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  • 1. Aguirre-Hudson, B.
    et al.
    Kokubun, T.
    Spooner, B.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Taxonomy of Calicium victorianum (F. Wilson) Tibell (Caliciaceae, Lecanorales), a lichenized ascomycete new to Europe2007In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 401-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphological features and chemical compounds found in the first European collection of Calicium victorianum are compared with type material from Australia of C. piperatum F. Wilson. The phylogenetic relationships of the species are discussed by comparing its nuclear rDNA ITS 1-5.8S-ITS2 with that of other species of Calicium.

  • 2. Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Fröberg, Lars
    Frödén, Patrik
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Lättman, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Lindblom, Louise
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Thell, Arne
    Westberg, Martin
    Professor Ingvar Karnefelt - a birthday tribute2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 453-456Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fröberg, Lars
    Lund University.
    Frödén, Patrik
    Lund University.
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Lättman, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Bergen.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörns högskola.
    Thell, Arne
    Lund University.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Professor Ingvar Kärnefelt - a birthday tribute2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 453-456Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Botanical Museum, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Museum of Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fröberg, Lars
    Frödén, Patrik
    n/a.
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Lättman, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindblom, Louise
    Department of Biology & Museum of Natural History, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway..
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Thell, Arne
    The Biological Museums, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Cryptogamic Botany, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Professor Ingvar Kärnfelt - a birthday tribute2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 453-456Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On 19 July 2009 Ingvar Kärnefelt celebrated his 65th birthday. This could have meant that we, his former students, would be celebrating him in his retirement from his position as head of the Biological Museums at Lund University. We are grateful that this is not the case, as Ingvar will carry on, probably for at least one or two more years. Instead, we celebrate Ingvar because he is the main reason for all of us having studied lichenology in Lund. This special issue of The Lichenologist is dedicated to him as a birthday tribute in honour of his long and fruitful lichenological career. The main authors of all the papers in this issue are former students of Ingvar. For several of us he has not only acted as supervisor but later also as the director of the Botanical Museum where we meet him in our daily work.

  • 5.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Lund.
    Ekman, Stefan
    University of Lund.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Lund.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    University of Lund.
    High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), an improved technique for screening lichen substances.1993In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 25, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Lücking, Robert
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    New combinations and names in Gyalecta for former Belonia and Pachyphiale (Ascomycota, Ostropales) species2013In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 723-727Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Bergman, Birgitta
    et al.
    Huss-Danell, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    ULTRASTRUCTURE OF STIGONEMA IN THE CEPHALODIA OF STEREOCAULON-PASCHALE1983In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 15, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Brännström, Ioana Onut
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thamnolia tundrae sp nov., a cryptic species and putative glacial relict2018In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 59-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lichen species of the genus Thamnolia, with their striking wormlike thalli and frequent occurrence in arctic and tundra environments, have often been debated with regard to the use of chemistry in lichen taxonomy. Phylogenetic studies have arrived at different conclusions as to the recognition of species in the genus, but in a recent study based on the analyses of six nuclear markers (genes or noncoding regions) of a worldwide sample of Thamnolia, we showed the existence of three well-supported lineages with two different chemistries and geographical distributions. Here, we present two analyses based on ITS and three markers, respectively, which were extended from the study mentioned above to include type specimens and additional Thamnolia strains and taxa. In these analyses the same three clades were retrieved. A putative DEAD-box helicase is used here for the first time as an informative phylogenetic marker to provide taxonomic resolution at species level. The distribution of morphological and chemical characters across the phylogeny was analyzed and it was concluded that three morphologically cryptic, but genetically well supported, species occur: T. vermicularis s. str., T. subuliformis s. str. and T. tundrae sp. nov. Thamnolia vermicularis s. str. contains individuals with uniform secondary chemistry (producing thamnolic acid) and a rather limited distribution in the European Alps, Tatra Mts and the Western Carpathians, a distribution which might result from glacial survival in an adjacent refugium/refugia. Thamnolia subuliformis s. str. is widely distributed in all hemispheres and the samples contain two chemotypes (either with thamnolic or squamatic acids). Thamnolia tundrae is described as new; it produces baeomycesic and squamatic acids, and has a distribution limited to the arctic tundra of Eurasia extending to the Aleutian Islands in North America. It may have survived the latest glaciation in coastal refugia near its present distribution. Thus, secondary chemistry alone is not suitable for characterizing species in Thamnolia, secondary chemistry and geographical origin are informative, and the ITS region can be confidently used for species recognition. Nomenclatural notes are given on several other names that have been used in Thamnolia.

