Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 299343
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    120112 HONG, SISONG
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies.
    LIN, SHUNZHAO
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies.
    Service Marketing in a cross-culture environment: a case of Elekta China2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    A. Aljundi, Rachelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Konst på internet idag: En retorikanalys av konstverksamma organisationers självpresentationer2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is a qualitative study about Art transformation and commodification in the digital age. The study applies a rhetoric analysis with the aim to understand how art sellers, gallery owners and entrepreneurs take part in this transformation process through their websites’ presentation texts ”about us”. The analysis is related to communication theories but it is also inspired by other theories such as Gramsci’s hegemony theory and Bourdieu’s cultural critical theory. The study shows that in an environment of ”Global Communication”, activities that are related to the visual art on the net are strongly influenced by the commodification. Marketers and business managers have a big advantage of this phase of change in Art activities on the net. As senders in a one-way communication process, they use their rhetorical skills in their presentation texts to build identities or to enhance their business, depending on the positions of power they have in the market. They invest in art and artists, in order to expand their businesses and to capture a wider audience of recipients on World Wide Web to get more money and power. The study recommends further research about the Art commodification, preferably from the receiver’s and the artists’ sides to reveal more aspects of the effects of this transformation process in Art and its values.

  • 3. A. Alkhamisi, Mahdi
    et al.
    Shukur, Ghazi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Statistik.
    A Monte Carlo Study of Recent Ridge Parameters2007In: Communications in statistics. Simulation and computation, ISSN 0361-0918, E-ISSN 1532-4141, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 535-547Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    A Anthony, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Ingjald, Tobias
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Handelsbanken: en studie om ledarskap2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 5. A, Ericson
    et al.
    S, Löfgren
    G, Bolinder
    S, Reeves
    S, Kitto
    I, Masiello
    Interprofessional education in a student-led emergency department: A realist evaluation.2017In: Journal of interprofessional careArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. A, Hadadgar
    et al.
    T, Changiz
    I, Masiello
    Z, Dehghani
    N, Mirshahzadeh
    N, Zary
    Applicability of the theory of planned behavior in explaining the general practitioners eLearning use in continuing medical education.2016In: BMC medical educationArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. A, Hadadgar
    et al.
    T, Changiz
    Z, Dehghani
    M, Bäckheden
    N, Mirshahzadeh
    N, Zary
    I, Masiello
    A Theory-Based Study of Factors Explaining General Practitioners’ Intention to Use and Participation in Electronic Continuing Medical Education.2016In: The Journal of continuing education in the health professionsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    A. Manneh, Ilana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Supporting Learning and Teaching of Chemistry in the Undergraduate Classroom2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is agreement in research about the need to find better ways of teaching chemistry to enhance students’ understanding. This thesis aims to contribute to the understanding of how we better support teaching and learning of undergraduate chemistry to make it meaningful and intelligible for students from the outset. The thesis is concerned with examining the interactions between student, specific content and teacher in the undergraduate chemistry classroom; that is, the processes making up the three relations of the didactic triangle. The data consists of observations of students and tutors during problem-solving activities in an introductory chemistry course and interviews with graduate students.

    Systematic analyses of the different interactions between the student, the chemistry content, and the tutor are made using the analytical tool of practical epistemology analysis. The main findings of the thesis include detailed insights into how undergraduate chemistry students deal with newly encountered content together with didactic models and concrete suggestions for improved teaching and for supporting continuity and progression in the undergraduate chemistry classroom. Specifically, I show how students deal with the chemistry content through a complex interaction of knowledge, experiences, and purposes on different levels invoked by both students and tutors as they interact with each other. Whether these interactions have a positive or negative effect on students’ learning depends on the nature of knowledge, experiences and purposes that were invoked. Moreover, the tutor sometimes invoked other purposes than the ones related to the task at hand for connecting the activity to the subject matter in general. These purposes were not always made continuous with the activity which resulting in confusion among students. The results from these analyses were used for producing hypotheses and models that could support continuity and progression during the activity. The suggested models aim to make the content more manageable and meaningful to students, enabling connections to other experiences and purposes, and helping teachers and tutors to analyze and reflect on their teaching. Moreover, a purpose- and activity-based progression is suggested that gives attention to purposes in chemistry education other than providing explanations of chemical phenomena. The aim of this ‘progression in action’ is to engage students in activities were they can see the meaning of chemical concepts and ideas through their use to accomplish different chemical tasks. A general conclusion is that detailed knowledge about the processes of teaching and learning is important for providing adequate support to both undergraduate students and university teachers in the chemistry classroom.

