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  • 1.
    Allan, Julie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen för Pedagogik.
    Smyth, Geri
    I’Anson, John
    Mott, Jane
    Understanding disability with children’s social capital2009Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 115-121Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a specific event which attempted to facilitate discussions with children and young people about diversity issues, including disability. The concept of social capital was operationalised and used as both a resource to stimulate discussions and as an explicit goal. The paper first reports on the processes involved and the topics identified for discussion by the children and young people and then considers their engagement with disability. Their insights on knowing disability, relationships, and provision and support illustrate a shift from an essentialising of impairment to an articulation of barriers which excluded disabled people and the lessons which teachers might take from these are discussed.

  • 2.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Occupational Therapy Program, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Factors related to successful transition planning for adolescents on the autism spectrum2018Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 3-14Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents on the autism spectrum often have difficulties with the transition from high school to post-school activities. Despite this, little is known about the transition planning processes for this group. This study explored predisposing, reinforcing and enabling factors related to the transition planning processes for adolescents on the autism spectrum in Australia. The PRECEDE model guided a needs assessment, in which descriptive data about transition planning processes were collected via an online questionnaire from adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents and professionals (N = 162). Predisposing factors included: an individualised and strengths-focused approach, and adolescent motivation, anxiety and insight. Reinforcing factors included: support and guidance, skill development and real-life experiences. Enabling factors were: having a clear plan with a coordinated approach, scheduled meetings and clear formal documentation. Whilst some factors aligned with recommendations for transition planning for adolescents with disabilities in general, there were some autism-specific factors. For example: anxiety, motivation and insight were important predisposing factors, and providing choice and flexibility was an enabling factor.

  • 3.
    Hatfield, Megan
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Curtin University, Australia.
    "Leaps of faith": Parents' and professionals' viewpoints on preparing adolescents on the autism spectrum for leaving school2017Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 187-197Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents on the autism spectrum experience difficulty transitioning from secondary school to post-school activities, often due to transition planning processes that do not meet their unique needs. This study identified parents' and professionals' viewpoints on transition planning for adolescents on the autism spectrum. Interviews were completed with nine parents of adolescents on the autism spectrum and four professionals who worked with adolescents on the autism spectrum. A constant comparison approach was used to analyse the transcripts. Four themes were identified, reflecting parents' and professionals' viewpoints on how to meet the transition planning needs of adolescents on the autism spectrum. Supporting adolescents to grasp the big picture can enhance motivation to participate in transition planning. Autism can be an ‘invisible disability’; therefore, encouraging adolescents to be active participants and to be seen in transition planning ensures their individual needs are met. Encouraging adolescents to have high aspirationsin transition planning develops their self-determination. Finally, to be prepared for the transition from school may reduce the adolescent's' anxiety. Adolescents on the autism spectrum face unique challenges in transition planning. The themes identified in this study provide insight into how parents and professionals might support adolescents with these challenges.

  • 4.
    Helldin, Rolf
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Bäckman, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Dwyer, Helen
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Skarlind, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Hugo, Anna J.
    Nel, Norma
    Müller, Helene
    Opportunities for a democratic pedagogy: a comparative study of South African and Swedish teachers' attitudes to inclusive education2011Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 11, nr 2, s. 107-119Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based upon the collaboration between two research groups from Stockholm University and the University of South Africa. The main objective is to compare attitudes between South African (SA) and Swedish teachers regarding inclusive education (IE). IE in this paper is examined as a distinct part of the Swedish welfare system. The method used can be characterised as a combined, quantitative and qualitative research design with a purposive sampling. A similar adapted questionnaire was distributed in the two countries. The Swedish teachers in our data are more pro‐inclusion and more hesitating to accommodate learners with barriers in special schools. However, both the Swedish and the SA teachers in the study are hesitating towards the feasibility to implement IE practically. A team approach is concluded to be an adequate pedagogy for supporting IE both in South Africa and Sweden.

