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  • 1.
    Amin, Tamer
    et al.
    Lebanese American University, Beirut, Lebanon.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN). Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN). Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN). Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Arrow of time: Metaphorical construals of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics2012Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 5, nr 96, s. 818-848Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Various features of scientific discourse have been characterized in the science education literature, and challenges students face in appropriating these features have been explored. Using the framework of conceptual metaphor, this paper sought to identify explicit and implicit metaphors in pedagogical texts dealing with the concept of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, an abstract and challenging domain for learners. Three university-level textbooks were analyzed from a conceptual metaphor perspective, and a range of explicit and implicit metaphors were identified. Explicit metaphors identified include entropy as disorder, thermodynamics processes as movements along a path, and energetic exchange as financial transactions among others. Implicit metaphors include application and elaboration of the generic Location Event Structure metaphor, application of the Object Event Structure metaphor, and others. The similarities and differences between explicit and implicit metaphors found in the textbooks are also described. Two key pedagogical implications are discussed: that the selection of explicit instructional metaphors can be guided by consistency with implicit metaphors; and that the range of implicit metaphors found in pedagogical texts implies that a multiple instructional metaphor strategy is warranted. The depth of the phenomenon of conceptual metaphor and its implications for future research are also discussed

  • 2.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Bergqvist, Kerstin
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Saljo, Roger
    Why Do Secondary School Students Lose Their Interest in Science? Or Does it Never Emerge? A Possible and Overlooked Explanation2016Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 100, nr 5, s. 791-813Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we review research on how students' interest in science changes through the primary to secondary school transition. In the literature, the findings generally show that primary students enjoy science but come to lose interest during secondary school. As this claim is based mainly on interview and questionnaire data, that is on secondary reports from students about their interest in science, these results are reexamined through our own extensive material from primary and secondary school on how interest is constituted through classroom discourse. Our results suggest the possibility that primary students do not lose their interest in science, but rather that an interest in science is never constituted. The overview indicates that studies relying on interviews and questionnaires make it difficult to ascertain what the actual object of interest is when students act in the science classroom. The possibility suggested should, if valid, have consequences for science education and be worthy of further examination.

  • 3.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Educ Adm, Sweden.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bergqvist, Kerstin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Pedagogik och didaktik. Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Säljö, Roger
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Why Do Secondary School Students Lose Their Interest in Science? Or Does it Never Emerge? A Possible and Overlooked Explanation2016Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 100, nr 5, s. 791-813Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we review research on how students interest in science changes through the primary to secondary school transition. In the literature, the findings generally show that primary students enjoy science but come to lose interest during secondary school. As this claim is based mainly on interview and questionnaire data, that is on secondary reports from students about their interest in science, these results are reexamined through our own extensive material from primary and secondary school on how interest is constituted through classroom discourse. Our results suggest the possibility that primary students do not lose their interest in science, but rather that an interest in science is never constituted. The overview indicates that studies relying on interviews and questionnaires make it difficult to ascertain what the actual object of interest is when students act in the science classroom. The possibility suggested should, if valid, have consequences for science education and be worthy of further examination.

  • 4.
    Bivall, Petter
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Medie- och Informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Ainsworth, Shaaron
    School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K..
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Medie- och Informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Do Haptic Representations Help Complex Molecular Learning?2011Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 95, nr 4, s. 700-719Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored whether adding a haptic interface (that provides users with somatosensory information about virtual objects by force and tactile feedback) to a three-dimensional (3D) chemical model enhanced students' understanding of complex molecular interactions. Two modes of the model were compared in a between-groups pre- and posttest design. In both modes, users could move and rotate virtual 3D representations of the chemical structures of the two molecules, a protein and a small ligand molecule. In addition, in a haptic mode users could feel the interactions (repulsive and attractive) between molecules as forces with a haptic device. Twenty postgraduate students (10 in each condition) took pretests about the process of protein--ligand recognition before exploring the model in ways suggested by structured worksheets and then completing a posttest. Analysis addressed quantitative learning outcomes and more qualitatively students' reasoning during the learning phase. Results showed that the haptic system helped students learn more about the process of protein–ligand recognition and changed the way they reasoned about molecules to include more force-based explanations. It may also have protected students from drawing erroneous conclusions about the process of protein–ligand recognition observed when students interacted with only the visual model.

