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  • 1.
    120112 HONG, SISONG
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för ekonomi.
    LIN, SHUNZHAO
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för ekonomi.
    Service Marketing in a cross-culture environment: a case of Elekta China2011Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (magisterexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
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  • 2. A. Alkhamisi, Mahdi
    et al.
    Shukur, Ghazi
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Nationalekonomi. Statistik.
    A Monte Carlo Study of Recent Ridge Parameters2007Ingår i: Communications in statistics. Simulation and computation, ISSN 0361-0918, E-ISSN 1532-4141, Vol. 36, nr 3, s. 535-547Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 3. A. Almaqtari, Faozi
    et al.
    H.S. Farhan, Najib
    Yahya Salmony, Monir
    M. Al-Ahdal, Waleed
    Mishra, Nandita
    Linköpings universitet. linköping university.
    Earning management estimation and prediction using machine learning: A systematic review of processing methods and synthesis for future research2022Ingår i: 2021 International Conference on Technological Advancements and Innovations (ICTAI): IEEE, IEEE, 2022Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study highlights earning management optimization possibilities to constrain the events of earning management and financial fraud. Our study investigates the existing stock of knowledge and strand literature available on earning management and fraud detection. It aims to review systematically the methods and techniques used by prior research to determine earning management and fraud detection. The results indicate that prior research in earning management optimization is diverged among several techniques and none of these techniques has provided an ideal optimization for earning management. Further, the results reveal that earning management determinants are complex based on the type and size of business entities which complicate the optimization possibilities. The current research brings useful insights for predicting and optimization of earnings management and financial fraud. The present study has significant implications for policymakers, stock markets, auditors, investors, analysts, and professionals.

  • 4.
    A Anthony, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Ingjald, Tobias
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Handelsbanken: en studie om ledarskap2007Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats
  • 5. Aaberge, Rolf
    et al.
    Bourguignon, François
    Brandolini, Andrea
    Ferreira, Francisco H. G.
    Gornick, Janet G.
    Hills, John
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Jenkins, Stephen P.
    Marlier, Eric
    Micklewright, John
    Nolan, Brian
    Piketty, Thomas
    Radermacher, Walter J.
    Smeeding, Timothy M.
    Stern, Nicholas H.
    Stiglitz, Joseph
    Sutherland, Holly
    Tony Atkinson and his Legacy2017Ingår i: The Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN 0034-6586, E-ISSN 1475-4991, Vol. 63, nr 3, s. 411-444Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tony Atkinson is universally celebrated for his outstanding contributions to the measurement and analysis of inequality, but he never saw the study of inequality as a separate branch of economics. He was an economist in the classical sense, rejecting any sub-field labelling of his interests and expertise, and he made contributions right across economics. His death on 1 January 2017 deprived the world of both an intellectual giant and a deeply committed public servant in the broadest sense of the term. This collective tribute highlights the range, depth and importance of Tony's enormous legacy, the product of almost fifty years’ work.

  • 6. Aaboe, L
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Högskolan i Kalmar, Handelshögskolan BBS.
    Löfsten, H
    Incubator performance: An efficiency frontier analysis2008Ingår i: International Journal of Business Innovation and Research, ISSN 1751-0252, E-ISSN 1751-0260, Vol. 2, nr 4, s. 354-380Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessments and evaluations of incubators has been a topic of discussion for as long as incubators have been in existence due to the fact that there has not been an agreement on how to determine good performance. This paper demonstrates the use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) when studying performance of incubators. More specifically, it does so within the four dimensions of cooperation with universities, business networks, external funding and competence development on a sample of 16 Swedish incubators. We show that DEA enables us to measure non-numerical dimensions, and to simultaneously take into account the efforts made by both the incubator and the outcomes. Moreover, DEA provides benchmarks and, based on a model that divides the incubators into four different groups, illustrates the difference between the benchmark and the incubators' current situation.

  • 7. Aaboen, L
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Högskolan i Kalmar, Handelshögskolan BBS.
    Löfsten, H
    Critical dimensions for technology transfer Incubator-facilitated links between finance, academia and NTBFs2008Ingår i: International Journal of Management and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1468-4330, E-ISSN 1741-8127, Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 331-335Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores incubator facilitation of technology transfer for their New Technology-Based Firms (NTBFs). Empirical evidence gathered from six interviews with incubator managers, together with a survey of 131 NTBFs in incubators in Sweden, in 2005, and the findings made in a survey of 273 NTBFs situated inside-and-outside Science Parks in 1999, are used for the exploration. It is suggested that incubators do facilitate technology transfer for their NTBFs. It is further suggested that the development towards increased ability to facilitate technology transfer will continue as a results of the efforts made on the incubator and systemic level.

