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  • 1.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Lim, Nena
    Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
    Usability of government websites in Uganda2010In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Government websites offer great benefits to citizens and governments. Such benefits, however,cannot be realized if websites are unusable. This study investigates usability of government websites in Uganda.Using the feature investigation method, the study evaluated four Ugandan government websites according tothree perspectives. Results show that websites are partially usable in the design layout and navigationperspectives but are rather weak in stating legal policies. Evaluation results provide the Ugandan governmentwith a clear picture of what needs to be improved according to international website design standards. Moreover,the parsimonious evaluation framework proposed in the research is useful for any country that wants to do aquick and easy evaluation of their government websites.

  • 2.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Lim, Nena
    Usability of government websites in Uganda2010In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Government websites offer great benefits to citizens and governments. Such benefits, however,cannot be realized if websites are unusable. This study investigates usability of government websites in Uganda.Using the feature investigation method, the study evaluated four Ugandan government websites according tothree perspectives. Results show that websites are partially usable in the design layout and navigationperspectives but are rather weak in stating legal policies. Evaluation results provide the Ugandan governmentwith a clear picture of what needs to be improved according to international website design standards. Moreover,the parsimonious evaluation framework proposed in the research is useful for any country that wants to do aquick and easy evaluation of their government websites.

  • 3.
    Avdic, Anders
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Lambrinos, Thomas
    Impera Kommunikation; Örebro universitet.
    Modeling and illustrating requirement prioritization in public e-service development from a value-based perspective2015In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major problem in e-service development is the prioritization of the requirements of different stakeholders. The main stakeholders are governments and their citizens, all of whom have different and sometimes conflicting requirements. In this paper, the prioritization problem is addressed by combining a value-based approach with an illustration technique. This paper examines the following research question: How can multiple stakeholder requirements be illustrated from a value-based perspective in order to be prioritizable? We used an e-service development case taken from a Swedish municipality to elaborate on our approach. Our contributions are: 1) a model of the relevant domains for requirement prioritization for government, citizens, technology, finances and laws and regulations; and 2) a requirement fulfillment analysis tool (RFA) that consists of a requirement-goal-value matrix (RGV), and a calculation and illustration module (CIM). The model reduces cognitive load, helps developers to focus on value fulfillment in e-service development and supports them in the formulation of requirements. It also offers an input to public policy makers, should they aim to target values in the design of e-services.

  • 4.
    Bakunzibake, Pierre
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Klein, Gunnar O.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Organisational Challenges in the Implementation of ‘one-stop’ e-Government in Rwanda2019In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One-stop e-government holds potential benefits in all contexts and especially in the context of developing countries and in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs). Implementation of one-stop e-government can be challenging as it normally requires addressing a number of organisational issues including those related to the integration of the individual government information systems of different departments which traditionally function as silos; tackling organisational issues can be difficult due to the nature of the public sector. However, the contemporary literature paints a picture of scarce research on the organisational issues that impede the implementation of one-stop e-government initiatives in LDCs. This paper explores the organisational issues underlying the implementation of ‘one-stop’ e-government initiatives in Rwanda, an LDC. The study explores the status of these elements as of and up to March 2017. The qualitative case study methodology used for this study involved data collection by means of documents and interviews with key managers from central government organisations, from a private company, and from local government service clerks. Template analysis was used as a method for data analysis. Even though the number of online services for citizens, businesses, and other agencies is growing rapidly and easy payment of service fees is available, a number of organisational issues were identified. These include the lack of a clear plan of ‘to-be’ service processes and a corresponding change management strategy. Service re-design was taking place very much ad hoc. There were also unclear systematic organisational learning mechanisms and unclear operational goals in the local government. Addressing these issues would contribute towards improving the implementation of one-stop e-government and its corresponding services in such a context. The paper contributes to research by providing insights into organisational issues in a country currently in an early stage of e-government development. For Rwandan e-government professionals, the paper suggests a way forward. It also helps decision makers in Rwanda and similar countries undertaking one-stop initiatives to understand the problem context of actions taken towards IT-driven institutional reform.