  • 5.
    Daane, Abigail R.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, South Seattle College,Seattle, Washington.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för ingenjörsvetenskap och fysik (from 2013).
    Robertson, Amy D.
    Department of Physics, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, Washington.
    Close, Hunter G.
    Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.
    Scherr, Rachel E.
    Department of Physics, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, Washington.
    The pedagogical value of conceptual metaphor for secondary science teachers2018Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 102, nr 5, s. 1051-1076Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The abstract nature of energy encourages metaphorical language. In educational settings, teachers and students use conceptual metaphors subconsciously to express their ideas about what energy is or how it functions in particular scenarios. However, research on scientific analogies and metaphors has predominantly focused on explicit instructional analogies, rather than implicit, everyday metaphor. In professional development for secondary science teachers, we sought to make explicit the embeddedness and ubiquity of conceptual metaphor in everyday language and in scienceparticularly, in energyto expand teachers' understanding of their students' ideas. In our microcase study, we observed and video recorded four secondary teachers discussing metaphor. We used interaction analysis methods, focusing on how both discursive and nonverbal interactions between people, objects, and environment change over time, to analyze the collected data. We found evidence of teachers' (1) learning about conceptual metaphor theory and (2) finding value in understanding conceptual metaphor in educational settings. In particular, teachers acknowledged that if they identify implicit metaphors in students' science language, they will better understand students' ideas about energy. We present possible mechanisms for teacher learning about and valuing of energy metaphor; we also suggest how to support teachers in noticing and valuing metaphors for energy instruction.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Fysikundervisningens didaktik. Kristianstad University College.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Fysikundervisningens didaktik.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Fysikundervisningens didaktik.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University.
    Who needs 3D when the Universe is flat?2014Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 3, s. 412-442Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An overlooked feature in astronomy education is the need for students to learn to extrapolate three-dimensionality and the challenges that this may involve. Discerning critical features in the night sky that are embedded in dimensionality is a long-term learning process. Several articles have addressed the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) simulations in astronomy education, but they have neither addressed what students discern nor the nature of that discernment. A Web-based questionnaire was designed using links to video clips drawn from a simulation video of travel through our galaxy and beyond. The questionnaire was completed by 137 participants from nine countries across a broad span of astronomy education. The descriptions provided by the participants were analyzed using hermeneutics in combination with a constant comparative approach to formulate six categories of discernment in relation to multidimensionality. These results are used to make the case that the ability to extrapolate three-dimensionality calls for the creation of meaningful motion parallax experiences.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ / Kristianstad Univ.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala Univ / Univ Western Cape, Dept Phys, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Airey, John
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Uppsala Univ.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad Univ.
    Who Needs 3D When the Universe Is Flat?2014Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 3, s. 412-442Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An overlooked feature in astronomy education is the need for students to learn to extrapolate three-dimensionality and the challenges that this may involve. Discerning critical features in the night sky that are embedded in dimensionality is a long-term learning process. Several articles have addressed the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) simulations in astronomy education, but they have neither addressed what students discern nor the nature of that discernment. A Web-based questionnaire was designed using links to video clips drawn from a simulation video of travel through our galaxy and beyond. The questionnaire was completed by 137 participants from nine countries across a broad span of astronomy education. The descriptions provided by the participants were analyzed using hermeneutics in combination with a constant comparative approach to formulate six categories of discernment in relation to multidimensionality. These results are used to make the case that the ability to extrapolate three-dimensionality calls for the creation of meaningful motion parallax experiences. (C) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Urban
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Who needs 3D when the universe is flat?2014Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 3, s. 412-442Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An overlooked feature in astronomy education is the need for students to learn to extrapolate three-dimensionality and the challenges that this may involve. Discerning critical features in the night sky that are embedded in dimensionality is a long-term learning process. Several articles have addressed the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) simulations in astronomy education, but they have neither addressed what students discern nor the nature of that discernment. A Web-based questionnaire was designed using links to video clips drawn from a simulation video of travel through our galaxy and beyond. The questionnaire was completed by 137 participants from nine countries across a broad span of astronomy education. The descriptions provided by the participants were analyzed using hermeneutics in combination with a constant comparative approach to formulate six categories of discernment in relation to multidimensionality. These results are used to make the case that the ability to extrapolate three-dimensionality calls for the creation of meaningful motion parallax experiences.

  • 9.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Experiments" and the Inquiry Emphasis Conflation in Science Teacher Education2011Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 95, nr 5, s. 908-926Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the use and role of the term experiment in science teacher education as described by teacher students. Data were collected through focus group interviews conducted at seven occasions with 32 students from six well-known Swedish universities. The theoretical framework is a sociocultural and pragmatist perspective on language and learning with the analysis based on the notion of pivot terms, introduced in an earlier article, to operationalize language use as habit and mediated action. The term experiment was found to be conflated with laboratory task and referred to as primarily a pedagogical activity in contrast to a research methodology, in line with the previously described inquiry emphasis conflation. The notion of controlled experiment was unfamiliar to most students and had not been explicitly discussed in terms of research methodology during their teacher education. The pedagogical meaning given to the term experiment is discussed in contrast to its use and function in scientific research. The possible problems of this conflation of terms are discussed in relation to the educational goal of teaching students about the nature of scientific inquiry. Recommendations for teacher education are discussed, and a heuristic model to use pivot terms to facilitate explicit reflection on unexamined customs of science education is introduced.

