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  • 1.
    Adamson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Teachers' knowledge about adolescents - an interview study2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 427-427Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Phonological processing skills and hearing impairment2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bergvall, A
    et al.
    Dept Forens Psychiat, Hisings Backa, Sweden Natl Board Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Dept Psychol, S-40020 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsman, A
    Dept Forens Psychiat, Hisings Backa, Sweden Natl Board Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Dept Psychol, S-40020 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hansen, S
    Dept Forens Psychiat, Hisings Backa, Sweden Natl Board Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Dept Psychol, S-40020 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wessely, H
    Dept Forens Psychiat, Hisings Backa, Sweden Natl Board Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Gothenburg, Dept Psychol, S-40020 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Evidence for selective executive dysfunction in violent offenders2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 55-55Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
    A Swedish study on temps: Insecure psychological contract, but willing to stay2008In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 43, no 3-4, p. 44-44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Hakanen, Jari
    Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ II) - concurrent validity assessed by a theoretical model2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no Issue S1, p. 640-640Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To validate the concurrent validity of COPSOQ II (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire), a work environment questionnaire translated into >25 languages. Methods. Electronic questionnaire sent to all public dentistry staff in four Swedish regions (response rate of 75%; n = 1345). Twenty‐two scales from COPSOQ II, complemented by the Utrecht Work Engagement scale, were mapped onto a hypothesized double mediated model based on the Job‐Demand‐Resources (JD‐R) Model with workability as outcome. The model was tested using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM). Results. The theoretical model fit the data well (RMSEA 0.060; CFI 0.925, TLI 0.913, χ2 1543.81; df 281; p < 0.001). The effect of leadership resources on workability was mediated through other kind of job resources and demands, and from these through strain symptoms and positive work‐related outcomes. Conclusion. The concurrent validity of the scales was corroborated and the results support the use of COPSOQ II for research and workplace risk assessment.

  • 6.
    Bertling, UMS
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Different gender patterns found refute biased conclusions about psychopathology in earlier drug abuse research2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 137-137Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Borjesson, AB
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Umea Univ, Dept Psychiat, Umea, Sweden Dept Psychol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Stockholm, Dept Psychol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, R
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden Umea Univ, Dept Psychiat, Umea, Sweden Dept Psychol, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Stockholm, Dept Psychol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, T
    Nilsson, LG
    Immunological variables mediates memory performance in normal older adults2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 420-420Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    et al.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Putnick, Diane L.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza’, Faculty of Psychology, Italy.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Quezon, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    University of South Carolina, Department of Psychology, Columbia, SC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Psychology, Kenya.
    Mother and father socially desirable responding in nine countries: Two kinds of agreement and relations to parenting self-reports2015In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 174-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed 2 forms of agreement between mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand and the United States (N = 1110 families). Mothers and fathers in all 9 countries reported socially desirable responding in the upper half of the distribution, and countries varied minimally (but China was higher than the cross-country grand mean and Sweden lower). Mothers and fathers did not differ in reported levels of socially desirable responding, and mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding were largely uncorrelated. With one exception, mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding were similarly correlated with self-perceptions of parenting, and correlations varied somewhat across countries. These findings are set in a discussion of socially desirable responding, cultural psychology and family systems.

  • 9.
    Brändström, Sven
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry .
    Nylander, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry .
    Przybeck, T
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden Washington Univ, St Louis, MO 63130 USA Univ Rostock, D-2500 Rostock 1, Germany.
    Richter, J
    The temperament and character inventory (TCI) - A cross-cultural tool.2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 440-440Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Carelli, Maria Grazia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Mäntylä, Timo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Forman, Helen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cognitive control in children's time monitoring2004In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, ISSN ISSN 0020-7594, EISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 39, no 5-6, p. 206-207-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined school-aged children's time monitoring in relation to individual differences in executive control functions. The present study involved an individual-difference approach with three latent executive functions - mental shifting, information updating and monitoring, and inhibition of prepotent responses. Children between 8 to 12 years completed a series of experimental tasks that were assumed to tap each target executive function as well as a parallel task of time monitoring. The findings are discussed in relation to the unity and diversity of executive functions and their contribution to children's time monitoring.

