Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Estrada, Felipe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Future Prospects, Deprivation, and Criminality – A Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study2018In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 1280-1293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the longitudinal relationship between subjective and objective deprivation in early adolescence on the one hand, and criminal offending in adolescence and early adulthood on the other. Data from the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study (n = 15,117), containing information from surveys and registers are used. Bivariate analyses confirm a relationship between low socioeconomic status and both subjective and objective deprivation. Subjective deprivation alone is related to offending only for those from less privileged background. Subjective and objective deprivation in combination is associated with a higher risk of offending for all individuals, although the less privileged background, the higher the risk.

  • 2.
    Azarian, Reza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Alalehto, Tage
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Patterns in Account-Giving among White Collar Criminals2014In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 101-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish entrepreneurs' own explanations, this article searches for the possible regularities in the accounts offered by white collar offenders and for the underlying factors that produce these regularities, tracing in particular the impact of these offenders' attitudes toward regulation and taxation as well as their perceptions of the functioning of the market in which they operate. The results show that justifications are more common among offenders who have a clearly negative view on both factors. Excuses, on the other hand, are more frequently used by those who hold a positive attitude toward taxation and regulation. The results also show that offenders who offer excuses tend to share the same negative perception of the market as the “justifiers.” This unanticipated finding suggests that the “excusers” commit their offenses because they believe that the unlawful behaviors of the relevant others disturb the functioning of the market mechanism and thereby push them toward criminality.

  • 3.
    Doğan, Recep
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Ankara, Turkey.
    Do Women Really Kill for Honor?: Conceptualizing Women’s Involvement in Honor Killings.2018In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, ISSN 0163-9625, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 1247-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    So far, women’s involvement in honor killings has been attempted to explain with the emphasis on either patriarchy or the concept of hegemonic masculinity.  However, the current conceptualization of women involved in honor killings is not completely representative of all of the cases. The accurate portrayal of women’s involvement in such killings requires a broader understanding of particular circumstances of the female perpetrators, the whole dynamic behind honor killings, and of the particular relationship between victim and the perpetrator. Through reflecting on the narratives of five female perpetrators, this article aims to provide this missing focus.

  • 4.
    Jansson, Peter M.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Exploring pathways related to men’s violence: A qualitative exploration of the relationship between violent men’s violence and their masculinities, childhood, and emotions2019In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1171-1186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored new ways of finding knowledge about violent men’s pathways toward their status as violent criminals and the mechanisms that underlie their violent behavior. The empirical data were gathered through biographical interviews with 10 men sentenced to therapy against violence and drugs at a Swedish treatment center. The men who had experienced violence and childhood maltreatment tended to bypass shame with uncontrolled anger and violence when reliving childhood traumas. Conversely, men without extreme childhood experiences seemed to exhibit more controlled violence mechanisms. Two men who had experienced brutal physical school bullying might have been expected to bypass shame with immediate violence; however, these men described their violence as controlled, suggesting that they had learnt to take cognitive control over their bypass mechanisms in order to escape the bullying.

  • 5.
    Jansson, Peter M.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Exploring pathways related to men’s violence: A qualitative exploration of the relationship between violent men’s violence and their masculinities, childhood, and emotions2019In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, Vol. 0, no 10, p. 1171-1186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored new ways of finding knowledge about violent men’s pathways toward their status as violent criminals and the mechanisms that underlie their violent behavior. The empirical data were gathered through biographical interviews with 10 men sentenced to therapy against violence and drugs at a Swedish treatment center. The men who had experienced violence and childhood maltreatment tended to bypass shame with uncontrolled anger and violence when reliving childhood traumas. Conversely, men without extreme childhood experiences seemed to exhibit more controlled violence mechanisms. Two men who had experienced brutal physical school bullying might have been expected to bypass shame with immediate violence; however, these men described their violence as controlled, suggesting that they had learnt to take cognitive control over their bypass mechanisms in order to escape the bullying.

  • 6.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg.
    A Deviance Perspective on Social Movements - The Case of Animal Rights Activism2014In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 133-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a theoretical framework for understanding deviance and deviance-management in a social movement context. Such a deviance perspective is useful because in striving for social change, activists challenge existing social norms and may readily be defined by their environments as “outsiders” or deviants. However, activists also differ from traditional deviant groups. The article therefore conceptualizes activists as “entrepreneurial deviants,” combining features of both moral entrepreneurs and deviants in society, as presented in Howard Becker's classical theory. It is argued that in order to understand the strategies of deviance-management performed by activists, traditional notions of “passing,” “techniques of neutralization,” and “subculture” must be complemented by the concepts of “confronting,” “techniques of idealization,” and the forming of a “transformative subculture.” Empirically, the article builds on a case study of animal rights activism in Sweden and the ways in which the activists counter stereotypes, which is interpreted as a form of deviance-management.

  • 7.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    A deviance perspective on social movements: The case of animal rights activism2014In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 133-151Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf