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  • 1.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Rifts in the hegemony: Swedish news journalism on cannabis legalization2019In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 1617-1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes the journalistic construction of the ongoing international renegotiation of cannabis, with the aim of contributing to the theorization of how journalism mediates between hegemonic and counter-hegemonic positions at times of crisis of hegemonic values. The study perceives the many ongoing attempts of legalizing and decriminalizing cannabis for recreational use as providing a disequilibrium to the hegemonic view of the substance as a dangerous narcotic that is rightly banned, and as intensifying a hegemonic struggle over the meaning of cannabis. Swedish print news journalism about cannabis legalization in different countries and contexts is studied, using critical discourse analysis. The analysis shows that journalism allows for debate between positive and skeptic discourses about the effects of recreational cannabis consumption and its medical benefits, and that voices that argue for cannabis legalization to combat organized crime are given important framing power. This means that a measure of legitimacy is given to discourses that counter the prohibitionist hegemony in Sweden, which means that mainstream journalism in this specific case serves as an arena for challenging hegemonic values that are in crisis.

  • 2.
    Adams, Paul C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). Department of Geography and the Environment, University of Texas at Austin, USA.
    Migration Maps with the News: Guidelines for ethical visualization of mobile populations2018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 527-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maps showing immigration into Europe are a potential source of journalistic bias. Limited time and funding to create maps of migration can lead to dependence on data from institutions dedicated to controlling migration, in effect promoting a logic of surveillance directed at immigrants rather than a logic of hospitality based on respect for human rights. There are organizational and logistical barriers to overcome if migration is to be portrayed in ways that support thoughtful, democratic, rights-based deliberation but efforts need to be made to map migration in ways that reveal the geographical experiences of individual immigrants including their movement paths and the risks they face. This article examines unusual maps of migration, drawing on examples from news media as well as from non-governmental organizations, research teams, book authors, private companies, and entertainment media based in several European countries. The examples provide a foundation for concrete recommendations regarding the responsible use of cartographic visualization as a component of immigration news.

  • 3.
    Allern, Sigurd
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Blach-Ørsten, Mark
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    The news media as a political institution: A Scandinavian perspective2011In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 92-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of Scandinavian journalism research this article discusses the changing political roles of news organizations and journalists after the fall of the party press and the dissolution of broadcasting as a state-controlled monopoly. Given these institutional changes, we ask the following: what new roles, if any, are news organizations and journalists playing in the political system? What are the characteristics of these new roles, and how do news organizations use their newfound political power? We address these questions in the context of an institutional approach to the news coupled with Hallin and Mancini's analysis of media systems.

  • 4.
    Barkho, Leon
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    The BBC's Discursive Strategy and Practices Vis-à-vis the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict2008In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 278-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the BBC's strategy and discursive practices with regard to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It triangulates critical linguistic analysis of the BBC's English and Arabic online reports, with the results of extensive interviews with BBC editors, articles by mainstream media as well as the BBC's guidelines and the editors' blogs. The aim behind the triangulation is to see whether the corporation's beliefs, norms and assumptions vis-à-vis the issue have a hand in the shaping of its discursive features. In order to understand why and how news is differently structured and patterned, Fowler urges critical linguists to contextualize their studies by examining discourse-related moments other than the text itself. The contextualization of the linguistic representations of the conflict demonstrates that BBC language reflects to a large extent the views, assumptions and norms prevalent in the corporation as well as the unequal division of power and control between the two protagonists despite the corporation's insistence on impartiality, balance and neutrality in its coverage of the conflict.

  • 5. Becker, Lee B.
    et al.
    Hollifield, C. Ann
    Jacobsson, Adam
    Jacobsson, Eva-Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Vlad, Tudor
    IS MORE ALWAYS BETTER?: Examining the adverse effects of competition on media performance2009In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 368-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While classic market economic theory argues that competition among media is better for consumers, preliminary research in emerging media markets suggests otherwise. High levels of competition in markets with limited advertising revenues may lead to poorer journalistic performance. This study tests that argument using secondary analysis of data from a purposive sample of countries where measures of news media performance and market competition exist. The authors find a curvilinear relationship between competition and the quality of the journalistic product, with moderate competition leading to higher-quality journalism products and higher levels of competition leading to journalistic products that do not serve society well. The implications of the findings for media assistance initiatives are discussed.

  • 6.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    What is Global Journalism?: Theoretical and empirical conceptualisations2008In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 845-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I argue that the emergence of transnational crises and threats such as the Muhammad cartoons controversy, the avian flu epidemic and climate change, calls for new ways of analysing news. The point of departure is that news media content seems to be becoming more and more deterritorialised, involving complex relations and flows across national borders and continents. In a globalising world, news on politics, ecological processes, agriculture etc. could thus become endowed with a global outlook on social reality, something which has by tradition only been associated with financial news. Even if it seems difficult to estimate more exactly the extent to which everyday news media content has become global, the indications are that it has become harder to categorise news texts as either solely domestic or foreign news. This, in turn, argues for the potential usefulness of the concept of global journalism, which transgresses and transcends the traditional domestic-foreign dichotomy. In news media and journalism studies, the concept of global journalism is under theoretical development, and still in need of a more stringent definition. The purpose of this article is therefore to theoretically define global journalism as a distinctive news style in order to facilitate empirical analyses of it, preferably news text analyses. The suggestion is that this news style rests on a distinct epistemology (the global outlook) when it comes to the representation of space, power and identity.

  • 7.
    Carpentier, Nico
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel.
    Cammaerts, Bart
    Hegemony, democracy, agonism, and journalism. An interview with Chantal Mouffe2006In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 964-975Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Doudaki, Vaia
    et al.
    Spyridou, Lia-Paschalia
    Print and Online News: Remediation Practices in Content and Form2013In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 907-925Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Conversation analysis in journalism studies2007In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 964-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article considers the role of conversational analysis in the study of journalism. The author argues that conversation is inherent to the very being of journalism, whether it be conversational exchange in broadcast journalism or the conversation engaged in by print journalists in their news gathering activities. The article offers a brief history of the field of conversational analysis. Of particular interest in conversational analysis for journalistic study is the role of institutional interaction. The author discusses the role of communication and conversation in news legitimacy.

  • 10.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Wikström, Patrik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Biased interrogations?: a multi-methodological approach on bias in election campaign interviews2013In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 423-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study, based on Swedish data from three elections (2002, 2006 and 2010) and on a revised version of Clayman's and Heritage's conceptualization of aggressive questioning, examines bias in election campaign interviews with leading political figures. In the first part of the study, the prevalence of partisan bias is explored, and this analysis confirms that such bias does not exist. Informed by Conversation Analysis, a limited number of interviews from the 2006 election are investigated in the second part. This analysis also involves questions scripted by journalists, and it compares both quantitatively and qualitatively the differences between the manuscripts and live interaction. The results question the assumption that bias is solely related to journalistic values and actions. The level of aggressiveness in the interviews is also dependent on how the politicians manage the interview questions.

  • 11.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Larsson, Larsåke
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Journalism and local politics: A study of scrutiny and accountability in Swedish journalism2006In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 292-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political accountability is defined as an important aspect of scrutiny. By analysing newspapers at three different points in time (1961, 1981 and 2001), this study suggests that the kind of scrutiny often mentioned in the literature, characterised by thorough investigations and disclosures of political wrongdoings, barely exists in the local press. By identifying other forms of scrutiny more closely related to ordinary news reporting, the study shows that one-third of the 1500 articles analysed display some degree of scrutiny. The local press plays an important role in communicating information and critique concerning the ways in which local authority service provision works and how political responsibilities are fulfilled. This study indicates that this role has been strengthened during the second half of the 20th century.

  • 12.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Beyond the broadcast interview: specialized forms of interviewing in the making of television news2011In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 172-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a mixed-method approach, this article aims at exploring the specialized forms of interviewing that are used as resources in television broadcast news production. Interviews are analyzed as functionally specialized forms of interaction (cf. Heritage, 1985) with various functions in different phases of the news production. We assume that interviews are organized and carried out as communicative activities oriented towards specific tasks, identities and contexts of interaction. In contrast to established definitions of the archetypical on air news interview, we argue that broadcast interviewing is only partially produced for an “overhearing audience” (ibid.). Taking into account the entire process of producing and presenting news, journalism harbours a multitude of interviewing practices and activities which remain invisible if only the taped and transcribed broadcast talk is analyzed. Our study clearly indicates that news interviews contain more diversified and hybrid activities of communication than has been described in previous research.

  • 13.
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Camouflaging Church as State: An exploratory study of journalism’s native advertising2016In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 1-13, article id SIArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the increasing trend of adopting native advertising in the digital editions of traditional news media outlets. Native advertising is defined here as a form of paid media where the commercial content is delivered within the design and form of editorial content, as an attempt to recreate the user experience of reading news instead of advertising content. Methodologically, this study examines 12 news websites of legacy newspapers from Sweden, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and analyzes the adoption of native advertising during the span of January 2015. Subsequently, these advertisements are analyzed in terms of type, form, function, integration, measurement, disclosure, and authorship. The results show that while the degree of implementation is still modest, the way in which it is implemented is uneven across countries.

