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  • 1.
    Backman, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching. ylva.backman@ltu.se.
    Circles of Happiness: Students' perceptions of bidirectional crossovers of subjective well-being2016In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 1547-1563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mental well-being of the world’s adolescents has decreased in the last 20–30 years. Such a trend is visible also in Sweden, a country otherwise considered a positive example in terms of child well-being. In Sweden, students in lower secondary school are especially exposed. From a salutogenic orientation, this study qualitatively explored 200 Swedish students’ (grades 5–9) perceptions of the role of happiness in school. Students perceived happiness as both promoting and being promoted by five aspects: learning, school engagement, appreciation of subjects or lesson content, others’ happiness, and prosocial behavior. Hence, five perceived bidirectional crossovers of subjective well-being were found. These were compared to the findings of previous research about the determinants and effects of happiness. The students’ perceptions both add new direction for future research and align in several respects with decades of earlier research.

  • 2.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics, Warsaw, Poland .
    What would your parents say?: the impact of cohabitation among young people on their relationships with their parents2014In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1313-1332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most European countries have seen a retreat from marriage, which is increasingly preceded or replaced by cohabitation. A question that arises in light of this trend is how the diffusion of non-marital cohabitation may affect the quality of family relations. This article investigates how cohabitation among young people affects their level of satisfaction with their relationship with their parents. We analyse data from the recently released Generation and Gender Survey for Poland, a country with a limited degree of social acceptance of cohabitation, a high degree of attachment to the institution of marriage, and a familialistic culture. Since young adults who choose to cohabit are a rather specific group, we use statistical methods that allow us to control for both the observed and the unobserved characteristics of cohabiters. We find that young people who cohabited in their first union rated their level of satisfaction with their parental relationship lower than their peers who were married. Thus, at least in the context of a country where informal partnerships are not yet fully socially accepted or institutionally supported, the role of cohabitation in intergenerational relations may not be neutral.

  • 3.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    Matysiak, Anna
    Wittgenstein Centre, Vienna Institute of Demography/Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
    Mynarska, Monika
    Institute of Psychology, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Does lone motherhood decrease women’s happiness?: evidence from qualitative and quantitative research2014In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1457-1477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the discussion on the effects of single motherhood on happiness. We use a mixed-method approach. First, based on in-depth interviews with mothers who gave birth while single, we explore mechanisms through which children may influence mothers’ happiness. In a second step, we analyze panel survey data to quantify this influence. Our results leave no doubt that, while raising a child outside of marriage poses many challenges, parenthood has some positive influence on a lone mother’s life.

    Our qualitative evidence shows that children are a central point in an unmarried woman’s life, and that many life decisions are taken with consideration of the child’s welfare, including escaping from pathological relationships. Our quantitative evidence shows that, although the general level of happiness among unmarried women is lower than among their married counterparts, raising a child does not have a negative impact on their happiness.

  • 4.
    Bergman, Lars R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Daukantaitė, Daiva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stability of Typical Patterns of Subjective Well–Being in Middle–Aged Swedish Women2007In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 293-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Typical patterns of general subjective well-being (SWB) were searched for in a representative longitudinal sample of Swedish women (N = 272) at age 43 and 49. Cluster analysis at each age separately resulted in a six-cluster solution at both ages. The two solutions were similar, indicating structural stability across 6 years. Five of the six clusters also showed significant individual stability. Among these clusters, a generalized positive typical pattern and two generalized negative typical patterns were found, one characterized by very high negative affect and one characterized by very low global life satisfaction. A cluster characterized by above average positive and negative affect was also found as well as one characterized by low positive affect. A strong relationship was found between membership in an extreme cluster and the values in certain SWB-related variables, supporting the validity of the typical patterns found. Further, it was shown that cluster membership contributed to the prediction of some validation variables above the prediction achieved by using only SWB components entered as continuous variables, suggesting the presence of interactions and nonlinearities in the SWB area.

  • 5.
    Berlin, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kaunitz, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Beyond Income: The Importance for Life Satisfaction of Having Access to a Cash Margin2015In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1557-1573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study how life satisfaction among adult Swedes is influenced by having access to a cash margin, i.e. a moderate amount of money that could be acquired on short notice either through own savings, by loan from family or friends, or by other means. We find that cash margin is a strong and robust predictor of life satisfaction, also when controlling for individual fixed-effects and socio-economic conditions, including income. Since it shows not to matter whether cash margin comes from own savings or with help from family members, this measure captures something beyond wealth.

  • 6.
    Bujacz, Aleksandra
    et al.
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eib, Constanze
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Academy of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden ; Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Not All Are Equal: A Latent Profile Analysis of Well-Being among the Self-Employed2019In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses a person-centered approach to distinguish between subpopulations of self-employed individuals using multidimensional well-being indicators. Data were obtained from European Social Survey including a sample of 3461 self-employed individuals from 29 European countries. The analysis has empirically identified six distinct profiles named ‘unhappy’, ‘languishing’, ‘happy’, ‘satisfied’, ‘passionate’, and ‘flourishing’. The profiles were associated with significant differences in well-being, health and work-related variables. The results highlight the heterogeneity of the self-employed population, and describe the complex—both hedonic and eudaimonic—character of the well-being concept in this population.

  • 7.
    Bujacz, Aleksandra
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eib, Constanze
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Stockholm University, Dept of Publ Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Not All Are Equal: A Latent Profile Analysis of Well-Being Among the Self-Employed2019In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses a person-centered approach to distinguish between subpopulations of self-employed individuals using multidimensional well-being indicators. Data were obtained from European Social Survey including a sample of 3461 self-employed individuals from 29 European countries. The analysis has empirically identified six distinct profiles named ‘unhappy’, ‘languishing’, ‘happy’, ‘satisfied’, ‘passionate’, and ‘flourishing’. The profiles were associated with significant differences in well-being, health and work-related variables. The results highlight the heterogeneity of the self-employed population, and describe the complex—both hedonic and eudaimonic—character of the well-being concept in this population.

