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  • 1.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Linnéuniversitetet.
    Anne Gjelsvik & Rikke Schubart (eds.), Women of Ice and Fire: Gender, Game of Thrones, and Multiple Media Engagements, Bloomsbury, 2016, 277 p.2018In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 152-154Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Allern, Sigurd
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    From party press to independent observers?: An analysis of election campaign coverage prior to the general elections of 1981 and 2005 in two Norwegian newspapers2007In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, ISSN 1403-1108, Vol. 28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Allern, Sigurd
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Bødker, Henrik
    Eide, Martin
    Lauk, Epp
    Pollack, Ester
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Introduction2013In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 34, p. 7-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Almgren, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Lunds Universitet.
    Commenting, sharing and tweeting news: Measuring online news participation2016In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 67-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social plugins for sharing news through Facebook and Twitter have become increasingly salient features on news sites. Together with the user comment feature, social plugins are the most common way for users to contribute. The wide use of multiple features has opened new areas to comprehensively study users’ participatory practices. However, how do these opportunities to participate vary between the participatory spaces that news sites affiliated with local, national broadsheet and tabloid news constitute? How are these opportunities appropriated by users in terms of participatory practices such as commenting and sharing news through Facebook and Twitter? In addition, what differences are there between news sites in these respects? To answer these questions, a quantitative content analysis has been conducted on 3,444 articles from nine Swedish online newspapers. Local newspapers are more likely to allow users to comment on articles than are national newspapers. Tweeting news is appropriated only on news sites affiliated with evening tabloids and national morning newspapers. Sharing news through Facebook is 20 times more common than tweeting news or commenting. The majority of news items do not attract any user interaction.

  • 5.
    Almgren, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Commenting, sharing and tweeting news: Measuring online news participation2016In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 67-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social plugins for sharing news through Facebook and Twitter have become increasingly salient features on news sites. Together with the user comment feature, social plugins are the most common way for users to contribute. The wide use of multiple features has opened new areas to comprehensively study users’ participatory practices. However, how do these opportunities to participate vary between the participatory spaces that news sites affiliated with local, national broadsheet and tabloid news constitute? How are these opportunities appropriated by users in terms of participatory practices such as commenting and sharing news through Facebook and Twitter? In addition, what differences are there between news sites in these respects? To answer these questions, a quantitative content analysis has been conducted on 3,444 articles from nine Swedish online newspapers. Local newspapers are more likely to allow users to comment on articles than are national newspapers. Tweeting news is appropriated only on news sites affiliated with evening tabloids and national morning newspapers. Sharing news through Facebook is 20 times more common than tweeting news or commenting. The majority of news items do not attract any user interaction.

  • 6.
    Amdam, Synnøve
    Faculty of Arts and Physical Education, Volda University College.
    Media Education Goes Professional?: Media Teachers’ Self-Image, Positioning and Educational Focus2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 81-95Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThis article explores how media teachers’ self-images, positionings and interpretative rep-ertoires inform educational practices in media education. Media education is viewed as a critical element of 21st century learning. However, we have very little knowledge of the im-plementers of this critical element, the media teachers. Based on a thematic literature review of historical positions of the Nordic media teacher, and supported by national survey data on the media teachers’ backgrounds, motivations and practices (n=383), the subject is explored through focus groups and individual interviews with media teachers at two case schools in upper secondary media education in Norway. The findings suggest that there are different and conflicting understandings about being media teachers, resulting in different educational practices with wider implications for the future implementation of media education. Keywords: media teachers, media education, media literacy, interpretative repertoires, pro-fessional cultures, communities of practice

  • 7.
    Appelgren, Ester
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Data Journalists Using Facebook: A Study of a Resource Group Created by Journalists, for Journalists2016In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On Facebook there are interest groups created by journalists, for journalists, that focus on the journalistic profession and work methods. One example is the Swedish group, “Datajournalistik” (in English, “Data Journalism”), which was created in 2012. This article builds on Granovetter’s theory on the strength of weak ties and is focused on the skill development process taking place in the group. A content analysis has been carried out of all posts that received comments in order to explore the social functions of the group. The results indicate both a significant need for knowledge exchange and a need for self-affirmation. At the time of the study, the group was unique in the Nordic countries and as such has played a major role in data journalism’s development process in the Nordic region. 