  • 9.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Bacidia rosellizans, a new lichen species from the taiga belt2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, no Part 5, p. 481-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacidia rosellizans S. Ekman is described as new to science. Morphologically, the newspecies is similar to the type species of the genus, B. rosella (Pers.) De Not., particularly in the pale pinkand pigment-deficient apothecia and in having the proper exciple and upper part of the hymeniuminspersed with minute crystals that consist at least partly of atranorin. Bacidia rosellizans, however,differs in having a thin whitish thallus, smaller apothecia and a thinner apothecial margin, a dense layerof crystals along the excipular rim, shorter and narrower ascospores with fewer septa, and septateconidia. Whereas B. rosella is a species occurring in the nemoral zone of Europe and possiblynorthernmost Africa and parts of Asia (but not North America), B. rosellizans is found mainly onPopulus and Salix in taiga. This species is currently known from Sweden, Russia, Canada and the USA.It was erroneously treated as Bacidia rosella in a monograph of North American corticolous species ofBacidia and Bacidina by Ekman (in Opera Botanica 127, 1996).

  • 10.
    Ekman, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Svensson, Måns
    Brianaria (Psoraceae), a new genus to accommodate the Micarea sylvicola group2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 285-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new genus Brianaria S. Ekman & M. Svensson is introduced for the Micarea sylvicola group, with the new combinations Brianaria bauschiana (Korb.) S. Ekman & M. Svensson, B. lutulata (Nyl.) S. Ekman & M. Svensson, B. sylvicola (Flot. ex Korb.) S. Ekman & M. Svensson and B. tuberculata (Sommerf.) S. Ekman & M. Svensson. The new genus is characterized by a chlorococcoid, non-micareoid photobiont, small, convex apothecia without an excipulum, an ascus of the 'Psora-type', 0-1-septate ascospores, dimorphic paraphyses, and immersed pycnidia containing bacilliform conidia. Brianaria is shown to form a monophyletic group in the Psoraceae, where it is probably the sister group to Psora and Protoblastenia.

  • 11.
    Ekman, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Wedin, Mats
    Lindblom, Louise
    Jorgensen, Per M.
    Extended phylogeny and a revised generic classification of the Pannariaceae (Peltigerales, Ascomycota)2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 627-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimated phylogeny in the lichen-forming ascomycete family Pannariaceae. We specifically modelled spatial (across-site) heterogeneity in nucleotide frequencies, as models not incorporating this heterogeneity were found to be inadequate for our data. Model adequacy was measured here as the ability of the model to reconstruct nucleotide diversity per site in the original sequence data. A potential non-orthologue in the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of Degelia plumbea was observed. We propose a revised generic classification for the Pannariaceae, accepting 30 genera, based on our phylogeny, previously published phylogenies, as well as available morphological and chemical data. Four genera are established as new: Austroparmeliella (for the 'Parmeliella' lacerata group), Nebularia (for the 'Parmeliella' incrassata group), Nevesia (for 'Fuscopannaria' sampaiana), and Pectenia (for the 'Degelia' plumbea group). Two genera are reduced to synonymy, Moelleropsis (included in Fuscopannaria) and Santessoniella (non-monophyletic; type included in Psoroma). Lepidocollema, described as monotypic, is expanded to include 23 species, most of which have been treated in the 'Parmeliella' mariana group. Homothecium and Leightoniella, previously treated in the Collemataceae, are here referred to the Pannariaceae. We propose 41 new species-level combinations in the newly described and re-circumscribed genera mentioned above, as well as in Leciophysma and Psoroma.