  • 11.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Where is the story?2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 379-379Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Jan
    Thats me in Beijing - Person and enviroment picture recognition for pupils with intellectual disability.2004In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 39, no 5-6, p. 114-114Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 13.
    Dubuc, SA
    et al.
    Univ Rouen, F-76821 Mt St Aignan, France Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, T
    Determinants of veridical memory: a process dissociation and experiential approach.2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 451-451Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Eek, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Selart, Marcus
    Department of Strategy and Management, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration, Breiviksveien 40, N-5045 Bergen, Norway.
    Is there a pro-self component behind the prominence effect?: Individual resource allocation decisions with communities as potential beneficiaries2005In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 429-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important problem for decision-makers in society deals with the efficient and equitable allocation of scarce resources to individuals and groups. The significance of this problem is rapidly growing since there is a rising demand for scarce resources all over the world. Such resource dilemmas belong to a conceptually broader class of situations known as social dilemmas. In this type of dilemma, individual choices that appear "rational" often result in suboptimal group outcomes. In this article we study how people make monetary allocation decisions between the community where they live and a neighbouring community, with the aim of finding out to what extent these decisions are subject to biased over-weighting. The manuscript reports four experiments that deal with the way individuals make such allocation decisions when the potential beneficiaries are such communities. The specific goal of these experiments is to gauge the amount of bias in the weights that people assign to the various beneficiaries. Taken together, the results from all the four experiments suggest that making the gain of the neighbouring community prominent to a higher extent de-biases the outcomes (the prominence effect) compared to when own community gain is made prominent. Place identity is discussed as a potentially important factor in this connection. Hence, it may be argued that there seems to be some kind of a pro-self component that is able to explain a large part of the variance observed for the prominence effect. Connections between such a factor and in-group favouritism are discussed. A strength of the study was that these major results appeared to be quite robust when considered as task effects, as the salience of the manipulated context factors in the studies (in terms of reliable main or interaction effects) did not distort them.

  • 15.
    Ferreira, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Reading without speaking.2004In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 39, no 5-6, p. 556-556Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 16.
    Frodi, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sepa, A
    ABIS - All Babies Born in Southeast Sweden - psychosocial predictors of young children's autoimmunity2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 33-33Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Population-level restoration phenomena and development of research on restorative environments2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Suppl 1, p. 354-354Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Restoration and restorative environments2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Suppl 1, p. 354-354Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hylander, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Turnings in the representation of a problem2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 135-135Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20. Johansson, K
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The role of emotional and cognitive factors in speechreading.1992In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 27, p. 50-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Johansson, O
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Transactive memory and memory compensation in elderly couples.2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, p. 189-189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Kovordanyi, Rita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Full factorial simulation modeling of selective attention in mental imagery2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 100-100Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Kubik, Veit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jönsson, Fredrik U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Knopf, Monika
    Two effects, one explanation: a study on the effects of intended and actual enactment2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Supplement 1, p. 562-562Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Motor-function encoding action phrases, facilitates recollection more than verbal encoding (enactment effect, c.f. Nilsson, 2000). Further, if the phrases are intended to be recalled via motor-function encoding it also leads to higher memory accessibility, referred to as the intention-superiority effect (Goschke & Kuhl, 1993) or the intended enactment effect (Freeman & Ellis, 2003), depending on whether the same process or different processes are assumed to underlie both effects. In three experiments, both effects were studied as a function of list length (18, 30, 60, or 90 items), retrieval measures (free recall, cued recall and recognition). Additionally, different moderator variables for these effects were investigated (familiarity, degree of motor involvement of the action phrases, individual differences in action orientation). Similar effects of intended and actual enactment were found for memory accuracy and accessibility (i.e., response latencies), but the effects were moderated by the nature of the action phrase and action orientation. State-oriented individuals and highly motoric action phrases showed a pronounced (intended) enactment effect. The results, at least partially, support a common explanation for both effects.