  • 5.
    Bernhard, Irene
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Grunden, Kerstin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Challenging Organizational Issues When Municipal Contact Centers are Implemented in Sweden2013In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 198-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two case studies of the implementation of Contact Centres(CCs) in Swedish municipalities were compared and discussed from anorganizational perspective. The research method was semi-structured qualitative interviews with different personnel categories in both municipalities. Several challenging organizational issues for management and employees were identified:the implementation strategies varied among the cases and affected the pace of implementation, attitudes and motivation, the mental construct and understanding of the implementation. The financing of the CC and recruitment strategies created problems, but in somewhat different ways and in phases of the process in each case. The potential of using registered information as asource for planning and decision-making was not fully utilized, although somestatistics were produced. In both cases there was a combination of formal andinformal learning strategies and flexible co-operation among the employees inthe CCs which contributed to continuous learning processes and a good,co-operative working climate. There was a need for continuous updating ofskills in both cases, but with slightly different focus, related to theorganization of the work. The organization in response groups required morespecialist competence, compared with the organization without response groups,which required more general competence. Some challenges for the caseadministrators in the back offices were to adapt to a more process-oriented organizationof their work, and to co-operate more with their colleagues both in the backoffice and at the CC. They now had the possibility to plan their administrativework in a better way than before, but some administrators missed the previousspontaneous contacts with citizens. Initially, many case administrators wereafraid of losing their jobs and work tasks to CC, contributing to negativeattitudes towards CC and hampering the learning process in taking part in theimplementation process.

  • 6.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Norström, Livia
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Gråsjö, Urban
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Degree of Digitalization and Citizen Satisfaction: A Study of the Role of Local e-Government in Sweden2018In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 16, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between degree of e-government in Swedish municipalities and perceived satisfaction among citizens generally. This is a large-scale quantitative study based on validand reliable Swedish national surveys. Based on these surveys, a new comprehensive index for measuring "degree of digitalization" was constructed. Citizen satisfaction was measured using established indices covering three dimensions:satisfaction with living in the municipality, satisfaction with performance of government activities (delivered services), and satisfaction with transparency and influence. The results show that there is a relationship between the degree of digitalization in a municipality and the perceived satisfaction among its citizens. The degree of digitalization is related to all three dimensions of citizen satisfaction. Additionally, this study indicates that the strength of this relationship is in parity with or even stronger than the relationship between citizen satisfaction and other crucial factors such as educational level and median income

  • 7.
    Garatli Nygren, Katarina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Melin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Multi‑Channel Service Management in Public Sector … Three Interpretative Frames Illustrating E‑government and Work Practice in a Swedish State Agency2014In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 112-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to deliver services to citizens, public sector agencies of today offer various types of channels for interaction. In this article we aim to develop an understanding of the reciprocal relation between multi‑channel services and work prac tice. By showing how actors at different organizational levels in an agency differ in their interpretation of multi‑channel services we have generated knowledge that is essential in multi‑channel strategy formulation. The study illustrates an example of a n agency that works actively and in a mature way with e‑government and e‑services. This qualitative case study illustrates that the top level management, middle management and the case officers need to confront and discuss their understanding of e‑governm ent and their work practice in order to reach a situation where strategies actually are influencing daily work more explicitly. An important aspect is the decision to adopt an internal or external perspective on multi‑channel service management. The resul t of this decision might be to view multi‑channel service management as a way of reaching either internal agency efficiency or external citizen benefits.

  • 8.
    Giritli Nygren, Katarina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    eGovernmentality: on Electronic Administration in Local Government2009In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a consequence of the advance of information technology into the realm of public administration, we are now faced with a potential increase in efficiency of a scope and power not previously seen. The intentional use of information technology to modernise the public sector goes internationally by the name of e-Government. While e-Government’s greatest impact thus far has been to promote customer satisfaction, its guiding spirit is more ambitious, with the fundamental reorganisation of the entire public sector in its sights. The overall purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how public administration at a local authority level adapts to impending e-Government by considering the discourses that are manifested and how they are used to understand and legitimise electronic administration. The present study uses critical discourse analysis to shed light on those discursive orders that are revealed in the course of deliberations on electronic administration at the local government level. On the one hand, it is possible to see electronic administration as a refinement - and a reform - of a bureaucracy’s techniques. On the other hand, it is equally possible to view it in the light of free market ideology.