  • 8.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Haneberg, Dag Håkon
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Jakobsen, Siri
    Nord University Business School, Nord University, Norway.
    Lauvås, Thomas
    Nord University Business School, Nord University, Norway.
    Wigger, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Projekt, innovationer och entreprenörskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Nord University Business School, Nord University, Norway.
    Case-based entrepreneurship education in and for the Nordic region2022Ingår i: Reframing the Case Method in Entrepreneurship Education.: Cases from the Nordic Countries / [ed] Wigger, K., Aaboen, L., Haneberg, D.H.,Jakobsen, S., & Lauvås, T., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2022, s. 2-17Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The case method provides entrepreneurship educators with great potential to be entrepreneurial and to think outside the box when adjusting the case method for increased entrepreneurial learning. This chapter provides the theoretical background of case-based entrepreneurship education and a debate on context in case teaching in general and the Nordic countries in particular. Further the chapter provides a synopsis and reflections of how the chapters in this book discuss the design and utilization of cases through 2 parts. Part 1 includes theoretical perspectives, discussions, and practical procedures on how the case method and case activities can be reframed and approached in entrepreneurship education in general and for experiential learning in particular. Part 2 contributes with a collection of Nordic entrepreneurship cases with accompanying teaching notes. We believe that this book is of great inspiration for entrepreneurship educators wanting to use the case method in their teaching.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
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  • 9.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology .
    La Rocca, Antonella
    BI Norwegian Business School.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Perna, Andrea
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik. Universita' Politecnica delle Marche.
    Shih, Tommy
    Starting up in Business Networks: Why relationships matter in entrepreneurship2016 (uppl. 1st)Bok (Refereegranskat)
  • 10.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Shih, Tommy
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Exploring the roles of university spin-offs in business networks2016Ingår i: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 59, s. 157-166Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies different university spin-off (USO) roles related to resource interaction among business parties. It does so by mapping how USOs become part of business networks in terms of their roles relative to other parties. The theoretical frame of reference focuses on roles and resource interaction based on an industrial network approach to business markets. The empirical research is based onfive cases of USOs representing a variety in terms of technology, degree of newness, sector, and area of application. As a result of the analysis, three different roles are identified: the USO as resource mediator, resource re-combiner and resource renewer. These roles reflect how USOs adapt resources to, or require changes among, business parties' resources. The paper also discusses the main resource interfaces associated with the three roles and related challenges. The paper contributes to previous research through illustrating USOs' roles relative to business parties from a resource interaction point of view, and by pointing to the establishment of new companies in business networks as a way of implementing innovation. Finally, the paper discusses the managerial implications of the research in terms of the USO's need to understand which role to take and how to develop it.

  • 11.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Shih, Tommy
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Exploring the roles of university spin-offs in business networks2016Ingår i: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 59, s. 157-166Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies different university spin-off (USO) roles related to resource interaction among business parties. It does so by mapping how USOs become part of business networks in terms of their roles relative to other parties. The theoretical frame of reference focuses on roles and resource interaction based on an industrial network approach to business markets. The empirical research is based onfive cases of USOs representing a variety in terms of technology, degree of newness, sector, and area of application. As a result of the analysis, three different roles are identified: the USO as resource mediator, resource re-combiner and resource renewer. These roles reflect how USOs adapt resources to, or require changes among, business parties' resources. The paper also discusses the main resource interfaces associated with the three roles and related challenges. The paper contributes to previous research through illustrating USOs' roles relative to business parties from a resource interaction point of view, and by pointing to the establishment of new companies in business networks as a way of implementing innovation. Finally, the paper discusses the managerial implications of the research in terms of the USO's need to understand which role to take and how to develop it.

  • 12.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Shih, Tommy
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Exploring the roles of university spin-offs in business networks2016Ingår i: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, Vol. 59, s. 157-166Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies different university spin-off (USO) roles related to resource interaction among business parties. It does so by mapping how USOs become part of business networks in terms of their roles relative to other parties. The theoretical frame of reference focuses on roles and resource interaction based on an industrial network approach to business markets. The empirical research is based onfive cases of USOs representing a variety in terms of technology, degree of newness, sector, and area of application. As a result of the analysis, three different roles are identified: the USO as resource mediator, resource re-combiner and resource renewer. These roles reflect how USOs adapt resources to, or require changes among, business parties' resources. The paper also discusses the main resource interfaces associated with the three roles and related challenges. The paper contributes to previous research through illustrating USOs' roles relative to business parties from a resource interaction point of view, and by pointing to the establishment of new companies in business networks as a way of implementing innovation. Finally, the paper discusses the managerial implications of the research in terms of the USO's need to understand which role to take and how to develop it.