  • 8.
    Axelson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology. Dalarna Univ, Religious Studies & Media, Falun, Sweden..
    Vernacular Meaning Making Examples of Narrative Impact in Fiction Film Questioning the 'Banal' Notion in Mediatization of Religion Theory2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of an audience study supports theories stating that stories are a primary means by which we make sense of our experiences over time. Empirical examples of narrative impact are presented in which specific fiction film scenes condense spectators' lives, identities, and beliefs. One conclusion is that spectators test the emotional realism of the narrative for greater significance, connecting diegetic fiction experiences with their extra-diegetic world in their quest for meaning, self and identity. The 'banal' notion of the mediatization of religion theory is questioned as unsatisfactory in the theoretical context of individualized meaning-making processes. As a semantically negatively charged concept, it is problematic when analyzing empirical examples of spectators' use of fictional narratives, especially when trying to characterize the idiosyncratic and complex interplay between spectators' fiction emotions and their testing of mediated narratives in an exercise to find moral significance in extra-filmic life. Instead, vernacular meaning-making is proposed.

  • 9.
    Axelson, Tomas
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Religious Studies.
    Vernacular meaning making: Examples of narrative impact in fiction film questioning the 'banal' notion in mediatization of religion theory2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of an audience study supports theories stating that stories are a primary means by which we make sense of our experiences over time. Empirical examples of narrative impact are presented in which specific fiction film scenes condense spectators' lives, identities and beliefs. One conclusion is that spectators test the emotional realism of the narative for greater significance, connecting diegetic fiction experiences with their extra-diegetic world in their quest for meaning, self and identity. The 'banal' notion of the mediatization of religion theory is questioned as unsatisfactory in the theoretical context of individualized meaning-making processes. As a semantically negatively charged concept, it is problematic when analyzing empirical examples of spectators' use of fictional narratives, especially when trying to characterize the idiosyncratic and complex interplay between spectators' fiction emotions and their testing of mediated narratives in an exercise to find moral significance in extra-filmic life. Instead vernacular meaning-making is proposed.

  • 10.
    Axelson, Tomas
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Vernacular Meaning Making: Examples of Narrative Impact in Fiction FilmQuestioning the ‘Banal’ Notion in Mediatizationof Religion Theory2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of an audience study supports theories stating that stories are a primarymeans by which we make sense of our experiences over time. Empirical examples ofnarrative impact are presented in which specific fiction film scenes condense spectators’lives, identities, and beliefs. One conclusion is that spectators test the emotional realismof the narrative for greater significance, connecting diegetic fiction experiences with theirextra-diegetic world in their quest for meaning, self and identity. The ‘banal’ notion of themediatization of religion theory is questioned as unsatisfactory in the theoretical context ofindividualized meaning-making processes. As a semantically negatively charged concept, itis problematic when analyzing empirical examples of spectators’ use of fictional narratives,especially when trying to characterize the idiosyncratic and complex interplay betweenspectators’ fiction emotions and their testing of mediated narratives in an exercise to findmoral significance in extra-filmic life. Instead, vernacular meaning-making is proposed.

  • 11. Axelson, Tomas
    Vernacular Meaning Making: Examples of Narrative Impact in Fiction FilmQuestioning the ‘Banal’ Notion in Mediatizationof Religion Theory2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of an audience study supports theories stating that stories are a primarymeans by which we make sense of our experiences over time. Empirical examples ofnarrative impact are presented in which specific fiction film scenes condense spectators’lives, identities, and beliefs. One conclusion is that spectators test the emotional realismof the narrative for greater significance, connecting diegetic fiction experiences with theirextra-diegetic world in their quest for meaning, self and identity. The ‘banal’ notion of themediatization of religion theory is questioned as unsatisfactory in the theoretical context ofindividualized meaning-making processes. As a semantically negatively charged concept, itis problematic when analyzing empirical examples of spectators’ use of fictional narratives,especially when trying to characterize the idiosyncratic and complex interplay betweenspectators’ fiction emotions and their testing of mediated narratives in an exercise to findmoral significance in extra-filmic life. Instead, vernacular meaning-making is proposed.