  • 9.
    Giritli Nygren, Katarina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Melin, Ulf
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Multi-channel service management in Public Sector: Three interpretative frames illustrating e-government and work practice in a swedish state agency.2014In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 112-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to deliver services to citizens, public sector agencies of today offer various types of channels for interaction. In this article we aim to develop an understanding of the reciprocal relation between multi‑channel services and work prac tice. By showing how actors at different organizational levels in an agency differ in their interpretation of multi‑channel services we have generated knowledge that is essential in multi‑channel strategy formulation. The study illustrates an example of a n agency that works actively and in a mature way with e‑government and e‑services. This qualitative case study illustrates that the top level management, middle management and the case officers need to confront and discuss their understanding of e‑governm ent and their work practice in order to reach a situation where strategies actually are influencing daily work more explicitly. An important aspect is the decision to adopt an internal or external perspective on multi‑channel service management. The resul t of this decision might be to view multi‑channel service management as a way of reaching either internal agency efficiency or external citizen benefits. 

  • 10.
    Grundén, Kerstin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    A Social Perspective on Implementation of e-Government: A Longitudinal Study at the County Administration of Sweden2009In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 65-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    longitudinal study of implementation of e-Government at the County Administration of Sweden was analysedcand discussed from a social perspective. Two interview studies at the legal and traffic departments were compared.Interviews were made with decision makers, handling officers and administrative assistants focussing on socialcconsequences of work situations, work processes and quality of e-services to the clients. The MOA-model was used as a frame of reference for the study. According to the analysis, coping and sense making strategies by the respondents increased. e-Government made demands for new competencies for employees and clients. Internal and external digital divides are social consequences of the implementation of e-services. Management increased their focus on efficiency aspects related to e-Government. There is a need to integrate competence of social aspects into the development process of e-Government. The users were aware of the importance of social aspects of IT implementation. There is a need for competence development of social consequences related to IT implementation also for development personnel and different interest groups

  • 11.
    Joseph, Shaji
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Where do e-Government strategies take the Nordic nations?2016In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effective strategy is critical for the successful development of e-Government. The leading nations in the e-Government rankings include Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. Their leading role makes them interesting to study when looking for reasons to successful e-Government. The purpose of this research paper is to describe the e-Government development strategies of Nordic countries, which rank highly on the international stage. In particular it aims to study the foci of these strategies. The approach is a document study of the e-Government development strategies of Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland was carried out using a qualitative content analysis inductive method. The results show that the major focus of Nordic e-Government strategies is on public sector reforms. Other focus areas include economic reforms and, to a lesser extent, e-Democracy efforts. Sweden, Finland and Norway have set ambitious policy goals in order to achieve global leadership in e-Government development. In response to the question posed by this paper’s title, we can say that Nordic e-Government strategies, except for Norway, focus more on reforming public sector services than on economic reforms.  E-Democracy reforms are hardly focused on at all.

    Practical implications: Public sector policy makers can relate their policy foci to some of the more successful e-Government countries in the world. Research implications/originality is that this paper can apart from the findings also provide a means on how to identify the actual foci of a country’s e-Government policy.

  • 12.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wehn, Uta
    From Assumptions to Artifacts: Unfolding e-participation within Multi-level Governance2017In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 57-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of technological innovation within the context of governance processes is often embraced with rhetorical enthusiasm and seen as a de facto enabler for democratic decision‑making. Underpinning this enthusiasm is the leap of faith made from transparency to trust, from complexity to coherence. The belief that using new tools for e‑participation can generate dramatic transformation in public sector redesign and result in societal benefits is heralded as a shift towards public innovation. It is precisely this belief that we examine in this paper. We start our investigation by providing a conceptualization of what e‑participation means within the context of multi‑level governance. By using a cross case comparison of two European research projects, we provide an empirical base upon which we can examine the process of e‑participation and the implications of digital e‑participation tools for various levels of governance and public accountability. Furthermore we provide an interdisciplinary contribution in understanding the gap between what technological innovation makes possible and the acceptance or openness on the part of decision makers to embrace citizen input within policy processes.

  • 13.
    Larsson, Hannu
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Evolving structure in the implementation of healthcare information systems: an actor-network analysis2011In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 30-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public sector ICT use is now moving towards integration of services and processes across departments, for instance in the healthcare sector. This is a challenging issue as it involves distributed decision making, often across both public and private organizations, which implies a multitude of issues. Enterprise Architectures (EA) aim at providing a common framework that includes data, resources and processes, through which all aspects of the enterprise can be directed towards a common goal in an efficient manner. It as been argued that architectures should be perceived as evolving (rather then as carefully planned roadmaps), although more research on how EA evolves is needed. This paper addresses the general question of, how does an EA evolve during implementation? A case study is used to illustrate how an EA evolves throughout the process of implementation. The case is the implementation of a national patient record system in the decentralized Swedish healthcare system. The project is part of a larger effort to implement an EA in the healthcare sector aimed at further integrating the whole sector.  Data is collected by means of observations, interviews and document analysis. Using an Actor-Network Theory perspective, this paper presents four episodes during which an EA evolves through interactions. In this way the paper contributes with a deepened understanding of how EA evolves by arguing that EA programs should be seen as something that needs to be planned with regard to that it will, and should, evolve in order to respond to needs discovered in the process. The contribution is a deepened understanding of how sub-projects co-evolve with a national EA project, thus mutually affecting each other. This should not be perceived as something unequivocally negative as this might also be strategic, and leads to evolution of other parts of the EA to suit each other.