  • 14.
    Gambarato, Renira R.
    et al.
    Department of Media, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russian Federation.
    Tárcia, L. P. T.
    Department of Communication, Centro Universitário de Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Transmedia Strategies in Journalism: An analytical model for the news coverage of planned events2017In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1381-1399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the meanings of transmedia journalism, which involves the expansion, not the repetition, of news content and then presents the development of a new analytical model that focuses on the coverage of planned events in news media. Planned events are temporal occurrences that are normally well schematized and publicized in advance. The proposed model addresses the fundamental features involved in transmedia strategies for media coverage to contribute to scholars’ analytic needs and to guide journalists in developing transmedia strategies in the context of the news coverage of planned events. Multiplatform news media production is already a reality that, although probably more modest than comprehensive, will inevitably grow and improve. 

  • 15.
    Gardeström, Elin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Losing Control: The emergence of journalism education as an interplay of forces2017In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 511-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalism education in Sweden emerged in the late 1950s after more than 50 years of discussions. This historical process is analyzed in this article as an interplay of forces, where different interest groups tried to shape how journalists were to be educated once the existing apprenticeship system was replaced by journalism schools. Using the work of sociologists Pierre Bourdieu and Margaret Archer, this study closely follows the struggle inside the journalistic field, and between the journalistic field and the academic field and other interest groups, about how journalists were to be trained and by whom. This study reveals how conflicts over journalism education tended to migrate; from who would run a journalism school in the postwar years to the governmental investigations of the 1960s and the prevailing internal conflict between theory and practice at the two national Journalist Institutes in the 1970s. This article discusses what is commonly understood to be the professionalization of journalism. However, from another perspective, it can also be viewed as a trade losing control over its education.

  • 16.
    Jacobsson, Adam
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Becker, Lee B.
    Hollifield, C. Ann
    Jacobsson, Eva-Maria
    Vlad, Tudor
    Is More Always Better? Examining the Adverse Effects of Competition on Media Performance2009In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 368-385Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Jansson, André
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    News Media Consumption in the Transmedia Age: Amalgamations, Orientations and Geo-Social Structuration2015In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 79-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Rituals of Transparency: Evaluating online news outlets’ uses of transparency rituals in the United States, United Kingdom and Sweden2010In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 535-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparency has been suggested as a new norm in journalism. However, few studies have investigated how the overarching notion of transparency is utilized in everyday news. The purpose of this study is to identify and compare how leading mainstream online news media in the United States, United Kingdom and Sweden make use of transparency techniques in news items. The results show that transparency has begun to affect online news but that current journalism practice is a long way from a fully fledged transparency norm.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Cornerstones in Journalism: According to citizens2019In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalism's appeal to the public is in decline and the causes and remedies for this are debated in society and academia. One dimension that has garnered attention is that of journalistic norms and how they are performed; it has been proposed that a journalism based on a different, more transparent, normative base can better connect with citizens, compared with the current prevailing norm of journalistic objectivity. However, the opinions of citizens themselves have been remarkably absent and, in order to inform the debate, this study inductively investigates how citizens view and relate to the notion of good journalism. Drawing upon a theoretical framework of Bourdieu's concept of doxa, journalistic role performance, and social contract theory, this study is based on the results of 13 focus groups. The findings suggest that the respondents’ views about good journalism are quite in accordance with the traditional norms of the journalistic field; however, there is more emphasis on stylistic and linguistic qualities. Few calls are made for transparency. The results suggest that a remedy to the decreasing trust in news may not lay in the changing of norms, but rather in how already established norms and values of the journalistic field are performed.

  • 20.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Patterns and origins in the evolution of multimedia on broadsheet and tabloid news sites: Swedish online news 2005-20102012In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 550-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This longitudinal study compares the development and implementation of multimedia on Swedish broadsheet and tabloid online news sites between 2005 and 2010. It also seeks the reasons behind these developments by interviewing journalists working on the sites. The results show that the initial implementation of multimedia was slow but increased sharply in pace between 2007 and 2008. By 2010, on average, one in four news items had some element of multimedia attached to them. Furthermore, results show that it was the quality papers that were the quickest off the mark rather than tabloids. The antecedents for this advance seem to be a mix of technological capacities, professional norms and economic needs.