  • 12.
    Bastiansen, Henrik G
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Rethinking Mass Communications in Norway: The Neglected Power of the Centre-Left Alliance in the Early 20th Century and its Importance until the Present2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article discusses the importance of the early years of mass communications in order to understand the shaping of them – the power of creating mass media for whole nations. It begins with references to scholars studying large nations and asks whether their results can be generalized to smaller countries. Therefore, it uses Norway as a case study. To what degree were Norway’s four major mass media – press, film, radio and television – formed institutionally in their early years? And if they were formed in this way, how long did the consequences of such a formation last? These questions have been neglected topics in research, so in order to answer them we also need to rethink the connections between the different media.

  • 13. Bastiansen, Henrik G
    Rethinking Mass Communications in Norway: The Neglected Power of the Centre-Left Alliance in the Early 20th Century and its Importance until the Present2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article discusses the importance of the early years of mass communications in order to understand the shaping of them – the power of creating mass media for whole nations. It begins with references to scholars studying large nations and asks whether their results can be generalized to smaller countries. Therefore, it uses Norway as a case study. To what degree were Norway’s four major mass media – press, film, radio and television – formed institutionally in their early years? And if they were formed in this way, how long did the consequences of such a formation last? These questions have been neglected topics in research, so in order to answer them we also need to rethink the connections between the different media.

  • 14.
    Becker, Karin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture.
    Digital Aesthetics: Comments2004In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 53-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Becker, Karin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture.
    Where is Visual Culture in Contemporary Theories of Media and Communication?2004In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 149-158Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bengtsson, Mette
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Approaches to Political Commentary in Scandinavia: A Call for Textual, Evaluating Scholarship2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political commentary is a contested genre that has attracted a great deal of attention in the Scandinavian public debate, whereas the scholarly literature on it is still in an initial phase. In order to strengthen future research, the present paper suggests a two-dimensional matrix indexing the research on Scandinavian political commentary along the dimensions text/context and descriptive/evaluative. The matrix enables us to see more clearly what we already know and where we lack knowledge. It enables us to see how each category can be developed, the interplay among them, and the obvious lack of textual, evaluative ap-proaches. The author argues that a joint, cross-disciplinary engagement is necessary if we are to adequately understand the potentials and problems of political commentary.K

  • 17.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Symbolic spaces of everyday life: work and leisure at home2006In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 119-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an analysis of the role of the media in the symbolic construction of work and leisure at home. Dealing with individuals who represent a post-industrial and cultural labour market and who work mainly at home, the analysis focuses upon the ritual transformations of everyday life and the role of the media within it. Leaning on social interactionist Erwin Goffman and his concepts of regions and frames, as well as a dimension of the materiality of culture, this analysis combines a perspective on media use as ritual, transformations in everyday life and the organization of material space. From this perspective, the discussion penetrates the symbolic dimension of media use in defining borders of behaviour and activities in relations to work and leisure at home.

  • 18.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Johansson, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg.
    Media Micro-Generations: How New Technologies Change Our Media Morality2018In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 95-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes and explores the notion of “media micro-generations”. Based on a survey of values and norms in relation to media-related behaviour in Sweden, we identify statistically significant media micro-generations. Through an analysis of the technologies that were introduced during the formative years of different media micro-generations, we propose that media micro-generations are formed with the introduction of new media technologies. Thus, the existence of media micro-generations illustrates how rapid trans- formations of media technologies can shape the moral notions of narrow age groups. It also explains why many earlier studies have detected a rather large span of years (1970-1985, in between the TV generation and the internet generation) during which no generational identity seems to have been formed.

  • 19.
    Bergström, Annika
    Journalism Media and Communication (JMG) University of Gothenburg.
    Digital Equality and the Uptake of DigitalApplications among Seniors of Different Age2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 79-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ageing societies are facing challenges from the perspective of the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). There is an increase in online services relevant for the economic, political, cultural and private life. Those who participate more fully in a digi-tally mediated social life enjoy advantages over their digitally disadvantaged counterparts. Today’s digital divide is not first and foremost between pensioners and others, but between younger and older pensioners. Scholars identify the need for longitudinal research among younger and older seniors to understand the differences between more or less advantaged users. Based on longitudinal, representative surveys, the present study finds that there is a clear gap between younger and older seniors, and that it is closing only very slowly. Age and level of education are powerful explanatory factors whereas generational belonging and social capital contribute only to a limited extent to the understanding of Internet uptake among older adults.