  • 9.
    A. Manneh, Ilana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Progression in action for developing chemical knowledgeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss the well-known teaching challenge of how to provide undergraduate students with basic chemistry knowledge without making them experience these basics as meaningless and unintelligible. First, we situate the challenge in a classic dilemma: should we teach the necessary basic facts before the chemical explanations or should the explanations be taught before or in parallel to these facts? Here we draw on examples from interviews with graduate students reflecting on their experiences regarding their studies at the undergraduate level. Second, we suggest a way out of the dilemma, through a shift in perspective from the typical progression of facts and explanations towards a purpose and activity-based progression. We conclude with a discussion of implications of such a shift for university chemistry education together with suggestions for future research.

  • 10.
    A. Manneh, Ilana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    The role of anthropomorphisms in students’ reasoning about chemical structure and bondingIn: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, E-ISSN 1609-4913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropomorphisms are widespread at all levels of the educational system even among science experts. This has led to a shift in how anthropomorphisms are viewed in science education, from a discussion of whether they should be allowed or avoided towards an interest in their role in supporting students’ understanding of science. In this study we examine the role of anthropomorphisms in supporting students’ understanding of chemistry. We analyze examples from undergraduate students’ discussions during problem-solving classes through the use of practical epistemology analysis (PEA). Findings suggest that students invoked anthropomorphisms alongside technical relations which together produced more or less chemically appropriate explanations. Also, anthropomorphisms constitute potentially productive points of departure for rendering students’ explanations more chemically appropriate. The implications of this study refer to the need to deal with anthropomorphisms explicitly and repeatedly as well as to encourage explicit connections between different parts of the explanation - teleological as well as causal.

  • 11.
    A. Manneh, Ilana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Tutor-student interaction in undergraduate chemistry: a case of learning to make relevant distinctions of molecular structures for determining oxidation states of atoms2018In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, no 16, p. 2023-2043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we explore the issues and challenges involved in supporting students’ learning to discern relevant and critical aspects of determining oxidation states of atoms in complex molecules. We present a detailed case of an interaction between three students and a tutor during a problem-solving class, using the analytical tool of practical epistemology analysis (PEA). The results show that the ability to make relevant distinctions between the different parts of a molecule for solving the problem, even with the guidance of the tutor, seemed to be challenging for students. These shifts were connected to both purposes that were specific for solving the problem at hand, and additional purposes for general learning of the subject matter, in this case how to assign oxidation states in molecules. The students sometimes could not follow the additional purposes introduced by the tutor, which made the related distinctions more confusing. Our results indicate that in order to provide adequate support and guidance for students the tutor needs to consider how to sequence, move between, and productively connect the different purposes introduced in a tutor-student interaction. One way of doing that is by first pursuing the purposes for solving the problem and then successively introduce additional, more general purposes for developing students’ learning of the subject matter studied. Further recommendations drawn from this study are discussed as well.

  • 12. Aaberge, Rolf
    et al.
    Bourguignon, François
    Brandolini, Andrea
    Ferreira, Francisco H. G.
    Gornick, Janet G.
    Hills, John
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jenkins, Stephen P.
    Marlier, Eric
    Micklewright, John
    Nolan, Brian
    Piketty, Thomas
    Radermacher, Walter J.
    Smeeding, Timothy M.
    Stern, Nicholas H.
    Stiglitz, Joseph
    Sutherland, Holly
    Tony Atkinson and his Legacy2017In: The Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN 0034-6586, E-ISSN 1475-4991, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 411-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tony Atkinson is universally celebrated for his outstanding contributions to the measurement and analysis of inequality, but he never saw the study of inequality as a separate branch of economics. He was an economist in the classical sense, rejecting any sub-field labelling of his interests and expertise, and he made contributions right across economics. His death on 1 January 2017 deprived the world of both an intellectual giant and a deeply committed public servant in the broadest sense of the term. This collective tribute highlights the range, depth and importance of Tony's enormous legacy, the product of almost fifty years’ work.