  • 13. AAboen, Lise
    et al.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    University spin-offs and their roles in business networks2014Ingår i: IMP Conference, 2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 14. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of technology, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of technology, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Sweden.
    University spin-offs and their roles in business networks2014Ingår i: IMP Conference, 1st - 6th September 2014, Bordeaux, France, 2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 15. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Löfsten, Hans
    Incubator performance: an efficiency frontier analysis2008Ingår i: International Journal of Business Innovation and Research, ISSN 1751-0252, Vol. 2, nr 4, s. 354-380Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 16. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Löfsten, Hans
    Towards incubator facilitation of technology transfer2008Ingår i: International Journal of Management and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1468-4330, E-ISSN 1741-8127, Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 331-335Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 17. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    von Koch, Christopher
    Löfsten, Hans
    Corporate governance and performance of small high-tech firms in Sweden2006Ingår i: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, nr 8, s. 955-968Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach uses data from a sample of 183 small high-tech firms, new, technology-based firms (small high-tech firms) in Sweden (54 variables under the headings of work experience, board and advice, financing, motivation-performance priorities, technological innovation and strategy). This study identifies some core areas of importance in corporate governance. Few managers in this study had a strong background and experience of finance and the preparation of business. Only 64 per cent of the managers have had previous work experience before starting the firm. The survey makes it clear that the small high-tech firms are likely to have a strong link with banking institutions. The consequence of these links is that most of the firm's capital supply is from banks, and that there are strong ownership links between banks and industry. The background of the founder does seem to have had an effect on the problem of financing and ownership issues. It is private sector organizations (banks) and families that are most frequently consulted by small high-tech firms (However, low means). It is also the private and public sector organizations, in connection with external board membership, regional development agencies and banks that are most frequently consulted. In the future, it is reasonable to search for factor patterns that can begin to explain and predict the direction of corporate governance in small new technology-based firms.

  • 18.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    The University of Nottingham.
    von Koch, Christopher
    School of Economics and Commercial Law, Department of Business Administration, Göteborg.
    Löfsten, Hans
    Chalmers universitet.
    Corporate governance and performance of small high-tech firms in Sweden2006Ingår i: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, nr 8, s. 955-968Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach uses data from a sample of 183 small high-tech firms, new technology-based firms (small high-tech firms) in Sweden (54 variables under the headings of work experience, board and advice, financing, motivation—performance priorities, technological innovation and strategy). This study identifies some core areas of importance in corporate governance. Few managers in this study had a strong background and experience of finance and the preparation of business. Only 64 per cent of the managers have had previous work experience before starting the firm. The survey makes it clear that the small high-tech firms are likely to have a strong link with banking institutions. The consequence of these links is that most of the firm's capital supply is from banks, and that there are strong ownership links between banks and industry. The background of the founder does seem to have had an effect on the problem of financing and ownership issues. It is private sector organizations (banks) and families that are most frequently consulted by small high-tech firms (However, low means). It is also the private and public sector organizations, in connection with external board membership, regional development agencies and banks that are most frequently consulted. In the future, it is reasonable to search for factor patterns that can begin to explain and predict the direction of corporate governance in small new technology-based firms.

  • 19. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Löfsten, Hans
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Nourishment for the piggy bank: facilitation of external financing in incubators2011Ingår i: International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, ISSN 1470-6075, E-ISSN 1741-5284, Vol. 10, nr 3/4, s. 354-374Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    Företag i inkubatorer attraherar lättare externt kapital än liknande företag ej lokaliserade i inkubatorer

  • 20.
    Aaby, Jovanna
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Entreprenörskap i Sverige och Japan: En komparativ studie utifrån GEM 20072011Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Syftet med denna studie är att jämföra entreprenörskap i Sverige och Japan och att få en förståelse för varför så olika länder båda har så lågt entreprenörskap. Jag har valt att avgränsa mig till data hämtade från GEM 2007.

    Metod: I detta arbete gör jag en jämförelse av entreprenörskap i Sverige och i Japan som jag gjort genom att införskaffa sekundär data från en rapport från GEM 2007. I detta arbete har mitt förhållningssätt främst varit abduktivt.

    Teoretiska Perspektiv: Wennekers (2006) har undersökt den U-kurva som uppstår när man studerar entreprenörskap i relation till ekonomisk utveckling. Länder tenderar att gå från en hög nivå av entreprenörskap till en låg nivå när man går från bondeekonomi till industriell ekonomi för att sedan öka igen när länder nått en avancerad nivå av ekonomisk utveckling. Trots dessa samband så skiljer sig länder fortfarande mycket åt när det kommer till entreprenörskap och förändringarna verkar vara ihållande. Wennekers (a.a.) menar att detta snarare beror på kulturella skillnader än ekonomiska skillnader eftersom kulturella skillnader är relativt oföränderliga över tiden.

    Empiri: GEM står för Global Entrepreneurship Monitor och är ett not-for-profit akademiskt forsknings konsortium. Deras mål är att göra internationell forskning av hög kvalité om entreprenöriska aktiviteter i världen som kan nå en så bred publik som möjligt. GEMs studie är den största enskilda studie av entreprenörisk aktivitet i världen och startade 1999. I detta arbete har jag använt mig av data från GEMs rapport från 2007 som är det år då både Japan och Sverige var med senast.

