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  • 1.
    Allan, J
    [external].
    Questions of inclusion in Scotland and Europe2010Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, nr 2, s. 199-208Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines inclusion in Scotland and in Europe. It considers some of the uncertainties surrounding inclusion and the questions – many of which give cause for concern – that are currently being raised by researchers, teachers and their representative unions, parents and children. The shifting political and policy contexts and recent patterns and trends in Scotland and across Europe, which illustrate key points of exclusion, as well as some of the challenges to these, are reported. A ‘landmark’ challenge to discrimination of Roma children, achieved within the European Convention on Human Rights, is presented as an illustration of the scope for asserting the right to inclusion. The paper ends with a discussion of the prospects and possibilities for inclusion. The significance of the barriers to inclusion is acknowledged and it is argued that there is an urgent need to address the competing policy demands within education and the problems associated with fragmented provision. A call is also made for research involving children, young people and families in order to inform practice.

  • 2.
    Andreasson, Ingela
    et al.
    Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik, Göteborgs universitet.
    Asp-Onsjö, Lisa
    Institutionen för didaktik och pedagogisk professsion, Göteborgs universitet.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Lessons learned from research on individual educational plans in Sweden: obstacles, opportunities and future challenges2013Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28, nr 4, s. 413-426Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1995 all Swedish compulsory schools have had a legal obligation to establish Individual Educational Plans (IEPs) for pupils with special educational needs. However, previous research shows that there are a number of issues associated with how these plans are used in schools’ overall work, and identifies a discrepancy between educational policy and practice. In this article we review previous research on authentic IEPs in Sweden to clarify issues and obstacles associated with each step of the process of working with these plans. We then problematise and critically discuss the role that IEPs have come to play in the current Swedish education system and Swedish education policy, following recent reforms. Informed by our review of previous research and the transformation of the Swedish education system during recent years, we conclude that the following issues regarding the use of IEPs require particular consideration on both policy and local school levels. Firstly, partly (at least) because guidelines for implementing IEPs are inadequate, schools appear to enact rather than implement these policy demands, without critically considering what an IEP is and how it should be used in practice. Secondly, in contrast to initial intentions, IEPs largely seem to be used primarily as administrative tools rather than to help meet the educational and developmental needs of the pupils concerned. Hence, there is a risk of IEPs being used merely for ‘fabricating’ a sanitised version of the schools’ procedures to demonstrate accountability in national quality audits and give a favourable representation of the schools. Finally, parents and pupils’ participation and involvement in developing IEPs need further exploration in schools. These issues should ideally be critically examined in future studies regarding the use of IEPs both nationally and internationally.

  • 3.
    Barow, Thomas
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Östlund, Daniel
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning grundskola, gymnasium och specialpedagogik.
    “The system shows us how bad it feels”: special educational needs assessment in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany2019Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 34, nr 5, s. 678-691Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of the North Rhine-Westphalian school reform towards an inclusive education system, this article problematises the practice of categorisation. Our research aims to investigate the assessment of special educational needs (SEN) and thereby enrich the discussion of the relation between inclusion and diagnostics. For this study, we interviewed 14 SEN investigators and five decision-makers. We discuss the results on the basis of a qualitative content analysis and against the background of Fleck’s concept of thought styles. We mainly found inertia in special education traditions, expressed in the use of intelligence tests, the dominance of SEN teachers in the assessment process and the lack of participation of parents and pupils. We conclude that it is necessary to reform the SEN assessment rules. At the same time, we see major challenges in transforming existing thought styles into a more flexible and decategorising approach.

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  • 4.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för hälsovetenskap, Forskningsmiljön Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Avdelningen för Psykologi. Jönköping University.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, nr 4, s. 572-583Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

  • 5.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, nr 4, s. 572-583Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 6.
    Brodin, Jane
    Stockholms universitet, Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm (LHS).
    Municipalities’ view of respite care service for families in Sweden: a comparison between two studies1996Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 11, nr 3, s. 330-336Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1994 a new law, the Act concerning Support and Service for Persons with Certain Functional Impairments (LSS), was passed in Sweden. Accessibility to respite care service is a legal right for families with children with disabilities primarily aimed at giving parents and caregivers relief from care in daily life. The aim of this short report is to illustrate how the municipalities meet the families’ need of support, to study the differences between the results from two data collections (1988 and 1994) and to reveal if and how the priorities have changed over time. The results show that there is a great need of respite care in families of children with disabilities and that there is a lack of case managing from the local authorities. Many municipalities had made an inventory of the need for support. A critical question is: to what extent can parents influence decisions concerning respite staff? To conclude, a need for developing well‐functioning models for respite care service is stressed.

  • 7.
    Brodin, Jane
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Still picture telephone use by persons with profound mental retardation: a pilot study1995Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 31-39Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A common perception is that persons with mental retardation are not expected to be able to benefit from advanced technology. This pilot study describes how four adults with profound mental retardation use one form of advanced communication equipment, namely still picture telephones. The findings based on questionnaires, interviews, diary notes and records refute the belief that mental retardation and high tech are not incompatible. On the contrary, the study suggests that a still picture telephone may become a necessary support to get access to telecommunications for those persons.