  • 5.
    Janson Spjut, Birgitta
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Child and Adolescent Habilitat and Hlth Unit, Sweden; Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Sweden.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Comparing Imitation Responding and IBT for children with ASD, a preschool intervention2019Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the effectiveness of two interventions, Imitation Responding (IR) and Intensive Behavior Treatment (IBT) used as initial treatment programs for autistic children enrolled in ordinary preschools. The interventions were carried out by parents and/or preschool teachers with supervision from Child Adolescent Habilitation and Health Clinics. Children were randomly assigned to either the IR group or the IBT group. The IR group received a new focused imitation treatment averaging 2.2 hours per week, while the children in the IBT group received 14.4 hours treatment per week. The outcome was measured with subscales from PEP-3 and Vineland-II, covering language and social domains. The between-group comparison revealed no significant differences in effect of treatment during the 5 months that encompassed the period from pre- to posttest. Within-group comparisons revealed significant changes on four subscales for the IR-group, with the highest effect sizes for play and expressive language, while for the children in the IBT-group a significant gain was evident for five subscales with the highest effect sizes observed for expressive and receptive language. These findings suggest that IR can be used as an initial and complementary method in settings where IBT is usually the primary treatment of choice.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    “One step ahead and two steps back”: meeting special education and inclusive challenges in the context of poverty (case study in the context of Republic of Moldova)2016Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 16, nr Suppl. 1, s. 786-788, artikkel-id JRS312179Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 20 years Moldavian and Ukrainian societies have been developing inclusive infrastructures, being under complicated transformative changes. There are two main tendencies of the current situation for children with disabilities. The first one is that the inherited system of internat special schools is rapidly changing its functions, expanding, due to work with children from marginal families. In this case economic polarization forms a specific family strategy to protect their children from family economic problems, “intentionally putting” their children in these special school internats. The second strategy is directed towards deinstitutionalization of the system of special school internats, the development of inclusive infrastructure and involvement the non-profit organizations etc. The article is discussing these tendencies, through a case study approach.

  • 7.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Ämnesforskning. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Skolnära forskning, Övrig skolnära forskning.
    SENCOs: vanguards or in vain?2013Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 198-207Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden today, special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) are educated at universities to help resolve educational problems related to children in need of special support at three levels, that is, the organisational level, the classroom level and the individual level. Before the education of SENCOs was created in the early 1990s, special teachers were the occupational group that worked primarily on an individual level. Children's school problems were then seen as individual deficits. SENCOs can be seen as vanguards in changing an educational system from primarily focusing on an individual perspective to a broader focus on the entire learning environment. How has the occupational role of SENCOs affected schools? The overall aim of this study is to investigate possible changes within a school system when the introduction of a new occupational group, SENCOs, challenges established structures. More specifically, this paper studies how different occupational groups view where and in what ways SENCOs work and should work. Three different questionnaires are the basis of this analysis of SENCOs' present situation within the Swedish educational system. A number of interesting findings were detected in this study. For example, several occupational groups respond that SENCOs should work with individually taught special education. Meanwhile, a pattern emerges in which SENCOs seem to have partly established a new work role. However, little is known about how these changes affect children in need of special support.

  • 8.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Pedagogiskt arbete.
    SENCOs: Vanguards or in vain?2013Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 198-207Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden today, special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) are educated at universities to help resolve educational problems related to children in need of special support at three levels, i.e. the organizational level, the classroom level and the individual level. Before the education of SENCOs was created, in the early 1990´s, special teachers were the occupational group that worked primarily on an individual level. Children’s school problems were then seen as individual deficits. SENCOs can be seen as vanguards in changing an educational system from primarily focusing on an individual perspective to a broader focus on the entire learning environment.  How has the occupational role of SENCOs affected schools? The overall aim of this study is to investigate possible changes within a school system when the introduction of a new occupational group, SENCOs, challenges established structures. More specifically, this paper studies how different occupational groups view where, and in what ways, SENCOs work and should work. Three different questionnaires are the basis of this analysis of SENCOs´ present situation within the Swedish educational system. A number of interesting findings were detected in this study. For example, several occupational groups respond that SENCOs should work with individually taught special education. Meanwhile, a pattern emerges in which SENCOs seem to have partly established a new work role. However, little is known about how these changes affect children in need of special support. 

