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  • 1. Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Sandby Borg Massacre: Interpersonal Violence and the Demography of the Dead2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 210-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During excavations of the Iron Age ringfort of Sandby borg (ad 400–550), the remains of twenty-six unburied bodies were encountered inside and outside the buildings. The skeletons and the archaeological record indicate that after the individuals had died the ringfort was deserted. An osteological investigation and trauma analysis were conducted according to standard anthropological protocols. The osteological analysis identified only men, but individuals of all ages were represented. Eight individuals (31 per cent) showed evidence of perimortem trauma that was sharp, blunt, and penetrating, consistent with interpersonal violence. The location of the bodies and the trauma pattern appear to indicate a massacre rather than a battle. The ‘efficient trauma’ distribution (i.e. minimal but effective violence), the fact that the bodies were not manipulated, combined with the archaeological context, suggest that the perpetrators were numerous and that the assault was carried out effectively. The contemporary sociopolitical situation was seemingly turbulent and the suggested motive behind the massacre was to gain power and control.

  • 2.
    Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    The Sandby Borg Massacre: Interpersonal Violence and the Demography of the Dead2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 210-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During excavations of the Iron Age ringfort of Sandby borg (ad 400-550), the remains of twenty-six unburied bodies were encountered inside and outside the buildings. The skeletons and the archaeological record indicate that after the individuals had died the ringfort was deserted. An osteological investigation and trauma analysis were conducted according to standard anthropological protocols. The osteological analysis identified only men, but individuals of all ages were represented. Eight individuals (31 per cent) showed evidence of perimortem trauma that was sharp, blunt, and penetrating, consistent with interpersonal violence. The location of the bodies and the trauma pattern appear to indicate a massacre rather than a battle. The 'efficient trauma' distribution (i.e. minimal but effective violence), the fact that the bodies were not manipulated, combined with the archaeological context, suggest that the perpetrators were numerous and that the assault was carried out effectively. The contemporary sociopolitical situation was seemingly turbulent and the suggested motive behind the massacre was to gain power and control.

  • 3.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    More Theory for Mortuary Research of the Viking World2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 519-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This themed journal issue provides many examples of ways forward in the study of death and memory in the Viking world. While all contributions demonstrate that there are exciting new ways to study remains from funerary contexts that focus on different forms of citation involving material culture and monuments, this article will very briefly discuss dimensions that have not been addressed here. Specifically, it showcases how the mortuary citations approach can also use post-humanist theory for further development and exploration of mortuary practices in the Viking world. Although short, this article discusses rune stones, particularly rune stones with kuml inscriptions, which I have examined elsewhere.

    The term kuml appears on contemporary rune stones; it refers to different material entities such as rune stones, mounds/cairns, and other standing stones. The being and becoming of kuml is briefly discussed through the concepts of intra-action and agential cuts championed by Karen Barad.

  • 4.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Review of Ruth M. Van Dyke, ed. Practicing Materiality, Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2015.2017In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 168-171Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Review of: Ann Garrison Darrin & Beth Laura O'Leary, (Eds), 2009, Handbook of Space engineering, Archaeology, and Heritage. Boca Raton: CRC Press.2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 271-273Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Colomer, Laia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Stones, Books and Flags: Born and the Role of Archaeological Heritage Management under the Barcelona Model2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 111-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1980s, Barcelona's local institutions have been pioneers in creating a close relationship between culture, urban regeneration, and the social and economic development of the city, and subsequently in implementing a new paradigm in cultural policy for entrepreneurial, cultural, and creative cities. As a consequence, the city has also become a model for place branding and cultural tourism. In this context, Born, an archaeological site of the early eighteenth century which offers detailed testimony to both the cultural and economic lifestyle of the city at that time and the defeat of the Catalans during the War of the Spanish Succession, has been preserved and opened to the public in line with the city's varying cultural policies and attitudes to national identity over the last two decades. This article discusses Born from 2000 to 2017 and the political and cultural management context in relation to the Barcelona model that has defined its current form as a cultural centre. In this context, this article also discusses the role of archaeology in Barcelona's cultural governance, as a case study through which to consider the role of urban archaeological heritage management today.