  • 10.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN). Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Andersson, Johanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN). Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Young children's analogical reasoning in science domains2012Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 96, nr 4, s. 725-756Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory study in a classroom setting investigates first graders (age 78 years, N = 25) ability to perform analogical reasoning and create their own analogies for two irreversible natural phenomena: mixing and heat transfer. We found that the children who contributed actively to a full-class discussion were consistently successful at making analogical comparisons between known objects provided by a researcher and that some of the children could come up with their own analogies for the abstract natural phenomena with which they interacted. The use of full-class and small-group settings, shared laboratory experiences of the phenomena and childrens drawings as different kinds of scaffolding was found to be helpful for the childrens analogical reasoning. As an implication for science education, self-generated analogies are put forward as a potential learning tool within a constructivist approach to education.

  • 11.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Beyond Explanations: What Else Do Students Need to Understand Science?2009Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 93, s. 1026-1049Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ difficulties with learning science have generally been framed in terms of their generalized conceptual knowledge of a science topic as elicited through their explanations of natural phenomena. In this paper, we empirically explore what more goes into giving a scientific account of a natural phenomenon than giving such generalized explanations. We audio-recorded pairs of upper secondary students during lab-work in electrochemistry. We used a situative and pragmatist approach to study learning in action. This approach made it possible to study how the particulars and contingencies of working with a real electrochemical cell went into students’ reasoning. Our results show that students needed to learn to make distinctions, recognize, and name the particulars in encounters with their cell. They also needed to learn what counts as reasonable readings and to deal with quantitative issues and correlations pertaining to their cell. We refer to these additional learning requirements as the students’ taxonomic and measurement interests. Implications for what is involved in giving a scientific account of a natural phenomenon in school are discussed. The study constitutes an attempt to include, in a systematic way, also the particulars and contingencies of actual practice in an account of students’ reasoning in science.

  • 12.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik. Naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik. Naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Describing and Analyzing Learning in Action: An Empirical Study of the Importance of Misconceptions in Learning Science2008Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 92, nr 1, s. 141-164Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although misconceptions in science have been established in interview studies, their role during the learning process is poorly examined. In this paper we use results from a classroom study to analyze to what extent nonscientific ideas in electrochemistry that students report in interviews enter into their learning in a more authentic setting. We audio recorded talk between eight pairs of Swedish upper secondary students during a practical on electrochemical cells. Learning was operationalized on a discursive level as a description of what students do and say when taking part in an activity. This enabled an analysis of how encounters with misconceptions influenced the development of students’ reasoning, compared to other encounters during the learning experience. Misconceptions did not constrain the development of students’ reasoning. Rather, their reasoning developed in response to the contingencies of the specific situation. When misconceptions were encountered, they appeared as alternatives and questions not actively defended. Sometimes, encounters with these misconceptions were generative of the students’ reasoning. The results indicate that demonstrating misconceptions in interviews is not enough to assume that they interfere with learning in other contexts. Educational implications and future lines of research based on these findings and on the methodology applied are discussed.

  • 13.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Supporting students’ progression in science: Continuity between the particular, the contingent, and the general2013Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 97, nr 1, s. 113-138Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyze the relation between particular, contingent, and general aspects of a school science activity and show how they are intertwined in nontrivial ways as students give explanations for how a real galvanic cell works during conversations with a researcher. The conversations were examined by using practical epistemology analysis, which made it possible to follow students’ meaning making in detail. The analysis revealed interactions between generic explanations of electrochemistry and the distinctions and correlations that were connected to particulars and contingencies of the galvanic cell. Consequences of these interactions amounted to becoming reminded of knowledge one had come across before, being able to connect distinctions of particular features of the cell to generalized chemical explanations, and realizing which aspects may be excluded from the account. The results indicate that learning in science needs to be approached more as a contingent process than as something that progresses along one particular dimension. They show how students appropriate the sociocultural tools of science and how they situate what they learn in both the particular features of the activity and in the relevant science. Hence, there is a need for more inclusive accounts of how students progress toward increased competency in science.

  • 14.
    Hansson, Lena
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Students' views concerning worldview presuppositions underpinning science: is the world really ordered, uniform, and comprehensible?2014Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 5, s. 743-765Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    That nature and the universe are ordered, uniform, and comprehensible is a starting point in science. However, such worldview presuppositions are often taken for granted, rather than explicitly mentioned, in science and in science class. This article takes a worldview perspective and reports from interviews (N = 26) with upper secondary students on how they view order, uniformity, and comprehensibility. In the article, it is shown that while most students view the universe as ordered and comprehensible, it is common for students to disagree that the universe is uniform. That is, they view scientific laws as only locally valid. In addition, many of them do not know that science builds upon such worldview presuppositions. In some cases, the results show differences between students’ own views and the views they associate with science. For example, it is common for students to state that science views the universe as more comprehensible than they themselves do. The consequences for students’ interests as well as their learning of science are discussed.