  • 9.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Ämnesforskning.
    SENCOs: vanguards or in vain?2013Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 198-207Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden today, special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) are educated at universities to help resolve educational problems related to children in need of special support at three levels, that is, the organisational level, the classroom level and the individual level. Before the education of SENCOs was created in the early 1990s, special teachers were the occupational group that worked primarily on an individual level. Children's school problems were then seen as individual deficits. SENCOs can be seen as vanguards in changing an educational system from primarily focusing on an individual perspective to a broader focus on the entire learning environment. How has the occupational role of SENCOs affected schools? The overall aim of this study is to investigate possible changes within a school system when the introduction of a new occupational group, SENCOs, challenges established structures. More specifically, this paper studies how different occupational groups view where and in what ways SENCOs work and should work. Three different questionnaires are the basis of this analysis of SENCOs' present situation within the Swedish educational system. A number of interesting findings were detected in this study. For example, several occupational groups respond that SENCOs should work with individually taught special education. Meanwhile, a pattern emerges in which SENCOs seem to have partly established a new work role. However, little is known about how these changes affect children in need of special support.

  • 10.
    Magnusson, Gunnlaugur
    et al.
    Malardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för pedagogiska studier (from 2013).
    Nilholm, Claes
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Varying access to professional, special educational support: A total population comparison of special educators in Swedish independent and municipal schools2018Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 18, nr 4, s. 225-238Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Independent schools are securely established in the Swedish education system. Prior research shows they generally have fewer pupils in need of support and lower proportions of special educators. Here, results are presented from a total population study of Swedish special educators (n=4252) examined after 2001. The aim was to explore and compare the occupational situations of special educators working in Swedish municipal and independent schools. This is done by studying their occupational situations and the values they express regarding identification of - and work with - special support. The results show that while the respondents are demographically similar and express similar values, they have very different occupational situations. Those employed in independent schools have fewer years' experience as special educators, are more often employed part-time than full-time and are more likely to hold other positions in schools (such as head teacher) than those employed in municipal schools. The results further illustrate different organisational approaches towards special educational support. Apparent is that independent schools offer professional special educational resources to a lower degree and utilise them differently. This is likely to influence the situation of pupils in need of support, and has consequences for the image of the Swedish education system.

  • 11.
    Magnússon, Gunnlaugur
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Karlstad University.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Varying access to professional, special educational support: a total population comparison of special educators in Swedish independent and municipal schools2018Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 18, nr 4, s. 225-238Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Independent schools are securely established in the Swedish education system. Prior research shows they generally have fewer pupils in need of support and lower proportions of special educators. Here, results are presented from a total population study of Swedish special educators (n = 4252) examined after 2001. The aim was to explore and compare the occupational situations of special educators working in Swedish municipal and independent schools. This is done by studying their occupational situations and the values they express regarding identification of – and work with – special support. The results show that while the respondents are demographically similar and express similar values, they have very different occupational situations. Those employed in independent schools have fewer years’ experience as special educators, are more often employed part‐time than full‐time and are more likely to hold other positions in schools (such as head teacher) than those employed in municipal schools. The results further illustrate different organisational approaches towards special educational support. Apparent is that independent schools offer professional special educational resources to a lower degree and utilise them differently. This is likely to influence the situation of pupils in need of support, and has consequences for the image of the Swedish education system.

