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  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling, Scotland.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Theorising simulation in higher education: difficulty for learners as an emergent phenomenon2016In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 613-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread interest in using and researching simulation in higher education, little discussion has yet to address a key pedagogical concern: difficulty. A sociomaterial view of learning, explained in this paper, goes beyond cognitive considerations to highlight dimensions of material, situational, representational and relational difficulty confronted by students in experiential learning activities such as simulation. In this paper we explore these dimensions of difficulty through three contrasting scenarios of simulation education. The scenarios are drawn from studies conducted in three international contexts: Australia, Sweden and the UK, which illustrate diverse approaches to simulation and associated differences in the forms of difficulty being produced. For educators using simulation, the key implications are the importance of noting and understanding (1) the effects on students of interaction among multiple forms of difficulty; (2) the emergent and unpredictable nature of difficulty; and (3) the need to teach students strategies for managing emergent difficulty.

  • 2. Case, Jennifer
    et al.
    Marshall, Delia
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Being a student again: a narrative study of a teacher's experience2010In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For some time there has been a focus in higher education research towards understanding the student experience of learning. This article presents a narrative analysis of the experience of a teacher who re-entered the learning world of undergraduate students by enrolling in a challenging chemical engineering course. The analysis identifies multiple lenses in the narrative: of student, of researcher, of teacher and of mature student. A personal reflective genre was noted which displayed an overriding emotional tenor, linked both to the emotions associated with the individual experience of struggling with difficult tasks and those arising from negotiating the social interactions of the learning environment. This hermeneutic engagement points to the value in teachers exploring their own learning, as well as new possibilities for critically examining the implications of apparently progressive teaching methodologies.

  • 3.
    Dahlgren , Lars Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt-Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Trowald, Nils
    Swedish University of Agriculture.
    Grading systems, features of assessment and students' approaches to learning2009In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 185-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bologna process aims at harmonising the higher education systems in the Europe. One of the most important tools proposed for such a purpose is the European Credit Transfer System. A significant element of this system is a common seven-step grading scale. It has previously been shown that assessment characteristics impact on students' approaches to learning. Furthermore, there is also empirical evidence that judgement criteria have an effect on students' learning. The focus of this article is on the relationships between grading systems, assessment characteristics and students' learning. Empirical evidence from a Swedish survey study indicates that multi-step grading scales may have detrimental repercussions on the nature of the assessment tasks and thereby indirectly on the students' approaches to learning. We suggest that the effects of grading systems need to be considered in the current discussion in order to support quality in learning.

  • 4.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Johansson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Learning to play the seminar game: Some students’ initial encounter with a basic working form in higher education2005In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 29-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates students' initial encounters with the seminar as a working form in higher education. The main interest was to explore how the communication pattern, the aim of the seminar and meaning were negotiated. The results originate from an ethnographic field study where we followed a group of students in a Masters program in Social Science during their first five weeks. Data were analyzed from a socio-cultural perspective and the concepts of participation and reification. We found that there was an implicit negotiation of the communication pattern, what to discuss and the function of the seminar. In these processes, the students and teacher participated in the negotiation of meaning. Different objects were created through a reification process, around which the negotiation of meaning took place.

  • 5.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för studier av vuxenutbildning, folkbildning och högre utbildning .
    Johansson, Kristina
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för studier av vuxenutbildning, folkbildning och högre utbildning .
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för studier av vuxenutbildning, folkbildning och högre utbildning.
    Learning to play the seminar game: Some students’ initial encounter with a basic working form in higher education2005In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 29-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fredholm, Angelica
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karolinska institutet.
    Henningsohn, L.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Savin-Baden, M.
    University of Worcester UK.
    Silén, C.
    Karolinska institutet.
    The practice of thresholds: Autonomy in clinical education explored through variation theory and the threshold concepts framework2019In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates a practical dimension to the discussion about threshold concepts. Threshold concepts have thus far mostly been acknowledged to elucidate learning processes mainly connected to theoretical concepts. By exploring situations that prompted experiences of autonomy and authenticity in clinical learning, findings showed how a practical experience could have the same power to transform thinking and identity as theoretical thresholds and serve as a trigger for transformational learning, therefore making the discussion about ‘practical thresholds' or thresholds in practice possible. The present study explores situations that prompted autonomy and authenticity, and offers context for and substance to these situations by adopting variation theory and the threshold concept framework. In order to learn more about situations that prompt experiences of autonomy and authenticity, and create prerequisites for such experiences, this paper examines how students discern and interpret these situations by analysing them through variation theory and the threshold concept framework.