  • 21.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Transparency to the Rescue?: Evaluating citizens’ views on transparency tools in journalism2018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, no 13, p. 1923-1933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparency has emerged as an ethical principle in contemporary journalism and is contended to improve accountability and credibility by journalists and scholars alike. However, to date, few attempts have been made to record the public’s views on transparency. This study enriches current knowledge by using data from an experiment, survey and focus groups in Sweden collected between 2013 and 2015. Overall, the results suggest that the respondents are not particularly moved by transparency in any form; it does not produce much effect in the experiments and is not brought up in the focus groups. While that is the key finding of this study, it should also be noted that various forms of user participation are evaluated negatively, while providing hyperlinks, explaining news selection and framing, and correcting errors are viewed positively. Implications for journalism practice and research are discussed.

  • 22.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    , Department of Geography, Media and Communication, Karlstad University, Sweden..
    Clerwall, Christer
    , Department of Geography, Media and Communication, Karlstad University, Sweden..
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet: Transparency’s (Lack of) Effect on Source and Message Credibility2014In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 668-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that transparency will change the way journalism is being produced as well as increase its credibility. However, little research has been conducted to assess the connection between transparency and credibility. This study utilizes an experimental setting with 1320 respondents to measure what impact transparency has on source and message credibility from a user perspective. The results reveal an almost total absence of any transparency effect on either source or message credibility, although some small significant effects could be observed primarily regarding internal hyperlinks, comments and contextual information. Although further research is needed in this area, the study suggests that transparency does not affect the credibility of journalism in the eyes of the contemporary audience and thus has limited appeal as a new norm in journalism.

  • 23.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Nord, Lars
    Mittuniversitetet.
    You ain´t seen nothing yet.: Transparency’s (lack of) Effect on Source and Message Credibility2014In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 668-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparency has been proposed to both change the way journalism is being produced and increase its credibility. However, little research has been conducted to assess the connection between transparency and credibility. This study utilizes an experimental setting (N=1320) to measure what impact transparency have on source and message credibility from the user perspective. The results reveals an almost absence of any transparency effect on both source and message credibility although some small significant effects could be observed primarily regarding internal hyperlinks, comments and contextual information. Although further research is desperately needed in this area the study suggest that transparency does not affect the credibility of journalism in the eyes of the contemporary audience and thus have limited appeal as a new norm in journalism.

  • 24.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Freezing the Flow of Online News: Exploring approaches to the study of the liquidity of online news2010In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 2-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research, two characteristics of online news as opposed to traditional news are interactivity and immediacy. However, most research in this area has focused on the news site-level of analysis, and there are only a few studies on how interactivity and immediacy affect online news on the news story-level of analysis. The main reason for this appears to be that the very nature of online news makes observation by traditional research methods, such as quantitative content analysis, problematic. Against this background, the overall purpose of this paper is to explore methodological approaches for the study of interactivity and immediacy on the news story-level of online news. The paper develops a three-pronged strategy for freezing the flow of online news to enable systematic content analyses of interactivity and immediacy, and tests this strategy in a comparative analysis of the online news sites Guardian.co.uk in Britain and Aftonbladet.se in Sweden.

  • 25.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Freezing the Flow of Online News: Exploring Approaches to the Study of the Liquidity of Online News2010In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 2-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research, two characteristics of online news as opposed to traditional news are interactivity and immediacy. However, most research in this area has focused on the news site-level of analysis, and there are only a few studies on how interactivity and immediacy affect online news on the news story-level of analysis. The main reason for this appears to be that the very nature of online news makes observation by traditional research methods, such as quantitative content analysis, problematic. Against this background, the overall purpose of this paper is to explore methodological approaches for the study of interactivity and immediacy on the news story-level of online news. The paper develops a three-pronged strategy for freezing the flow of online news to enable systematic content analyses of interactivity and immediacy, and tests this strategy in a comparative analysis of the online news sites Guardian.co.uk in Britain and Aftonbladet.se in Sweden.