  • 12.
    Magnússon, Gunnlaugur
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation, Utbildningsvetenskap och Matematik.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Varying access to professional, special educational support: a total population comparison of special educators in Swedish independent and municipal schools2018Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 18, nr 4, s. 225-238Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Independent schools are securely established in the Swedish education system. Prior research shows they generally have fewer pupils in need of support and lower proportions of special educators. Here, results are presented from a total population study of Swedish special educators (n = 4252) examined after 2001. The aim was to explore and compare the occupational situations of special educators working in Swedish municipal and independent schools. This is done by studying their occupational situations and the values they express regarding identification of – and work with – special support. The results show that while the respondents are demographically similar and express similar values, they have very different occupational situations. Those employed in independent schools have fewer years’ experience as special educators, are more often employed part‐time than full‐time and are more likely to hold other positions in schools (such as head teacher) than those employed in municipal schools. The results further illustrate different organisational approaches towards special educational support. Apparent is that independent schools offer professional special educational resources to a lower degree and utilise them differently. This is likely to influence the situation of pupils in need of support, and has consequences for the image of the Swedish education system.

  • 13.
    Svensson, Idor
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Falth, Linda
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Pedagogik och didaktik. Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Two-step tier three interventions for children in grade three with low reading fluency2019Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 19, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a tier three intervention, response-to-intervention design, on children with low reading ability in grade three. Twenty-eight children (12 females and 16 males) participated in this study. The participants were given out a battery of reading tests including decoding and reading comprehension tests, and in total, the children received 20 reading intervention sessions in two waves, during 4 weeks. The results showed substantial gains with large effect sizes (d 0.78-2.95) on all the reading tests after the intervention period. A short, intensive and individualised intervention has a substantially positive effect on childrens reading ability. For a majority of the children, the increased ability sustains even 4 years after the end of the interventions. However, as boys seem to have the greatest problem to sustain their increased ability, the authors claim that it is important to continue the intervention even after the research interventions have ended.

  • 14.
    Svensson, Idor
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för psykologi (PSY).
    Fälth, Linda
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för samhällsvetenskap (FSV), Institutionen för pedagogik och lärande (PEL).
    Tjus, Tomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Mikael, Heimann
    Linköping university.
    Stefan, Gustafson
    Linköping university.
    Two-step tier three interventions for children in grade three with low reading fluency2019Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 3-14Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to investigate theeffect of a tier three intervention, response-tointerventiondesign, on children with low readingability in grade three. Twenty-eight children (12females and 16 males) participated in this study.The participants were given out a battery of readingtests including decoding and reading comprehensiontests, and in total, the children received20 reading intervention sessions in two waves, during4 weeks. The results showed substantial gainswith large effect sizes (d 0.78–2.95) on all thereading tests after the intervention period. A short,intensive and individualised intervention has a substantiallypositive effect on children’s reading ability.For a majority of the children, the increasedability sustains even 4 years after the end of theinterventions. However, as boys seem to have thegreatest problem to sustain their increased ability,the authors claim that it is important to continuethe intervention even after the research interventionshave ended.

  • 15.
    Zakirova Engstrand, Rano
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Roll-Pettersson, Lise
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Inclusion of preschool children with autism in Sweden: attitudes and pereceived efficacy of preschool teachers2014Inngår i: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 14, nr 3, s. 170-179Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study examined the relations among preschool teachers' attitudes towards the inclusion of children with autism and perceived self-efficacy, as well as demographic characteristics such as teachers' work experience and educational background. The cohort consisted of 21 participants who had degrees in preschool education and worked with children with autism in general preschool/kindergarten settings in central Sweden. Data were collected using the Autism Attitude Scale for Teachers, the Teacher Efficacy Scale and a demographic survey. In general, findings revealed that preschool teachers held positive attitudes towards children with autism, and this was significantly related to the number of credits in special education taken during pre-service education. However, teachers showed neutral attitudes towards the inclusion of children with autism into general preschool classrooms. No relations were found between teachers' perceived self-efficacy and attitudes towards inclusion, although a relationship was found between participation in in-service training and efficacy to make decisions. Implications concerning early childhood education professional development and supervision are discussed.

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