  • 12. Ekman, Stefan
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lindblom, Louise
    Jørgensen, Per M.
    Extended phylogeny and a revised generic classification of the Pannariaceae (Peltigerales, Ascomycota)2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, p. 627-656Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Ertz, Damien
    et al.
    Bungartz, Frank
    Diederich, Paul
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Molecular and morphological data place Blarneya in Tylophoron (Arthoniaceae)2011In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 345-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on morphological, anatomical, chemical, ecological and molecular evidence, Blarneya is synonymized here with Tylophoron. The molecular phylogeny derived from sequences obtained from sporodochia of Blarneya places this genus, described to accommodate an anamorphic lichen with white cushion-shaped sporodochia, within Tylophoron. This conclusion is further supported by the discovery of Tylophoron-type ascomata emerging directly from thalli with Blarneya-type sporodochia and producing identical hyaline conidia. In one specimen pycnidia were also observed. This represents a surprising variety of morphologically different conidiomata. A different anamorphic type was previously reported from Tylophoron, and this is confirmed here by molecular analysis for T. moderatum: besides thalli with ascomata this species has anamorphic thalli with an irregularly delimited brown sporodochial felt and brown conidia. Ascomata are not known from these entirely anamorphic thalli, whereas they do occur infrequently in Tylophoron species with Blarneya-type sporodochia. A key to all currently accepted species of Tylophoron is provided. In addition to the corticolous Tylophoron hibernicum, confined to humid forests, two saxicolous species with Blarneya-type sporodochia are described here as new: T. galapagoense, known only from Galapagos, differs from T. hibernicum by a thicker, more compact, beige rather than white, more strongly C+ red thallus, growing below sheltered rock overhangs in dry forests; T. stalactiticum has a C- thallus with stipitate, white, C+ red sporodochia; the species is known only from a single locality in Tenerife, on a large slope with volcanic boulders.

  • 14. Fryday, Alan M.
    et al.
    Printzen, Christian
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Bryobilimbia, a new generic name for Lecidea hypnorum and closely related species2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new generic name Bryobilimbia is proposed for Lecidea hypnorum and the closely related taxa Lecidea ahlesii var. ahlesii, L. ahlesii var. nemoralis, L. diapensiae, L. sanguineoatra and Mycobilimbia australis. A phylogenetic analysis based on five genes shows that Lecidea berengeriana does not belong to this group but is more closely related to Romjularia. Both groups of species have been included in Mycobilimbia by some authors but are instead shown to be most closely related to a group of genera ( including Clauzadea, Farnoldia, Lecidoma and Romjularia) that do not belong to Lecideaceae s. str. A neotype is selected for Lichen sanguineoater Wulfen and the new combinations Bryobilimbia ahlesii var. ahlesii, B. ahlesii var. nemoralis, B. australis, B. diapensiae, B. hypnorum and B. sanguineoatra are proposed. A lectotype is also selected for L. templetonii Taylor.

  • 15.
    Fröberg, L.
    et al.
    Botanical Museum, Lund, Sweden.
    Niklasson, M.
    Institute of Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Paltto, Heidi
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Ecology, Swedish Agricultural University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Knutsson, T.
    Nedre Västerstad 111, Mörbylånga, Sweden.
    Johansson, T.
    County Administrator of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Age and epiphytic lichen diversity of the dwarf shrub Helianthemum oelandicum on the island of Öland , Sweden2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 537-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lichen cover and diversity was analysed on the dwarf shrub Helianthemum oelandicum (L.) Dum.Cours.at one site in the calcareous grassland of the area known as the 'Great Alvar' on the Island of Öland, Sweden. The age of 22 phorophytes was determined by ring counting and varied from 8 to 41 years and was accurately predicted by the root diameter. A total of 18 lichen species were found, with a range between 0 and 13 species per phorophyte. The number of lichen species on living H. oelandicum was correlated with the phorophyte age. The number of lichen species and their coverage was greater on dead compared with living phorophytes. The species number was also higher on thin branches compared with thick branches and roots and some of the species showed preferences for dead phorophytes, and for thin branches. This study of lichen colonization and growth on dwarf shrubs in relation to phorophyte age is a new application of herbchronology.

  • 16. Hilmo, O
    et al.
    Holien, H
    Hytteborn, Håkan
    Ely-Aastrup, H
    Richness of epiphytic lichens in differently aged Picea abies plantations situated in the oceanic region of Central Norway2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 97-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Hognabba, Filip
    et al.
    Pino-Bodas, Raquel
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Myllys, Leena
    Stenroos, Soili
    Phylogenetic position of the crustose Stereocaulon species2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships of Stereocaulon with emphasis on the crustose taxa were studied based on nuclear ribosomal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and partial beta-tubulin sequences. The placement of four of the six crustose species currently included in the genus has previously been confirmed based on molecular data. It has, however, remained unresolved whether the crustose growth form is a plesiomorphic or apomorphic feature within Stereocaulon, due to contradictory placements of the crustose species in earlier studies. The aim of this study was to clarify the position of the crustose species by including additional data, especially of S. nivale and S. plicatile, which have not been included in previous analyses. The inclusion of S. plicatile in the genus is of particular interest as it is the only species in the genus with submurifrom to muriform ascospores. Altogether 37 specimens representing 31 species of the ingroup, including all the crustose Stereocaulon species, were incorporated in the analyses. Conventional, as well as direct optimization parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses were performed. The results show that the crustose species do not form a monophyletic entity and that the crustose growth form is a plesiomorphic feature within Stereocaulon. The crustose S. nivale and S. plicatile are nested within the genus and their inclusion in Stereocaulon is thereby confirmed. The nested position of S. plicatile indicates that the submuriform to muriform spore type has been gained independently within the genus. Here, S. plicatile is also reported for the first time from Scandinavia.

