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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Cristian
    et al.
    Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    En Delfistudie om lärares uppfattning av elevengagemang i NO-undervisningen2019In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 128-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens in a science classroom where students are engaged and how do teachers observe and interpret student engagement? This article highlights teachers’ perspective on students’ engagement in science education and to what extent it is connected to the scientific content. This approach complements earlier research which focuses mostly on students’ attitude towards science education and their interest in various topics in science.

    The findings are based on a three-stage Delphi survey distributed to 39 expert science teachers. The results shows science education with a range of different perspectives and that most teachers do not perceive any direct connection between specific science topics and the students’ engagement. The survey also shows that teachers to a high level interpret students’ emotional expressions and academic behavior as engagement rather than their cognitive behavior.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Benckert, Sylvia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wiberg, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Gapet har minskat: skillnader mellan hög- och lågpresterande flickors och pojkars attityder till biologi, fysik och kemi 1995 och 20072011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the change over time of boys’ and girls’ attitudes towards biology, physics and chemistry. We use data from the TIMSS studies for grade 8 in Sweden to investigate how the attitudes for high- and low performing pupils have changed between 1995 and 2007. The attitude is measured by four questions from the student questionnaire in the TIMSS study. The results indicate that there have been some changes in attitudes between 1995 and 2007. High-achieving pupils and especially boys have a more negative attitude towards all three subjects, biology, physics and chemistry, in 2007 compared to 1995. The low-achieving students think that they are performing better in all three subjects 2007 compared to 1995. The difference between the group that are most positive to physics and chemistry and the least positive group has diminished between the two years. The results are discussed in relation to the changes in Swedish schools during the period.

  • 3.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Villkor för implementering av naturvetenskap och teknik för alla, NTA2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 89-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Danielsson Thorell, Helena
    Andersson, Carina
    Holst, Andreas
    Nordling, Johan
    Syften och tillfälligheter i högstadie- och gymnasielaborationen: en studie om hur elever handlar i relation till aktivitetens mål2014In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 63-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purposes and contingencies in the lower and upper secondary school lab

    Studies have shown that students’ awareness of the goals and purposes of the laboratory activity is important for their possibility to participate in and learn from the activity. While practical activities often have been considered to be a central part of science education, relatively few studies have examined laboratory work in situ. In this paper we addressed these issues by examining (a) what purposes are distinguished when students’ work with a laboratory assignment and (b) how these purposes are made continuous with the teacher’s aim with the assignment. The data was based on classroom observations from two ordinary laboratory settings, one from a chemistry class in lower secondary school and one from a physics class in the natural science programme in upper secondary school. Although both student groups acknowledged their teacher’s intentions with the practical and could act towards the more student centered purposes of the activity, e.g. describe what happens with the copper and measure the speed of a small vessel respectively, there were differences regarding the possibilities the students had to act toward the activity’s final aim. The results showed that these factors can be referred to the amount of purposes introduced by the teacher as well as those that arose because of contingences, and the connection of these purposes to students’ prior experiences.

  • 5.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    'What do you know about fat?' Drawing on diverse funds of knowledge in inquiry based science education2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 178-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connecting students’ worlds, knowledge and experiences with school science has been a central issue in science education research. Here, we conceptualize processes of drawing on students’ personal experiences and knowledge in terms of ‘funds of knowledge’. We scrutinize two sixth grade classroom practices where the inquiry curriculum reform effort, Naturvetenskap och teknik för alla (NTA), is used. This curriculum material explicitly incorporates ideas of ‘learning science from experience’. Our aim is to contribute to a discussion on what conditions of inquiry based science education (IBSE) practices may open up opportunities for science to become personally relevant to students. The  research question investigated is: What do students do when they draw on funds of knowledge that are related to students’ memberships and experiences out-of-school in IBSE pratices? We then use Cultural-Historical Activity Theory framework to analyze how students’ actions of drawing on different funds of knowledge gain meaning in relation to different cultural-historical motives. Our findings indicate that students, when positioning themselves as part of different communities in relation to different goals and overall motives, make use of quite different funds of knowledge. Finally, we discuss possibilities for expanding and acknowledging students’ funds of knowledge when working with  investigations in the science classroom.

  • 6.
    Anker-Hansen, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Skolverket.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    In Pursuit of Authenticity in Science Education2019In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 498-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a systematic review of how authenticity is used in science education research and discusses the implications these uses have for the design of science education classroom practices. Authenticity has been discussed in education for decades. However, the authenticity of science education not only concerns the design of educational activities, but also the content of what is being taught. This article reviews research articles published in 2013 and 2014, in the three highest ranking journals in science education, regarding how authenticity is framed in science education. The findings suggest that the uses vary greatly from referring to externally defined practices to student relevance. The findings are discussed with the notions of cultural and personal authenticity to suggest important aspects involved with designing science classroom activities authentic to the different references. Based on the review, we have developed a strategy for balancing authenticity in science education classroom practices between cultural and personal authenticity.