  • 14.
    Lidén, Gustav
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Is e-democracy more than democratic?: An examination of the implementation of socially sustainable values in e-democratic processes2012In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 84-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing literature tries to contribute to a more balanced view of the concept of e-democracy. However, one seldom discussed aspect is the concept’s inadequate dimension on what a desirable development of society consists of. By adding certain values, today most pronounced in the theory of social sustainability, this article examines the awareness of such in three e-democratic projects in Swedish municipalities. This is carried out through a qualitative inquiry that uses different types of data and that regards social sustainability as an ongoing process that is suitable to be analysed in relation to other structures in society. The empirical part reveals different important topics. First it shows that the consciousness of socially sustainable values varies between the examined cases. Second, this variation can be due to both the varying success of e-democracy and to conditions inside the political organizations. In conclusion, this paper reveals that the consequence of adding a socially sustainable perspective to e-democracy is that it provides adequate opportunities for analysing social development without missing out qualities that are desired in a democratic society.

  • 15.
    Moe, Carl Erik
    et al.
    University of Agder.
    Päivärinta, Tero
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Challenges in information systems procurement in the public sector2013In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 307-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public procurement constitutes a large part of the market in many countries, and it has the potential of playing an important role in stimulating communities and serving policy goals. With this in mind the governments have set regulations for public procurement. Procurement of Information Systems is especially challenging due to the complexity of procuring unknown technology and the importance an information system has for different stakeholders in an organization. Public procurement of information systems (IS) and services provides several challenges to the stakeholders involved in the procurement processes. However, these are not well established or understood, and there is a knowledge gap that needs to be covered. This paper presents results from a Delphi study, which involved 46 experienced procurement managers, chief information officers, and vendor representatives in the Norwegian public sector. The participants identified 98 challenges related to IS procurement, and subsequently ranked the relative importance of the top issues. The study supports findings from previous research related to diverging stakeholder goals; challenges in balancing between objectives; in requirement specifications; and in too narrow cost focus. In addition to providing empirical confirmation of these previous propositions the study revealed new findings, such as benefits realization in IS procurement; coordinating and standardizing public procurement processes; complex and constraining government regulations; issues of technological integration and compatibility; and inter-municipal cooperation. Developing clear requirements specifications stands out as critical for public sector officials. The results provide a rich overview of IS procurement challenges in the public sector in Norway, and may also give a good picture of challenges in other countries with similar procurement regulations.

  • 16.
    Runardotter, Mari
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    The changing nature of archives - whose responsibility?2011In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the increase of e-services, many employees in the public sector get their working conditions changed. Their involvement in the building of e-government transforms their everyday work practices. A vivid example of such a transformation includes archivists and archival work. The use of information technologies produces huge amounts of digitally recorded information. Considering the laws and regulations of public and citizens' rights and obligations, this leads to an increased need for well-functioning e-archives. However, we find that there is little awareness in public organisations for how to deal with this complex and challenging issue. Rather the matter is left to the archivists alone, who have limited agency and influence to be able to deal with digital preservation to the extent needed. In this paper we analyse and discuss plans for, and layers of, responsibility for digital preservation as configured and reconfigured in archivists' stories and Swedish national policy documents. We use a model that covers three arenas: political, organizational, and practical (or individual). Our findings suggest that to conduct good governance there is a need to spread the responsibility for digital preservation and plan for cooperation, coordination, and communication around the same. This should happen in interplay between various actors which hold the practical responsibility, technological responsibility and strategic responsibility. Additionally we note that the view of archivists as keepers of information is moving towards the role of facilitators, which supports access to information rather than merely keeping it intact for future. Moreover, due to technological development's we find that issues to address in further studies are; present laws and regulations that governs archives, change of work practices and ways of dealing with digital preservation.

