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  • 1.
    Acevedo, Reinaldo
    et al.
    Biologic Evaluation Department, Finlay Institute of Vaccines, Havana, Cuba.
    Bai, Xilian
    Meningococcal Reference Unit, Public Health England, Manchester, UK.
    Borrow, Ray
    Meningococcal Reference Unit, Public Health England, Manchester, UK.
    Caugant, Dominique A.
    Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlos, Josefina
    Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of the East – Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Ceyhan, Mehmet
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Christensen, Hannah
    Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Climent, Yanet
    Biologic Evaluation Department, Finlay Institute of Vaccines, Havana, Cuba.
    De Wals, Philippe
    Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City QC, Canada.
    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri
    Department of Paediatrics, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Faculty of Medicine, Eskisehir, Turkey.
    Echaniz-Aviles, Gabriela
    Center for Research on Infectious Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, México.
    Hakawi, Ahmed
    Infectious Diseases Control, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Kamiya, Hajime
    Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.
    Karachaliou, Andromachi
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Lucidarme, Jay
    Meningococcal Reference Unit, Public Health England, Manchester, UK.
    Meiring, Susan
    Division of Public Health Surveillance and Response, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Mironov, Konstantin
    Central Research Institute of Epidemiology, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Safadi, Marco A. P.
    Department of Pediatrics, FCM Santa Casa de São Paulo School of Medical Sciences, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Shao, Zhujun
    National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
    Smith, Vinny
    Meningitis Research Foundation, Bristol, UK.
    Steffen, Robert
    Department of Epidemiology and Prevention of Infectious Diseases, WHO Collaborating Centre for Travellers’ Health, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Stenmark, Bianca
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Taha, Muhamed-Kheir
    Institut Pasteur, National Reference Centre for Meningococci, Paris, France.
    Trotter, Caroline
    Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Vazquez, Julio A.
    National Centre of Microbiology, Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
    Zhu, Bingqing
    National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
    The Global Meningococcal Initiative meeting on prevention of meningococcal disease worldwide: Epidemiology, surveillance, hypervirulent strains, antibiotic resistance and high-risk populations2019In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 15-30Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The 2018 Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) meeting focused on evolving invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) epidemiology, surveillance, and protection strategies worldwide, with emphasis on emerging antibiotic resistance and protection of high-risk populations. The GMI is comprised of a multidisciplinary group of scientists and clinicians representing institutions from several continents.

    Areas covered: Given that the incidence and prevalence of IMD continually varies both geographically and temporally, and surveillance systems differ worldwide, the true burden of IMD remains unknown. Genomic alterations may increase the epidemic potential of meningococcal strains. Vaccination and (to a lesser extent) antimicrobial prophylaxis are the mainstays of IMD prevention. Experiences from across the globe advocate the use of conjugate vaccines, with promising evidence growing for protein vaccines. Multivalent vaccines can broaden protection against IMD. Application of protection strategies to high-risk groups, including individuals with asplenia, complement deficiencies and human immunodeficiency virus, laboratory workers, persons receiving eculizumab, and men who have sex with men, as well as attendees at mass gatherings, may prevent outbreaks. There was, however, evidence that reduced susceptibility to antibiotics was increasing worldwide.

    Expert commentary: The current GMI global recommendations were reinforced, with several other global initiatives underway to support IMD protection and prevention.

  • 2. Bengtsson, Karin Lövgren
    et al.
    Morein, Bror
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.
    ISCOM technology-based Matrix M (TM) adjuvant: success in future vaccines relies on formulation2011In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 401-403Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Boberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Bråve, Andreas
    Johansson, Susanne
    Wahren, Britta
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology .
    Rollman, Erik
    Murine models for HIV vaccination and challenge2008In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HIV-1 only infects humans and chimpanzees. SIV or SHIV are, therefore, used as models for HIV in rhesus, cynomologus and pigtail macaques. Since conducting experiments in primate models does not fully mimic infection or vaccination against HIV-1 and is expensive, there is a great need for small-animal models in which it is possible to study HIV-1 infection, immunity and vaccine efficacy. This review summarizes the available murine models for studying HIV-1 infection with an emphasis on our experience of the HIV-1-infected-cell challenge as a model for evaluating candidate HIV-1 vaccines. In the cell-based challenge model, several important factors that, hopefully, can be related to vaccine efficacy in humans were discovered: the efficiency of combining plasmid DNA representing several of the viral genes originating from multiple clades of HIV-1, the importance of adjuvants activating innate and induced immunity and the enhanced HIV eradication by drug-conjugated antibody. © 2008 Future Drugs Ltd.