  • 8.
    Brodin, Jane
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm (LHS).
    Claesson, Inger
    The third wheel ‐ to be a respite caregiver by profession1998Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 238-242Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on respite caregivers (i.e. the professionals) and is a complement to previous studies on municipalities' and parents' views on respite care for families of children and adolescents with disabilities. Three parties are involved in the support service and this explains the title of the paper ‐ the ‘third wheel’. The paper is based on a pilot study and reports the results from a questionnaire answered by 10 respite caregivers and personal interviews with 6 of them. It appears that respite caregivers need basic education and inservice training in functional impairments, and that they require supervision.

  • 9.
    Brodin, Jane
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för barn- och ungdomsvetenskap.
    Lindstrand, Peg
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för barn- och ungdomsvetenskap.
    What about ICT in Special education?: Special educators evaluate Information and Communiation Technology as a learning tool2003Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 71-87-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Focus in this article is special educators working with children in need of special support and their relation to ICT. The study is an evaluation of a National State programme intended to train special educators in the ICT field. The study is based on interviews and a questionnaire answered by 618 teachers.

  • 10.
    Brodin, Jane
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm (LHS).
    Paulin, Sanja
    Stockholms universitet, Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm (LHS).
    Parents' view of respite care service for families with children with disabilities in Sweden1997Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 12, nr 3, s. 197-208Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 11.
    Dahlin, Karin I. E.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    A Three Year Follow-up Study: Students´ Performances in Reading and Mathematics Three Years after Five-week Computerized Working Memory Training2013Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory (WM) can be conceptualised as a system that stores and processes information continuously for a few seconds, is suggested to be malleable and to affect learning. To find out how WM training affects learning in a long-term perspective, twenty-seven children (mean age = 14.1) with attention deficits participated in this study. The treatment group (n = 18; 3 female) had trained earlier with an interactive computerised working-memory training programme at school for five weeks, while the control group (n = 9; 3 female) had not received any extra training. Three years after the training, the children completed further tests in reading and mathematics. The treatment group had enhanced their reading comprehension results more than the control group had, compared to baseline results. This study suggests that working memory training in children with attention deficits does not appear to be conducive to persistent improvement in all measures, but rather in one: reading comprehension. One limitation is the design of the study; the groups were not randomised and the control group was inactive. Further, many conditions could not be controlled for, such as the different teaching approaches over the time period, SES, as well as the school and home environments which include the efforts and knowledge of teachers and parents.  The gains in reading comprehension after three years were observed for all the students in the treatment group. The previous advantage, that the students had gained after the five-weeks WM training, was thus maintained at the three-year follow-up. However, the results cannot be generalised due to the limitation in design and small sample size. It is hoped that future studies will target WM-training and basic skills.

  • 12.
    Dolva, Anne-Stine
    et al.
    Lillehammer University College, Norway.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Facilitating peer interaction - support to children with Down syndrome in mainstream schools2011Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 26, nr 2, s. 201-213Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the support provided by class staff in order to facilitate social participation of pupils with Down syndrome and peers in regular classes, and how they experience the interaction between the pupils. Data were collected through field observations of six pupils with Down syndrome in their class in mainstream schools, their six teachers and teachers’ assistants. Qualitative interviews were conducted with the teachers and teachers’ assistants. The analysis showed different support strategies, implying both environmental adaptations and individual support in order to facilitate peer interaction. A major finding was the role of the ‘supported ego’, mainly provided by teachers’ assistants. This role accommodated to the differences between the pupils, by compensating for the cognitive difficulties (i.e., perceptions, understanding and agency) of the pupils with Down syndrome. We concluded that class staff strived to keep the class as one unit by creating opportunities for participation for all the pupils through different strategies depending on their role and responsibility.

  • 13.
    Dolva, Anne-Stine
    et al.
    Lillehammer University College.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Children with Down syndrome in mainstream schools: peer interaction in activities2010Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 283-294Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this qualitative study was to explore peer interaction in the context of school activities in mainstream classes that included pupils with Down syndrome together with their peers without disabilities in order to identify enabling conditions. Six children with Down syndrome, each of whom was the only one with Down syndrome in a regular class, were observed and interviewed. Two main patterns of interaction were identified; equal and unequal interaction. Enabling conditions were found to be related to the pupils' shared understanding of the activities and the task demands in relation to the performance range of the participating pupils. When interaction was challenged by limited understanding of the activity or by too high task demands in relation to performance range, the findings revealed how peers applied diverse enabling strategies to include the pupil with Down syndrome. The results of this study highlight how activities form the basis for interaction and constitute an understudied and very important dimension for peer interaction. By looking more closely at this dimension, we can discover a fruitful approach with which to enable interaction between pupils with and without disability.