  • 18.
    Jansson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Palmqvist, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Esseen, Per-Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Growth of the old forest lichen Usnea longissima in forest edges2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 663-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lichen Usnea longissima was used to examine how distance from forest edge and edge contrast influence growth of pendulous lichens. Thalli of two sizes (12 and 27 cm) were transplanted to the lower canopy of old Picea abies forest at 5, 25 and 100 m distance from cutovers. Sites represented three levels of edge contrast: high (clear-cut), intermediate (3 m tall saplings) and low (6-7 m tall young forest). Lichen growth was assessed as annual length and weight gain. Growth rates of intact thalli were size-dependent, with both growth variables being higher in long than in short thalli. Distance and edge contrast had significant effects on weight gain in long thalli but not in short ones. Weight gain in long thalli was twice as high near the edge (23%) compared to the forest interior (12%). The highest weight gain (31%) occurred at intermediate contrast edges with lower growth at both low (18%) and high contrast edges (20%). Chlorophyll a concentration was highest near the edge and positively correlated with weight gain, so growth was apparently stimulated by both increased photosynthetic capacity and higher light availability near the edge. The lower part of the canopy in forest edges apparently have favourable growth conditions for U. longissima with growth being influenced by vegetation on adjoining cutovers. Therefore growth responses can not explain the previously observed decline of pendulous lichens following edge creation. Our results suggest that vegetation buffers can improve conditions for pendulous lichens near forest edges.

  • 19. Knudsen, K
    et al.
    Kocourková, J
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wheeler, T
    Two new species of Acarosporaceae from North America with carbonized epihymenial accretions.2016In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 48, p. 347-354Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Kosuthova, Alica
    et al.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Collolechia revisited and a re-assessment of ascus characteristics in Placynthiaceae (Peltigerales, Ascomycota)2016In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 48, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Lindblom, Louise
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    New evidence corroborates population differentiation in Xanthoria parietina2007In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 39, p. 259-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to examine genetic variation and population structure of the widespread lichen-forming ascomycete Xanthoria parietina from similar habitats, but different sites in Scandinavia, we investigated seven populations in Scania, southernmost Sweden, and compared the results with a corresponding study on Storfosna, central Norway. Sequence variations of the nuclear ribosomal DNA were used as molecular markers, for both a part of the IGS region and the complete ITSI-5.8S-ITS2 region. The amount of genetic variability observed was comparable in the two investigations. Divergence between populations in different habitats found in the previous study was also present in this study. Xanthoria parietina is genetically differentiated between habitats with no evidence of restricted gene flow between populations in the same habitat at the present spatial scale, at least at sites along the coast of Scandinavia. Differentiation between habitats is considerable at both study sites, which we attribute to restricted gene flow between habitats, i.e. habitat isolation.

  • 22.
    Lorentsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala university.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Uppsala university.
    New reports of soredia dispersed by ants, Formica cunicularia1999In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 31, p. 204-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Brand, Anneli
    Hedlund, Johanna
    Krikorev, Mikael
    Olsson, Niklas
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Robeck, Alexandra
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Rönnmark, Fredrik
    Matsson, Jan-Eric
    Generation time estimated to be 25-30 years in Cliostomum corrugatum (Ach.) Fr.2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 557-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lättman, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brand, Annelie
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Krikorev, Mikael
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Olsson, Niklas
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Robeck, Alexandra
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rönnmark, Fredrik
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Generation time estimated to be 25-30 years in Cliostomum cossugatum (Ach.) Fr.2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 557-559Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of spore to spore generation time is extremely important for several reasons. As it is the shortest generation time, it indicates the maximum nucleotide substitution rate over time and provides a rate limit for the evolution of a species. In population genetics most calculations involving time use ‘generations’ as the unit of measurement and in order to convert these ‘generations’ into ‘years’, knowledge of generation time is needed but rarely available. Knowledge of generation time may also be essential for conservation purposes and assessments of migration history. This knowledge also makes it possible to estimate both the age of a population and also to determine to what extent a population represents the genetic diversity of a species (Rosenberg & Nordborg 2002). In this paper we present a method for assessing generation length for lichens using Cliostomum corrugatum (Ach.) Fr. as an example. This lichen was selected for investigation because it is restricted to forests with long temporal continuity (Lättman et al. 2009) and information on generation time is essential to estimate the rate of dispersal at the landscape level.