  • 7.
    Hagström, Eva
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Education.
    Lindberg, Owe
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Three theses on teaching and learning in higher education2013In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our article, we explore the possibility of formulating theses about teaching as one way to use research as a basis for educational action. The theses are formulated from current educational research on teaching and learning in higher education. We also explore the potential for action and the consequences derived from the theses. With our theses, we criticise less complex ways of using research for educational purposes. Through theses we can suggest directions for action without prescribing certain methods or procedures and provide answers without reducing the teachers' possibilities for choice or diminishing their responsibility for their actions. Our exploration is an invitation to a collaborative exploration of theses on teaching and learning in order to broaden and deepen our shared basis for educational action.

  • 8.
    Hagström, Eva
    et al.
    Next Generation Learning Center, Dalarna Univ, Falun, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Owe
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Three theses on teaching and learning in higher education2013In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our article, we explore the possibility of formulating theses about teaching as one way to use research as a basis for educational action. The theses are formulated from current educational research on teaching and learning in higher education. We also explore the potential for action and the consequences derived from the theses. With our theses, we criticise less complex ways of using research for educational purposes. Through theses we can suggest directions for action without prescribing certain methods or procedures and provide answers without reducing the teachers' possibilities for choice or diminishing their responsibility for their actions. Our exploration is an invitation to a collaborative exploration of theses on teaching and learning in order to broaden and deepen our shared basis for educational action.

  • 9.
    Holmén, Magnus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ljungberg, Daniel
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The teaching and societal services nexus: Academics' experiences in three disciplines2015In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 208-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate the perception of academics regarding how their experiences from societal interaction (third mission) inform their teaching and vice versa. We report on a phone survey of Swedish academics in three engineering-related disciplines. The findings show that there is a perceived positive and bidirectional relationship between societal interaction and teaching. Industry-related activities were perceived to inform teaching more than other types of societal interaction. While societal interaction is at large more important for the academics in their search for relevant teaching topics and content, teaching was deemed more important for the implementation of societal interaction. We conclude by proposing that academics creatively (re)combine experiences from third mission and education, often mediated by their research activities. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  • 10.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Pedagogiska institutonen, Lunds universitet.
    Service as collaboration: an integrated process in teaching and research. A response to Greenbank2007In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 281-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a response to Greenbank's (2006) The academic's role: the need for a re-evaluation? It is also a contribution to the ongoing debate about the need to develop a broader view of scholarship and the different activities related to it such as 'teaching', 'research' and 'service to the community'. Arguments related to current research are presented to enhance a deeper understanding and more nuanced definition of 'service', which has been perceived by many academics as a confusing term that lacks professional status. 'Collaboration' is a better term for describing the interactivity between universities and the community, implying collaboration with practitioners. A holistic view of scholarship is suggested, where the integration of collaboration, teaching and research is seen as an interdependent whole instead of a hierarchy of functions.

  • 11.
    Levander, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Forsberg, Eva
    Elmgren, Maja
    A blind spot in the black box: The meaning-making of educational proficiency in academic appointment of full professorsIn: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Liebel, Grischa
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Burden, Håkan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Heldal, Robgardt
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    For free: continuity and change by team teaching2017In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 62-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team teaching is advocated in education to offer students multiple explanations to complex concepts and to improve teacher development. However, team teaching is typically associated with high staff cost due to the increased amount of teachers involved. The authors argue that team teaching can be conducted in a cheap way by including novice teaching assistants in the lectures and train them ‘on the job’. Additionally, novice assistants cause reflection on action and prevent a mechanization of the course. The authors use Brookfield’s four lenses to reflect on the application of team teaching in a Swedish undergraduate course on software modeling over three years, involving 3 teachers and collecting evaluation data from close to 400 students. The reflection shows that team teaching can be used as a cost-effective way to introduce novice teachers to a course, while at the same time receiving benefits from their participation in lectures and course development.