  • 7.
    Fallgren, Jan-Henrik
    et al.
    Univ Aberdeen, Kings Coll, Ctr Scandinavian Studies, Aberdeen AB9 1FX, Scotland.;Univ Aberdeen, Kings Coll, Dept Archaeol, Aberdeen AB9 1FX, Scotland..
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The Ritual Use of Brooches in Early Medieval Forts on Öland, SwedenL'usage rituel des fibules dans les enceintes fortifiées de l’île d’Öland en Suède au haut moyen âgeDer rituelle Gebrauch von Fibeln in den frühmittelalterlichen Befestigungen auf der schwedischen Insel Öland2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 681-703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010, the largest find of exquisite gilded silver brooches ever made in Scandinavia came to light during a metal detector survey in a small fort on oland in the Baltic Sea. It consisted of five hoards buried in five different houses within the fort. The brooches were of the Dreiknopfbugelfibeln/radiate-headed and relief types. Three of the hoards also contained large quantities of beads and pendants, some quite exclusive and rare. In addition, the upper part of another relief brooch probably belonged to a sixth hoard ploughed up in the late nineteenth century. In 2011, Kalmar County Museum excavations at the site of these hoard finds also revealed the traces of a massacre. Though a connection between the deposition of the hoards and the massacre is plausible, several elements suggest that the deposits are ritual in character and unrelated to the attack on the fort. The regular placing of the hoards in the right corner inside the entrance of the houses suggests ritual acts, and the composition of the hoards demonstrates that the deposits are symbolic. We conclude that the hoards and the brooches are props belonging to the interior of the forts and to activities conducted inside them; they may have been worn by some women during rituals. Why these hoards were left in the Sandby fort is, however, no doubt related to its destruction.

  • 8.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of Blaze O'Connor, Gabriel Cooney and John Chapman, eds, (Prehistoric Society Research Paper 3, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2009, 191pp., 93 b/w illustr., 8 colour plates, hbk, ISBN 978-1-84217-377-0)2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 251-253Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hennius, Andreas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Rudolf, Gustavsson
    Societas Archaeologica Upsaliensis .
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Spindler, Luke
    University of York.
    Whalebone Gaming Pieces: Aspects of Marine Mammal Exploitation in Vendeland Viking Age Scandinavia2018In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 612-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discussions of pre-Viking trade and production have for many decades focused on products made of precious metals, glass and, to some degree, iron. This is hardly surprising considering the difficulties in finding and provenancing products made of organic matter. In this article we examine gaming pieces made from bone and antler, which are not unusual in Scandinavian burials in the Vendel and Vikingperiod (c. AD 550–1050). A special emphasis is placed on whalebone pieces that appear to dominate after around AD 550, signalling a large-scale production and exploitation of North Atlantic whale products.In combination with other goods such as bear furs, birds of prey, and an increased iron and tar production, whalebone products are part of an intensified large-scale outland exploitation and indicate strong, pre-urban trading routes across Scandinavia and Europe some 200 years before the Viking period and well before the age of the emporia.

  • 10.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Can you hear me at the back? Archaeology, communication and society2007In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 10, no 2/3, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Comments on Suzie Thomas: Collaborate, Condemn, or Ignore? Responding to Non-Archaeological Approaches to Archaeological Heritage2015In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 333-334Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Real Archeology: The Medialization of archeological Knowledge in the Field of Tension between Science and Public2013In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 580-582Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of M. Kircher (2012), Wa(h)re Archäologie: Die Medialisierung archäologischen Wissens im Spannungsfeld von Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit Bielefeld: transcript., ISBN 38376203792013In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 580-582Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The past in our lives: two archaeological novels. Review of R. Martin, The Sorrow of Archaeology, and J. Hildebrandt, Fördömd2006In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 9, no 2/3, p. 287-290Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The Past is Now: An interview with Anders Högberg2008In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 7-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Anders Högberg is a Swedish archaeologist whose research offers an original perspective on prehistoric flint technology but he has also been directing some innovative projects in archaeological teaching and learning. In this interview I am exploring some of the ideas that have been guiding his work in both realms. Although part of the interview is about work conducted in the past, equal weight is given to new opportunities and developments that affect the future of archaeology. Anders Högberg's ideas cannot be said to be typical or representative for any larger community, but he is operating in very specific historic circumstances that are shared to a greater or lesser extent by many other archaeologists living and working today. This interview documents the particular views on material culture, public archaeology, and the field of archaeology more generally that were held by one European archaeologist in 2008.