  • 25.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.
    Hansson, Anne-Charlotte
    Lindblom, Louise
    Genetic variation in relation to substratum preferences of Hypogymnia physodes2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 547-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic variability and its relationship to substratum preferences within and among populations of the sorediate foliose lichen Hypogymnia physodes was investigated using sequence variation in the complete nrDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. A few samples of the putatively closely related, sorediate, H. tubulosa were also included. Samples were collected from each tree species in study sites in Estonia, Finland, and Sweden. In total, DNA sequences from 104 individuals of H. physodes and 16 of H. tubulosa were obtained. A group I intron situated at the end of the small subunit (SSU) of the nrDNA was detected in both species. Within-species variability was observed in both species: fifteen haplotypes were found for H. physodes and seven for H. tubulosa for the combined alignment of the intron and the ITS. Possible recombination within the total gene fragment was detected and hence the different regions (intron, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2) were analysed separately. They show a different degree of variability both between each other and between the species. The number of haplotypes of H. physodes in the four regions are 5, 5, 1, and 5 and for H. tubulosa 5, 2, 1 and 2, respectively. A statistical parsimony estimation resulted in two unconnected networks; one containing all the samples of H. physodes and one containing all H. tubulosa samples. It was not possible to show different potentials of the different haplotypes for establishment on different substrata as the network of H. physodes indicates recombination within the ITS region which may be frequent enough to make this primarily clonally reproducing species to behave like a sexual species.

  • 26.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lättman, Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Linköpings universitet.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköpings universitet.
    Rapid changes in the epiphytic macrolichen flora on sites in southern Sweden2006In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 38, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A relatively quick and simple method is presented for monitoring changes in distribution and in site and substratum preferences of epiphytic macrolichens; the method also records the natural turnover of common species. Changes in the epiphytic lichen flora in southern Sweden were recorded at 64 sites in 1986 and again in 2003. In total 1990 observations of lichens were recorded on 15 tree species, mainly on trunks but also on branches up to 2 in above the ground. Almost all species showed a high turnover with regard to substratum, including very abundant species such as Hypogymnia physodes. Many of the species had changed substratum within their sites, possibly reflecting a general change in the ecological quality of sites. Canonical Correspondence Analysis was used to extract the variation in species composition over time, using 1685 records of 55 lichen species on 8 different substrata. Some species such as Hypogymnia tubulosa had increased in abundance whilst others such as Vulpicida pinastri had decreased.

  • 27.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    The Botanical Museum (Fytoteket), Uppsala University.
    Wedin, Mats
    Botany Department, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, UK.
    A Re-Assessment of the Family Alectoriaceae1999In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 431-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    et al.
    Uppsala university.
    Wedin, Mats
    The Natural History Museum, London .
    Phylogeny of the Parmeliaceae – DNA data versus morphological data1998In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 30, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Mattsson, J-E
    et al.
    Lättman, Håkan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology .
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology .
    Rapid changes in the epiphytic macrolichen flora on sites in southern Sweden.2006In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 38, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 30. Millanes, A.M.
    et al.
    Diederich, P.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Pippola, E
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella cetrariellae (Tremellales, Basidiomycota, Fungi), a new lichenicolous species on Cetrariella delisei2015In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 47, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Nordin, A
    et al.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Phylogenetic reconstruction of character development in Physciaceae2001In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 33, p. 3-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cladistic analysis of the Physciaceae, based on morphological and chemical data, is presented. In the resulting phylogenetic reconstruction two major clades are formed, one containing the foliose genera (Anaptychia, Dirinaria, Heterodermia, Hyperphyscia, Physcia, Phaeophyscia, Physconia, Pyxine) and the fruticose Tornabea, and the other containing the remaining, mainly crustose genera. Rinodina appears as paraphyletic with representatives both at the base of the tree, at the same level as the mio major clads and at the base of the crustose clade. Also Mobergia has a basal position. The characters used and their distribution in the phylogenetic trees are discussed as well as their significance for the identification of monophyletic groups. The history of the family is also briefly hinted at and characters of importance for the recognition of new genera are surveyed. Relevant publications and the variation in secondary chemistry are presented in tables.