  • 13. Lundqvist, Robert
    Critical thinking and the art of making good mistakes1999In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 523-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical thinking, desirable as it may seem, can imply an emphasis on the ability to deconstruct. This ability is clearly important, but reasonably only part of what is required for learning which must comprise integration and the finding of patterns. Reflection is also fundamental and a critical attitude might provide a detriment to such reflection since critique often seems to rely on a focus on results, rather than on reflection upon mistakes. The arguments will be supported by a description of the experiences from a statistics course comprising peer review and attempts to stimulate the making of good mistakes.

  • 14. Lundqvist, Robert
    Quality improvements of teaching and learning in higher education: a comparison with developments in industrial settings1998In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As in the case in many areas of society, quality issues have come into focus also in higher education. One expression is that there are a number of institutions in higher education where a Total Quality Management (TQM) perspective has been adopted. However, most of these examples are found in non-academic activities. This article discusses the possibility to achieve improvements in teaching and learning from the adoption of a TQM perspective. The discussion will be based upon an analogy with one particular development common in trade and industry, namely the transition towards process orientated structures, and towards less reliance on screening, rework and scrapping of non-conformance. The basic argument is that a similar change in higher education accompanied by the adoption of a TQM perspective comprising elements as focus on customer needs, process orientation and continuous improvements could result in improvements in teaching and learning.

  • 15. McGrath, Lisa
    et al.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English for Specific Purposes and Academic Literacies: Eclecticism in academic writing pedagogy2016In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 933-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic Literacies and English for Specific Purposes perspectives on the teaching of academic writing tend to be positioned as dichotomous and ideologically incompatible. Nonetheless, recent studies have called for the integration of these two perspectives in the design of writing programmes in order to meet the needs of students in the increasingly diverse and shifting landscape of academia. The aim of the present paper is to reflect on how this theoretical integration could be put into practice. Drawing on the design of a research-based writing workshop for postgraduate anthropology students, we argue that rather than a ‘hybrid’ model of writing pedagogy, a theoretically grounded but eclectic approach is needed in order to respond to students’ personal, local, and disciplinary contexts.

  • 16.
    Salwén, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Threshold concepts, obstacles or scientific dead ends?2019In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational researchers have concluded that there are threshold concepts in a large number of disciplines. Yet, these researchers have not paid enough attention to the objection to the theory. It is beset with severe definitional and empirical problems. I will portray definitions of 'threshold concepts' provided by Land and Meyer, the founding fathers of the threshold concept theory. I argue, in the first place, that the definitions fail and, in the second place, that even if the definitional problems were solved and we were able to identify some threshold concepts, their scientific importance would be limited if not nil.

  • 17.
    Silen, C.
    et al.
    Centre for Teaching and Learning (CUL), Department of Learning Informatics, Management and Ethics, LIME Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlin, L.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Self-directed learning - A learning issue for students and faculty!2008In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 461-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-directed learning (SDL), is an essential concept in problem-based learning (PBL), and, in a broader sense, student-centred learning. Considering the complex nature of SDL, it has been taken for granted and given a shallow meaning, i.e. self-study. In order to develop a deeper understanding and make use of the potential in SDL, this paper discusses and puts forward a more profound meaning. The importance of regarding becoming a self-directed learner as a learning process, and the need for teachers to take part in the learning, is crucial. Two 'thinking models', one concerning the PBL tutorial work and one the relationship between tutorial work and self-study, are introduced. The unifying idea behind the reasoning is to emphasise the essence of providing opportunities for, as well as stimulating, the students' inquiring approach and responsibility.

  • 18.
    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Weurlander, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Owe
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hult, Håkan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Medical teachers’ professional development: perceived barriers and opportunities2010In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 401-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores medical teachers' perceived barriers and opportunities for educational and professional development. Data has been gathered through 19 semi-structured interviews with participants on a staff development course 1 year after their participation. The analysis shows that most perceived barriers are found on an organisational level, whilst motivation for development is found on an individual level and often related to the notion of teaching as a ‘private business’. However, what some respondents perceive as barriers are by others seen as opportunities. Some of these differences in perception may be explained by self-efficacy beliefs.

1 - 18 of 18
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