  • 20. Bjerke, Paul
    et al.
    Kjos Fonn, Birgitte
    A Hidden Theoryin Financial Crisis Journalism?: The Case of Norway2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyses press coverage of the dramatic finance crisis and the ensuingEuropean debt crisis in Europe, in three decisive periods. The authors conduct quantitativeand qualitative content analyses of two major mainstream Norwegian newspapers, Aftenpostenand Dagbladet, employing concepts and methods from framing theory, to analysecoverage in the framework of two contesting schools in economics.The study finds traces of discussions of finance brokers’ ethics and some discussions ofgovernmental regulations that made the 2008 crisis possible, but few indications of a basicdiscussion of the system as such. The authors conclude that the crisis was framed more asa superficial, short-term problem (as per a mainstream, neoliberal theory of economics)than as a deeper and long-term system problem (as a more critical ‘political economics’theory would have held).

  • 21.
    Bock Segaard, Signe
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Perceptions of Social Media: A Joint Arena for Voters and Politicians?2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 65-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While observers have focused on the political use of social media when exploring theirdemocratic potential, we know little about users’ perceptions of these media. These perceptionscould well be important to understanding the political use of social media. Inexploring users’ perceptions, the article asks whether politicians and voters view socialmedia in a similar way, and to what extent they consider social media to be an apt arenafor political communication. Within a Norwegian context, which may prove useful as acritical case, and using the technological frames model, we find that although voters’ andpoliticians’ opinions are not that dissimilar overall, politicians are more likely to recognizethe political communicative role of social media. However, social media do indeed havethe potential to become arenas for political mobilization among groups that traditionallyare less visible in political arenas.

  • 22.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    In the Market for Symbolic Commodities: Swedish Lottery Game Show ‘Bingolotto’and the Marketing of Social and Cultural Values2002In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, no 1-2, p. 177-204Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Television Textuality: Textual Forms in Live Television Programming2009In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 37-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the production of live television formats, as they have developed in Europe during the past decade. The analytical examples are taken from entertainment as well as factual television, and from public service as well as commercial contexts. In the article, it is argued that there has been an approximation between the textual features and generic and narrative structures of entertainment and factual live television, and a model is presented that is supposed to account for these narrative patterns.

  • 24.
    Christensen, Christa Lykke
    Department of Media, Cognition and Communication, University of Copenhagen.
    Healthy Ageing and Mediated Health Expertise2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no special issue 1, p. 9-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The media are, for many older people, one of the most important sources of information about health. In this article, I examine older people’s experiences and use of media to acquire knowledge about health issues relating to their own life. Key questions concern how media influence older people’s perceptions of health and to what extent they trust the media in relation to health issues. The study demonstrates that the media do not have a uniform influence among older people. For some, the media function as a guide to main-taining and experimenting with an active lifestyle in late life; for others, the media are met with a skeptical attitude as they are not trusted as a source of reliable and unequivocal information on health issues. The study is based on a qualitative interview study with men and women between 65 and 86 years.

  • 25.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the Open and Closed Space of Public Discourse2006In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 35-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subject of this article is to investigate the notion and status of public discourse in contemporary media. The article opens with a reading of the trope the ’open’ (das Offene) in Rainer Maria Rilke’s eighth Duineser Elegie and then discusses the meanings given to openess and public (Öffentlich, Öffentlichkeit) in the academic discourses of law, philoso- phy, political theory, and sociology. However, the principal focus of the article is on the artistic and political interventions by two Austrian artists, Otto Mittmannsgruber and Martin Strauß, made in commercialized public spaces in Austria and Germany during the years 1995-2004. Their artistic works directly address issues of power and public dis- course, and effect both a questioning of unilinear mass media communication and a politicization of commercialized public space. In the article it is argued that the interven- tions of Mittmannsgruber and Strauß in commercial mass media make strikingly visible the simultaneously open and closed nature of contemporary public discourse.

  • 26.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Put a Tiger in Your Text: Metalepsis and Media Discourse2010In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subject of this article is the extensive use of metalepsis as an argumentative and rhetorical device in media discourse, and in particular in advertising. Metalepsis, a form of metonymy, sets up an inverted relation - causal, logical or contiguous - between terms and/or objects, either as an aesthetic effect or a means of persuasion. The first part of the article discusses the use of metalepsis in literature and film; the second part discusses the use of the figure in mass media and advertising; the third part discusses the relation between advertising, art, and popular culture. The final part of the article discusses the pervasive use metalepsis in advertising. Since metalepsis is a powerful rhetorical device, I have chosen the figure of the tiger to illustrate how it operates in advertising and media discourse.