  • 32.
    Nordin, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Larsson, Björn-Owe
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Two new Aspicilia species from Fennoscandia and Russia2011In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 27-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aspicilia fluviatilis and A. granulosa, two arctic and/or (sub) alpine species with elongate +/- diverging and +/- branching marginal areoles, are described as new and compared with similar species occurring in Fennoscandia. A parsimony analysis based on ITS indicates a close relationship with the mainly coastal A. epiglypta. Aspicilia epiglypta, A. disserpens and A. sublapponica are lectotypified and A. disserpens is reduced to synonymy with A. perradiata. Aspicilia alboradiata and A. circularis are excluded from the Fennoscandian lichen biota. A key to Fennoscandian Aspicilia species with radiating thalli and/or elongate +/- diverging and +/- branching marginal areoles is also presented.

  • 33. Otálora, Monica A.G.
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Collema fasciculare belongs in Arctomiaceae2013In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 295-304Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Palice, Zdenek
    et al.
    Printzen, Christian
    Spribille, Toby
    Svensson, Mans
    Tonsberg, Tor
    Urbanavichene, Irina
    Yakovchenko, Lidia S.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Taxonomy of the genus Myrionora, with a second species from South America2013In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A taxonomic and biogeographic overview of the genus Myrionora is provided. Two species are recognized, M. albidula (Willey) R. C. Harris and M. pseudocyphellariae (Etayo) S. Ekman & Palice comb. nov. The genus is characterized by polysporous asci, the presence of crystals in the hymenium and proper exciple that partly consist of lobaric acid, and a photobiont with large cells (mostly in the range 12-20 mu m). Myrionora albidula is currently known from Germany, Norway, Sweden, the Russian Federation (Altayskiy Kray, Chelyabinskaya Oblast', Khabarovskiy Kray and Zabaykal'skiy Kray), and the United States (Alaska, Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts). It inhabits bark of deciduous trees and shrubs and conifers over a wide range of latitudes. Myrionora pseudocyphellariae is known from Chile and Ecuador, where it has been encountered on lichens and decaying bark. Based on morphological characteristics, we conclude that Myrionora belongs in the Ramalinaceae.

  • 35. Pino-Bodas, Raquel
    et al.
    Burgaz, Ana R.
    Martín, María P.
    Ahti, Teuvo
    Stenroos, Soli
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    The phenotypic features used for distinguishing species within the Cladonia furcata complex are highly homoplasious2015In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 47, p. 287-303Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Purvis, O. W.
    et al.
    Univ Exeter, Camborne Sch Mines, Penryn TR10 9EZ, England..
    Fernandez-Brime, S.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Wedin, M.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Myriospora, a genus newly reported for Antarctica with a worldwide key to the species2018In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myriospora signyensis Purvis, Fdez-Brime, M. Westb. & Wedin is described from Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, Antarctica, where it occurs predominantly on quartz mica schist. This represents the first record of the genus for Antarctica. The distinctive interrupted photobiont arrangement places it within the genus Myriospora (formerly known as the 'Acarospora' smaragdula group, or Silobia). The new species is characterized by having large, distinctly elevated, sessile apothecia with a prominent margin and a thallus that is usually lobed at the margins and variously orange-red, rust- coloured or brown-pigmented. Molecular phylogenetic analyses inferred with strong support that M. signyensis is closely related to M. scabrida which is similar in having a lobed, imbricate thallus with large and frequently somewhat raised apothecia, but which differs in never being rusty red, by frequently having a larger number of apothecia per areole/squamule and by having a thick and distinctive thalline epinecral layer. Myriospora signyensis is otherwise most similar to M. dilatata but the thallus of M. dilatata is never imbricate-lobate and the ascomata of M. signyensis have larger and more distinctly raised and sessile apothecia. A worldwide key to the 10 species currently recognized in the genus is presented.