  • 7.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Science verbs as a tool for investigating scientific phenomena: a pedagogical idea emerging from practitioner-researcher collaboration2016In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 235-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper communicates the pedagogical idea of approaching scientific phenomena through verbs. The idea has sprung from a collaboration between preschool practitioners and a researcher, addressing science education in preschool (children aged 1-5 years). Drawing on a joint problem inventory, the project group aimed to create a teaching model that supports inquiry-oriented approaches to science, and teachers’ ability of distinguishing chemical processes and physics phenomena in everyday practice. The core idea of the teaching model turned out to be a list of everyday verbs, connected to scientific phenomena. Starting from verbs appear to help teachers to recognise the scientific phenomena in everyday practice. Further, the verbs guide the formulating of questions that can be answered by scientific inquiry, such as: ''what matters to how something melts/rolls/mixes?''.

  • 8.
    Berg, Astrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Natural Science - Medicine - Esthetics - Communication .
    Löfgren, Ragnhild
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Natural Science - Medicine - Esthetics - Communication .
    Eriksson, Inger
    Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm.
    Kemiinnehåll i undervisningen för nybörjare. En studie av hur ämnesinnehållet får konkurrera med målet att få eleverna intresserade av naturvetenskap2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 146-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Berge, Maria
    et al.
    Chalmers, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Anna T, Danielsson
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Ingerman, Åke
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Different stories of group work: exploring problem solving in engineering education2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to further the understanding of group work in higher education, primarily in science. This is done through an empirical investigation of problem solving in small groups. Position theory isused as an analytic tool for describing the complex and dynamic processes of group work, focusing simultaneously on the physics content and the student community and how they constitute each other. We analysed four video-recorded sessions with students from two Master’s programs, Engineering Physics and Bioengineering, respectively. The students addressed two introductory mechanics problems. The analysis resulted in a characterisation in terms of seven ‘storylines’ of two different kinds. These are argued to reflect different aspects of engineering student communities, where one kind of storylines captures ways of approaching the problems and the other kind exemplifies boundary work involved in the constitution of communities.

  • 10.
    Berge, Maria
    et al.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Ingerman, Åke
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Different stories of group work: Exploring problem solving in engineering education2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Björkholm, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology Education in Elementary School: Boys' and Girls' Interests and Attitudes2010In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 33-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Björkholm, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Humanities (CeHum). Kungliga Tekniska högskolan (KTH), Sverige .
    Teknik i de tidiga skolåren – om vad det innebär att kunna konstruera en länkmekanism2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technical knowing in the early school years – A learning study of the meaning of knowing how to construct a linkage mechanism

    This study within primary technology education aims at exploring the capability to construct a specific linkage mechanism. The study reported was integrated in a Learning study, a kind of design experiment inspired by the Japanese Lesson Study, and was carried out in collaboration with two primary school teachers and their two classes, a preschool class and a grade one class. The study reports on the analysis of the video-recorded pre- and post-test. The tests were analysed phenomenographically resulting in four categories describing qualitatively different ways of experiencing the object of learning. The categories were then analysed in terms of critical aspects, describing aspects necessary to discern for this group of students in order to learn how to construct a linkage mechanism. The result indicates the importance of discerning the two joints and their different characteristics in terms of a fixed and a moving joint as well as the placement of the moving joint in relation to the resulting movement.

  • 13.
    Björkholm, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Teknik i de tidiga skolåren: Om vad det innebär att kunna konstruera en länkmekanism2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study within primary technology education aims at exploring the capability to construct a specific linkage mechanism. The study reported was integrated in a Learning study, a kind of design experiment inspired by the Japanese Lesson Study, and was carried out in collaboration with two primary school teachers and their two classes, a preschool class and a grade one class. The study reports on the analysis of the video-recorded pre- and post-test. The tests were analysed phenomenographically resulting in four categories describing qualitatively different ways of experiencing the object of learning. The categories were then analysed in terms of critical aspects, describing aspects necessary to discern for this group of students in order to learn how to construct a linkage mechanism. The result indicates the importance of discerning the two joints and their different characteristics in terms of a fixed and a moving joint as well as the placement of the moving joint in relation to the resulting movement.