  • 15.
    Helldén, Gustav
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Institutionen för matematik och naturvetenskap. Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Solomon, Joan
    The Open University, Milton Keynes.
    The persistence of personal and social themes in context: long- and short-term studies of students' scientific ideas2004Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 88, nr 6, s. 885-900Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will examine the persistence of “misconceptions.” We used data from a longitudinal study of personal ideas in 24 students' thinking about ecological processes. The results show students often speaking about personal experiences dating from an early age, to which they had also referred in similar interviews conducted years before. These data are compared with results from a different study of middle school physics students' thinking about energy and steam engines. After the new learning had been “successfull” completed and assessed, old ideas returned. These findings are used to set up a theoretical basis for understanding the longitudinal results. Findings from memory studies are shown to explicate the long-term effects of the passage of time and prompts for the recall of scientific concepts.

  • 16.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Natur-miljö-samhälle (NMS).
    Mäkitalo, Åsa
    Säljö, Roger
    Conceptions of knowledge in research on students' understanding of the greenhouse effect: Methodological positions and their consequences for representations of knowing2009Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 6, s. 978-995Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the research on students’ understanding of the greenhouse effect and global warming reports poor results. Students are claimed to hold misconceptions and na¨ıve beliefs, and the impact of teaching on their conceptions is also low. In the present study, these results are called into question, and it is argued that they may to a large extent be seen as artifacts of the research methods deployed, in particular when written questionnaires are used. When following students’ projectwork in school over a long period, many of the misunderstandings reported in the literature do not appear. It is argued that the appropriation and use of scientific language when discussing complex socioscientific issues is a gradual process. When observing the language and mediational means students use over time, it is obvious that they are able to identify and use central distinctions in their interactions. They are also able to make productive use of texts and other materials that allow them to successively approximate scientific modes of reasoning. Thus, what students know emerges in communicative practices where they interact with others and with cultural tools in a focused activity. It is argued that students’ knowledge of complex multidisciplinary phenomena of this kind may be particularly ill-suited to conventional questionnaire types of testing.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Hallden, Ola
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    A Structural View on the Emergence of a Conception: Conceptual Change as Radical Reconstruction of Contexts2010Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 94, nr 4, s. 640-664Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptual change is often described as a causal process in which changes in an embraced system of beliefs result in a new system of beliefs. Here, it is argued that conceptual change is better understood as an intentional activity with regard to the learner, that is, what the learner is doing when trying to understand something. Children were interviewed every year during a period of 3 years from their ages of 4-6 years of age. In the study, there were 37 children participating, of which 29 were followed during all 3 years. They were asked to tell about their beliefs about the earth, and their developing understanding is described. The results show that in the conceptual changes the children's main concern was to restructure the often vast amount of knowledge they possessed. This reconstruction is described as a simultaneous reconstruction of conceptual contexts as well as contexts for their application. This also directs the focus of conceptual change from specific conceptions to structural changes.

  • 18.
    Leden, Lotta
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik.
    Hansson, Lena
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö universitet.
    The mangle of school science practice: teachers’ negotiations of two nature of science activities at different levels of contextualization2019Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237XArtikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature of science (NOS) has increasingly been emphasized as an important element in science education. This paper engages in the question of how teachers negotiate different approaches to and contexts for NOS teaching. This exploratory study is part of a three‐year longitudinal project where six in‐service teachers developed and negotiated their NOS‐teaching practices. Pickering's (1995) theory of the mangle of practice is used for the analysis of teachers’ focus‐group discussions. In a mangled practice, school science traditions, policy documents, and students’ and teachers’ expectations and identities are rubbed against each other. As part of the project teachers planned, implemented, and reflected on two NOS activities at different levels of contextualization. The concepts alignment, resistance, and accommodation are used as an analytical tool to understand the processes of the mangle in relation to teachers’ negotiations concerning the two activities during the focus groups. The results of the mangle are presented in relation to a backdrop of three teaching traditions (facts, lab‐work, and discussions) that the teachers’ claim to depart from. The results show how the alignment and resistance of different components of the mangle lead to various accommodations as regards both the activities and the three traditions. The article concludes by discussing how the teachers’ negotiations highlight what becomes possible and what becomes challenging when NOS meets existing traditions, and what this means in respect of possibilities for NOS learning.