  • 8.
    Bykvist, Krister
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Happiness in a flux.: The instability problem.2010In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 11, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bykvist, Krister
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Brulde, Bengt
    Happiness, Ethics, and Politics: Introduction, History, and Conceptual Framework2010In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 11, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Demir, Melikşah
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ, United States .
    Özdemir, Metin
    Department of Psychology, University of Maryland in Baltimore County, Baltimore MD, United States .
    Friendship, need satisfaction, and happiness2010In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 243-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friendship quality is an important predictor of happiness, however, what might account for the association between the two? Two studies investigated satisfaction of basic psychological needs as a mediator of the relationship between friendship quality and happiness. Study 1 (n = 424) found support for the model for best friendship. Second study (n = 176) replicated the first study and showed that needs satisfaction in best and two closest friendships mediated the relationship between the quality of all friendships and happiness. The findings suggest that one reason why the quality of friendships is related to happiness is because friendship experiences provide a context where basic needs are satisfied.

  • 11. Garcia, Danilo
    et al.
    Rosenberg, Patricia
    Erlandsson, Arvid
    Siddiqui, Anver
    Umeå University.
    On Lions and Adolescents: Affective Temperaments and the Influence of Negative Stimuli on Memory2010In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 477-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the relation between reaction to negative stimuli and memory for stimuli. The relation was further investigated using as a framework individuals' affective temperaments (AFTs). Eighty adolescents participated in the study. The AFTs are based on selfreported affect and categorizes individuals in four temperaments: self-actualizing, high affective, low affective and self-destructive. Reaction to negative stimuli was measured by interpretation of specific words in a short story. Two days later, participants were presented with a list of words and asked which of them were present in the short story. Individuals' AFTs were expected to predict the promotion of pleasure or the prevention of displeasure. On a general level, reaction to negative stimuli predicted memory for negative, positive and neutral words. At an individual level, self-actualizers and high affectives' negative reaction predicted the memory of positive words (i.e., promotion). In contrast, low affectives' negative and positive reaction predicted the memory of neutral words (i.e., prevention).

  • 12.
    Garcia, Danilo
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden .
    Siddiqui, Anver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Adolescents’ psychological well-being and memory for life events: Influences on life satisfaction with respect to temperamental dispositions2009In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 407-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to explore how the number of recalled life events (positive and negative) predicts psychological well-being (PWB) and how PWB predicts life satisfaction (LS). In addition, participants were categorized into one of four different affective temperaments (self-actualizing, high affective, low affective, and self-destructive). One hundred and thirty-five high school students participated in completing the SWLS (LS), PWB (short-version), PANAS (to create affective temperaments), and the life events recollection task. Results indicated that adolescents with high positive affect also had high PWB; adolescents with low affective profiles also had high PWB. Positive and negative life events predicted PWB for self-destructive temperaments, whereas positive life events predicted PWB for low affective temperaments. PWB predicted LS for all temperaments except the self-actualizing group. In conclusion, the temperament combinations may allow the individual to achieve PWB and LS. Even more importantly, self-acceptance may foster LS regardless of temperament and may have more impact on LS than life events.

  • 13. Gärling, Tommy
    et al.
    Gamble, Amelie
    Fors, Filip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hjerm, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Emotional Well-Being Related to Time Pressure, Impediment to Goal Progress, and Stress-Related Symptoms2016In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 1789-1799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose that emotional well-being in everyday life is partially related to the balance of positive and negative affect associated with everyday routine activities. Factors that interfere with positive affect associated with such activities would therefore have negative impacts on emotional well-being. Supporting that time pressure is one such factor, we find in Study 1 for a representative sample of Swedish employees (n = 1507) answering a survey questionnaire that emotional well-being has a negative relationship to time pressure. In Study 2 we test the hypothesis that the negative effect of time pressure on emotional well-being is jointly mediated by impediment to goal progress and time stress. In another survey questionnaire a sample of Swedish employees (n = 240) answered retrospective questions about emotional well-being at work and off work, experienced impediment to goal progress, experienced time pressure, and stress-related symptoms. Statistical mediation analyses supported the proposed hypothesis.

  • 14.
    Jaunky, Vishal Chandr
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Jeetoo, Jamiil
    Department of Economics and StatisticsUniversity of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius.
    Rampersad, Shreya
    Department of Economics and StatisticsUniversity of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius.
    Happiness and Consumption in Mauritius: An Exploratory Study of Socio-Economic Dimensions, Basic Needs, Luxuries and Personality Traits2019In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstream economics perceive an individual as highly individualistic, presuming that he/she consumes goods in the most efficient way to optimize his/her level of happiness. This study attempts to explore the nexus between socio-economic dimensions, basic needs, luxuries and personality traits and happiness in Mauritius. Material consumption and happiness are projected to be positively and strongly related. This is usually illuminated in terms of the increased possibilities to satisfy basic needs and luxuries along with other motives which additional spending provides. Other instrumental aspects of consumption, such as its relative, community-based and hedonic magnitudes are accounted. Cross-sectional data are compiled from a household survey with a sample size of 1015 observations. To conduct the analysis, an ordered probit model is applied. The general conclusion is drawn upon the results that socio-economic indicators like educational attainment, residential location, family size, income in addition to the intermediate needs deprivation index, brand consciousness, fashion innovativeness, commercial interest, shopping enjoyment, hedonism, bandwagon effect and personality traits are significantly related to people’s happiness.

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