  • 16.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bronze Age Connections: Cultural Contact in Prehistoric Europe2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 304-306Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Childhood in the Past2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 119-120Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Spatial and Temporal Trends in New Cases of Men with Modified Teeth from Sweden (AD 750 to 1100)2014In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 45-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vikings with artificially modified teeth have previously been documented in the south-eastern parts ofScandinavia and in England. In a project dealing with life in the Mälaren Valley in Sweden duringthe period AD 750–1100, new cases of people with modified maxillary teeth were observed. Thehypothesis that the practice was entirely associated with adult men dating to the Viking Age was tested.The new cases demonstrate that the habit extended to eastern-central Sweden, including the proto-townof Birka, perhaps as early as in the middle of the eighth century. Additionally, cases from Sigtuna showthat the practice may have ended as late as the beginning of the twelfth century. A microanalysis, usinga scanning electron microscope, showed the heterogeneous character of the modifications. The affectedindividuals were all adult men, similar to previously published cases. Some of the men are associatedwith weapons and violent acts and the cases from Sigtuna were all from cemeteries with a possibleassociation with lower social strata. However, discrepancies in archaeological contexts and in the charac-teristics of the modifications suggest temporal and spatial variation in the social meaning of themodifications.

  • 19.
    Klevnäs, Alison Margaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    ‘Imbued with the Essence of the Owner’: Personhood and Possessions in the Reopening and Reworking of Viking-Age Burials2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 456-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the wide range of grave disturbance practices seen in Viking-age burials across Scandinavia. It argues that the much-debated reopenings at high-profile sites, notably the Norwegian royal' mounds, should be seen against a background of widespread and varied evidence for burial reworking in Scandinavia throughout the first-millennium ad and into the Middle Ages. Interventions into Viking-age graves are interpreted as disruptive, intended to derail practices of memory-creation set in motion by funerary displays and monuments. However, the reopening and reworking of burials were also mnemonic citations in their own right, using a recurrent set of practices to make heroic, mythological, and genealogical allusions. The retrieval of portable artefacts was a key element in this repertoire, and in this article I use archaeological and written sources to explore the particular concepts of ownership which enabled certain possessions to work as material citations appropriating attributes of dead persons for living claimants.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Review: Kossian, Rainer, Bartholomäus, Werner A; Hunte 1: ein mittel- bis spätneolithischer und frühbronzezeitlicher Siedlungsplatz am Dümmer, Ldkr. Diepholz (Niedersachsen). ISBN 978-3-938078-03-72010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 1-3Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of a very important book (in German) regarding a famous site in Niedersachsen. A site excavated in the 1930´s with several housefoundations and a very rich fins matewrial.

  • 21.
    Lindholm, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The bear in the grave: Exploitation of Top Predator and Herbivore Resources in 1st millennium Sweden – First Trends From a Long-term Research Project2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 3-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focusses on animal remains associated with archaeological contexts dated to the middle and later phases of the Scandinavian Iron Age, which corresponds to the first millennium AD. The main question to be addressed is whether this record can be used for identifying human impact on certain animal populations for modelling faunal exploitation and interregional trade. In the first part of the paper, we undertake a detailed inventory of animal finds recorded in published excavation reports, research catalogues, and in existing databases maintained primarily by the Historical Museum in Stockholm. We compare the chronological pattern identified in the burial assemblages with a chronological sequence retrieved from pitfall hunting systems located in the Scandinavian inland region. The chronologies of the animal finds from burials and the pitfall systems are then compared with dated pollen-analytical sequences retrieved in the inland region and additional archaeological assemblages, such as graves and hoards of Roman coins. In our discussion, we outline an interregional model of faunal exploitation between ad 300 and 1200, including the possible location of hunting grounds and end-distribution areas for animal products. The paper provides deeper insights into the burial record of the middle Iron Age, arguing for the need for broader interregional approaches, and focussed archaeological research in the inland regions of Scandinavia.

  • 22.
    Ljungkvist, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Lindholm, Karl Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Bear in the Grave: Exploitation of Top Predator and Herbivore Resources in First Millennium Sweden: First Trends from a Long-Term Research Project2015In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focusses on animal remains associated with archaeological contexts dated to the middle and later phases of the Scandinavian Iron Age, which corresponds to the first millennium AD. The main question to be addressed is whether this record can be used for identifying human impact on certain animal populations for modelling faunal exploitation and interregional trade. In the first part of the paper, we undertake a detailed inventory of animal finds recorded in published excavation reports, research catalogues, and in existing databases maintained primarily by the Historical Museum in Stockholm. We compare the chronological pattern identified in the burial assemblages with a chronological sequence retrieved from pitfall hunting systems located in the Scandinavian inland region. The chronologies of the animal finds from burials and the pitfall systems are then compared with dated pollen-analytical sequences retrieved in the inland region and additional archaeological assemblages, such as graves and hoards of Roman coins. In our discussion, we outline an interregional model of faunal exploitation between ad 300 and 1200, including the possible location of hunting grounds and end-distribution areas for animal products. The paper provides deeper insights into the burial record of the middle Iron Age, arguing for the need for broader interregional approaches, and focussed archaeological research in the inland regions of Scandinavia.