  • 37. Purvis, O.P.
    et al.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, M
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Myriospora, a genus newly reported for Antarctica with a worldwide key to the species2018In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 50, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Reese Næsborg, Rikke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    van den Boom, Pieter P. G.
    Lecania belgica van den Boom & Reese Næsborg, a new saxicolous species from Western Europe2007In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 499-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species, Lecania belgica, is described and illustrated. It is a saxicolous lichen known only from the type locality in Belgium. It is characterized by apothecia with pruinose, irregularly undulating discs, relatively short ascospores, and by having 12-16 spores in the asci. It was found on mortar together with Diplotomma alboatrum.

  • 39.
    Savić, Sanja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Atla, a new genus in the Verrucariaceae (Verrucariales)2008In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 40, no Part 4, p. 269-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new genus Atla forms a well-supported clade in a molecular phylogeny based on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and LSU regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. The genus has a crustose thallus, a hamathecium at maturity without hyphal elements except for pseudoparaphyses remaining at the ostiolum, and large, muriform spores. Atla wheldonii was previously referred to Polyblastia. Three new species, A. alpina (the type of the new genus), A. palicei and A. praetermissa, are included in the genus and described here as new to science. They were found on calcareous rocks and soil in Northern Scandinavia, A. alpina also occurs in Central Europe, and A. wheldonii likewise in Central Europe, the Pyrenees and in the British Isles. An identification key to the species and a revision of the genus are also provided.

  • 40.
    Schneider, Kevin
    et al.
    University of Graz.
    Resl, Philipp
    University of Graz.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Spribille, Toby
    University of Graz + University of Montana.
    A new, highly effective primer pair to exclude algae when amplifying nuclear large ribosomal subunit (LS) DNA from lichens2015In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 269-275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Schultz, Matthias
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Diel, H
    Prieto, Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Epiphloea belongs to Collemataceae (Lecanoromycetes, lichenized Ascomycota)2015In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 47, p. 369-378Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Soto, Edier
    et al.
    Prieto, Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    A new Bunodophoron species (Sphaerophoraceae, Lecanorales) from the Neotropics2018In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 50, p. 255-256Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. anders.tehler@nrm.se.
    Three new combinations in the genus Fulvophyton (Roccellographaceae, Arthoniales)2017In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 49, p. 171-173Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Tibell, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Tibell Savić, Sanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Van Der Pluijm, Arno
    Visserskade 10, NL-4273 GL Hank, Netherlands.
    Chaenotheca biesboschii a new calicioid lichen from willow forests in the Netherlands2019In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 123-135, article id PII S0024282919000021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of Chaenotheca, C. biesboschii, has been found in the freshwater tidal area of the Biesbosch in the Netherlands, a national park well known for harbouring several rare and threatened mosses and lichens. A phylogenetic analysis of the ITS region revealed some strongly supported infrageneric clades in Chaenotheca which were given informal names, and some were assigned provisional names in anticipation of generic recognition. The analysis also showed that the new species differed in the sequenced region from other European Chaenotheca species. Chaenotheca biesboschii might be mistaken for C. gracillima but, in addition to a considerable difference in the ITS region, it also differs from this species in morphology. It is also similar to C. servitii but again differs in morphology. Chaenotheca biesboschii inhabits decorticated wood in the oldest stages of forest development of abandoned willow coppices. In 2016 and 2017 a fairly large population was found in an area comprising several square kilometres. In the Biesbosch area, extensive woodlands have developed only since the 1950s and therefore C. biesboschii might have been recently established in the area, possibly following climatic warming. The new species is characterized by having an immersed, glaucous green thallus; apothecia 0 center dot 9-1 center dot 4 mm high; capitulum on the lower side when young with a ring-like thickening covered by a yellow pruina; when mature with a rusty brown pruina on the capitulum and upper part of stalk; spherical spores, 3 center dot 5-5 center dot 5 mu m diam., ornamented by irregular cracks, medium brown; photobiont Stichococcus. A key to the European species of Chaenotheca is provided.

  • 45.
    Tibell, Sanja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Two new species of Atla (Verrucariaceae)2015In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new species in the lichen genus Atla, A. alaskana and A. recondita, are described. The ITS rDNA region is used for their molecular characterization. Morphologically, Atla alaskana is characterized by its rather thick and well-developed whitish grey thallus, and the rather large perithecia having a thalline excipulum. The presence of a thalline excipulum renders it similar to Sporodictyon species; however, in A. alaskana a distinct zone around the ostiolum is without a thallus and covered only by a thick white pruina. Atla recondita has a thin olivaceous brown thallus and moderately sized, emerging perithecia. It is not possible to identify this species unequivocally as an Atla species only by morphology, and it might well be mistaken for a Polyblastia. A key to all six Atla species, including the two new species, is provided.