  • 14.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    School of Education, Malmö university.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chemistry in crisis?: Perspectives on teaching and learning chemistry in Swedish upper secondary schools2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explanations for a decline in the number of students studying chemistry at advanced level all over the world have been sought for quite some time. Many students do not find chemistry relevant and meaningful and there have been difficulties in developing school chemistry courses that engage students sufficiently and tempt them to further studies in the field. In this study, Swedish upper secondary school students (Ns=372) and their teachers (Nt=18) answered a questionnaire on their experiences of the content and the working methods of their chemistry course. They were also given the opportunity to express ideas on how to make chemistry courses more interesting and meaningful. The results point out some subject areas as both easy and interesting, e.g. atomic structure; while other areas are hard to understand but still interesting, e.g. biochemistry. The students find chemistry lessons teacher-centred, something they appreciate. When teachers and students gave suggestions on how to improve the relevance of chemistry education at upper secondary level, more laboratory work and connections to everyday life were the most common proposals. But on the whole, these students seem quite satisfied with their chemistry courses.

  • 15.
    Dahlin, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Östergaard, E
    Hugo, A
    An Argument for Reversing the Bases of Science Education: A Phenomenological Alternative to Cognitionism2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 201-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract

    This paper is a phenomenological critique of some of the basic notions informing much of the research in and practice of science education (SE) today. It is suggested that the theoretical bases of SE are in need of three reversals of primacy: the ontological primacy of the perceptual lifeworld must replace that of abstract scientific models; the epistemological primacy of attentive action must replace that of conceptual cognition; and the pedagogical primacy of cultivating competencies must replace that of imparting ready-made knowledge. Four arguments for a phenomenological approach to SE are presented and some consequences for the training of science teachers are discussed; some of which are already being implemented at the science teacher education of the Norwegian University of Life Sciences

  • 16.
    Danckwardt-Lillieström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Creative drama in chemistry education: a social semiotic approach2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 250-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drama is a way of teaching that has been suggested to support learning, but studies in science education are limited and the potential of using drama needs further scrutiny and design development. In this study, from an upper secondary school in Sweden, we investigate how creative drama may afford students’ meaning-making of abstract non-spontaneous chemical concepts, by exploring what kind of semiotic work students are engaged in when given the opportunity to use their own bodies as semiotic resources. We combine sociocultural theory of learning with multimodal social semiotic analysis. In our analysis, we found different types of transductions and transformations that had consequences for students' meaning-making. A conclusion is that when creative drama activities open up for students to use bodily mode in combination with a variety of other semiotic resources, the students are afforded to explore intermolecular forces in new ways.

  • 17.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Characterising the practice of physics as enacted in university student laboratories using 'Discourse models' as an analytical tool.2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 219-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Science for whom?: Case studies of two male primary school student teachers’ constructions of themselves as teachers of science2013In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Domert, Daniel
    et al.
    Airey, John
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Kung, Rebecca
    An exploration of university physics students' epistemological mindsets towards the understanding of physics equations2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 3, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Domert, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics.
    Lippmann Kung, Rebecca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics.
    An exploration of university physics students' epistemological mindsets towards the understanding of physics equations2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ attitudes and beliefs about learning have been shown to affect learning outcomes. Thisstudy explores how university physics students think about what it means to understand physicsequations. The data comes from semi-structured interviews with students from three Swedish univer-sities. The analysis follows a data-based, inductive approach to characterise students’ descriptions ofwhat it means to understand equations in terms of epistemological mindsets (perceived critical attri-butes of a learning, application, or problem-solving situation that are grounded in epistemology). Theresults are given in terms of different components of students’ epistemological mindsets. Relationsbetween individuals and sets of components as well as differences across various stages of students’academic career are then explored. Pedagogical implications of the findings are discussed and tenta-tive suggestions for university physics teaching are made.

  • 21.
    Dudas, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Didactic modelling of complex sustainability issues in chemistry education2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 267-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet future challenges regarding sustainability issues, science education needs to address how to educate scientifically literate and responsible citizens. One aspect of this is how to draw students’ attention to the complexity in sustainability issues. Therefore, this study analyses how complexity can become visible in students’ deliberations. The study has been conducted as an in-situ study at two upper secondary schools. The data was analysed using Practical Epistemological Analysis (PEA) and Deliberative Educational Questions (DEQ). The results show that four different kinds of considerations were used to visualise complexity. Those considerations regarded facts and values in relation to known and unknown facts. The considerations were used to develop a didactic model. Design principles were also developed, which together with the model can support teachers in didactic analyses regarding complex sustainability issues in chemistry education. Furthermore, the study shows that chemistry education can contribute to development of Bildung and democratic citizenship.