    Resultat: I en jämförelse av Japan och Sverige så hittar jag en del likheter, men främst skillnader. Detta antyder att det inte finns några enkla svar på varför entreprenörskap är lågt i ett land. Resultatet av studien indikerar att de nationella experterna hade rätt när de gav statlig politik som främsta problemområde för Sverige och kultur och sociala normer för Japan.

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    fulltext
  • 21.
    Aad, G.
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, CPPM, CNRS IN2P3, Marseille, France..
    Leopold, Alexander
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Lundberg, Olof
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Lund-Jensen, Bengt
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Ohm, Christian
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Ripellino, Giulia
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Shaheen, Rabia
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Shope, David R.
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Strandberg, Jonas
    KTH, Skolan för teknikvetenskap (SCI), Fysik, Partikel- och astropartikelfysik.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland..
    et al.,
    A search for an unexpected asymmetry in the production of e(+)mu(-) and e(-)mu(+) pairs in proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector at root s=13 TeV2022Ingår i: Physics Letters B, ISSN 0370-2693, E-ISSN 1873-2445, Vol. 830, artikel-id 137106Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This search, a type not previously performed at ATLAS, uses a comparison of the production cross sections for e(+)mu(-) and e(-)mu(+) pairs to constrain physics processes beyond the Standard Model. It uses 139 fb(-1) of proton-proton collision data recorded at root s = 13 TeV at the LHC. Targeting sources of new physics which prefer final states containing e(+)mu(-) and e(-)mu(+), the search contains two broad signal regions which are used to provide model-independent constraints on the ratio of cross sections at the 2% level. The search also has two special selections targeting supersymmetric models and leptoquark signatures. Observations using one of these selections are able to exclude, at 95% confidence level, singly produced smuons with masses up to 640 GeV in a model in which the only other light sparticle is a neutralino when the R-parity-violating coupling lambda(23)(1)' is close to unity. Observations using the other selection exclude scalar leptoquarks with masses below 1880 GeV when g(1R)(eu) = g(1R)(mu c) = 1, at 95% confidence level. The limit on the coupling reduces to g(1R)(eu) = g(1R)(mu c) = 0.46 for a mass of 1420 GeV.

  • 22.
    Aadland, Torgeir
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hägg, Gustav
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US).
    Lundqvist, Mats A.
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stockhaus, Martin
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Williams Middleton, Karen
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mitigating the lack of prior entrepreneurial experience and exposure through entrepreneurship education programs2023Ingår i: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 30, nr 11, s. 19-44Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To increase the understanding of how entrepreneurship education impacts entrepreneurial careers, the purpose of the paper is to investigate the role that a venture creation program (VCP) might have in mitigating or surpassing a lack of other antecedents of entrepreneurial careers. In particular, the authors focus on entrepreneurial pedigree and prior entrepreneurial experience.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Data from graduates of VCPs at three universities in Northern Europe were collected through an online survey. Questions addressed graduate background prior to education, yearly occupational employment subsequent to graduation and graduates' own perceptions of entrepreneurial activity in employment positions. The survey was sent to 1,326 graduates and received 692 responses (52.2% response rate).

    Findings

    The type of VCP, either independent (Ind-VCP) or corporate venture creation (Corp-VCP), influenced the mitigation of prior entrepreneurial experience. Prior entrepreneurial experience, together with Ind-VCP, made a career as self-employed more likely. However, this was not the case for Corp-VCP in subsequently choosing intrapreneurial careers. Entrepreneurial pedigree had no significant effect on career choice other than for hybrid careers.

    Research limitations/implications

    Entrepreneurial experience gained from VCPs seems to influence graduates toward future entrepreneurial careers. Evidence supports the conclusion that many VCP graduates who lack prior entrepreneurial experience or entrepreneurial pedigree can develop sufficient entrepreneurial competencies through the program.

    Originality/value

    This study offers novel evidence that entrepreneurship education can compensate for a lack of prior entrepreneurial experience and exposure for students preparing for entrepreneurial careers.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Aadland et al (2023) Mitigating the lack of prior entrepreneurial experience and exposure through entrepreneurship education programs
  • 23. Aagaard, A.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Maskinkonstruktion (Inst.), Integrerad produktutveckling. KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Maskinkonstruktion (Inst.), Maskinkonstruktion (Avd.).
    The critical aspects of co-creating and co-capturing sustainable value in service business models2019Ingår i: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous researchers and practitioners emphasize the potential to create value through sustainable business models (SBMs). However, little attention has been paid to how sustainable value is proposed, created, delivered, and captured in the organization, and how customers perceive sustainable value in service. The aim of this paper is to explore this research gap empirically through a case study of sustainable value (co-)creation through SBMs of sustainable service innovations as experienced among two hotels' managers, employees and customers. The contributions of the study relate to the development of SBMs in service, where the value processes happen simultaneously and where the element value perception has to be added to the extant SBM literature, which is closely related to the creation and delivery of physical goods as in product-oriented industries. The study also contributes through the dual perspective (providers and customers) on sustainable value proposition, value creation and value capture. The findings reveal different key aspects in creating and capturing sustainable value through SBMs and sustainable service innovation. The managerial implications for creating and implementing SBM in service stress the need for employee engagement, customer involvement and targeted and personal communication educating internal and external sustainability ambassadors.