  • 23.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Contemporary and historical archaeology in the making: [review of] Mats Burström, Samtidsarkeologi, and Laura McAtackeny, Matthew Palus and Agela Piccini (eds), Contemporary and historical archaeology in theory2008In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 11, no 2-3, p. 270-273Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    McWilliams, Anna
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    [Review of] John Schofield and Wayne Cocroft (eds), A Fearsome Heritage : Diverse Legacies of the Cold War2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 263-265Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Nilsson, Björn
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology. Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute.
    Wide-Ranging Perspectives On Archaeology and Material Studies: [Review of:] Linda M. Hurcombe, Archaeological Artefacts as Material Culture and James M. Skibo & Michael Brian Schiffer, People and things. A Behavorial Approach to Material Culture2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 250-253Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Mats Larsson. Life and Death in the Mesolithic of Sweden (Oxford: Oxbow, 2017, 144pp., 61 illustr., hbk, ISBN 978-1-78-570385-0)2018In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 658-660Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    The Many Archaeologies of Ritual: [Review of] Anna Lucia d’Agata and Aleydis Van de Moortel, eds, Archaeologies of Cult. Essays on Ritual and Cult in Crete in honor of Geraldine C. Gesell. (Hesperia supplement 42, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 2009, 354 pp., 146 illus., pbk, ISBN 978 0 87661 542 3) and Evangelos Kyriakides, ed., The Archaeology of Ritual (Cotsen Advanced Seminars 3, Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, 2007, 331 pp., illustr., pbk, ISBN 978 1 931745 47 5)2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 389-392Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Price, Neil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Mortimer, Paul
    Independent scholar.
    An eye for Odin? Divine role-playing in the age of Sutton Hoo2014In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 517-538Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ocriculum (Otricoli, Umbria): An Archaeological Survey of the Roman Town2014In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 745-748Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ramqvist, Per H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Review of: Siegmar von Schnurbein, ed., Atlas der Vorgeschichte: Europa von den ersten Menschen bis Christi Geburt; Miroslav Buchvaldek, Andreas Lippert and Lubomír Košnar, eds, Archeologický Atlas Praveké Evropy / Archäologischer Atlas zur Prähistorischen Archäologie Europas2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 276-276Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ramqvist, Per H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Reviews: Siegmar von Schnurbein, ed., Atlas der Vorgeschichte: Europa von den ersten Menschen bis Christi Geburt; Miroslav Buchvaldek, Andreas Lippert and Lubomír Košnar, eds, Archeologický Atlas Praveké Evropy / Archäologischer Atlas zur Prähistorischen Archäologie Europas2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 276-276Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 32. Skoglund, Peter
    et al.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Discourses of nature conservation and heritage management in the past, present and future:: Discussing heritage and sustainable development from Swedish experiences2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 368-385Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Äikäs, Tiina
    et al.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    New Users and Changing Traditions—(Re)Defining Sami Offering Sites2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 95-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sami are indigenous people of Northern Fennoscandia. Some Sami offering sites have been used for over a thousand years. During this time, the offering traditions have changed and various people have started using the places based on different motivations. Present day archaeological finds give evidence of both continuing traditions and new meanings attached to these sites, as well as to sites that were probably not originally used for rituals in the Sami ethnic religion. In some cases, the authenticity of the place seems to lie in the stories and current beliefs more than in a historical continuity or any specifically sacred aspects of the topography or nature it is situated in. Today's new users include, for example, local (Sami) people, tourists, and neo-pagans. This paper discusses what informs these users, what identifies certain locations as offering sites, and what current users believe their relationship to these places should be. What roles do scholarly traditions, heritage tourism, and internal culture have in (re)defining Sami offering sites and similarly what roles do ‘appropriate’ rituals have in ascribing meaning to particular places? How do we mediate wishes for multivocality with our professional opinions when it comes to defining sacredness?

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