  • 22.
    Due, Karin
    et al.
    Department of science and mathematics education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tellgren, Britt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Department of science and mathematics education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Christina, Ottander
    Department of science and mathematics education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Bodil
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Inte som i skolan - pedagoger positionerar naturvetenskap i förskolan: Preschool teachers talk about science – Positioning themselves and positioning science2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 411-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how preschool teachers, who include a scientific content in their practice, describe their practice and their view of science in preschool. The study is based on 20 interviews in 9 Swedish preschools. The theoretical and analytical framework combine “communities of practice”(Lave & Wenger) and “positioning theory” (Harré & Langehove). The stories reveal a strong position for the pre-school curriculum and traditions. A prominent storyline is that Science in preschool is something different from science in school. This includes an anti-authoritarian view with a focus on ”the competent child”. The preschool teachers affirm fantasy, creativity and intuition as a part of science and they position science as easy to access. They also position themselves as pedagogues competent to manage science in preschool. One of the dilemmas is about letting children’s interests and initiatives drive the activities while educators curriculum-based goals have certain intentions to fulfill.

  • 23.
    Due, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Tellgren, Britt
    örebro universitet.
    Areljung, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Sundberg, Bodil
    Örebro univ, NT-akademin.
    Inte som i skolan - pedagoger positionerar naturvetenskap i förskolan: Preschool teachers talk about science – Positioning themselves and positioning science2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 411-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how preschool teachers, who include a scientific content in their practice, describe their practice and their view of science in preschool. The study is based on 20 interviews in 9 Swedish preschools. The theoretical and analytical framework combine "communities of practice"(Lave & Wenger) and "positioning theory" (Harré & Langehove). The stories reveal a strong position for the pre-school curriculum and traditions. A prominent storyline is that Science in preschool is something different from science in school. This includes an anti-authoritarian view with a focus on "the competent child". The preschool teachers affirm fantasy, creativity and intuition as a part of science and they position science as easy to access. They also position themselves as pedagogues competent to manage science in preschool. One of the dilemmas is about letting children’s interests and initiatives drive the activities while educators curriculum- based goals have certain intentions to fulfill.

  • 24.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedicine, Linnaeus University.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedicine, Linnaeus University.
    Johansson Cederblad, Brita
    Department of Biology and the Environment, Linnaeus University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    University students' reflections on representations in genetics and stereochemistry revealed by a focus group approach2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part of this difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In order to optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure the meaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior know-ledge. Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representations in introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representa-tions. The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in their problem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiar to the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”. The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways of interpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discus-sions enhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’ representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a university context to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitful way.

  • 25.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    University students' reflections on representations in genetics and stereochemistry revealed by a focus group approach2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part ofthis difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In orderto optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure themeaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge.Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representationsin introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealedhow students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representations.The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting themeaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in theirproblem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiarto the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”.The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways ofinterpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discussionsenhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a universitycontext to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitfulway.

  • 26.
    Ehdwall, Dana Seifeddine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hur lärare kan stödja andraspråkselever på gymnasiet att tala kemi2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 299-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate how two didactic models can be used by chemistry teachers to improve teaching to support students with a second language to “talk chemistry”. The study contributes to show how these models can be used by chemistry teachers to organize, perform and assess chemistry lessons in a way that better supports second language students to become more active in talking and so learn chemistry. The material consists of video and audio recordings from chemistry lessons in an introductory class in upper secondary school in Sweden. The study was carried out in two cycles of planning, teaching and analysis in two successive classes. The first cycle entailed analyzing how a “normal” chemistry lesson gave students opportunities to talk and learn chemistry. In cycle 2 changes were made by using the models for the purpose of increasing the students’ opportunities to “talk chemistry”. Our findings show how teachers can support also second language students’ learning to “talk chemistry” by using the didactic models developed for mono-lingual classrooms when planning and performing chemistry lessons.