  • 14.
    Garrels, Veerle
    et al.
    Department of Special Needs Education, faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Department of Special Needs Education, faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Measuring self-determination in Norwegian students: adaptation and validation of the AIR Self-Determination Scale2018Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, nr 4, s. 466-480Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the adaptation and validation of the American Institute for Research (AIR) Self-Determination Scale for use in Norwegian research and education. The study contributes to the field by enabling reliable assessment of self-determination of Norwegian students with intellectual disability. The operational equivalence of the construct of self-determination in American and Norwegian culture were examined. The article further describes the adaptations that were made to the scale to ensure its fitness for intended use. Psychometric reliability (Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability) was tested on 121 students, and the underlying structure of the scale was examined by means of principal component analysis. The adapted version of the questionnaire (AIR-S-NOR) shows respectable psychometric properties. Suggestions for how the AIR-S-NOR can be used in future research and educational practices are presented.

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    Fulltext
  • 15.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Staff in-service training on intervention with persons with impairment1991Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 6, nr 3, s. 165-176Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Roll-Pettersson, L
    The perceived needs of support of parents and classroom teachers: a comparison of needs in two microsystems2001Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 16, nr 3, s. 225-244Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Terneby, J
    Olsson, C
    Creating communicative opportunities through a combined in-service training and supervision package1992Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 7, nr 3, s. 229-252Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Dolva, Anne-Stine
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Borell, Lena
    Children with Down’s syndrome in mainstream schools: peer interaction in activities2010Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 283-294Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore interaction in school activities of pupils with Down syndrome in mainstream schools to understand enabling conditions. Six ten year old pupils with Down syndrome were observed in their class, and interviewed. By applying qualitative methodology, we identified two main categories; equal and unequal interaction. Unequal interaction comprised patterns of peer supported and non-supported interaction. Peers’ support comprised modifying tasks, activities or their own behavior that enabled interaction with a less competent pupil. Peers support are discussed within the frames of inclusive schooling.

  • 19.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik.
    Kittelsaa, Anna
    Tøssebro, Jan
    Successful schooling: a complex phenomenon2017Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, nr 4, s. 491-492Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 20.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik.
    Kittelsaa, Anna
    Tøssebro, Jan
    Successful schooling for pupils with intellectual disabilities: the demand for a new paradigm2017Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, nr 4, s. 469-483Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive review of educational interventions for pupils with intellectual disabilities showed that most studies report positive results for a variety of interventions. The aim of this article is to explore how these results can be understood. We draw on similar earlier findings concerning intervention effects in psychotherapy and social work, discussing the so-called Dodo bird conjecture, indicating that established methods for identification of evidence-based practices can provide false, positive results influenced by so-called common factors present in most interventions. In conclusion, we argue for a new paradigm of research on educational interventions for pupils with intellectual disabilities, replacing the present ambition to find evidence-based support for specific interventions in favour of a line of research exploring alternative explanations in terms of, for instance, common positive factors.

  • 21. Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Nilholm, Claes
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Local school ideologies and inclusion the case of Swedish independent schools2013Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28:1, s. 49-63Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the development of a framework for the classification of local school ideologies in relation to inclusion that provides a tool for classifying the general educational direction as well as work with pupils in need of special support of individual schools. The framework defines different aspects of local school ideology in terms of values related to the societal level, school level and individual level of the education system. The paper also reports on a study exploring variations among Swedish independent schools, concerning local school ideology using the framework as a theoretical tool. In this qualitative analysis, eight schools were selected from results of a questionnaire to all Swedish independent schools (return rate 79.5%) for further analysis based on interviews with different categories of school personnel, parents and pupils. Five different patterns of local school ideologies were found more or less in line with values of inclusion, e.g. the holistic-inclusive and the market-oriented-exclusive. Results are discussed in relation to the multiple and sometimes competing objectives that every school has to deal with and make priorities between. Implications for pupils in need of special support in a school system rapidly undergoing marketisation are finally discussed.

  • 22.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Nilholm, Claes
    Local school ideologies and inclusion: The case of Swedish independent schools2013Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 49-63Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 23.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö.
    Local school ideologies and inclusion: the case of Swedish independent schools2013Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 49-63Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the development of a framework for the classification of local school ideologies in relation to inclusion that provides a tool for classifying the general educational direction as well as work with pupils in need of special support of individual schools. The framework defines different aspects of local school ideology in terms of values related to the societal level, school level, and individual level of the education system. The paper also reports on a study exploring variations among Swedish independent schools, concerning local school ideology using the framework as a theoretical tool. In this qualitative analysis, eight schools were selected from results of a questionnaire to all Swedish independent schools (return rate 79.5%) for further analysis based on interviews with different categories of school personnel, parents, and pupils. Five different patterns of local school ideologies were found more or less in line with values of inclusion, e.g. the holistic – inclusive and the market oriented – exclusive. Results are discussed in relation to the multiple and sometimes competing objectives that every school has to deal with and make priorities between. Implications for pupils in need of special support in a school system rapidly undergoing marketisation are finally discussed. 