  • 19.
    Leden, Lotta
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Hansson, Lena
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    The mangle of school science practice: Teachers’ negotiations of two nature of science activities at different levels of contextualization2020Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 104, nr 1, s. 5-26Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature of science (NOS) has increasingly been emphasized as an important element in science education. This paper engages in the question of how teachers negotiate different approaches to and contexts for NOS teaching. This exploratory study is part of a three‐year longitudinal project where six in‐service teachers developed and negotiated their NOS‐teaching practices. Pickering's (1995) theory of the mangle of practice is used for the analysis of teachers’ focus‐group discussions. In a mangled practice, school science traditions, policy documents, and students’ and teachers’ expectations and identities are rubbed against each other. As part of the project teachers planned, implemented, and reflected on two NOS activities at different levels of contextualization. The concepts alignment, resistance, and accommodation are used as an analytical tool to understand the processes of the mangle in relation to teachers’ negotiations concerning the two activities during the focus groups. The results of the mangle are presented in relation to a backdrop of three teaching traditions (facts, lab‐work, and discussions) that the teachers’ claim to depart from. The results show how the alignment and resistance of different components of the mangle lead to various accommodations as regards both the activities and the three traditions. The article concludes by discussing how the teachers’ negotiations highlight what becomes possible and what becomes challenging when NOS meets existing traditions, and what this means in respect of possibilities for NOS learning.

  • 20.
    Lidar, Malena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för didaktik.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för didaktik.
    A Pragmatist Approach to Meaning Making in Children's Discussions About Gravity and the Shape of the Earth2010Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 94, nr 4, s. 689-709Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past few decades, researchers from a cognitive science tradition and a sociocultural perspective on learning have discussed how to understand students’ conceptions of the earth. In this article, some of the questions discussed in this debate are elaborated in relation to meaning-making in educational settings. The aim is to illustrate how an approach built on pragmatism and Wittgenstein’s works makes it possible to take the role of both situation and experiences into account within a sociocultural perspective on learning. In video-recordings of second and fourth-fifth graders working in pairs meaning-making is studied using practical epistemology analysis, i.e. what children talk about as relevant and what experiences they re-actualize when answering questions. By analyzing the role of re-actualization of experience, the role of re-actualization and situation in making questions and problems intelligible and the individuals’ encounters with artifacts and the consequences of this in meaning-making, we elucidate why it is important to consider meaning making in situ as an empirical question. It is concluded that the way questions are made intelligible will direct the meaning-making and when using an artifact to answer questions, it is not the artifact in itself, but the specific use of the artifact that mediates action.

  • 21.
    Lidar, Malena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för lärarutbildning.
    Lundqvist, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för lärarutbildning.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för lärarutbildning.
    Teaching and learning in the science classroom: The interplay between teachers' epistemological moves and students' practical epistemology2006Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 90, nr 1, s. 148-163Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The practical epistemology used by students and the epistemological moves delivered by teachers in conversations with students are analyzed in order to understand how teaching activities interplay with the how and the what of students' learning. The purpose is to develop an approach for analyzing the process of privileging in students' meaning making and how individual and situational aspects of classroom discourse interact in this process. Here we especially focus on the experiences of students and the encounter with the teacher. The analyses also demonstrate that a study of teaching and learning activities can shed light on which role epistemology has for students' meaning making, for teaching and for the interplay between these activities. The methodological approach used is an elaboration a sociocultural perspective on learning, pragmatism, and the work of Wittgenstein. The empirical material consists of recordings made in science classes in two Swedish compulsory schools.

  • 22.
    Linder, Cedric
    University of the Western Cape.
    A challenge to conceptual change1993Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 77, nr 3, s. 293-300Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23.
    Lundegård, Iann
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Hamza, Karim M.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Putting the Cart Before the Horse: The Creation of Essences out of Processes in Science Education Research2014Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 1, s. 127-142Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the problem of treating generalizations of human activity as entities and structures that ultimately explain the activities from which they were initially drawn. This is problematic because it involves a circular reasoning leading to unwarranted claims explaining the originally studied activities of science teaching and learning. Unlike other fields within social science research, this problem has not been appreciated and discussed in the science education literature and the field thus needs to be reminded of it. A heuristic specifically developed for the purposes of this article is applied to two examples taken from a much-cited research in the field. Through the examples it is argued that the practice of creating entities out of generalizations of science classroom activities leads to a number of unintended consequences. It is further argued that the stated purposes in the two example articleswould actually have been better served by investigating the entire processes through which the activities develop, as well as how the activities may change through teaching. The article concludes that through the search for explanations caused by underlying entities, science education research runs a risk of alienating its results from the activities from which it initially wanted to meliorate.