  • 26.
    Kiousis, Spiro
    et al.
    Univ Florida, Coll Journalism & Commun, Journalism, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA.
    Kim, Ji Young
    Bradley Univ, Caterpillar Global Commun Ctr, Peoria, IL 61625 USA.
    Ragas, Matt
    Depaul Univ, Coll Commun, Chicago, IL 60604 USA.
    Wheat, Gillian
    Univ Florida, Coll Journalism & Commun, Journalism, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA.
    Kochhar, Sarab
    Univ Florida, Coll Journalism & Commun, Journalism, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA.
    Svensson, Emma
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Miles, Maradith
    Univ Florida, Coll Journalism & Commun, Journalism, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA.
    EXPLORING NEW FRONTIERS OF AGENDA BUILDING DURING THE 2012 US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION PRE-CONVENTION PERIOD Examining linkages across three levels2015In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 363-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grounded in an agenda-building theoretical perspective, this study explored in depth the relationships between political campaign information subsidies and elite national news media coverage. Specifically, this investigation examined three levels of agenda-building linkages (object, attribute, and network connections) simultaneously during the 2012 US Presidential Election pre-convention period between Barack Obama (Democrat) and Mitt Romney (Republican). A total of 2655 campaign information subsidies and 345 news stories were content analyzed. The results suggest solid support for all three levels of agenda building. Our findings indicate the strongest linkages were at the third level for stakeholder network associations and at the second level for substantive issue frames. Campaign blog posts, press releases, and issue platforms were the most effective agenda-building tools at this phase of the election campaign. The theoretical, methodological, and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  • 27.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    The complex visual gendering of political women in the press2008In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 891-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present an analysis of how gendering is “being done” in press visuals of women in politics. In short, we will argue that women professionals working within the area of politics are gendered and type-cast in more complex ways than previous research has yet shown. In a qualitative analysis of visuals from three different political scandals in Sweden involving prominent political women, we analyse the diversified ways of portraying women in visuals that do not simply reproduce the idea that the gendering of women uncritically correlates with concepts like sexualization, objectification, passivity and otherness. As on-lookers of a professional woman in politics caught in a pressing situation in a photograph, we will argue that at times we may be invited to see her as both an Other and a person with whom we can identify ourselves with. Or a woman may be positioned as an object with a focus on appearance, but not by emphasizing her femininity and sexuality but by doing exactly the reverse. We will also discuss the complexity that is related to the various contextual factors that come into play when press photographers and editors communicatively “work” at accomplishing specific gendered visual “preferred readings”.

  • 28.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Interviews as communicative resources in news and current affairs broadcasts2010In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 20-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we quantitatively establish the centrality and importance of interviews in news and current affairs broadcasts. We show how segments of interviews (from soundbites to longer recorded or live question-and-answer interactions) are deployed as communicative resources in the construction and presentation of news in various ways. The data allows for a cross-national comparison in between the UK and Sweden that point to differences in practice between the  countries. We argue that our findings may be used to critically examine various conceptualisations of broadcast interviews in general and political interviews in particular. We also show how journalists outnumber politicians as interviewees in the news, a finding that is in need of further exploration from a range of perspectives We also believe that our study provides solid ground on which to base future critical studies of the authority of journalism, dialogical and soundbite journalism, and the alleged fragmentisation of news.

  • 29.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University, UK.
    Europe in Crisis: Discourses on Crisis-Events in the European Press 1956-20062009In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 18-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes a diachronic, empirically founded and qualitative approach to the examination of constructions of a European Public Sphere in Europe's national news media. By focusing on transnational press-reporting of a set of selected Crisis Events in post-war European history (in the period 1956-2006), different discursive representations of "Europe" (and Europe-related normative notions such as, e. g., "European values") are studied to show the diversity and heterogeneity of their nationally specific perceptions. Similar discursive patterns and commonalities in discourses across Europe are highlighted, as are the evolving ways of (re-)constructing the tension between the transnational and the national, in the specifically European context. Within the latter, Europe changes its role in news-media discourse over time-from being an adversary or source of problems for the nation, to becoming the "bearer" of common values for all (or at least several) European nation-states.

  • 30.
    Larsson, Larsåke
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Journalists and politicians: a relationship requiring manoeuvring space2002In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study attempts to deepen our knowledge of the relationship between journalists and local politicians/officials. The study's primary conclusion is that there is a large degree of interplay between these groups, an observation that reinforces the findings of previous journalistic research. The findings are also in line with recent public relations research arguing that the journalist-politician relationship is governed by certain variables - particularly trust and mutual control - as well as recognising the importance of professional norms. Actors on both sides require manoeuvring space in which they can create and maintain a balance of power in the relationship. The interplay between the two groups results in four types of local journalism - documentation, promotional, watchdog and collaborative journalism.

  • 31.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Karlsson, Michael
    Cosmopolitan Journalists?: Global Journalism in the Work and Visions of Journalists2016In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 860-870Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Young people, class and the news: Distinction, socialization and moral sentiments2018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, p. 2042-2061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalism studies almost exclusively rely on a “sociology of integration” perspective when theorizing the social function of journalism. Focus is put on if and how journalism facilitates democratic processes, encourages civic engagement and strengthens the sense of community. In providing an alternative view, this study mobilizes the cultural sociology of Pierre Bourdieu – a “sociologist of conflict” – in order to study how young people’s conditions of existence have given rise to vastly different orientations towards news and the normative order surrounding journalism. Based on focus group interviews with young people in Brazil and Sweden, the study shows that socialization into the world of news in the family and in school generates class-distinctive news orientations. The world of news is a site where social groups draw moral and cultural boundaries against each other. Since different social groups monopolize completely different news practices and preferences, they work to legitimate social differences. As such, the findings challenge common notions of news as creating the “healthy citizen”, and that news media provide spaces for the practice of civility and citizenship. 