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Postprint
  • 24.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle, Malmö högskola.
    Local school ideologies and inclusion: the case of Swedish independent schools2013Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 49-63Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the development of a framework for the classification of local school ideologies in relation to inclusion that provides a tool for classifying the general educational direction as well as work with pupils in need of special support of individual schools. The framework defines different aspects of local school ideology in terms of values related to the societal level, school level and individual level of the education system. The paper also reports on a study exploring variations among Swedish independent schools, concerning local school ideology using the framework as a theoretical tool. In this qualitative analysis, eight schools were selected from results of a questionnaire to all Swedish independent schools (return rate 79.5%) for further analysis based on interviews with different categories of school personnel, parents and pupils. Five different patterns of local school ideologies were found more or less in line with values of inclusion, e.g. the holistic-inclusive and the market-oriented-exclusive. Results are discussed in relation to the multiple and sometimes competing objectives that every school has to deal with and make priorities between. Implications for pupils in need of special support in a school system rapidly undergoing marketisation are finally discussed.

  • 25. Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för skolutveckling och ledarskap (SOL).
    Local school ideologies and inclusion: the case of Swedish independent schools2013Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, nr 1, s. 49-63Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the development of a framework for the classification of local school ideologies in relation to inclusion that provides a tool for classifying the general educational direction as well as work with pupils in need of special support of individual schools. The framework defines different aspects of local school ideology in terms of values related to the societal level, school level and individual level of the education system. The paper also reports on a study exploring variations among Swedish independent schools, concerning local school ideology using the framework as a theoretical tool. In this qualitative analysis, eight schools were selected from results of a questionnaire to all Swedish independent schools (return rate 79.5%) for further analysis based on interviews with different categories of school personnel, parents and pupils. Five different patterns of local school ideologies were found more or less in line with values of inclusion, e.g. the holistic-inclusive and the market-oriented-exclusive. Results are discussed in relation to the multiple and sometimes competing objectives that every school has to deal with and make priorities between. Implications for pupils in need of special support in a school system rapidly undergoing marketisation are finally discussed.

  • 26.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation, Utbildningsvetenskap och Matematik.
    Nilholm, C.
    Malmö University,.
    A continuing need for conceptual analysis into research on inclusive education: Response to commentators2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 295-296Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 27. Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för skolutveckling och ledarskap (SOL).
    A continuing need for conceptual analysis into research on inclusive education: respons to commentators2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 295-296Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 28.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö University.
    A continuing need for conceptual analysis into research on inclusive education: Response to commentators2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 295-296Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 29.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö University.
    Conceptual diversities and empirical shortcomings - a critical analysis of research on inclusive education2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 265-280Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to critically analyse research about inclusive education.Prior reviews and the outcome of a recent search of databases are analysedwith regard to (a) how inclusion is defined and (b) what empirical knowledgethere is regarding factors that make schools and classrooms more inclusive. Ourpoint of departure is that we regard inclusion as an idea about what school systems,schools and classrooms should accomplish, and as such, an expression ofan educational philosophy. Four different understandings of inclusive educationwere found: (a) inclusion as the placement of pupils with disabilities in mainstreamclassrooms, (b) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of pupilswith disabilities, (c) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of all pupilsand (d) inclusion as creation of communities. Under a strict definition of inclusiveeducation, hardly any research was found which reliably identified factorsthat give rise to inclusive processes. The outcome of our analyses are discussedfrom the perspective that different understandings of inclusion should be seen, toa large extent, as expressions of different views of what schools should accomplish.We also propose that some of the adherents to inclusion as creation ofcommunities can be placed in the grand educational tradition reaching back toDewey that tries to establish new ideals for school systems in a society in whichindividualism is perhaps the main ideology. The main conclusions are that theoperative meaning of inclusion in reviews and empirical research should bemuch more clearly defined and that new types of studies are needed.

  • 30.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation, Utbildningsvetenskap och Matematik.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Conceptual diversities and empirical shortcomings - a critical analysis of research on inclusive education2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 265-280Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to critically analyse research about inclusive education. Prior reviews and the outcome of a recent search of databases are analysed with regard to (a) how inclusion is defined and (b) what empirical knowledge there is regarding factors that make schools and classrooms more inclusive. Our point of departure is that we regard inclusion as an idea about what school systems, schools and classrooms should accomplish, and as such, an expression of an educational philosophy. Four different understandings of inclusive education were found: (a) inclusion as the placement of pupils with disabilities in mainstream classrooms, (b) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of pupils with disabilities, (c) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of all pupils and (d) inclusion as creation of communities. Under a strict definition of inclusive education, hardly any research was found which reliably identified factors that give rise to inclusive processes. The outcome of our analyses are discussed from the perspective that different understandings of inclusion should be seen, to a large extent, as expressions of different views of what schools should accomplish. We also propose that some of the adherents to inclusion as creation of communities can be placed in the grand educational tradition reaching back to Dewey that tries to establish new ideals for school systems in a society in which individualism is perhaps the main ideology. The main conclusions are that the operative meaning of inclusion in reviews and empirical research should be much more clearly defined and that new types of studies are needed.