  • 24.
    Aagaard, Annabeth
    et al.
    Department of Business Development and Technology, School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Jönköping University, Internationella Handelshögskolan, IHH, Företagsekonomi.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Department of Industrial Engineering & Management, Faculty of Management & Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Mapping the types of business experimentation in creating sustainable value: A case study of cleantech start-ups2021Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 279, artikel-id 123182Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, business experimentation for sustainable value creation is explored through seven cleantech start-ups by applying the systemic combining approach. The findings reveal novel descriptions of six different business experimentation types. The study also advances our theoretical understanding of how the specific roles of learning, signaling, and convincing dominate each of the experimentation types differently and how each type of business experimentation has a distinct purpose. Furthermore, our findings propose how business experimentation types can be applied as a continuum as part of the cleantech start-ups’ sustainable value creation process. Hence, our study contributes theoretically to our understanding of business experimentation for sustainable value creation and how the different types are applied in cleantech start-ups. We conclude our treatise with managerial implications and outline fruitful future research avenues.

  • 25.
    Aagaard, Anna-Eva Sparf
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sektionen för management.
    Group Structure: Specialists and Generalists2011Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (magisterexamen)Studentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [sv]

    Här undersöks och diskuteras olika spekter på att organisera generalister och secialister i en organisations struktur. Teorier kring en organisations design och organisationsstruktur ger inblick i generalist och specialist funktioner. Dessa funktioner brukar man kunna hitta i alla typer av organisationer. Uppsatsen försöker svara på frågan: Finns det en en bästa organisationsstruktur utifrån generalist och specialist perspektivet?

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 26.
    Aagaard, Isabelle
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för ekonomi, samhälle och teknik.
    Kurdmark, Hawal
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för ekonomi, samhälle och teknik.
    Kommunikationsproblematiken som uppstår vid implementering av den agila metodiken: - En kvalitativ studie sedd ur ett förändringsperspektiv2019Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
  • 27.
    Aagah, Awa
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Nationalekonomi.
    Baydono, Sibel
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Nationalekonomi.
    Does openness affect economic growth?: A panel data on developing and developed countries2018Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the impact of trade openness on economic growth through a panel analysis containing a set of 61 countries over 15 years. The method we use is the fixed effect regression model in Stata, to see whether openness to trade has explanatory power over GDP per capita growth. We use secondary data taken from World bank and Worldwide Governance Indicators. The data used is a panel data containing 61 countries and the period we are studying starts at 2002 and ends in 2016, a 15 years' time interval. Our empirical results suggest that openness during these years have had a small negative impact on growth, but although this, the variable does not seem to have a statistical significance upon per capita growth within this period of time. Therefore, with reference to this study we cannot see any significance of openness upon growth.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    24. The state: economic policy and democracy2002Ingår i: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, s. 322-332Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    25. Economic Instruments: Three Interlinkages Between Ecology and Economics2012Ingår i: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, s. 280-293Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    ehsa 3-25
  • 30.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    46. Trends in economic transition2002Ingår i: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, s. 591-600Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    BSR 8-46
  • 31.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    50. EU enlargement2001Ingår i: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2001, 1, s. 630-638Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    BSR 8-50
  • 32.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    51. The environment2002Ingår i: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, s. 639-650Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    BSR 8-51
  • 33.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    BSR Section 8: Introduction2002Ingår i: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, s. 588-590Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    BSR 8-intro
  • 34.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Accessible luxury fashion brand building via fat discrimination2018Ingår i: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 2-16Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if accessible luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: The physical sizes of garments are surveyed in-store and compared to the body sizes of the population. A gap analysis is carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the demand of each market segment.

    Findings: The surveyed accessible luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The survey is limited to London while the corresponding population is British. It is therefore possible that the mismatch between assortments and the population is in part attributable to geographic and demographic factors. The study’s results are however so strikingly clear that even if some of the effect were due to extraneous variables, it would be hard to disregard the poor match between overweight and obese women and the clothes offered to them.

    Practical implications: For symbolic/expressive brands that are conspicuously consumed, that narrowly target distinct and homogenous groups of people in industries where elitist practices are acceptable, companies can build brands via customer rejection.

    Social implications: The results highlight ongoing discrimination of overweight and obese fashion consumers.