  • 17.
    Runardotter, Mari
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Umeå University ; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    The Changing Nature of Archives: Whose Responsibility?2011In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of eGovernment and the increasing amount of e-services leads to the production of huge amounts of digitally recorded information. In turn, this raises a demand for well-functioning e-archives, considering the laws and regulations of public and citizens‟ rights and obligations. However, we find that there are difficulties in public organisations in dealing with the complex and challenging issue of digital preservation. Not only does eGovernment transformation change productivity, governance and governmental coordination and collaboration, it also transforms the everyday work practices of many public sector employees. A vivid example is archivists and archival work. The matter of e-archives is often left to the archivists, who have limited power and influence to be able to deal with digital preservation to the extent needed. The research question we address is therefore: who should be held responsible for the changing nature of archives and digital preservation in an organization? Our aim in this paper is to analyse and discuss plans for, and layers of, responsibility for digital preservation as configured and reconfigured in archivists‟ stories and Swedish national policy documents. We use a model that covers three arenas: political, organizational, and practical (or individual). Our findings suggest that to conduct good governance and create properly-functioning e-archives there is a need to spread the responsibility for these e-archives and to plan for cooperation, coordination, and communication around digital preservation. This should happen in interplay between the various actors which hold the practical responsibility, technological responsibility and strategic responsibility. Additionally we note that the view of archivists as keepers of information is moving towards the role of facilitators, who support access to information rather than merely keeping it intact for future. Moreover, as a result of technological developments we find that issues to address in further studies are the present laws and regulations that govern archives, change of work practices and ways of dealing with digital preservation.

  • 18.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    ”We do not talk about this” – Problematic silences in eGovernment2009In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish public sector is currently in a process of transformation, often referred to as e‑ Government. In this paper stories are told of problematic silences in an e‑Government implementation project in a Swedish government agency. e‑Government is discussed as something that is articulated differently by a range of actors in various locations. This enables articulations of multiple e‑Government and the multiple articulations can also be a means to contest dominant and possibly problematic articulations of e‑Government. The dominant discourse of e‑Government is the rationalisation of the public sector as a means of saving public resources. The improvement of quality and availability of public services, and to improve democratic processes are central in the dominant discourse. In this discourse there is a silence about the dismissal of employees in the public sector. There is neither talk about how the public sector is an important labour market for women nor how the rationalisation will affect the employees. Employees' knowledges are not considered as being a resource for strategic IT‑planning, and thus they are not invited to participate in the further design of IT‑systems. The purpose of the paper is to explore the participation of the administrative officers in an e‑Government implementation project, and the meanings of e‑Government articulated in the project. Ethnographic methods were used in the collection of empirical material, and central ideas in participatory design and feminist technoscience were used in the analysis. The main argument is that the administrative officers participated in an ambiguous way. They were central actors but were at the same time marginalised within the organisation. The ambiguity regarding how they participated is related to different and more inclusive articulations of e‑ Government in the project. The paper is concluded with a discussion concerning how alternative articulations of e‑Government can offer alternatives to the dominant e‑Government discourse. 

  • 19.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för informationsteknologi och medier.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    University of Oslo.
    "We do not talk about this" – Problematical silences in eGovernment2009In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish public sector is currently in a process of transformation, often referred to as eGovernment. In this paper stories are told of problematic silences in an eGovernment implementation project in a Swedish government agency. eGovernment is discussed as something that is articulated differently by a range of actors in various locations. This enables articulations of multiple eGovernment and the multiple articulations can also be a means to contest dominant and possibly problematic articulations of eGovernment. The dominant discourse of eGovernment is the rationalisation of the public sector as a means of saving public resources. The improvement of quality and availability of public services, and to improve democratic processes are central in the dominant discourse. In this discourse there is a silence about the dismissal of employees in the public sector. There is neither talk about how the public sector is an important labour market for women nor how the rationalisation will affect the employees. Employees’ knowledges are not considered as being a resource for strategic IT-planning, and thus they are not invited to participate in the further design of IT-systems. The purpose of the paper is to explore the participation of the administrative officers in an eGovernment implementation project, and the meanings of eGovernment articulated in the project. Ethnographic methods were used in the collection of empirical material, and central ideas in participatory design and feminist technoscience were used in the analysis. The main argument is that the administrative officers participated in an ambiguous way. They were central actors but were at the same time marginalised within the organisation. The ambiguity regarding how they participated is related to different and more inclusive articulations of eGovernment in the project. The paper is concluded with a discussion concerning how alternative articulations of eGovernment can offer alternatives to the dominant eGovernment discourse.