  • 31. Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för skolutveckling och ledarskap (SOL).
    Conceptual diversities and empirical shortcomings: a critical analysis of research on inclusive education2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 265-280Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to critically analyse research about inclusive education. Prior reviews and the outcome of a recent search of databases are analysed with regard to (a) how inclusion is defined and (b) what empirical knowledge there is regarding factors that make schools and classrooms more inclusive. Our point of departure is that we regard inclusion as an idea about what school systems, schools and classrooms should accomplish, and as such, an expression of an educational philosophy. Four different understandings of inclusive education were found: (a) inclusion as the placement of pupils with disabilities in mainstream classrooms, (b) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of pupils with disabilities, (c) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of all pupils and (d) inclusion as creation of communities. Under a strict definition of inclusive education, hardly any research was found which reliably identified factors that give rise to inclusive processes. The outcome of our analyses are discussed from the perspective that different understandings of inclusion should be seen, to a large extent, as expressions of different views of what schools should accomplish. We also propose that some of the adherents to inclusion as creation of communities can be placed in the grand educational tradition reaching back to Dewey that tries to establish new ideals for school systems in a society in which individualism is perhaps the main ideology. The main conclusions are that the operative meaning of inclusion in reviews and empirical research should be much more clearly defined and that new types of studies are needed.

  • 32.
    Hellblom-Thibblin, Tina
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation, Utbildningsvetenskap och Matematik.
    Challenges and dilemmas – a conceptual approach to children’s diversity in school2018Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, nr 1, s. 1-15Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to discuss and problematise issues related to conceptual approaches to differences among children in the world of school education. The article is based on results from a Swedish study on categorisation of schoolchildren’s ‘problems’ from a historical perspective. Its central questions are: ‘What concepts are used to formulate children’s various educational needs, and how can these concepts be understood?’ Supported by an ecological analysis model, complex situations in the categorisation and problem-solving process are clarified. Using terminology to refer to pupils’ diverse abilities and needs involves aspects of categorising. An understanding of how this works may bring more profound knowledge of obstacles to children’s learning. The categorisation process illustrates effects both at individual level and more generally. Categorisation may be regarded as a useful practice for understanding children’s differences better, and thereby finding the best ways of responding to them. However, categorisation based on abilities and needs also adds a challenge to the important idea of inclusion. The article discusses categorisation as a basis for educational problem-solving and the implications of categorising children’s varying abilities and experience of school education. The theoretical premises enhance understanding of the dynamic nature of terminology usage, and thus future prospects of meeting challenges that may arise, in schools.

  • 33.
    Herkner, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Allodi, Mara
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Olofsson, Åke
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Early identification or broken promises?: a comparison of literacy assessment performance in 112 Swedish third graders2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 237-246Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The national standardised literacy assessment (NSLA) for Swedish Language was introduced in 2009 as a grade-three compulsory assessment and includes the assessment of reading ability. It was introduced as a measure of relatively early identification of reading difficulties among nine-years old students. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether the NSLA is able to identify students with word decoding problems from a sample of third graders (N = 112; n = 57 girls; n  = 55 boys) attending six schools in a Swedish municipality. Eleven students (10%) performed below the cut-off value for word decoding ability in students of this age group. Only three of these students were identified as not achieving the goals posed by the NSLA. In contrast, eight students with low word decoding ability managed to meet the NSLA requirements. Gender differences were observed, since all of the students who passed the NSLA, notwithstanding having low performance in WD, were boys. Although the NSLA was specifically introduced at this level to identify weakness in reading at an early stage, the results of this study indicate that approximately three quarters of students with poor word decoding ability may remain unidentified by the NSLA. These findings call into question the validity of the NSLA in recognising pupils in need of additional support in reading.

  • 34.
    Herkner, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Olofsson, Åke
    Early identification or broken promises?: A comparison of literacy assessment performance in 112 Swedish third graders2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 237-246Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The national standardised literacy assessment (NSLA) for Swedish Language was introduced in 2009 as a grade-three compulsory assessment and includes the assessment of reading ability. It was introduced as a measure of relatively early identification of reading difficulties among nine-years old students. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether the NSLA is able to identify students with word decoding problems from a sample of third graders (N = 112; n = 57 girls; n  = 55 boys) attending six schools in a Swedish municipality. Eleven students (10%) performed below the cut-off value for word decoding ability in students of this age group. Only three of these students were identified as not achieving the goals posed by the NSLA. In contrast, eight students with low word decoding ability managed to meet the NSLA requirements. Gender differences were observed, since all of the students who passed the NSLA, notwithstanding having low performance in WD, were boys. Although the NSLA was specifically introduced at this level to identify weakness in reading at an early stage, the results of this study indicate that approximately three quarters of students with poor word decoding ability may remain unidentified by the NSLA. These findings call into question the validity of the NSLA in recognising pupils in need of additional support in reading.