    Originality/value: The study is the first to provide quantitative evidence for brand building via customer rejection, and it delineates under which conditions this may occur. This extends the theory of typical user imagery. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 35.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Accessible luxury fashion brand building via fat discrimination2018Ingår i: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 2-16Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if accessible luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: The physical sizes of garments are surveyed in-store and compared to the body sizes of the population. A gap analysis is carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the demand of each market segment.

    Findings: The surveyed accessible luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The survey is limited to London while the corresponding population is British. It is therefore possible that the mismatch between assortments and the population is in part attributable to geographic and demographic factors. The study’s results are however so strikingly clear that even if some of the effect were due to extraneous variables, it would be hard to disregard the poor match between overweight and obese women and the clothes offered to them.

    Practical implications: For symbolic/expressive brands that are conspicuously consumed, that narrowly target distinct and homogenous groups of people in industries where elitist practices are acceptable, companies can build brands via customer rejection.

    Social implications: The results highlight ongoing discrimination of overweight and obese fashion consumers.

    Originality/value: The study is the first to provide quantitative evidence for brand building via customer rejection, and it delineates under which conditions this may occur. This extends the theory of typical user imagery.

  • 36.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Building nightclub brand personality via guest selection2020Ingår i: International Journal of Hospitality Management, ISSN 0278-4319, E-ISSN 1873-4693, artikel-id 102336Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies that guest selection at exclusive nightclubs is a brand building process, and that the guests’ primary value to the clubs therefore is the image they bestow on the brand. The paper contributes to theory by providing empirical support for several mechanisms that have previously been stipulated in literature. It validates that companies build brand personality by controlling typical user imagery, and that for self-expressive product categories, negative user stereotypes are particularly powerful. It supports the theory of symbolic brand avoidance, as well as the notion that social rejection encourages people to elevate their perceptions of their rejecters and strengthens their predilection to affiliate with them. For practitioners, the paper shows managers in the hospitality industry that it is possible to build brands by controlling who is allowed to become a brand-user, and under which conditions this applies.

  • 37.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Building nightclub brand personality via guest selection2019Ingår i: International Journal of Hospitality Management, ISSN 0278-4319, E-ISSN 1873-4693, artikel-id 102336Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies that guest selection at exclusive nightclubs is a brand building process, and that the guests’ primary value to the clubs therefore is the image they bestow on the brand. The paper contributes to theory by providing empirical support for several mechanisms that have previously been stipulated in literature. It validates that companies build brand personality by controlling typical user imagery, and that for self-expressive product categories, negative user stereotypes are particularly powerful. It supports the theory of symbolic brand avoidance, as well as the notion that social rejection encourages people to elevate their perceptions of their rejecters and strengthens their predilection to affiliate with them. For practitioners, the paper shows managers in the hospitality industry that it is possible to build brands by controlling who is allowed to become a brand-user, and under which conditions this applies. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

  • 38.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Intermediate Luxury Fashion: Brand Building via Fat Discrimination2016Ingår i: 11th Global Brand Conference / [ed] Stuart Roper, Saltaire, UK: Greenleaf Publishing , 2016, s. 23-28Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate if intermediate luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: 1,454 intermediate luxury garments were tallied and measured in-store in London. The physical sizes of the garments were matched to the body sizes of the population, and a gap analysis was carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the relative importance of each market segment.

    Findings: While previous research shows that mass-market fashion companies do not discriminate overweight and obese consumers, intermediate luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The findings show that purveyors of intermediate luxury fashion limit assortments of garments so they avoid fat typical user imagery.

    Practical implications: Companies that market products that are sensitive to the typical user imagery can optimize their brands by limiting undesirable customer types access to their brands, provided that 1) they have the financial strength to reject customers whose image would be detrimental to the brand, 2) the companies are active in an industry in which people would tolerate customer rejection, and 3) they sell a product that actually can be denied undesirable customers.

    Social implications: The study shows that fat consumers are relegated to mass-market fashion but are excluded from intermediate luxury fashion. This constitutes a social inequality.

    Originality/value: The result of this study provides quantitative evidence that companies control assortments to exclude undesirable typical user imagery. It also delineates under which conditions they do it. This adds to the theory of user imagery.

  • 39.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Intermediate Luxury Fashion: Brand Building via Fat Discrimination2016Ingår i: 11th Global Brand Conference / [ed] Stuart Roper, Saltaire, UK: Greenleaf Publishing , 2016, s. 23-28Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate if intermediate luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: 1,454 intermediate luxury garments were tallied and measured in-store in London. The physical sizes of the garments were matched to the body sizes of the population, and a gap analysis was carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the relative importance of each market segment.

    Findings: While previous research shows that mass-market fashion companies do not discriminate overweight and obese consumers, intermediate luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The findings show that purveyors of intermediate luxury fashion limit assortments of garments so they avoid fat typical user imagery.