  • 33.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Stockholms universitet.
    Young People, Class and the News: Distinction, socialization and moral sentiments2018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 9, no 14, p. 2042-2061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalism studies almost exclusively rely on a “sociology of integration” perspective when theorizing the social function of journalism. Focus is put on if and how journalism facilitates democratic processes, encourages civic engagement and strengthens the sense of community. In providing an alternative view, this study mobilizes the cultural sociology of Pierre Bourdieu—a “sociologist of conflict”—in order to study how young people’s conditions of existence have given rise to vastly different orientations towards news and the normative order surrounding journalism. Based on focus group interviews with young people in Brazil and Sweden, the study shows that socialization into the world of news in the family and in school generates class-distinctive news orientations. The world of news is a site where social groups draw moral and cultural boundaries against each other. Since different social groups monopolize completely different news practices and preferences, they work to legitimate social differences. As such, the findings challenge common notions of news as creating the “healthy citizen”, and that news media provide spaces for the practice of civility and citizenship.

  • 34. Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics, Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Young People, Class and the News: Distinction, socialization and moral sentiments2018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 19, no 14, p. 2042-2061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalism studies almost exclusively rely on a sociology of integration perspective when theorizing the social function of journalism. Focus is put on if and how journalism facilitates democratic processes, encourages civic engagement and strengthens the sense of community. In providing an alternative view, this study mobilizes the cultural sociology of Pierre Bourdieua sociologist of conflictin order to study how young people's conditions of existence have given rise to vastly different orientations towards news and the normative order surrounding journalism. Based on focus group interviews with young people in Brazil and Sweden, the study shows that socialization into the world of news in the family and in school generates class-distinctive news orientations. The world of news is a site where social groups draw moral and cultural boundaries against each other. Since different social groups monopolize completely different news practices and preferences, they work to legitimate social differences. As such, the findings challenge common notions of news as creating the healthy citizen, and that news media provide spaces for the practice of civility and citizenship.

  • 35.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Glowacki, M.
    University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Hök, Jöran
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Kiria, I.
    Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.
    Orlova, D.
    School of Journalism, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine.
    Taradai, D.
    School of Journalism, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine.
    Journalism in the Crossfire: Media coverage of the war in Ukraine in 20142018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 1059-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    War reporting has mostly been analyzed as a struggle between political and military control over information and journalistic professionalism. An analysis of reporting in mainstream media from the conflict in eastern Ukraine in 2014 shows that many other aspects must also be considered. In a comparative study, mainstream media coverage in four countries, Ukraine, Russia, Poland, and Sweden, was analyzed and interviews were held with journalists in the media included in the content analysis. Findings revealed significant variations in the framing of the conflict, portrayal of actors involved, and word choice across national settings. Interviews with journalists also highlighted crucial differences in approaches and perceptions. Results show that the specific journalistic culture in each country, self-censorship, and the degree of activist approach among journalists similarly play an important role in war reporting. Researchers from all four countries participated in the project.

  • 36.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Stigbrand, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    The Formation of a Professional Identity: Journalism students in different media systems2014In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 841-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalism education plays an important role in the formation of a professional identity. With the results from a survey to 527 journalism students in five countries (Poland, Russia, Sweden, Estonia and Finland) similarities and differences are analysed – motives to become a journalist, competences and character traits, ideals and values and relations to other professional areas as PR and politics. The main question is whether there is a process of homogenization among future journalists as a result of globalization, or whether there still are clear differences connected to history, politics and different media systems.  The results shows that it is not possible to talk about one similar professional identity, but rather hybrid forms of professional identities that combine some universal journalistic values with cultural heritage and social/political conditions of the different countries.

  • 37.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The celebrified journalist: Journalistic self-promotion and branding in celebrity constructions on Twitter2018In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 19, no 16, p. 2379-2399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ongoing transformations of the media ecology in the direction of greater digitization have increasingly blurred the boundaries between professional journalists and other information brokers; the former now must work hard to distinguish themselves from the latter. Notable among these developments is a shift towards the individualization of journalism, with journalists seeming to spend more time building personal brands, for instance on Twitter, than on building organizational ones. Within journalism research there is a growing interest in the use of Twitter for journalistic self-promotion and branding, but studies are still scarce, and the ways in which journalistic self-promotion is discursively constituted need further empirical and theoretical attention. By means of a critical discourse analysis of the tweets of a widely followed journalist in Sweden, and through the theoretical lens of celebrity, this study aims to contribute knowledge about how journalistic self-promotion discourses evolving in the digitized media setting are constituted. The article identifies discourses that construct celebrity through (1) “fame by association,” (2) asymmetrical communication, and (3) “lifestreaming.” It concludes by discussing “celebrification” as a vital component of journalistic self-promotion discourses as well as the power aspects of ubiquitous self-promotional discourses, which are deeply embedded in the general structures of society.