  • 35.
    Hjelte, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Ineland, Jens
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Quality in professional encounters with students who have intellectual disabilities: experiences from special needs upper secondary schools in Sweden2020Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyse how professionals in special needs upper secondary schools in Sweden – assistants, teachers and Special Education Needs Coordinators – understand and define quality in their daily interactions with students who have intellectual disabilities. Our analysis draws on data collected via a digital questionnaire, including both open-ended and standardised (Likertscale) questions. In this study, written excerpts from open-ended questions comprised the primary empirical data used in the analysis. 129 respondents provided a total of 289 statements concerning their views on quality in professional encounters. In order to explore the semantic content of the written excerpts, the empirical data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Our findings show that perceptions of quality can be categorised differentiated into three typological themes or aspects: individual, relational and contextual. Our findings also show that differences in responses – both frequency and content – appear to be associated with the respondents' professional affiliation. Based on these findings, the article suggests the need for an established and shared theoretical basis –in education and practice – of what constitutes quality in professional encounters with students who have intellectual disabilities.

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  • 36.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Lindqvist, Rafael
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    What is the meaning of special education?: Problem representations in Swedish policy documents: late 1970s-20142015Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 30, nr 1, s. 122-137Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other countries, inclusion has been on the political agenda for a long time and has served as a blueprint and guiding principle for practical work in school. However, inclusive education has, by and large, been associated with special education measures, which seriously limit the chances of achieving the vision of inclusion. In this article, we analyse how the meaning of special education is constructed in policy documents from four distinct time periods of Swedish education policy from the late 1970s to 2014. The paper draws on an approach to scrutinise the process of problematisation in public policy making. Based on the analysis, we argue that there are prospects of a hegemonic intervention regarding the meaning of special education during later years in Swedish education policy, emphasising an individual perspective and individual deficiencies. In contrast to inclusive ambitions, this perspective advocate segregated support measures. Finally, based on previous research and tendencies within the field, we present arguments in the concluding discussion why this hegemonic intervention in education policy also might attract the support of school personnel at the local school level and some potential consequences of the expansion of special education in Sweden

  • 37.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, Umeå University.
    Lindqvist, Rafael
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    What is the meaning of Special Needs Education? Problem representations in Swedish policy documents: late 1970s-20142015Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 30, nr 1, s. 122-137Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 38.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskaplig fakultet, Socialt arbete.
    Lindqvist, Rafael
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskaplig fakultet, Socialt arbete.
    Bergström, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    School problems or individual shortcomings?: A study of individual educational plans in Sweden2007Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 75-91Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1995 it became mandatory to establish individual educational plans (IEPs) for children with special educational needs in the Swedish compulsory school. On the basis of the pupils' needs, such a plan should contain information about the pupils' school situation and performance, the class, teaching etc. The aim of this article was to study how special educational needs are defined and described and what support measures the school is suggesting, using IEPs from a sample of Swedish compulsory schools. Our study is based on an analysis of IEPs for pupils with special educational needs in the nine-year compulsory school in a municipality in northern Sweden. A strategic selection of three compulsory schools was made and we restricted the study to grades 3, 6 and 9. The method used to analyse the IEPs was content analysis. Using different theories within the field of special education and disability studies, we have tried to discern to what extent the problems described, and the proposed measures (intervention), are related to predetermined theoretical models of disability and special needs education. Our analysis indicates that difficulties are predominantly attributed to the pupils' shortcomings and individual characteristics, and the same holds for the recommended measures. Another interesting finding is that a number of the plans were established without involving the parents, and many of them did not even know that their child had an IEP. Finally, we discuss our findings in relation to different research traditions within the field of special education.

  • 39.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap.
    Danermark, Berth
    Institutet för handikappvetenskap, Örebro Universitet.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap.
    Swedish Primary School Teachers' attitudes to inclusion: The case of PE and pupils with physical disabilities2010Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 45-57Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 40.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Danermark, Berth
    Institutet för handikappvetenskap, Örebro Universitet.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Swedish Primary School Teachers' attitudes to inclusion: The case of PE and pupils with physical disabilities2010Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 45-57Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 41.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Gill, Peter
    Swedish primary-school teachers' attitudes to inclusion: the case of PE and pupils with physical disabilities2010Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 45-57Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers play a decisive role in making inclusive education a reality. The particular case of inclusion in physical education (PE) poses a specific challenge to teaching practice. How PE teachers view inclusion may provide special insights into teachers' general attitudes toward inclusion and inclusive practices in the general school curriculum. The aim of this study is to investigate Swedish PE teachers' attitudes to inclusion of pupils with physical disabilities in mainstream PE classes at primary school. The sampling frame was members of the Swedish Teachers' Union who had registered themselves as PE teachers and who indicated a current e-mail address (n = 560). Respondents were invited to complete an e-mail questionnaire with questions covering demographics, general attitudes, support from school management and staff, possible hindrances and personal experiences of inclusion. A total of 221 teachers (39%) responded, equal numbers of males and females with a bimodal age distribution (means of 28 and 44) with an average of eight years of service. On average, Swedish PE teachers are very positive to inclusion of pupils with physical disabilities into general PE. Gender, age, years of service and work satisfaction had no impact on general opinions of inclusive PE. PE teachers with actual previous experience of teaching pupils with physical disabilities were slightly more positive to inclusive PE. Stepwise multiple regressions were used to establish a predictive model of positive attitudes to inclusion based on: (1) having adequate training; (2) having general school support (from management and staff); and (3) demands on resources. This yielded an adjusted R2 that explained 33% of variation in attitudes.