    Practical implications: Companies that market products that are sensitive to the typical user imagery can optimize their brands by limiting undesirable customer types access to their brands, provided that 1) they have the financial strength to reject customers whose image would be detrimental to the brand, 2) the companies are active in an industry in which people would tolerate customer rejection, and 3) they sell a product that actually can be denied undesirable customers.

    Social implications: The study shows that fat consumers are relegated to mass-market fashion but are excluded from intermediate luxury fashion. This constitutes a social inequality.

    Originality/value: The result of this study provides quantitative evidence that companies control assortments to exclude undesirable typical user imagery. It also delineates under which conditions they do it. This adds to the theory of user imagery.

  • 40.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Göteborgs universitet. Handelshögskolan. Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    It’s Not What You Sell: It’s Whom You Sell it To: How the Customer’s Character Shapes Brands and What Companies Do About it2015Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation I investigate the effects of user and usage imagery on brands and how businesses employ user imagery to build brands. Over four articles I present results that suggest that user imagery affects brand personality and that companies under certain conditions adapt their behavior to optimize this effect. Although both mass market fashion and nightclubs are susceptible to the influence of user imagery, out of the two only nightclubs actively reject customers to improve its effect on brand perception. I relate these practices to the practical and financial feasibility of rejecting customers, the character of nightclubs’ brands, and to their inability to differentiate their brands through any other brand personality influencer besides user imagery. In this dissertation, I also discuss the ethical ramifications of user imagery optimization through customer rejection. In one study, the role of conspicuous usage imagery on socially desirable consumer behavior is investigated. It is concluded that conspicuousness increases consumers' propensity to choose environmentally friendly products, and that this tendency is especially pronounced for individuals that are high in attention to social comparison information. The conclusion is that consumers use green products to self-enhance for the purpose of fitting in with the group rather than to stand out from it.

  • 41.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University.
    Lean if you are seen: Improved weight loss via social media2020Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 42.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University.
    Lean if you're seen2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 43.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Gothenburg University.
    Maxamizing long-term profit in high end night clubs by balancing user imagery and income2009Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 44.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet.
    Men’s and women’s implicit negativity towards obese fashion models2022Ingår i: Journal of Global Fashion Marketing, ISSN 2325-4483, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 273-288Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to investigate whether women’s relatively positive response to obese models is the result of social desirability bias on the part of women rather than deep seated attitudes. 60 university students in Sweden underwent an Implicit Associations Test (IAT) to reveal attitudes towards obese models that the participants were not able or willing to openly express. The study shows that even though women express significantly more positive attitudes towards obese models than men do, women and men display similar implicit negativity towards obese models. The study replicates a previously shown explicit gender effect, but also extends theory on gender preferences towards models of different sizes and body types by introducing measurements of implicit attitudes. Finally, the paper provides a possible explanation for why the fashion industry largely refrains from using obese models even though women express relatively positive attitudes towards them. © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 45.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness2018Ingår i: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 557-570Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of obese models vs. normal weight models on fashion brands’ attractiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 1,225 university students in Sweden and Brazil rated the attractiveness of a fashion brand worn by a normal weight model and an obese model.

    Findings: The overall effect of obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness was insignificant. Further, neither culture, nor the consumer’s own weight had a significant effect. There was, however, a significant effect of the participant’s own gender; women rate fashion brands worn by obese models significantly higher on attractiveness than they did fashion brands worn by normal weight models. Men displayed the inverse response.

    Research limitations/implications: The effect of the model’s ethnicity was beyond the scope of the experiment, and the brand attractiveness scale captured only one aspect of brand character, leaving other potential brand effects for future studies.

    Practical implications: Companies can use obese models with no overall brand attractiveness penalty across markets and for marketing to women of all sizes. Given men’s negative reactions, such models might however be unsuitable for the male-to-female gift market.

    Social implications: The results support the use of obese models, which can lead to greater representation of larger women in the media, and consequently, reduced fat stigma.

    Originality/value: The study validates the theory of user imagery, and it extends the theory by examining how different target consumers react to user imagery traits and thus provides evidence for gender bias towards obese models. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 46.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness2018Ingår i: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 557-570Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of obese models vs. normal weight models on fashion brands’ attractiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 1,225 university students in Sweden and Brazil rated the attractiveness of a fashion brand worn by a normal weight model and an obese model.

    Findings: The overall effect of obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness was insignificant. Further, neither culture, nor the consumer’s own weight had a significant effect. There was, however, a significant effect of the participant’s own gender; women rate fashion brands worn by obese models significantly higher on attractiveness than they did fashion brands worn by normal weight models. Men displayed the inverse response.

    Research limitations/implications: The effect of the model’s ethnicity was beyond the scope of the experiment, and the brand attractiveness scale captured only one aspect of brand character, leaving other potential brand effects for future studies.

    Practical implications: Companies can use obese models with no overall brand attractiveness penalty across markets and for marketing to women of all sizes. Given men’s negative reactions, such models might however be unsuitable for the male-to-female gift market.