  • 13. Aaboe, L
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Löfsten, H
    Incubator performance: An efficiency frontier analysis2008In: International Journal of Business Innovation and Research, ISSN 1751-0252, E-ISSN 1751-0260, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 354-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessments and evaluations of incubators has been a topic of discussion for as long as incubators have been in existence due to the fact that there has not been an agreement on how to determine good performance. This paper demonstrates the use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) when studying performance of incubators. More specifically, it does so within the four dimensions of cooperation with universities, business networks, external funding and competence development on a sample of 16 Swedish incubators. We show that DEA enables us to measure non-numerical dimensions, and to simultaneously take into account the efforts made by both the incubator and the outcomes. Moreover, DEA provides benchmarks and, based on a model that divides the incubators into four different groups, illustrates the difference between the benchmark and the incubators' current situation.

  • 14. Aaboen, L
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Löfsten, H
    Critical dimensions for technology transfer Incubator-facilitated links between finance, academia and NTBFs2008In: International Journal of Management and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1468-4330, E-ISSN 1741-8127, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 331-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores incubator facilitation of technology transfer for their New Technology-Based Firms (NTBFs). Empirical evidence gathered from six interviews with incubator managers, together with a survey of 131 NTBFs in incubators in Sweden, in 2005, and the findings made in a survey of 273 NTBFs situated inside-and-outside Science Parks in 1999, are used for the exploration. It is suggested that incubators do facilitate technology transfer for their NTBFs. It is further suggested that the development towards increased ability to facilitate technology transfer will continue as a results of the efforts made on the incubator and systemic level.

  • 15.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology .
    La Rocca, Antonella
    BI Norwegian Business School.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Perna, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Universita' Politecnica delle Marche.
    Shih, Tommy
    Starting up in Business Networks: Why relationships matter in entrepreneurship2016 (ed. 1st)Book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Exploring the roles of university spin-offs in business networks2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 59, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies different university spin-off (USO) roles related to resource interaction among business parties. It does so by mapping how USOs become part of business networks in terms of their roles relative to other parties. The theoretical frame of reference focuses on roles and resource interaction based on an industrial network approach to business markets. The empirical research is based onfive cases of USOs representing a variety in terms of technology, degree of newness, sector, and area of application. As a result of the analysis, three different roles are identified: the USO as resource mediator, resource re-combiner and resource renewer. These roles reflect how USOs adapt resources to, or require changes among, business parties' resources. The paper also discusses the main resource interfaces associated with the three roles and related challenges. The paper contributes to previous research through illustrating USOs' roles relative to business parties from a resource interaction point of view, and by pointing to the establishment of new companies in business networks as a way of implementing innovation. Finally, the paper discusses the managerial implications of the research in terms of the USO's need to understand which role to take and how to develop it.

  • 17. AAboen, Lise
    et al.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    University spin-offs and their roles in business networks2014In: IMP Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Löfsten, Hans
    Incubator performance: an efficiency frontier analysis2008In: International Journal of Business Innovation and Research, ISSN 1751-0252, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 354-380Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    Löfsten, Hans
    Towards incubator facilitation of technology transfer2008In: International Journal of Management and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1468-4330, E-ISSN 1741-8127, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 331-335Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    The University of Nottingham.
    von Koch, Christopher
    School of Economics and Commercial Law, Department of Business Administration, Göteborg.
    Löfsten, Hans
    Chalmers universitet.
    Corporate governance and performance of small high-tech firms in Sweden2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 955-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach uses data from a sample of 183 small high-tech firms, new technology-based firms (small high-tech firms) in Sweden (54 variables under the headings of work experience, board and advice, financing, motivation—performance priorities, technological innovation and strategy). This study identifies some core areas of importance in corporate governance. Few managers in this study had a strong background and experience of finance and the preparation of business. Only 64 per cent of the managers have had previous work experience before starting the firm. The survey makes it clear that the small high-tech firms are likely to have a strong link with banking institutions. The consequence of these links is that most of the firm's capital supply is from banks, and that there are strong ownership links between banks and industry. The background of the founder does seem to have had an effect on the problem of financing and ownership issues. It is private sector organizations (banks) and families that are most frequently consulted by small high-tech firms (However, low means). It is also the private and public sector organizations, in connection with external board membership, regional development agencies and banks that are most frequently consulted. In the future, it is reasonable to search for factor patterns that can begin to explain and predict the direction of corporate governance in small new technology-based firms.