  • 42.
    Jortveit, Maryann
    et al.
    University of Agder.
    Tveit, Anne Dorthe
    University of Agder.
    Cameron, David Lansing
    University of Agder.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier. Högskolan Dalarna.
    A Comparative Study of Norwegian and Swedish Special Educators’ Beliefs and Practices 2019Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 43.
    Jortveit, Maryann
    et al.
    Univerity of Agder.
    Tveit, Anne Dorthe
    University of Agder.
    Cameron, David Lansing
    University of Agder.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Pedagogik. Uppsala universitet.
    A Comparative Study of Norwegian and Swedish Special Educators’ Beliefs and Practices2019Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 44.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Walton, Elizabeth
    Wits school of education, Johanneburg University, South Africa.
    Challenges Arising From the Special Education Legacies in South Africa and Soviet Russia2017Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 45.
    Karlsson, Maria
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    Changing services to children with disabilities and their families through in-service training: is the organisation affected?2008Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 23, nr 3, s. 207-222Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional development in family‐centred services was given to professionals supporting children with disabilities and their families with the purpose to influence ways to perform working tasks. Is it possible to change ways of working through in‐service training? In order to find answers to that question perceptions of in‐service training at different organisational levels were collected by interviews. Ways to perform working tasks were investigated by self‐reported ratings on questionnaires. What kind of change the teams experienced was analysed through written assignments at the end of professional development. The study builds on a longitudinal design. Watzlawick and co‐workers identified orders of change to analyse perceptions of, and changes following, professional development. The findings reveal that participants at different levels of the organisation have similar perceptions of the in‐service training. They are described more in depth by participants within the organisation, rather than the ones outside (parents and managers), who describe the consequences of the professional development rather than the professional development process. After professional development, the family approach has been adopted among most professionals; for example, are assessment tools and model for habilitation plans which were presented in the professional development used afterwards in everyday work? This implies a second‐order change. However, some professionals do claim that the family‐centred way of working is nothing new to them, which corresponds to a first‐order change. Professional development in conjunction with resources for implementing change after professional development are therefore seen as factors that facilitate second‐order change.

  • 46.
    Klang, Nina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Gustafson, Katarina
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Nilholm, Claes
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fakulteten för utbildningsvetenskaper, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Enacting the role of special needs educator: six Swedish case studies2017Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, nr 3, s. 391-405Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing focus on inclusion, special needs educators (SNEs) are now expected to share responsibility for pupils with teacher colleagues and to lead school development, but it is a challenge to enact this role in schools. The aim of the study was to explore how professional roles of Swedish SNEs are enacted in local school contexts. From a survey of SNEs in 10 Swedish municipalities, six participants whose work tasks were expected to correspond to the degree ordinances for their university training were chosen. The participants were followed at work, and data were collected through observation of the participants at work, participants’ diaries and interviews with the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals. The analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative methods. First, based on the researchers’ observations of the participants at work, categories of SNEs’ tasks were discerned, and the amount of time devoted to those categories of tasks was summarised. Second, case study narratives of the SNEs’ work were constructed to describe how the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals view the SNE role and to describe how the work is enacted in various school contexts. The results revealed seven categories of work tasks practised to varying degrees by the six SNEs. The case study narratives exposed large variation in how the SNEs conceptualised their role and how it evolved in relation to local school contexts. The results of the study are discussed with regard to the role of the SNE in relation to policies of inclusion. 

  • 47.
    Klang, Nina
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Katarina
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, Lärandepraktiker i och utanför skolan (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Nilholm, Claes
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Department of Pedagogical Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Enacting the role of special needs educator – six Swedish case studies2017Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, nr 3, s. 391-405Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing focus on inclusion, special needs educators (SNEs) are now expected to share responsibility for pupils with teacher colleagues and to lead school development, but it is a challenge to enact this role in schools. The aim of the study was to explore how professional roles of Swedish SNEs are enacted in local school contexts. From a survey of SNEs in 10 Swedish municipalities, six participants whose work tasks were expected to correspond to the degree ordinances for their university training were chosen. The participants were followed at work, and data were collected through observation of the participants at work, participants’ diaries and interviews with the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals. The analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative methods. First, based on the researchers’ observations of the participants at work, categories of SNEs’ tasks were discerned, and the amount of time devoted to those categories of tasks was summarised. Second, case study narratives of the SNEs’ work were constructed to describe how the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals view the SNE role and to describe how the work is enacted in various school contexts. The results revealed seven categories of work tasks practised to varying degrees by the six SNEs. The case study narratives exposed large variation in how the SNEs conceptualised their role and how it evolved in relation to local school contexts. The results of the study are discussed with regard to the role of the SNE in relation to policies of inclusion.