  • 24.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Emirates College for Advanced Education. Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan, and Health and Special Education Division, , Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research Program in Developmental Neuroscience, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    Hong Kong Institute of Education, Department of Psychological Studies, Hong Kong, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Education Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Mothers', fathers' and children's perceptions of parents' expectations about children's family obligations in nine countries.2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's family obligations involve assistance and respect that children are expected to provide to immediate and extended family members and reflect beliefs related to family life that may differ across cultural groups. Mothers, fathers and children (N = 1432 families) in 13 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand and United States) reported on their expectations regarding children's family obligations and parenting attitudes and behaviours. Within families, mothers and fathers had more concordant expectations regarding children's family obligations than did parents and children. Parenting behaviours that were warmer, less neglectful and more controlling as well as parenting attitudes that were more authoritarian were related to higher expectations regarding children's family obligations between families within cultures as well as between cultures. These international findings advance understanding of children's family obligations by contextualising them both within families and across a number of diverse cultural groups in 9 countries.

  • 25.
    Laukka, Petri
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Juslin, Patrik N
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gabrielsson, Alf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Impact of intended emotion intensity on cue utilization and decoding accuracy in vocal expression of emotion.2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, p. 288-289Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Cochlear implantation: Cognitive skills and speech understanding2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Phonological processing skills and speech understanding with hearing-aids and cochlear implants in individuals with severe hearing loss.2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Tactile supported speechreading1992In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 27, p. 62-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Verbal information-processing capabilities and cochlear implant1996In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 31, p. 404-404Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognitive Psychology.
    Borg, E.
    Ohlsson, I-S
    Background noise and speech understanding: The effect of cognitive skills2003In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Mac Giolla, Erik
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University of Skövde, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Skövde, Sweden.
    Sex differences in personality are larger in gender equal countries: Replicating and extending a surprising finding.2019In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 705-711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex differences in personality have been shown to be larger in more gender equal countries. We advance this research by using an extensive personality measure, the IPIP-NEO-120, with large country samples (N > 1000), from 22 countries. Furthermore, to capture the multidimensionality of personality we measure sex differences with a multivariate effect size (Mahalanobis distance D). Results indicate that past research, using univariate measures of effect size, have underestimated the size of between-country sex differences in personality. Confirming past research, there was a strong correlation (r = .69) between a country's sex differences in personality and their Gender Equality Index. Additional analyses showed that women typically score higher than men on all five trait factors (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness), and that these relative differences are larger in more gender equal countries. We speculate that as gender equality increases both men and women gravitate towards their traditional gender roles.

  • 32.
    Mac Giolla, Erik
    et al.
    Department of psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Behavioral Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Sex differences in personality are larger in gender equal countries: Replicating and extending a surprising finding2019In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 705-711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex differences in personality have been shown to be larger in more gender equal countries. We advance this researchby using an extensive personality measure, the IPIP-NEO-120, with large country samples (N > 1000), from 22countries. Furthermore, to capture the multidimensionality of personality we measure sex differences with a multivariateeffect size (Mahalanobis distance D). Results indicate that past research, using univariate measures of effect size, haveunderestimated the size of between-country sex differences in personality. Confirming past research, there was a strongcorrelation (r = .69) between a country’s sex differences in personality and their Gender Equality Index. Additionalanalyses showed that women typically score higher than men on all five trait factors (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness), and that these relative differences are larger in more gender equal countries. Wespeculate that as gender equality increases both men and women gravitate towards their traditional gender roles.

  • 33.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Gender harassment among university teachers and researchers: an explorative study2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no Issue S1, p. 614-614Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examined the prevalence of gender harassment and it's associations to different organisational factors, ill‐health and job satisfaction among university teachers and researchers in Southern Sweden. Altogether 322 participants, 186 women and 136 men, responded to a web questionnaire. The results showed that gender harassment was more prevalent among women than men, and among senior lecturers and professors than lecturers. Gender harassment was associated with high job demands, less fair leadership style of the immediate manager, and job dissatisfaction for both women and men. For women, there was also an association between gender harassment, ill‐health and gender of the immediate manager. For men, poorer social organisational climate was related to gender harassment, but not the gender of the immediate manager. As the immediate manager's leadership style seems to be associated with the occurrence of gender harassment, universities should take this into consideration in their leadership programs.