  • 27.
    Danielson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    "Shaming the Devil!": Performative Shame in Investigative Journalism2013In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 34, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers the performativity of shaming in investigative TV-journalism. Itargues that the construction of shame is not only a constituent element in investigative TVjournalismbut also an important factor in pursuing some of its main objectives: establishingmorals, exercising social control, reinforcing journalistic identity and ideology, and competingfor attention in a diversified media theatre where drama, entertainment and emotionalthrills are the hard currency. An empirical study of the Swedish TV programme Uppdraggranskning, is used to inductively propose three categories of shaming and to give someexamples of the ways in which shaming is performed. The core of the paper is a theorydriven analysis in which the performativity of shaming in investigative TV-journalism isanalysed in the light of some converging media and societal trends.

  • 28.
    Danielson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    "Shaming the Devil!": Performative Shame in Investigative TV-journalism2013In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, no Special issue, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers the performativity of shaming in investigative TV-journalism. Itargues that the construction of shame is not only a constituent element in investigative TVjournalismbut also an important factor in pursuing some of its main objectives: establishingmorals, exercising social control, reinforcing journalistic identity and ideology, and competingfor attention in a diversified media theatre where drama, entertainment and emotionalthrills are the hard currency. An empirical study of the Swedish TV programme Uppdraggranskning, is used to inductively propose three categories of shaming and to give someexamples of the ways in which shaming is performed. The core of the paper is a theorydriven analysis in which the performativity of shaming in investigative TV-journalism isanalysed in the light of some converging media and societal trends.

  • 29.
    Edin, Anna
    University of Gävle, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Ämnesavdelningen för medier, kommunikation och film.
    Times have changed: on the relationship between Swedish public service television and the viewing public2006In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 61-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Ekecrantz, Jan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, History.
    Olsson, Tom
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, History.
    Ericson, Staffan
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Åker, Patrik
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Media and Communication Studies.
    Media societies around the Baltic Sea: Cultures and communications in transition1999In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, no 2, p. 79-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Research on media and democracy: reflections on changes and challenges2008In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Ekström, Ylva
    et al.
    Malmö högskola.
    Høg Hansen, Anders
    Malmö högskola.
    Boothby, Hugo
    Malmö högskola.
    The Globalization of the Pavement: A Tanzanian Case Study2012In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 33, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Enghel, Florencia
    Towards a Political Economy of Communication in Development?2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no Special Issue, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the development communication equation, whether more theoretical, empirical and analytical attention is given to ‘development’ or to ‘communication’ makes a difference: where the emphasis is on development, it is at the expense of communication. Since com-munication and media arguably play an increasingly pervasive role in the everyday life of citizens and in the politics, economies and governance of most societies, the characteristics and role of specific forms of applied communication strategies in the context of the neolib-eral project merit critical scrutiny. Given a complex global scenario, what can a political economy approach bring into an agenda for the future of development communication as a field of study, a practice and an institutional project? This article outlines ways in which a focus on political economy dimensions may contribute to understanding the obstacles and limits to a transformative practice of international development communication.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Rethinking the rethinking: the problem of generality in qualitative media audience research2006In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 31-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few decades, the possibilities and limitations of qualitative media audience research have regularly been discussed in media and communication research. Quantitatively oriented researchers have claimed that qualitatively oriented research is incapable of producing general knowledge. From a ‘radical ethnographic’ point of view it has been stated that such knowledge is more or less useless, while other qualitatively oriented researchers have approached the question of generality in a more balanced way, and argued for the necessity to interpret specific events within a framework of more general theories. But these solutions are not satisfactory. The aim of this article is to suggest an alternative conceptualisation of generality. From the meta-theoretical viewpoint of critical realism, this article states that generalisations have to take into consideration the domain of the deep structures of reality. Qualitative media audience research should aim at producing general knowledge about the constituent properties or transfactual conditions of the process of media consumption.