  • 24.
    Lundqvist, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för didaktik.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för didaktik.
    Epistemological norms and companion meanings in science classroom communication2009Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 93, nr 5, s. 859-874Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe two central epistemological norms related to the importance of making investigations and to scientific language and its logic. These norms have been identified in empirical material consisting of 200 video-recorded lessons in three different science classes. With regard to the learning of science and socialization, we discuss and problematize these norms in the context of science learned at school and the nature of science. A methodological approach has been developed and used to analyze and identify the role that teachers' actions play in which epistemology students adopt in their meaning making and to highlight which view of science this usage represents. The approach consists of a combination of three methodologies: practical epistemology analyses, epistemological move analyses, and analyses of companion meanings. This combination produces communication analysis of companion meanings. The theory is based on pragmatism, sociocultural approaches to learning, and the later works of Wittgenstein. The companion meanings described in the empirical material indicate that if students learn the identified norms without any explicit problematization, they will only view science as rational and inductive in character and exclude alternative views from the practice.

  • 25.
    Patron, Emelie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Fysikundervisningens didaktik.
    Teachers' reasoning: Classroom visual representational practices in the context of introductory chemical bonding2017Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, ISSN 0036-8326, Vol. 101, nr 6, s. 887-906Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual representations are essential for communication and meaning-making in chemistry, and thus the representational practices play a vital role in the teaching and learning of chemistry. One powerful contemporary model of classroom learning, the variation theory of learning, posits that the way an object of learning gets handled is another vital feature for the establishment of successful teaching practices. An important part of what lies behind the constitution of teaching practices is visual representational reasoning that is a function of disciplinary relevant aspects and educationally critical features of the aspects embedded in the intended object of learning. Little is known about teachers reasoning about such visual representational practices. This work addresses this shortfall in the area of chemical bonding. The data consist of semistructured interviews with 12 chemistry teachers in the Swedish upper secondary school system. The methodology uses a thematic analytic approach to capture and characterize the teachers' reasoning about their classroom visual representational practices. The results suggest that the teachers' reasoning tended to be limited. However, the teachers' pay attention to the meaning-making potential of the approaches for showing representations. The analysis presents these visualization approaches and the discussion makes theoretical links to the variation theory of learning.

  • 26.
    Patron Sigfridsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för kemi och biomedicin (KOB).
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för kemi och biomedicin (KOB).
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för kemi och biomedicin (KOB).
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för biologi och miljö (BOM).
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University;University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Teachers’ reasoning: Classroom visual representational practices in the context of introductory chemical bonding2017Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 101, nr 6, s. 887-906Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual representations are essential for communication and meaning-making in chemistry, and thus the representational practices play a vital role in the teaching and learning of chemistry. One powerful contemporary model of classroom learning, the variation theory of learning, posits that the way an object of learning gets handled is another vital feature for the establishment of successful teaching practices. An important part of what lies behind the constitution of teaching practices is visual representational reasoning that is a function of disciplinary relevant aspects and educationally critical features of the aspects embedded in the intended object of learning. Little is known about teachers reasoning about such visual representational practices. This work addresses this shortfall in thearea of chemical bonding. The data consist of semistructured interviews with 12 chemistry teachers in the Swedish upper secondary school system. The methodology uses a thematic analytic approach to capture and characterize the teachers’ reasoning about their classroom visual representational practices. The results suggest that the teachers’ reasoning tended to be limited. However, the teachers’ pay attention to the meaning-making potential of the approaches for showing representations. The analysis presents these visualization approaches and the discussion makes theoretical links to the variation theory of learning.

  • 27.
    Piqueras, Jesús
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Achiam, Marianne
    Science museum educators' professional growth: Dynamics of changes in research–practitioner collaboration2019Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 103, nr 2, s. 389-417Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Educators' work is a key element in museums' learning experience, yet knowledge about their professional development is still limited. In this study, we followed three science museum educators' professional growth during collaboration with researchers, with special focus on the introduction of research‐based frameworks in their practice. To analyse the dynamics of educators' changes in knowledge, practices, and beliefs, we used the interconnected model of professional growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002. Teach Teacher Edu, 18, 947‐967). During the collaboration, key educators' changes were evidenced in a progressive acquisition of the concepts and ideas and their transformation in functional tools for museum practice. However, the anticipation of potential benefits of the use of the theoretical frameworks, as well as the close collaboration in dialogue between researchers and educators, were pivotal for the development of these changes. Furthermore, our results show the significance of the contextualization of the frameworks in familiar practices, exhibits, and specific science content to use the theory in new contexts. Overall, our results suggest that introducing research‐based frameworks in the work of museum educators was a successful approach in the collaboration but, at least to some extent, challenge the use of learning theories as solely ground for professional development in informal settings.