  • 27.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ideland, Malin
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Science for life - a conceptual framework for construction and analysis of socio-scientific cases.2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework to be used as a tool for analyzing work with socio-scientific issues (SSI) and for constructing SSI cases in secondary school. The framework consists of six components describing the more detailed characteristics of SSI. The components were chosen to reflect what we know from research about what might have an impact on students’ learning and interest in science. Six socio-scientific cases were then constructed and these are discussed in the article. The cases are relevant in that they both display the characteristics of SSI and meet the requirements of the Swedish national curriculum. The components and the cases are described in a table. This work is the first step in an evidence-based research project aiming at investigating if, how and why students and teachers in secondary school develop knowledge and interests when working with SSI. © Naturfagsenteret

  • 28.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Mathematics, Technology and Science Education.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmberg, Claes
    Science for life: a conceptual framework for constru´ction and analysis of socio-scientific issues2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework to be used as a tool for analyzing work with socio-scientific issues (SSI) and for constructing SSI cases in secondary school. The framework consists of six components describing the more detailed characteristics of SSI. The components were chosen to reflect what we know from research about what might have an impact on students’ learning and interest in science. Six socio-scientific cases were then constructed and these are discussed in the article. The cases are relevant in that they both display the characteristics of SSI and meet the requirements of the Swedish national curriculum. The components and the cases are described in a table. This work is the first step in an evidence-based research project aiming at investigating if, how and why students and teachers in secondary school develop knowledge and interests when working with SSI.

  • 29.
    Eliasson, Nina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Karlsson, Karl Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.
    Lenner, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Specialpedagogiska myndigheten.
    Boys' and Girls' written responses to PISA science questions2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time student responses to science questions from the Swedish PISA 2006 Main Study and the PISA 2015 Field Trial have been used in order to investigate differences in boys’ and girls’ written responses. Students’ correct and incorrect answers to the science questions are studied with respect to response length, the number of everyday words used, and the inclusion of nouns and long words in the responses. The results reveal that girls give longer and denser correct responses to most of the questions, compared to boys. The difference in response length cannot be explained by girls’ excessive use of the most common Swedish words, since boys and girls use the same proportion of these words. For incorrect answers the only difference between boys and girls is in the response length, since girls give longer answers than boys.

  • 30.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Vad är teknik? Pedagogers uppfattningar om och erfarenheter av teknik och teknikundervisning i förskolan: [What is technology? Preschool teachers' conceptions and experiences of technology and technology education in the preschool]2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 37-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years technology has become increasingly emphasized as educational content in the Swedish preschool, not the least with the introduction of the latest curriculum in 2010 (revised in 2016). Since preschool teachers have not had any formal technology education until just recently, it is of importance to investigate how they conceive of and experience technology in the daily activities of the preschool. The purpose of this study is therefore to describe and analyze Swedish preschool teachers’ views and experiences of technology and technology education in the preschool, focusing on what opportunities and obstacles that they see. The data consists of transcripts from focus group interviews with sixteen teachers in two Swedish preschools, and the data was coded and categorized with a thematic analysis. The results show that when it comes to opportunities, the teachers consider technology to permeate all preschool activities, and the challenge here is rather to make technology visible. In terms of obstacles, however, the teachers are also uncertain about what technology is and want to have more knowledge of technology themselves, for example, relevant concepts for various technologies or activities. They also want to know more about technology education in order to be able to educationally convey knowledge of technology to the children and to make the children conscious of the technology that surrounds them.

  • 31.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Institutionen för pedagogik och lärande, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Vad är teknik? Pedagogers uppfattningar om och erfarenheter av teknik och teknikundervisning i förskolan [What is technology? Preschool teachers' conceptions and experiences of technology and technology education in the preschool]2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 37-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years technology has become increasingly emphasized as educational content in the Swedish preschool, not the least with the introduction of the latest curriculum in 2010. Since preschool teachers have not had any formal technology education until just recently, it is of importance to investigate how they handle technology in the daily activities of the preschool. The purpose of this study is therefore to describe and analyze Swedish preschool teachers’ views and experiences of working with technology in the preschool, focusing on what opportunities and obstacles that they see. The data consists of transcripts from focus group interviews with sixteen teachers in two Swedish preschools, and the data was analyzed with open coding in a Grounded Theory tradition. The results show that when it comes to opportunities, the teachers consider technology to permeate all preschool activities, and the challenge here is rather to make technology visible. In terms of obstacles, the teachers are uncertain about what technology is and want to have more knowledge of technology themselves, for example, relevant concepts for various technologies or activities. They also need to know more about technology education in order to be able to educationally convey knowledge of technology to the children and to make the children conscious of the technology that surrounds them.

  • 32.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Schenk, Linda
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Nanoteknik och riskbedömning som nytt kunskapsinnehåll i gymnasiets naturvetenskapliga kurser – en designstudie2016In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 218-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology (NST) is a rapidly developing knowledge area, which need incorporating in the school science curricula. The many uncertainties of risks and benefits with NST also open up for using NST as a socio-scientific issue (SSI). We present the two first iterations of a teaching sequence aimed for upper secondary school physics.  The sequence contains content knowledge on NST and risk assessment and employs traditional classroom teaching, and a debate about NST as a SSI. The aims are to explore 1) students assessments of risks and benefits with NST, and 2) what design principles for teaching nanoscience and risk assessment that emerge as significant. We found that the risk assessment exercise stimulated student argumentation and discussion during the SSI debate. The teachers preferred to focus on the SSI activity, but found it challenging to fit NST content knowledge into the traditional teaching approach. Design principles found are discussed.