  • 46. Valadbeigi, Tahereh
    et al.
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Megaspora rimisorediata (Pertusariales, Megasporaceae), a new sorediate species from Iran and its affinities with Aspicilia sensu lato2011In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Megaspora rimisorediata Valadbeigi & A. Nordin is described from Iran, where it mainly grows on tree bark but also on calciferous rocks and mosses. It is characterized by a pale ochraceous to bluish grey, cracked and sorediate thallus, very rarely producing ascomata. It appears to be rather commonly distributed in Iran. Its close affinity with Megaspora verrucosa is illustrated in a graph resulting from a phylogenetic network analysis of nuclear rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequences from specimens representing the different genera of Megasporaceae.

  • 47. Wedin, Mats
    et al.
    Ihlen, Per G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Triebe, Dagmar
    Scutula tuberculosa, the correct name of the Scutula growing on Solorina spp., with a key to Scutula s. str. in the Northern Hemisphere2007In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 39, p. 329-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The taxonomic and nomenclatural status of the common Scutula (Ramalinaceae, Lecanorales, Ascomycota) parasitizing species of Solorina (Peltigeraceae, Lecanorales) is clarified. The type of Biatorina tuberculosa Th. Fr., which, according to the protologue, was described from a Peltigera, is actually growing on Solorina saccata, and the correct name for this species is here shown to be Scutula tuberculosa (Th. Fr.) Rehm. Lectotypes are designated for Lecidea solorinaria Nyl., Scutula krempelhuberi Körb. and Lecidea solorinicola Vain. Notes on the taxonomy and classification of the genus are given, and a key to the species of Scutula s. str. in the Northern Hemisphere is presented. Scutula tuberculosa is reported as new to Asia and North America.

  • 48. Westberg, Martin
    et al.
    Crewe, Anna T
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Purvis, O William
    Wedin, Mats
    Silobia, a new genus for the Acarospora smaragdula complex (Ascomycota, Acarosporales) and a revision of the group in Sweden2011In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 7-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new genus Silobia M. Westb. & Wedin is proposed for the Acarospora smaragdula group, which is taxonomically and nomenclaturally revised in Sweden. The proposed taxonomy results from our former molecular phylogeny, together with morphological and anatomical investigations and analysis of secondary metabolites. Seven species are recognized in Sweden in this paper: Silobia dilatata sp. nov., S. myochroa sp. nov., S. rhagadiza comb. nov., S. rufescens comb. nov., S. scabrida comb. nov., S. smaragdula comb. nov. and S. tangerina sp. nov. Acarospora alberti, A. amphibola, A. isortoquensis, A. murina and A. undata are recognized as synonyms of S. smaragdula, Acarospora verruciformis as a synonym of S. scabrida and A. scyphulifera as a synonym of S. rhagadiza. The following names are lectotypified: Acarospora amphibola, A. amphibola f. testacea, A. lesdainii, A. lesdainii var. subochracea, A. murina, A. scyphulifera f. subdiscreta, Endocarpon smaragdulum, Lecanora rhagadiza and Sagedia rufescens. Acarospora scyphulifera is neotypified. Acarospora fusca is excluded from the Swedish checklist as the specimen was found to belong to S. rufescens. A key to the species is presented.

  • 49. Williams, Cameron B.
    et al.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Calicium sequoiae, a new lichen species from north-western California, USA2008In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 40, no Part 3, p. 185-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe Calicium sequoiae as a new species of lichenized Ascomycota from northwestern California, USA. The species is distinguished morphologically from other known members of Calicium by its stalks that react I+ blue, mature ascospores that are ornamented with spiral ridges, and apothecia that produce prominent white pruina. It is also the only Calicium known to produce thamnolic acid as a major secondary substance. Sequences from the ITS-region showed C. sequoiae to be unique among calicioid Physciaceae, and phylogenetic analysis positioned it close to C. adspersum, C. chlorosporum, C. lenticulare, Cyphelium notarisii, and C. tigillare. Thus far, Calicium sequoiae has been collected only from old-growth redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) forests, where it occurred on thick, fibrous bark of large redwood trees. A key to the 12 species of Calicium known from the Pacific Northwest is provided.

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