  • 35.
    Eriksson, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Camauër, Leonor
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lakew, Yuliya
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ordinary People on Television: A longitudinal study of Swedish Television, 1982-20112017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 113-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By using a longitudinal design and measuring television content and the occurrence of ordinary television and ‘ordinary’ participants at four different points in time from 1982 to 2011, this study investigates the alleged shift towards ordinariness in the 1990s. Using Sweden as a test case, three research questions are posed: To what extent did ordinary television programming increase during the 1990s? To what extent did the participation of ordinary people increase as a consequence of this shift? To what extent has public service television adapted to commercial competition through broadcasting more ordinary television? The analysis confirms the alleged shift towards ordinariness. Ordinary television and ordinary participants did increase during the studied era, but a key argument put forward is that this shift occurred gradually and that one should avoid using overdramatic epithets to characterise it. The results also suggest that the public service broadcaster (SVT) also moved towards ordinariness but that this change was modest and occurred later than expected in Sweden.

  • 36.
    Falkheimer, Jesper
    et al.
    The Department of Strategic Communication, Lund University.
    Blach-Ørsten, Mark
    Department of Communication and Arts Communication, Journalism and Social Change, Roskilde University.
    Kæmsgaard Eberholst, Mads
    Department of Communication and Arts Communication, Journalism and Social Change, Roskilde University.
    Möllerström, Veselinka
    The Department of Strategic Communication, Lund University.
    News Media and the Öresund Region.: A Case of Horizontal Europeanisation?2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 1-15Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a first attempt to investigate the news content and news routines of Danish and Swedish news media covering the Öresund region. From a theoretical per-spective, the Öresund region can be considered a possible best-case example of what is categorised as horizontal Europeanisation, in other words, of the potential for increased communication linkages in news media content among European Union (EU) member states. We investigate this topic by analysing news content published by selected media outlets from 2002 to 2012 and by interviewing Danish and Swedish journalists who cover the region. We find that most news content does not mention the Öresund region, and that one reason for this lack might be that neither Danish nor Swedish reporters consider the region to be newsworthy.

  • 37. Falkheimer, Jesper
    et al.
    Heide, Mats
    From Public Relations to Strategic Communication in Sweden: The Emergence of a Transboundary Field of Knowledge2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 123-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this conceptual article, we argue that strategic communication is a transboundary concept that captures, better than public relations does, the complex phenomenon of an organiza-tion’s targeted communication processes in contemporary society. The aim of the article is twofold. First, the purpose is to describe and reflect the development and institutionalization of public relations education and research in Sweden. Second, based on the transboundary changes we see in industry, education and research, we argue that strategic communication is a conceptual and holistic framework that is more valid and relevant than public relations. Moreover, we suggest that strategic communication also integrates organizational (internal) communication as well as aspects of management theory and marketing, thus allowing us to understand, explain and criticize contemporary communication processes both inside organizations and between organizations and the surrounding society. The article is mainly based on secondary data about the public relations industry, earlier research and a mapping of public relations education and research in Sweden.

  • 38.
    Fernández-Ardèvol, Mireia
    et al.
    Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.
    Sawchuk, Kim
    Department of Communication Studies, Concordia University, Montreal.
    Grenier, Line
    Department of Communication Studies, Concordia University, Montreal.
    Maintaining Connections: Octo- and Nonagenarians on Digital ‘Use and Non-use’2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 39-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concepts of user and non-user are frequently deployed within media and communica-tions literature. What do these terms mean if examined regarding age and ageing? In this article we explore and trouble these notions through an analysis of twenty-two conversa-tions with a group of octogenarians and nonagenarians living in a retirement home. Their descriptions of their changing uses of media througout lifetime, and their encounters with mobile phones, computers, newspapers, television, radio and landline phones, are presented as a set of ‘techno-biographies’ that challenge binary divisions of use and non-use, linear notions of media adoption, and add texture to the idea of ‘the fourth age’ as a time of life bereft of decisional power. Speaking with octogenarians and nonagenarians provides in-sights into media desires, needs and uses, and opens up ‘non-use’ as a complex, variegated activity, rather than a state of complete inaction or disinterest.

  • 39.
    Filimonov, Kirill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    (re)Articulating feminism: A discourse analysis of Sweden’s Feminist Initiative election campaign2016In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we study campaign material of the Swedish party Feminist Initiative (FI) during the 2014 parliamentary election campaign in Sweden. Approaching the topic from discourse-theoretical and intersectional perspectives, we ask how the inclusion of various social groups into the hegemonic project of feminist politics becomes possible, what was constructed as an antagonist to feminist politics, and in what ways it impeded FI to realise such politics. Our findings show that intersectionality allowed FI to include every group/ individual into its feminist political project as long as they experienced oppression. Even though racists and nationalists in general (the Sweden Democrats in particular) were singled out as antagonists, it was mainly norms and structures that were addressed in the online material as standing in the way for FI to fulfil both their identity and hegemonic project.

