In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 77-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Örtqvist, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Performance outcomes from reciprocal altruism: a multi-level model2019In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, many small- and medium-sized firms have joined formal strategic networks in an effort to enhance firm performance. We set out to examine how altruistic behavior by these firms affected their performance at different levels of altruistic norms within their network. Using a multi-level analytic approach and data from a population of Swedish strategic networks, we found significant cross-level moderating effects that explained variance in firm-level performance. The results showed that firms participating in strategic networks benefit more from being altruistic when other network members generally display high levels of altruism. Apparently, altruistic behaviors are rewarded relative to a general network norm. The potential to perform well thus depends on aligning a firm’s altruistic behavior with the general level of altruism in its network.

1 - 18 of 18
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