  • 33.
    Engström, Susanne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Vilka fysikaliska och miljömässiga förklaringar återfinns i elevers diskussioner om begreppet hållbart energisystem?2008In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes a pilot study, an introduction to a series of investigations of upper secondaryschool pupils’ explanations of sustainable energy. The physics syllabus have the intentions on onehand to guide pupils into science-education and on the other to give insights to pupils in order toparticipate in the debate on e.g. energy usage. The results obtained, from questionnaire and groupdiscussions, indicate that pupils can get caught in narrow physical explanations of the concept ofsustainable energy systems. Some pupils discuss an environmental explanation parallel but showinsecurity. One interpretation is that pupils feel an inappropriateness connecting environment andphysics. An implication is that the concept of energy quality might be an accessible way for pupils torelate concepts of physics with environmental questions.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Elevimpulser och lärarresponser: Betydelsen av lärares återkoppling för undervisningens diskurs och elevernas meningsskapande i undervisning om sociovetenskapliga dilemma2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 285-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Today teachers face an increased challenge in listening to classroom discourses and students’ areas ofinterest to let these coincides with the overall teaching purpose by feedback. Present study explorehow classroom communication can be modeled to allow this. The socio-scientific-issues raised wereat the same time aimed at creating relevance in the students’ social life as giving a respond to thecurriculum. The data consisted of recordings from science lessons in grade 7 and 8 in Sweden. To makevisible the tension that occurred between different discourses and displacement of power in theconversations, practical epistemological analysis has been made. This resulted in a categorization offive different ways the teacher is taking care of and reconnects the students’ impulses in relation tothe overall purpose. Consequently, this study is offering opportunities for teachers to, in a consciouslymanner, reflect on different strategies for discourse feedback in teaching.

  • 35. Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Vargfrågan - Gymnasieelevers argumentation kring ett sociovetenskapligt dilemma2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 43-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Wolf Issue - Upper Secondary Students’ Argumentation about a Socio-Scientific Issue

    The focus of this study is the attitudes towards wolves in Sweden among upper secondary students.This socio-scientific issue (SSI) involves many aspects, such as ethical, political and biological aspects,and provides a context to study students’ informal argumentation. The different arguments usedby the students were analyzed using the framework of the SEE-SEP-model. A questionnaire probingattitudes to the existence of wolves in the neighbourhood was distributed to 352 upper secondarystudents. 18 students were interviewed in focused group-interviews (in pairs). The results showedthat 55% of the students showed a negative attitude towards the existence of wolves in the neighbourhood.The analysis of the different aspects of arguments used by the students in the interviewsshowed that arguments based on value were more dominant (60%) than arguments based on knowledge(30%), and arguments based on personal experiences (10%).

  • 36.
    Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholms universitet.
    Vargfrågan: Gymnasieelevers argumentation kring ett sociovetenskapligt dilemma2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 43-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this study is the attitudes towards wolves in Sweden among upper secondary students.This socio-scientific issue (SSI) involves many aspects, such as ethical, political and biological aspects,and provides a context to study students’ informal argumentation. The different arguments usedby the students were analyzed using the framework of the SEE-SEP-model. A questionnaire probingattitudes to the existence of wolves in the neighbourhood was distributed to 352 upper secondarystudents. 18 students were interviewed in focused group-interviews (in pairs). The results showedthat 55% of the students showed a negative attitude towards the existence of wolves in the neighbourhood.The analysis of the different aspects of arguments used by the students in the interviewsshowed that arguments based on value were more dominant (60%) than arguments based on knowledge(30%), and arguments based on personal experiences (10%).