  • 4. Durbin, Anna
    et al.
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore ; London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England.
    An update on Zika vaccine developments2017In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 781-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The devastating consequences of congenital Zika virus (ZIKV) infection led to a global response directed toward a better understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ZIKV and to efforts at vaccine development. As a result, there are currently 45 ZIKV vaccine candidates in development. Areas covered: Both traditional (purified inactivated, live attenuated, viral-vectored, recombinant sub-unit) and novel (DNA, self-replicating RNA, mRNA) vaccine platforms are being utilized. For emergency use, vaccines that are appropriate for women of child-bearing age (including pregnant women) are being developed. Live vaccines that may be contraindicated in pregnancy are also in development for potential inclusion in national immunization programmes in childhood or pre-teenage age groups. WHO developed a target product profile for Zika vaccines for use in an emergency. Expert commentary: Although ZIKV vaccine development had a quick head start, further development may be hampered because of the inability to conduct large efficacy trials with the decline in cases globally and unpredictability of new outbreaks. Furthermore, there are complex ethical issues involved in conducting efficacy trials in pregnant women.

  • 5. Geels, Mark J
    et al.
    Imoukhuede, Egeruan B
    Imbault, Nathalie
    van Schooten, Harry
    McWade, Terry
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Dobbelaer, Roland
    Craig, Alister G
    Leroy, Odile
    European Vaccine Initiative: lessons from developing malaria vaccines2011In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 1697-1708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For over 10 years, the European Vaccine Initiative (EVI; European Malaria Vaccine Initiative until 2009) has contributed to the development of 24 malaria candidate vaccine antigens with 13 vaccine candidates being advanced into Phase I clinical trials, two of which have been transitioned for further clinical development in sub-Saharan Africa. Since its inception the EVI organization has operated as a funding agency, but with a clear service-oriented strategy. The scientific successes and difficulties encountered during these years and how these efforts have led to standardization and harmonization in vaccine development through large-scale European consortia are discussed. In the future, the EVI will remain instrumental in the pharmaceutical and clinical development of vaccines against ?diseases of poverty? with a continued focus on malaria. EVI will continue to focus on funding and managing preclinical evaluation up to Phase I/II clinical trials and strengthening the vaccine-development infrastructure in Europe, albeit with a global orientation.

  • 6.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Therapeutic vaccines against IgE-mediated allergies2008In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 193-208Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic vaccines targeting various self-molecules is an emerging field of vaccine development that is studied extensively in areas such as birth control, cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. Promising results have come from a number of animal studies and several vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. However, no vaccine is currently on the market. This review will focus on the progress in the development of vaccines against IgE-mediated allergies. Targets under investigation are the IgE molecule itself and several Th2 cytokines, that is, IL-4, -5, -13, -33, -18 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin. This review will also discuss new methods to enhance the immunogenicity of the vaccines and how this can contribute to more rapid progress in the field.

  • 7.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular Virology.
    Clarification of how HIV-1 DNA and protein immunizations may be better used to obtain HIV-1-specific mucosal and systemic immunity2007In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 203-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More focused research on a mucosal HIV-1 vaccine is needed urgently. An increasing amount of collected data, using heterologous multimodality prime-booster strategies, suggest that an efficient and protective HIV-1 vaccine must generate broad, long-lasting HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and neutralizing antibody responses. In the mucosa, these responses would be most effective if a preferential stimulus of HIV-1 neutralizing secretory immunoglobulin A and G were obtained. The attractive property of mucosal immunization is the obtained mucosal and systemic immunity, whereas systemic immunization induces a more limited immunity, predominantly in systemic sites. These objectives will require new vaccine regimens, such as multiclade HIV DNA and protein vaccines (nef, tat, gag and env expressed in DNA plasmids) delivered onto mucosal surfaces with needle-free delivery methods, such as nasal drop, as well as oral and rectal/vaginal delivery, and should merit clinical trials. © 2007 Future Drugs Ltd.