  • 28.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Ohman, Johan
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Analyzing Students' Learning in Classroom Discussions about Socioscientific Issues2013Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 97, nr 4, s. 594-620Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the purpose is to develop and illustrate a method that facilitates investigations of students' learning processes in classroom discussions about socioscientific issues. The method, called transactional argumentation analysis, combines a transactional perspective on meaning making based on John Dewey's pragmatic philosophy and an argument analysis based on Toulmin's argument pattern. This analytical method consists of three steps. In the first step, we analyze the direction of the students' meaning making, that is, the relations construed in and by action. In the second step, we use a functional interpretation of Toulmin's argument pattern to clarify the meanings in terms of argumentative elements. Finally, we investigate the students' learning progress, both in terms of the way the arguments are constructed and the knowledge content used, by comparing each student's arguments over time. The empirical material consists of a video-recorded lesson in a Swedish upper secondary school. Two examples of learning processes identified during the classroom discussion are described: learning to specify the conditions for one's claim and learning to find new solutions. These examples show that the suggested method can be used to identify the different kinds of learning progressions that take place during students' argumentative discussions.

  • 29.
    Rudsberg, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Östman, Leif
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Analyzing students' learning in classroom discussions about socioscientific issues2013Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 97, nr 4, s. 594-620Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the purpose is to develop and illustrate a method that facilitates investigations of students' learning processes in classroom discussions about socioscientific issues. The method, called transactional argumentation analysis, combines a transactional perspective on meaning making based on John Dewey's pragmatic philosophy and an argument analysis based on Toulmin's argument pattern. This analytical method consists of three steps. In the first step, we analyze the direction of the students' meaning making, that is, the relations construed in and by action. In the second step, we use a functional interpretation of Toulmin's argument pattern to clarify the meanings in terms of argumentative elements. Finally, we investigate the students' learning progress, both in terms of the way the arguments are constructed and the knowledge content used, by comparing each student's arguments over time. The empirical material consists of a video-recorded lesson in a Swedish upper secondary school. Two examples of learning processes identified during the classroom discussion are described: learning to specify the conditions for one's claim and learning to find new solutions. These examples show that the suggested method can be used to identify the different kinds of learning progressions that take place during students' argumentative discussions.

  • 30.
    Serder, Margareta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Language Games and Meaning as Used in Student Encounters With Scientific Literacy Test Items2016Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 100, nr 2, s. 321-343Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research in science education has suggested that difficulties among students learning science relate to challenges in framing its discourse. This article examines the role that language plays in a scientific literacy test for which everyday life is an augmented aspect. Video-recorded data was collected in four ninth-grade science classes in a Swedish compulsory school as small groups of students discussed and collaboratively solved Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) science test items. The theoretical framework assumes sociocultural perspectives as well as that of Wittgenstein's later works on language. The study involves an analysis of students’ meaning making of specific words that occur in the test and the various language games to which these words contribute. Specifically, we analyzed the students’ use of four different words: reference, constant, pattern, and factor. We found that the students use these words in everyday or mathematical language games; for example, understanding the word “pattern” as a mathematical regularity rather than a result of a scientific experiment. The results were analyzed in relation to the specific illustrations and wording that contextualize the items. We argue that a crucial part of being scientifically literate is privileging science content over other possible disciplines and contexts and ignoring the everyday perspective. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 31.
    Serder, Margareta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för natur, miljö, samhälle (NMS).
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för natur, miljö, samhälle (NMS).
    Language Games and Meaning as Used in Student Encounters With Scientific Literacy Test Items2016Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 100, nr 2, s. 321-343Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research in science education has suggested that difficulties among students learning science relate to challenges in framing its discourse. This article examines the role that language plays in a scientific literacy test for which everyday life is an augmented aspect. Video-recorded data was collected in four ninth-grade science classes in a Swedish compulsory school as small groups of students discussed and collaboratively solved Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) science test items. The theoretical framework assumes sociocultural perspectives as well as that of Wittgenstein's later works on language. The study involves an analysis of students’ meaning making of specific words that occur in the test and the various language games to which these words contribute. Specifically, we analyzed the students’ use of four different words: reference, constant, pattern, and factor. We found that the students use these words in everyday or mathematical language games; for example, understanding the word “pattern” as a mathematical regularity rather than a result of a scientific experiment. The results were analyzed in relation to the specific illustrations and wording that contextualize the items. We argue that a crucial part of being scientifically literate is privileging science content over other possible disciplines and contexts and ignoring the everyday perspective.