  • 38.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    The diversified nature of “domesticated” news discourse: The case of climate change in national news media2014In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 711-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have concluded that foreign news in national media is characterized by a national logic largely caused by so-called “domestication,” i.e. the adaptation of news from “outside” to a perceived national audience. The domesticated news discourse counteracts discursive constructions of the global, reinforcing instead nation-state discourse and identity. However, this paper argues that we need to take the search for constructions of the transnational beyond the genre of foreign news. The deterritorialized nature of today's globalized risks and crises, such as climate change, blurs the boundaries between the domestic and foreign, and renders the distinction between domestic and foreign news more or less obsolete. This, in turn, requires us to revisit the concept and practice of “domestication” using context-sensitive analytical approaches to capture its discursive constitution. Guided by the theoretical and methodological framework of critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper aims to analyze and de-construct news discourses of “domestication” by studying the reporting on climate change in Indian, Swedish, and US newspapers. It identifies three discursive modes of domestication: (1) introverted domestication, which disconnects the domestic from the global; (2) extroverted domestication, which interconnects the domestic and the global; and (3) counter-domestication, a deterritorialized mode of reporting that lacks any domestic epicenter.

  • 39.
    Picard, Robert
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Organizational Failures in the Jason Blair Incident2004In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 404-406Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Picard, Robert G.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Shifts in Newspaper Advertising Expenditures and their Implications for the Future of Newspapers2008In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 704-716Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Richardson, John E
    et al.
    Barkho, Leon
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Reporting Israel/Palestine: Ethnographic insights into the verbal and visual rhetoric of BBC journalism2009In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 594-622Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Shehata, Adam
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Hopmann, D
    Centre for Journalism, Department of Political Science, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark .
    Framing climate change: A study of US and Swedish press coverage of global warming2012In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 175-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative study investigates news coverage of climate change in the United States and Sweden. The main research question concerns the extent to which news coverage of climate change is influenced by domestic political elite discussion or the scientific consensus surrounding the issue. While there has been a widespread consensus in Sweden that climate change is (partly) caused by human activity and that there is an unquestionable need to take countermeasures, there has been substantial debate about the causes and the necessity of political action in the United States. Based on an extensive content analysis of 1785 articles over a 10-year period, as well as an intensive analysis of news coverage of the Kyoto and Bali summits, results show that media coverage is strikingly similar in these two countries, indicating a weak influence of national political elites on how climate change is framed in news coverage. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 43. Skogerbø, Eli
    et al.
    Josefsen, Eva
    Fjellström, Anna-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Indigenous Political Journalism in the Norwegian and Swedish Public Service Broadcasters2019In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 991-1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across the world, Indigenous peoples are reclaiming their cultural and political identities, after having suffered decades of assimilation, repression and marginalisation. A major tool in this process is Indigenous journalism, which allows for storytelling and news reporting from the inside, as opposed to being a marginalised group that is only reported about from the outside. This article presents a comparative analysis of Indigenous political journalism as practised in the Norwegian and Swedish public broadcasters. The article explains the differences between the practices of NRK Sapmi and SR Sameradion & SVT Sapmi regarding their reporting on the campaign leading up to the Samediggi elections in Norway and Sweden in 2013. The analysis shows that Sami journalists on both sides of the border adhere to commonly shared characteristics of Indigenous journalism practices, but with considerable variation between them. There are two main conclusions of the analysis. First, NRK Sapmi and SR Sameradion & SVT Sapmi indeed practise Indigenous journalism, but do so differently, and second, ethnic identity counts, but institutions decide. Sami journalism is constrained not only by national borders but also by the institutional framework of the parent company, the public service remits and the resources available to them.

  • 44.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Does Public Service TV and the Intensity of the Political Information Environment Matter?2017In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1415-1432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, a number of studies have suggested a positive linkage between public service broad- casting and public knowledge about current affairs. Most studies are, however, based on aggregate, cross-sectional data. On the individual level they fall short of establishing any causal linkage between TV news exposure and public knowledge. In addition, studies which investigate whether the intensity of the political information environment matters for learning effects from watching TV news, are missing. Against this background, this study compares knowledge effects from watch- ing public service and commercial TV news in three contexts that vary in the intensity of the political information environment: a national election campaign, a European parliamentary election cam- paign and a non-election period. Among other things, the results show stronger knowledge effects from watching public service than commercial TV news.