  • 48.
    Klang, Nina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Gustafsson, Katarina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Jönköping university.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Uppsala universitet.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för pedagogiska studier (from 2013).
    Enacting the role of special needs educator: six Swedish case studies2017Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, nr 3, s. 391-405Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing focus on inclusion, special needs educators (SNEs) are now expected to share responsibility for pupils with teacher colleagues and to lead school development, but it is a challenge to enact this role in schools. The aim of the study was to explore how professional roles of Swedish SNEs are enacted in local school contexts. From a survey of SNEs in 10 Swedish municipalities, six participants whose work tasks were expected to correspond to the degree ordinances for their university training were chosen. The participants were followed at work, and data were collected through observation of the participants at work, participants’ diaries and interviews with the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals. The analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative methods. First, based on the researchers’ observations of the participants at work, categories of SNEs’ tasks were discerned, and the amount of time devoted to those categories of tasks was summarised. Second, case study narratives of the SNEs’ work were constructed to describe how the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals view the SNE role and to describe how the work is enacted in various school contexts. The results revealed seven categories of work tasks practised to varying degrees by the six SNEs. The case study narratives exposed large variation in how the SNEs conceptualised their role and how it evolved in relation to local school contexts. The results of the study are discussed with regard to the role of the SNE in relation to policies of inclusion.

  • 49.
    Klavina, Aija
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Sport Medicine and Adapted Physical Activity, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga, Latvia.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Kristén, Lars
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Hammar, Lena
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools, Örebro, Sweden.
    Soulie, Tine
    Danish Disability Sport Information Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cooperative oriented learning in inclusive physical education2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 119-134Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the implementation of cooperation directed learning of peer tutoring in elementary general inclusive physical education (GPE) setting in three elementary city schools in Sweden was studied. The purpose was to assess the impact of peer tutoring on the interaction behaviours between students with and without disabilities in GPE. A design of multiple case study with elementary school age students with moderate disabilities (n = 4) was used. Peer tutors (n = 37) were students without disabilities who voluntary participated in a peer tutor training programme. The programme included the collaborative learning values, teaching instructions and communication skills served as the independent measure. Dependent measures were multiple interactions between students with and without disabilities. Data to the case studies were collected through a design of mixed methods, containing both quantitative and qualitative data. Totally 43 observation sessions of inclusive GPE settings were collected on videotapes and analysed using the Computerized Evaluation Protocol of Interactions in Physical Education (CEPI-PE). In addition, interviews with school personnel and children served as a complementary study outcome. The percentage of interactions between target students and peer tutors significantly increased (3.2–11.8%, respectively, p < .05) during peer tutor intervention. This study indicated that peer tutor arrangements can contribute the successful cooperation between students with and without disabilities in inclusive GPE in Swedish elementary school. All four students with moderate disabilities maintained high percentage of activities done independently throughout baseline and intervention phase (50.5 and 57.6%, accordingly). Qualitative data throughout field notes and interviews with school personnel and pupils confirmed a positive class climate change and improvement in peer relation culture. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  • 50.
    Klavina, Aija
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Sport Medicine and Adapted Physical Activity, Latvian of Sport Education, Riga,.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, Idrottsvetenskap.
    Kristén, Lars
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Halmstad University,.
    Hammar, Lena
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools, Örebro, Sweden.
    Souliee, Tine
    Danish Disability Sport Information Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cooperative oriented learning in inclusive physical education2014Ingår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 119-134Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the implementation of cooperation directed learning of peer tutoring in elementary general inclusive physical education (GPE) setting in three elementary city schools in Sweden was studied. The purpose was to assess the impact of peer tutoring on the interaction behaviours between students with and without disabilities in GPE. A design of ultiple case study with elementaryschool age students with moderate disabilities (n = 4) was used. Peer tutors (n = 37) were students without disabilities who voluntary participated in a peer tutor training programme. The programme included the collaborative learningvalues, teaching instructions and communication skills served as the independent measure.  Dependent measures were multiple interactions between students with and without disabilities. Data to the case studies were collected through a design of mixed methods, containing both quantitative and qualitative data. Totally 43 observation sessions of inclusive GPE settings were collected on videotapes and analysed using the Computerized Evaluation Protocol of Interactions in PhysicalEducation (CEPI-PE). In addition, interviews with school personnel and children plementary study outcome. The percentage of interactions between target students and peer tutors significantly increased (3.2–11.8%, respectively,p < .05) during peer tutor intervention. This study indicated that peer tutor arrangements can contribute the successful cooperation between students with and without disabilities in inclusive GPE in Swedish elementary school. All four students with moderate disabilities maintained high percentage of activities done independently throughout baseline and intervention phase (50.5 and 57.6%, accordingly). Qualitative data throughout field notes and interviews with school personnel and pupils confirmed a positive class climate change and improvement in peer relation culture.

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