  • 32.
    Thörne, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Hagberg, Mariana
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Linguistic challenges in Mendelian genetics: teachers' talk in action2013Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 97, nr 5, s. 695-722Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates Swedish teachers’ use of language when teaching genetics in grade nine (students 15-16 years old). Mendelian genetics comprises a substantial part of the genetics taught in many classrooms, including the central relation between the gene and trait concepts. This relation has been identified as a significant problem in teaching and learning genetics, but few satisfactory explanations of its difficulty have been suggested. Thus, the primary objective of the study is to reveal how teachers explain and relate gene and trait (i.e. gene function) while teaching Mendelian genetics, in order to shed light on this problem. Four teachers were observed and recorded through a whole sequence of genetic teaching. The empirical data consist of records of their communications during 45 lessons. Their verbal communications were analyzed using a linguistic framework called thematic pattern analysis. The linguistic analysis of teachers’ talk in action revealed that nuances in their spoken language conveyed four major categories of meanings regarding the gene-to-trait relationship: genes control traits, are identified by traits, have traits or are traits.  The results also reveal a common use of an old word, anlag (from the German word Anlage), in the teachers’ references to the meaning of both gene and trait. This study thus highlights several linguistic challenges in the teaching of Mendelian genetics that might affect students’ learning. Moreover, the study exemplifies how a linguistics methodology can be used to investigate science teaching, an approach heavily called for, but rarely used in published empirical studies.

  • 33.
    Åberg-Bengtsson, Lisbeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Borås.
    Karlsson, Karl Göran
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Avdelningen för ämnesdidaktik och matematik.
    Ottosson, Torgny
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    “Can There be a Full Moon at Daytime?”: Young Students Making Sense of Illustrations of the Lunar Phases2017Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 101, nr 4, s. 616-638Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching and learning situations nowadays typically build on richly illustrated material or multimodal presentations. Under these circumstances, the transparency of images and models used for explaining various phenomena becomes central. The present study deals with 20 Swedish children, 9–12 years old, discussing an illustration meant to show the cause of the different appearances of the Moon in the sky. The students’ task was to place eight numbered moon phases in the lunar orbit in the image. The illustration in question was chosen (a) because it was of a kind frequently used to explain the lunar phases and (b) because the phenomenon is known to be difficult to understand for students of all ages. The analysis leans on historical and sociocultural approaches as well as on multimodal semiotics. The results show that a majority of students were able to make sense of the most central features of the illustration but that very few spontaneously reasoned in a way that could be interpreted as the intended meaning-making of the cause of the lunar phases. The results also indicate that the simultaneous adoption of two perspectives necessary for understanding the phenomenon was a stumbling block for most of the students.

  • 34.
    Åberg-Bengtsson, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Karlsson, Karl Göran
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Ottosson, Torgny
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    “Can there be a full moon at daytime?”: Young students making sense of illustrations of the lunar phases.2017Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 101, nr 4, s. 616-638Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching and learning situations nowadays typically build on richly illustrated material or multimodal presentations. Under these circumstances, the transparency of images and models used for explaining various phenomena becomes central. The present study deals with 20 Swedish children, 9–12 years old, discussing an illustration meant to show the cause of the different appearances of the Moon in the sky. The students’ task was to place eight numbered moon phases in the lunar orbit in the image. The illustration in question was chosen (a) because it was of a kind frequently used to explain the lunar phases and (b) because the phenomenon is known to be difficult to understand for students of all ages. The analysis leans on historical and sociocultural approaches as well as on multimodal semiotics. The results show that a majority of students were able to make sense of the most central features of the illustration but that very few spontaneously reasoned in a way that could be interpreted as the intended meaning-making of the cause of the lunar phases. The results also indicate that the simultaneous adoption of two perspectives necessary for understanding the phenomenon was a stumbling block for most of the students.

  • 35.
    Åberg-Bengtsson, Lisbeth
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    Mid Sweden University.
    Ottosson, Torgny
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    "Can there be a full moon at daytime?”: young students making sense of illustrations of the lunar phases2017Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 101, nr 4, s. 616-638Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching and learning situations nowadays typically build on richly illustrated material or multimodal presentations. Under these circumstances, the transparency of images and models used for explaining various phenomena becomes central. The present study deals with 20 Swedish children, 9–12 years old, discussing an illustration meant to show the cause of the different appearances of the Moon in the sky. The students’ task was to place eight numbered moon phases in the lunar orbit in the image. The illustration in question was chosen (a) because it was of a kind frequently used to explain the lunar phases and (b) because the phenomenon is known to be difficult to understand for students of all ages. The analysis leans on historical and sociocultural approaches as well as on multimodal semiotics. The results show that a majority of students were able to make sense of the most central features of the illustration but that very few spontaneously reasoned in a way that could be interpreted as the intended meaning-making of the cause of the lunar phases. The results also indicate that the simultaneous adoption of two perspectives necessary for understanding the phenomenon was a stumbling block for most of the students.

  • 36.
    Östman, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    A Pragmatic Approach on Epistemology, Teaching, and Learning2014Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 3, s. 375-382Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 37.
    Östman, Leif
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A Pragmatic Approach on Epistemology, Teaching, and Learning2014Inngår i: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 98, nr 3, s. 375-382Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
1 - 37 of 37
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