  • 37.
    Ferlin, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Biologisk mångfald i svenska läroböcker för skolår 6-92011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 71-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö.
    Fem elevers föreställningar om organsystem: vad händer i kroppen när vi dricker vatten?2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 160-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has earlier been shown on a group level that it is difficult for 9th grade students (15-16 years old) in a Swedish school to understand how water is transported in the human body. The detailed analysis of five Swedish students in the 9th and final year of compulsory school concerning their ideas about water transportation is presented here. The empirical data consists of drawings, answers to a questionnaire with both open ended and multiple-choice questions, and student interviews. The analysis shows that all the students struggle to produce explanations involving the three organ systems: digestive, blood and excretion systems and they seem to use a variety of explanatory models as basis for their reasoning. Possible ways of understanding this are discussed together with implications for future teaching

  • 39.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment.
    Fem elevers föreställningar om organsystem: vad händer i kroppen när vi dricker vatten?2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 160-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has earlier been shown on a group level that it is difficult for 9th grade students (15-16 years old) in a Swedish school to understand how water is transported in the human body. The detailed analysis of five Swedish students in the 9th and final year of compulsory school concerning their ideas about water transportation is presented here. The empirical data consists of drawings, answers to a questionnaire with both open ended and multiple-choice questions, and student interviews. The analysis shows that all the students struggle to produce explanations involving the three organ systems: digestive, blood and excretion systems and they seem to use a variety of explanatory models as basis for their reasoning. Possible ways of understanding this are discussed together with implications for future teaching

  • 40.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Fem elevers föreställningar om organsystem: vad händer i kroppen när vi dricker vatten?2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 160-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has earlier been shown on a group level that it is difficult for 9th grade students (15-16 years old) in a Swedish school to understand how water is transported in the human body. The detailed analysis of five Swedish students in the 9th and final year of compulsory school concerning their ideas about water transportation is presented here. The empirical data consists of drawings, answers to a questionnaire with both open ended and multiple-choice questions, and student interviews. The analysis shows that all the students struggle to produce explanations involving the three organ systems: digestive, blood and excretion systems and they seem to use a variety of explanatory models as basis for their reasoning. Possible ways of understanding this are discussed together with implications for future teaching.

  • 41.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Fem elevers föreställningar om organsystem: vad händer i kroppen när vi dricker vatten?2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 160-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has earlier been shown on a group level that it is difficult for 9th grade students (15-16 years old) in a Swedish school to understand how water is transported in the human body. The detailed analysis of five Swedish students in the 9th and final year of compulsory school concerning their ideas about water transportation is presented here. The empirical data consists of drawings, answers to a questionnaire with both open ended and multiple-choice questions, and student interviews. The analysis shows that all the students struggle to produce explanations involving the three organ systems: digestive, blood and excretion systems and they seem to use a variety of explanatory models as basis for their reasoning. Possible ways of understanding this are discussed together with implications for future teaching

  • 42.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nymark, Tanja
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The role of ‘Teknikåttan’– a competition aimed at increasing interest in science and technology for grade 8 students.2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 197-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1993, Swedish technical universities have engaged 15-year-old students and their teachers in the annual tournament “Teknikåttan” (technology for students in school year eight), which is aimed at increasing students’ interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects, as well as at making them aware of career possibilities within these areas. Given its large number of participating students, Teknikåttan offers a unique opportunity to study students’ understanding of and interest in STEM subjects by analysing the results collected for the participating students. This paper gives a description of the Teknikåttan tournament and presents an analysis of the results from the first round of the 2014 tournament. The data collected came from the answers of students in the Stockholm region. All questions were characterised according to three parameters, which were used to analyse answers to high-score and low-score questions and differences in answers according to gender. The analysis indicates that a difference exists in answers according to gender, such that boys scored higher than girls overall, but that girls scored higher in questions related to the subject of biology. Finally, a possible expansion of the analysis involving future tournaments is discussed.

  • 43.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nymark-Kramer, T.
    The Technology-Eight Competition: An Analysis of Year 8 Students' Quiz Results2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Gustafsson, Barbro
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Naturvetenskaplig undervisning och det dubbla uppdraget2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 107-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this contribution is to discuss the significance of a democratic approach in science education. Initially, the concept of "democracy" is outlined. According to the deliberative view, democracy is learnt and practiced in communication with others. Furthermore, according to sociocultural theory, communication also enhances scientific content knowledge. This implies that deliberative discussions could be helpful in carrying out teachers' dual assignment: to transmit knowledge and foster independent, judicious, democratic citizens. The discussion is approached through the presentation of a simulated teaching sequence. Based on this scenario, in which a socioscientific issue is the theme for deliberation, the possibilities and limitations of a deliberative approach in science education is discussed.