  • 40.
    Filimonov, Kirill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    (re)Articulating Feminism A Discourse Analysis of Sweden's Feminist Initiative Election Campaign2016In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 51-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we study campaign material of the Swedish party Feminist Initiative (FI) during the 2014 parliamentary election campaign in Sweden. Approaching the topic from discourse-theoretical and intersectional perspectives, we ask how the inclusion of various social groups into the hegemonic project of feminist politics becomes possible, what was constructed as an antagonist to feminist politics, and in what ways it impeded FI to realise such politics. Our findings show that intersectionality allowed FI to include every group/individual into its feminist political project as long as they experienced oppression. Even though racists and nationalists in general (the Sweden Democrats in particular) were singled out as antagonists, it was mainly norms and structures that were addressed in the online material as standing in the way for FI to fulfil both their identity and hegemonic project.

  • 41.
    Florencia, Cristine
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    The Mediatized Zlatan,Made by Sweden: An Immigrant’s Path from Provincial Othernessto a Western Literary Space2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyses the mediatization of the brand and celebrity Zlatan Ibrahimovićusing the reception and marketing of the footballer’s life story and autobiography as itsmain case. It is shown that the construction of a myth such as Ibrahimović transcends themateriality of the book as well as geographical, vernacular and media boundaries, as it isconstituted as content in a digital network that produces signification. This ‘Zlatan content’is framed by national Swedish values and a traditional Western myth of individual masculineexcellence. It is also marked by emotions, class and race, telling a tale about the marginalizedemotive immigrant becoming both a national icon and part of an imaginary Westernghetto experience and global literary canon formation. It is argued that the performance ofexcitable speech acts is crucial in the mediatization and branding of mass market literatureand celebrities such as Ibrahimović.

  • 42.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Digital Borderlands: Identity and Interactivity in Culture, Media and Communications1998In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Culture and communication are closely connected. Culture is constituted by meaning-making practices, i.e. by symbolic com­mu­ni­ca­tion. Com­munication is the sharing and transmission of meanings between people, i.e. the process that con­stitutes culture. Culture as communication has double effects: it gathers people around a set of shared meanings, i.e. creates identity, but it simul­tane­ous­ly also connects selves to others, i.e. constructs difference.

  • 43.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Linköpings universitet.
    Intermedial Passages in Time and Space: Contexts, Currents and Circuits of Media Consumption2004In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 123-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses spatial, temporal and relational aspects of mediated communication. It is based on experiences from the Swedish media ethnographic Passages project, where an interdisciplinary research team for five years empirically investigated interacting processes of communication and consumption in a shopping centre.

    (1) Spatial contexts of media places. The interplay between people and media – including so-called new media – are always spatially contextualised, in spite of the transgressivity of communication. Places frame and delimit media uses, which at the same time form spatialities as meaningful geographic places and social worlds. The collective Passages ethnography invited renewed reflection on concepts like space, place, borders and movements.

    (2) Temporal currents of media consumption. The processes of media consumption as multifarious temporal chains of acquisition and use also form time at all levels, from present moments to historical memories that shape identities. Inspired by Walter Benjamin’s Arcades Project, the Passages project developed a historical perspective on how the past, present and future are combined when media structure modern daily life. Reworking the borders between consumption and reception research gave a new understanding of flows and currents of media use.

    (3) Relational circuits of media types. Media industries and research have conventional ways to define and differentiate media types. These boundaries are challenged by technical, social and cultural transformations. The Passages studies of media in a shopping centre – and the mall as a medium! – made visible a series of border cases and intermedial hybrids that highlighted limitations of traditional categories. An expanded media concept let us scrutinize how media circuits are both kept apart and interconnected in intertextual, intersubjective and intercontextual practices.

  • 44.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Intermedial Passages in Time and Space: Contexts, Currents and Circuits of Media Consumption2004In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 123-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses spatial, temporal and relational aspects of mediated communication. It is based on experiences from the Swedish media ethnographic Passages project, where an interdisciplinary research team for five years empirically investigated interacting processes of communication and consumption in a shopping centre.