  • 34.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Jönsson, Sandra
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Bäckström, Martin
    Forssell, Rebecka
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Assessing Exposure to Cyberbullying Behaviour in Working Life2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no Issue S1, p. 22-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse the reliability and validity of a cyberbullying behaviour questionnaire (CBQ) in working life. Further aim was to analyse the reliability and validity of a short version of a cyberbullying behaviour questionnaire (CBQ‐S) in working life. Altogether 3 371 working adults in Sweden, and 238 in the USA participated in the study. The results of the confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) showed that the one‐factor CFA model had an excellent fit to data, and Cronbach's alpha indicates that both scales are reliable. In addition, the convergent validity of the scales was demonstrated by significant correlations with the following theoretically relevant concepts: wellbeing, work engagement and intention to quit. The results of the study support the use of the CBQ and CBQ‐S as reliable and valid measures of cyberbullying behaviour in working life.

  • 35.
    Naslund, LJ
    Dept Educ & Psychol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Re-enactment processes in clinical group supervision2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 349-349Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Early detection of later dementia: Cognitive, demographic, and biological markers2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Spec, p. 118-118Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In most societies, there is an increasing proportion of old and very old in the population. This is a positive development in the sense that it reflects societal and medical accomplishments. However, it also means that a growing number of people will experience age-related problems like cognitive decline and dementia, and thereby a diminished quality of life. Intense research is currently being conducted in many laboratories in the world in order to identify early those persons who later will undergo a cognitive decline or develop dementia. By early detection of these individuals, various treatments might be more efficient than presently, when treatments are given much later at the time of diagnosis of cognitive decline or dementia. The present address will provide a list of early markers that have the potential of discovering those individuals already in middle age, who later will be experiencing these age-related problems. These markers differ in nature; they are cognitive, biological or demographic. A great challenge in contemporary research is to understand how these markers can serve as individual risk factors or as interactive risk factors. Empirical data on early cognitive performance, overweight in middle age, certain genes, beta-amyloid, and metabolites will be presented and discussed as to how they can serve as predictors (each factor separately or in interactions with other factors) for cognitive decline and dementia in late life.

  • 37.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The white coat blood pressure effect and plasma cortisol2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 110-110Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Olofsson, Ulrich
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Age-related differences in memory for item, relational and order information in children2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 393-393Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Daily Travel and Subjective Wellbeing2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, p. 1145-1145, article id SIArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Pan, Jianying
    et al.
    Zhejiang University School of Management, GERC,Hangzhou.
    Wang, Zhongming
    Zhejiang University School of Management, GERC,Hangzhou.
    Segelod, Esbjörn
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Bogg, Lennart
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Differential effect of multi-level science parks on motives and performance of high-tech firms under change in China2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 515-515Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Qiu, CX
    et al.
    von Strauss, Eva
    Winblad, B
    Fratiglioni, L
    Decline in blood pressure over time and risk of dementia in the Kungsholmen project2004In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 39, no 5-6 Suppl. S, p. 175-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim-To examine the relationship between blood pressure decline and dementia risk. Methods-A community-based dementia-free cohort (n=947, 75+ years) was followed to detect dementia. Data were analyzed with Cox models. Results-Blood pressure markedly decreased before dementia diagnosis and continued to decline thereafter. Diastolic pressure decline was not predictive of dementia. Systolic pressure decline ⩾15 mm Hg was associated with an increased risk of dementia among people with baseline systolic pressure <160 mm Hg. Conclusions-Blood pressure decreases from the preclinical phase of dementia. A greater decline in systolic pressure is associated with dementia risk in selective subgroups of aging population.

  • 42.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Language structure, Language experience and STM.2004In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 39, no 5-6, p. 37-37Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 43.
    Rydell, Ann-Margret
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The mother-child relationship and the development of CU-traits and antisocial behaviour2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Suppl 1, p. 256-256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Cognition, communication and disability2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 110-110Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognition, Communication and disability2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, p. 110-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive and neuroscience perspectives on speech and sign processing: Evidence from persons with deafness, hearing impairment, and normal hearing2004In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 39, no 5-6, p. 222-222Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 47.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The cognitive architecture of lipreading skill1992In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 27, p. 50-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Working memory for poorly specified linguistic input: Applications to sensory aids2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 222-222Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Strand, Niklas
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Dukic Willstrand, Tania
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human Factors in the Transport System.
    Marin-Lamellet, Claude
    IFSTTAR.
    SAFE Move for older drivers: A French-Swedish research initiative2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, p. 1144-1144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Sundström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Lifestyle factors, genetics and cognitive aging2008In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, International Journal of Psychology, Vol. 43, p. 477-477Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 59
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