  • 8. Lim, Jacqueline Kyungah
    et al.
    Lee, Yong-Seok
    Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    Thiry, Georges
    Mahoney, Richard
    Yoon, In-Kyu
    Points for Consideration for dengue vaccine introduction: recommendations by the Dengue Vaccine Initiative2016In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 529-538Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dengue is a public health problem in the tropics and subtropics. There are several vaccine candidates in clinical development. However, there may be gaps in the new vaccine introduction after vaccine licensure before it becomes available in developing countries. In anticipation of the first dengue vaccine candidate to be licensed, Dengue Vaccine Initiative (DVI) and, its predecessor, Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI) have been working on points for consideration to accelerate evidence-based dengue vaccine introduction, once a vaccine becomes available. In this paper, we review the history of PDVI and its successor, the DVI, and elaborate on the points of consideration for dengue vaccine introduction.

  • 9.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    In light of recent clinical trial results, what lies next for Type 1 diabetes vaccine research?2012In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 263-265Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Silfverdal, Sven Arne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Coremans, Vanessa
    Francois, Nancy
    Borys, Dorota
    Cleerbout, Jan
    Safety profile of the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV)2017In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 109-121Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety and reactogenicity data were reviewed following 10 years of experience with the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) in clinical development and from post-licensure settings. Analyses of pooled clinical trial data and post-marketing reports provided an overview of its safety profile and allowed assessment of rare adverse events that might not have been identified previously. The safety of PHiD-CV was also evaluated in children at higher risk for pneumococcal infection (preterm and HIV-infected or HIV-exposed infants), for different vaccination schedules and co-administered pediatric vaccines, and with a focus on special categories of adverse events (febrile convulsions, apnea, Kawasaki disease and sudden deaths). Following the distribution of over 235 million doses, PHiD-CV has been well tolerated when co-administered with other pediatric vaccines to children aged less than 5 years from diverse ethnic and geographic backgrounds. Detailed examination of various aspects has confirmed its favorable benefit: risk profile.

  • 11. Vetter, Volker
    et al.
    Baxter, Roger
    Denizer, Gülhan
    Sáfadi, Marco A P
    Silfverdal, Sven-Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Vyse, Andrew
    Borrow, Ray
    Routinely vaccinating adolescents against meningococcus: targeting transmission & disease.2016In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 641-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents have the highest rates of meningococcal carriage and transmission. Interrupting the adolescent habitat in order to reduce carriage and transmission within adolescents and to other age groups could help to control meningococcal disease at a population level. Compared to immunization strategies restricted to young children, a strategy focused on adolescents may have more profound and long-lasting indirect impacts, and may be more cost effective. Despite challenges in reaching this age-group, experience with other vaccines show that high vaccine coverage of adolescents is attainable.

  • 12. Wikman, Maria
    et al.
    Friedman, Mikaela
    Pinitkiatisakul, Sunan
    Andersson, Christin
    Lovgren-Bengtsson, Karin
    Lunden, Anna
    Ståhl, Stefan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Achieving directed immunostimulating complex incorporation2006In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 395-403Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, several studies have been reported with the common aim of generating general expression systems for straightforward production and subsequent coupling of expressed antigens to an adjuvant system. Here, we describe a series of such efforts with a common theme of using gene fusion technology for association of recombinant antigens to immunostimulating complexes (iscoms). In the early stages of vaccine development, uniform antigen preparations are crucial to allow the comparison of immune responses to different antigens, or even subdomains thereof, and we believe that the described systems constitute an important development in this context.

  • 13. Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    et al.
    Massad, Eduardo
    Age specific differences in efficacy and safety for the CYD-tetravalent dengue vaccine2016In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 437-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CYD-TDV is the first dengue vaccine to have completed Phase 3 efficacy trials. Efficacy was consistently higher in those aged 9 and above for all variables studied: efficacy against virologically confirmed dengue of any severity and serotype, serotype specific efficacy, efficacy dependent on baseline seropositivity, efficacy against hospitalizations and efficacy against severe disease. Because of the higher efficacy and the absence of a safety signal, the age group with the best benefit of the use of CYD-TDV is individuals aged 9 and above - the age group for which licensure is now being sought.

  • 14. Wilder-Smith, Annelies
    et al.
    Yoon, In-Kyu
    Edging closer towards the goal of a dengue vaccine2016In: Expert Review of Vaccines, ISSN 1476-0584, E-ISSN 1744-8395, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 33-35Article in journal (Refereed)
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