  • 45.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    In Search of a Standard: four models of democracy and their normative implications for journalism2005In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 331-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature discussing the impact of media and journalism upon democracy, typically criticizes both media and journalism for their content and their negative effects on some aspects of democracy. In turn, this raises the question of identifying news standards by which the quality of news journalism might be evaluated. But neither the proposed news standards nor the criticism levelled against them specify with sufficient clarity the model of democracy to be used as a normative departure. This article argues that the question of proper news standards cannot be addressed in isolation from the question of different normative models of democracy. In order to discover news standards by which the quality of news journalism can or should be evaluated, it analyzes four normative models of democracy and their demands upon citizens: procedural democracy, competetive democracy, participatory democracy and deliberative democracy. Building upon that analysis, the article asks: What normative implications for media and news journalism follow from the distinctive perspectives of procedural, competitive, participatory and deliberative democracy?

  • 46.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Mediatization and perceptions of the media's political influence2011In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 423-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the key concepts related to the media's increasing political influence is mediatization. It has even been described as a meta-process, on a par with other social change processes such as globalization and individualization. Despite the fact that the concept has been used for several decades, it remains however a concept referred to more often than properly defined and used to guide systematic empirical research. Against this background and based on the conceptualization of mediatization as a multi-dimensional concept, the purpose of this article is to investigate perceptions of the media's political influence among members of parliament and political news journalists at major national and regional media in Sweden. The results show that both groups attribute great influence to the media, in particular TV, newspapers and radio, and that both groups perceive TV and radio as influential as even the prime minister in terms of how often they manage to place a new issue highest on the political agenda. The results of the study are discussed in light of the theory of an ongoing mediatization of politics. 

  • 47.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Esser, Frank
    University of Zurich.
    Introduction: Making Sense of the Mediatization of Politics2014In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 243-255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Department of Media and Communication, Karlstad University, Universitetsgatan 2, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hopmann, David Nicolas
    Centre for Journalism, Department of Political Science, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark.
    Determinants of News Content: Comparing Journalists’ Perceptions of the Normative and Actual Impact of Different Event Properties When Deciding What’s News2012In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 13, no 5-6, p. 718-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is a large body of research on news values and news selection, most research does not clearly distinguish between the concept of news and news selection, on the one hand, and news values and criteria of newsworthiness on the other. These concepts are often treated as synonymous. This is problematic, as there may be many other factors aside from news values or criteria of newsworthiness that determine what becomes news, and as there may be differences between what journalists think should be, and actually is, important when deciding what’s news. Against this background, this study investigates what Swedish journalists think is, and should be, important event properties when deciding what’s news, and whether there are differences across journalists working for different kinds of media and depending on whether they work with online publishing. The results show that there are significant differences between the perceived normative and actual importance of investigated event properties when deciding what’s news.

  • 49.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Hopmann, David Nicolas
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Determinants of News Content: Comparing journalists' perceptions of the normative and the actual impact of different event properties when deciding what's news2012In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 13, no 5-6, p. 718-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is a large body of research on news values and news selection, most research does not clearly distinguish between the concept of news and news selection, on the one hand, and news values and criteria of newsworthiness on the other. These concepts are often treated as synonymous. This is problematic, as there may be many other factors aside from news values or criteria of newsworthiness that determine what becomes news, and as there may be differences between what journalists think should be, and actually is, important when deciding what's news. Against this background, this study investigates what Swedish journalists think is, and should be, important event properties when deciding what's news, and whether there are differences across journalists working for different kinds of media and depending on whether they work with online publishing. The results show that there are significant differences between the perceived normative and actual importance of investigated event properties when deciding what's news.

  • 50.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Shehata, Adam
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Structural Biases in British and Swedish Election News Coverage2007In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 798-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Election campaigns in advanced democracies are highly mediated events. Thus, the electorate has come to depend upon the media for information regarding the election, the parties and their policies. At the same time, research indicates that the news coverage of elections tends to be structurally biased, in the sense that the media coverage is episodic rather than thematic and that it is focused on the horse race and the political strategies of the competing parties rather than on the issues at stake. However, comparative studies of election news coverage in different countries are still somewhat lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to compare the election news coverage in Britain and Sweden, two countries that are part of different models of media and political systems. The study investigates the election news coverage in two major broadsheets and one major tabloid in each country, during the last three weeks before the Swedish Election in 2002 and the British Election in 2005. The results show several significant differences between the Swedish and the British election news coverage.

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