  • 45.
    Gustafsson, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Nilsson, Tor
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Teknikämnet i svensk grundskolas tidiga skolår sett genom forskningscirkelns lupp.2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 113-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology has been a compulsory subject in the Swedish school curriculum since 1980. However,many primary school teachers say that they do not feel comfortable with teaching technology. Thisoften results in a teaching time that is a (too) small part of the total teaching time of science andtechnology. In addition, studies show that pupils are probably not given equivalent education asthe syllabi may be interpreted in different ways. Against this background, we have conducted threeresearch circles under the guidance of researchers, in three municipalities in the Mälardalen region,addressing teachers working in preschool class to grade 6. Each circle had up to five participants andhad five meetings during one year. Based on the teachers’ own questions and needs we have studieddidactic literature connected to the subject of technology, discussed the syllabi for technology anddifferent forms of teaching support. An existing model for pedagogical content knowledge in technologyhas been used to interpret the activities in the research circles. The teachers experienced and appreciatedthe opportunities to work with the subject content linked to the syllabi for technology andsaw ways to integrate technology with other school subjects.

  • 46.
    Gustavsson, Laila
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU).
    Thulin, Susanne
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Pedagogik. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Barndom, Lärande och Utbildning (BALU).
    Lärares uppfattningar av undervisning och naturvetenskap som innehåll i förskolans verksamhet2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 81-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the research project is to analyze and describe how pre-school teachers during an in-service training period develop theoretical knowledge about focusing the content when planning for teaching science in pre-school. The variation theory is used for analysis as well as for the planning for teaching in pre-school. The theory can be described in terms of learning object, critical aspects, discernment, simultaneity and differences. 30 pre-school teachers from nine different municipalities participated in the project. The empirical material consists of a questionnaire as the preschool teachers answered in the beginning and in the end of the training period and of group reports. The results can be discussed as a number of critical aspects in relation to teachers'learning as: ways of understand the concept of variation, to discern the object of learning and to discern o shared space of learning.

  • 47.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Secondary science teachers’ selective traditions and examples of inquiry-oriented approaches2010In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 44-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes aspects of the existing tradition of practical work in secondary science education in Sweden, with a focus on inquiry-oriented teaching approaches. Twelve secondary science teachers were interviewed and asked to describe examples of their own teaching practices that they believed constituted inquiry-oriented teaching. The descriptions are analysed in relation to key components of inquiry as conceptualised in the science education literature. In addition, the teachers’ way of talking about their own teaching in relation to inquiry is described and analysed. The results show a wide variety of teaching approaches that are associated with inquiry in different ways. Although inquiry is valued by many teachers, it is also problematic. We discuss the nature of the problems associated with inquiry by the teachers and the possible consequences of these for teacher education, in-service training and curriculum development.

  • 48.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Lindahl, Britt
    Kristianstad University, Department of Mathematics and Science. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Apropå Fuglesang: världsbilder och rekryteringen till naturvetenskapliga/tekniska utbildningar2007In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In connection to the astronaut Christer Fuglesang’s space flight, different stakeholders have expressed a hope that this event will increase the interest among youths for science and technology studies. The modernistic and technique positive discourse that is used is however not unproblematic in this situation. In the article this is exemplified with students’ views concerning the possibility that humans in the future will be able to live on other planets. This is something that, during an interview, was mentioned by Fuglesang as the main reason for space flights.

  • 49.
    Hansson, Lena
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Löfgren, Lena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds universitet.
    Att utgå från frågor och situationer i förskolans vardag: vilket naturvetenskapligt innehåll kan det leda till?2014In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 77-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying and building on children’s questions and everyday situations is often discussed as a basis for science learning in preschool. With a starting point in such questions and situations, children should be given the opportunity to investigate and search for answers. What questions and situations do preschool teachers identify as possible bases for science learning? What science content is present? To what extent are the questions possible to investigate for children and preschool teachers through experiments and observations or theoretical studies? The paper presents children’s questions and everyday situations that might form the basis for science learning, as identified by preschool teachers taking part in a science in-service training course. Based on a content analysis, we discuss possibilities and difficulties that preschool teachers may face in their practice when they try to use these questions and situations as a basis for science learning.

  • 50. Hast, Ylwa Li
    et al.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    "I normala fall gillar tjejer killukt”: Naturkunskapens sexualitets- och relationsundervisning analyserad ur ett heteronormativitetsperspektiv2016In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, a new subject syllabus for Science Studies (Naturkunskap) in upper secondary school was introduced in 2011. In this syllabus knowledge about norms concerning sexualities and relations was brought to the fore as a core content. The aim of this paper is to explore how norms concerning sexuality guide the teaching, through a case study where three upper secondary school teachers were observed and their teaching was analysed from the perspective of companion meanings. All three observed teachers did teach about homosexuality, bisexuality, and transgender identities, often using genetics or evolution as their explanatory model. The teaching most often assumed that all students in the class were heterosexual, positioning LGBT-people as the Other, and did at no times take power perspectives into account.

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