    Social implications: The results support the use of obese models, which can lead to greater representation of larger women in the media, and consequently, reduced fat stigma.

    Originality/value: The study validates the theory of user imagery, and it extends the theory by examining how different target consumers react to user imagery traits and thus provides evidence for gender bias towards obese models.

  • 47.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Department of Business Administration School of Business, Economics and Law University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Impact of User Weight on Brands and Business Practices in Mass Market Fashion2010Licentiatavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. If they were, it would be in line with branding theory supporting the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands. However, fashion companies do not confess to such practices.

    To shed some light on the subject, I have conducted two studies.

    The first attempts to illustrate what effect, if any, user imagery has on fashion brands. It is an experiment designed to show how the weight of users affects consumers’ perceptions of mass market fashion brands. The findings show that consumers’ impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of its users. The effect of male user imagery is ambiguous. For women’s fashion on the other hand, slender users are to be preferred.

    In the second study I examine what effects these effects have on assortments. I compare the sizes of mass market clothes to the body sizes of the population. No evidence of discrimination of overweight or obese consumers was found -quite the contrary.

    The reasons for these unexpected findings may be explained by the requirements a brand must fulfil to make management of the customer base for user imagery purposes viable. The brand must be sensitive to user imagery; a requirement that mass market fashion fulfils. However, it must also be feasible for a company to exclude customers, and while garment sizes can be restricted to achieve this, the high volume sales strategy of mass market fashion apparently cannot.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Department of Business Administration School of Business, Economics and Law University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Impact of User Weight on Brands and Business Practices in Mass Market Fashion2010Licentiatavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. If they were, it would be in line with branding theory supporting the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands. However, fashion companies do not confess to such practices.

    To shed some light on the subject, I have conducted two studies.

    The first attempts to illustrate what effect, if any, user imagery has on fashion brands. It is an experiment designed to show how the weight of users affects consumers’ perceptions of mass market fashion brands. The findings show that consumers’ impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of its users. The effect of male user imagery is ambiguous. For women’s fashion on the other hand, slender users are to be preferred.

    In the second study I examine what effects these effects have on assortments. I compare the sizes of mass market clothes to the body sizes of the population. No evidence of discrimination of overweight or obese consumers was found -quite the contrary.

    The reasons for these unexpected findings may be explained by the requirements a brand must fulfil to make management of the customer base for user imagery purposes viable. The brand must be sensitive to user imagery; a requirement that mass market fashion fulfils. However, it must also be feasible for a company to exclude customers, and while garment sizes can be restricted to achieve this, the high volume sales strategy of mass market fashion apparently cannot.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL). School of Business, Economics, and Law, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The influence of real women in advertising on mass market fashion brand perception2011Ingår i: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 486-502Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the weight of ideal users affects the perception of mass market fashion brands. Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 640 university students replied to a web survey, rating the brand personality of jeans and shirts according to Aaker's Big Five construct. The garments were worn by thin, overweight, and obese models. Findings: The findings show that consumers' impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of ideal users. Slender models lead to the most positive brand perception followed by obese models. Overweight user imagery is for pure fashion brand building the least attractive kind. Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is the use of convenient student samples. Consequently, the generalization of the results beyond this convenience sample may be limited. It is further possible, even probable, that high fashion would suffer more from the negative imagery of overweight and obese users than mass market fashion. It would therefore be interesting to replicate this experiment using clothes of higher fashion grade and price. Practical implications: The demonstrated effects of user imagery support the industry practice of slim ideal female imagery. Social implications: The results inform the debate over skinny models vs real women in advertising. Originality/value: Previous research regarding the effectiveness of real women in advertising has been inconclusive. This paper demonstrates not only that model weight affects consumers' brand perception, but also how. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 50.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    The influence of real women in advertising on mass market fashion brand perception2011Ingår i: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 486-502Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the weight of ideal users affects the perception of mass market fashion brands. Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 640 university students replied to a web survey, rating the brand personality of jeans and shirts according to Aaker's Big Five construct. The garments were worn by thin, overweight, and obese models. Findings: The findings show that consumers' impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of ideal users. Slender models lead to the most positive brand perception followed by obese models. Overweight user imagery is for pure fashion brand building the least attractive kind. Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is the use of convenient student samples. Consequently, the generalization of the results beyond this convenience sample may be limited. It is further possible, even probable, that high fashion would suffer more from the negative imagery of overweight and obese users than mass market fashion. It would therefore be interesting to replicate this experiment using clothes of higher fashion grade and price. Practical implications: The demonstrated effects of user imagery support the industry practice of slim ideal female imagery. Social implications: The results inform the debate over skinny models vs real women in advertising. Originality/value: Previous research regarding the effectiveness of real women in advertising has been inconclusive. This paper demonstrates not only that model weight affects consumers' brand perception, but also how.

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