  • 20.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    et al.
    Institutionen för informations teknologi och media, Mittuniversitet.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    “We do not Talk About This” – Problematical Silences In e-Government.2009In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    University of Oslo.
    "We do not talk about this": Problematical silences in eGovernment2009In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish public sector is currently in a process of transformation, often referred to as eGovernment. In this paper stories are told of problematic silences in an eGovernment implementation project in a Swedish government agency. eGovernment is discussed as something that is articulated differently by a range of actors in various locations. This enables articulations of multiple eGovernment and the multiple articulations can also be a means to contest dominant and possibly problematic articulations of eGovernment. The dominant discourse of eGovernment is the rationalisation of the public sector as a means of saving public resources. The improvement of quality and availability of public services, and to improve democratic processes are central in the dominant discourse. In this discourse there is a silence about the dismissal of employees in the public sector. There is neither talk about how the public sector is an important labour market for women nor how the rationalisation will affect the employees. Employees’ knowledges are not considered as being a resource for strategic IT-planning, and thus they are not invited to participate in the further design of IT-systems. The purpose of the paper is to explore the participation of the administrative officers in an eGovernment implementation project, and the meanings of eGovernment articulated in the project. Ethnographic methods were used in the collection of empirical material, and central ideas in participatory design and feminist technoscience were used in the analysis. The main argument is that the administrative officers participated in an ambiguous way. They were central actors but were at the same time marginalised within the organisation. The ambiguity regarding how they participated is related to different and more inclusive articulations of eGovernment in the project. The paper is concluded with a discussion concerning how alternative articulations of eGovernment can offer alternatives to the dominant eGovernment discourse.

  • 22.
    Sundberg, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information and Communication systems.
    Risk and Decision in Collaborative e-Government: An Objectives-Oriented Approach2016In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Developing e-services in the public sector is a demanding task that involves a variety of stakeholders and values. Further complexity is added by organizational and institutional challenges, especially when specialized government agencies are expected to collaborate to create seamless, integrated services. This paper focuses on decision making and risk analysis in two Swedish collaborative e-Government cases. Empirical material consists of semi-structured interviews and project documentation, which are analyzed using an objectives-oriented Logical Framework Approach (LFA). The results highlight two factors that influence the outcomes of the projects; governance for collaboration and financial models for distributing resources between government agencies. When these formal support mechanisms are not provided, they become risks for the projects and create uncertainties in decision processes. While the studied government context has matured enough to develop fully functional platforms for e-services, these uncertainties become issues when public values are to be measured and evaluated. The paper concludes by suggesting the use of public values as objectives together with measurable indicators in order to create a common language for decision making and risk management across government agencies.

  • 23.
    Twizeyimana, Jean Damascene
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. College of Science & Technology University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Larsson, Hannu
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    E-government in Rwanda: Implementation, Challenges and Reflections2018In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E‑government is currently high on the agenda in many developing countries (DCs). While e‑government is well‑established in many developed countries it is new to least developed countries. Countries that start implementing e‑government today can benefit from easy import of modern technologies, but adaptation to local conditions and the organizational change that is required cannot be imported, but must be developed at home. By using examples of an ongoing initiative by the Government of Rwanda to digitalize all G2C and G2B into a single window platform, the current study investigated the important challenges in the implementation of e‑government in Rwanda. An interpretive case study was followed. Data was collected through interviews and participatory observations during August to December 2015. Data analysis was inductive, the analysis method was content analysis, and the coding followed open‑coding. NVivo software has been used to handle data and facilitate the analysis. The study found six overarching categories of aspects that challenge a successful implementation of e‑government in Rwanda. They include information infrastructure for e‑government, social inclusion, governance, management, trust in the new system, and languages. However, challenges to e‑government implementation should not be taken as of the same extent, neither their degree of mitigation. Rather, they influence and are influenced by various contextual factors which include political support, nature of the e‑government project, implementation strategies, human and socio‑economic development, existing information infrastructure, and operational capabilities. Having said this, we also argue that countries should learn from one another of their experiences, success stories, and mistakes. Despite a number of associated challenges, the adopted public‑private partnership (PPP) approach to e‑Government implementation in Rwanda might indeed seem as a suitable catalyst for e‑government success in the country.

    2.5.0.0

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