    (1) Spatial contexts of media places. The interplay between people and media – including so-called new media – are always spatially contextualised, in spite of the transgressivity of communication. Places frame and delimit media uses, which at the same time form spatialities as meaningful geographic places and social worlds. The collective Passages ethnography invited renewed reflection on concepts like space, place, borders and movements.

    (2) Temporal currents of media consumption. The processes of media consumption as multifarious temporal chains of acquisition and use also form time at all levels, from present moments to historical memories that shape identities. Inspired by Walter Benjamin’s Arcades Project, the Passages project developed a historical perspective on how the past, present and future are combined when media structure modern daily life. Reworking the borders between consumption and reception research gave a new understanding of flows and currents of media use.

    (3) Relational circuits of media types. Media industries and research have conventional ways to define and differentiate media types. These boundaries are challenged by technical, social and cultural transformations. The Passages studies of media in a shopping centre – and the mall as a medium! – made visible a series of border cases and intermedial hybrids that highlighted limitations of traditional categories. An expanded media concept let us scrutinize how media circuits are both kept apart and interconnected in intertextual, intersubjective and intercontextual practices.

  • 45.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karaoke: Subjectivity, Play and Interactive Media1994In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Karaoke is an interactive media pheno­menon which opens new avenues, for music use and for media research. It focuses attention on aspects of the playful use of symbols and imputation of meaning which are latent in other media forms, as well. In the following I shall explore some of these aspects, with an emphasis on differences in subject construction that relate to ethnicity and patterns of socialization.

  • 46.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden.
    The Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden/ACSIS: A national centre for transnational and interdisciplinary cultural research2005In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 145-147Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Ganetz, Hillevi
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Familiar Beasts: Nature, Culture and Gender in Wildlife Films on Television2004In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 197-214Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Ganetz, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Jewel in the Crown: The Nobel Banquet Broadcast as Co-Construction2018In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 111-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the aims of the Nobel Banquet broadcast, produced by the Swedish public service company SVT and the Nobel Foundation. The study suggests that the programme can be viewed as a co-construction of science and media, and that the Nobel Foundation has three primary purposes: 1) to teach the audience about science; 2) to honour the laureates; and 3) to maintain and increase the status of the Nobel prize. SVT, for their part, has two main purposes: 1) to teach their audience about science, and 2) to entertain. The aims of the Nobel Foundation and SVT may seem disparate, but they are interrelated. At the same time, the subtleties between the entities create a tension that develops through mutual negotiations. The study ends with a discussion of two unexpected findings: 1) the shared, yet essentially differently-grounded aims of both parties to inform about science, and 2) the fact that their scientific content has increased in both absolute and relative terms over the years, a finding that questions notions of a continuous mediatisation of social institutions.

  • 49.
    Gelfgren, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Why does the archbishop not tweet?: how social media challenge church authorities2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 109-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In summer 2012, the Archbishop of the Church of Sweden appeared on Twitter. There was only one problem – it was not the Archbishop himself who was tweeting, but an anonymous person. A discussion then ensued on Twitter and in the blogosphere between those in favor of the Archbishop and his department and mainly social media proponents.

    The present article describes and analyzes the social media debate, and how authority and hierarchies are negotiated in and through social media. The analysis is based on Heidi Campbell’s “Religious-Social Shaping of Technology” model, and emphasizes the need to take into account not only the faith and tradition of the religious actor, but also the societal context in which the negotiating process takes place. In this case, the concepts of “media- tization” and “secularization” are used to understand the broader context of the process. 

  • 50.
    Givskov, Cecilie
    Department of Media, Cognition and Communication,University of Copenhagen .
    Growing Old with Mediatization: Reflexivity and Sense of Agency2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computers, tablets, smartphones and mobile phones enable people to act across contexts. For individuals born during the first half of the twentieth century, these social infrastruc-tures for agency arrived late in the life course. This article presents an analysis of a set of interviews that were thematically coded to reveal ways in which the infrastructures figured in reflexive practices among older single-dwelling women. The interviews were patterned by the shared image of a ‘media world’ and the hypothesis of the indispensability of newer media for living a socially integrated life in today’s society. Control of media connected with feelings of dis- or empowerment; ultimately media amplified the participants’ feelings of being autonomous actors. I argue that the newer media infrastructures extend the scope and need for reflexivity and augment the reflexive ageing associated with the continued activity and autonomy of the third age.

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