  • 21. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Lindelöf, Peter
    von Koch, Christopher
    Löfsten, Hans
    Corporate governance and performance of small high-tech firms in Sweden2006In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 955-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach uses data from a sample of 183 small high-tech firms, new, technology-based firms (small high-tech firms) in Sweden (54 variables under the headings of work experience, board and advice, financing, motivation-performance priorities, technological innovation and strategy). This study identifies some core areas of importance in corporate governance. Few managers in this study had a strong background and experience of finance and the preparation of business. Only 64 per cent of the managers have had previous work experience before starting the firm. The survey makes it clear that the small high-tech firms are likely to have a strong link with banking institutions. The consequence of these links is that most of the firm's capital supply is from banks, and that there are strong ownership links between banks and industry. The background of the founder does seem to have had an effect on the problem of financing and ownership issues. It is private sector organizations (banks) and families that are most frequently consulted by small high-tech firms (However, low means). It is also the private and public sector organizations, in connection with external board membership, regional development agencies and banks that are most frequently consulted. In the future, it is reasonable to search for factor patterns that can begin to explain and predict the direction of corporate governance in small new technology-based firms.

  • 22. Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Löfsten, Hans
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Nourishment for the piggy bank: facilitation of external financing in incubators2011In: International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, ISSN 1470-6075, E-ISSN 1741-5284, Vol. 10, no 3/4, p. 354-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we argue that incubators facilitate access to external financing for their incubatees. Incubators use a wide range of activities to facilitate the accessing of external financing from public and private sources. We have grouped these into two sets of activities. The general activities aim to develop the conditions for external financing through information, education of incubatees, network-building and lobbying activities. The specific activities aim to assist the individual incubatee in their pursuit of external finance through help in application procedures, establishing need for capital, making contacts with the best public or private investor, etc. Based on the survey data, we have also shown that it is more common for incubatees to attract external capital compared to non-incubator firms. The incubatees seem especially successful in attracting public capital. The incubatees also attract more private external capital, however, the observed frequency of private capital in the incubatees are low.

  • 23.
    Aaby, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Olsson, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Ett deltagande, för vem?: En kvalitativ intervjustudie om gymnasieelevers deltagande i Idrott och hälsa 12016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate, at first, why students in upper secondary school in Sweden participate or not in Physical education and health (PEH) and also find out what changes the subject need that can affect their participation. To get answers out of the in-vestigation, we formulated questions about what preconceptions the students of an specific group have about participation and non-participation in PEH and what changes the subject need, according to the students, to become a subject for all students. The study was based on a qualitative method, by using interviews of ten students from Swedish upper secondary school. The students were from two schools in a mediumsized region and from different programmes.

    The results of the study shows clearly that the content and the grades in PEH affects the student’s participation, which was crucial to whether they felt they wanted to participate actively in the lessons or not. The grades were considered as important and affected the participation even though some of the students were not interested in the content, but they still did the things that the teacher demanded. Despite this, the attitudes towards the subject were positive among the interviewed students. The factors the students think can change the participation to more actively is implement more activities as dance, individual training but also, delimit ballsports. It seems like the interviewed students are searching for meaningfulness in the lessons of the subject with a link between the curriculum and grading criteria.

  • 24.
    Aaby, Jovanna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Entreprenörskap i Sverige och Japan: En komparativ studie utifrån GEM 20072011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose with this thesis has been to compare entrepreneurship in Sweden and in Japan. It has also been to get a wider understanding why two so different countries both have a low level of entrepreneurship compared to other countries. Since the subject is wide I have chosen to delimitate to data from GEM 2007.

    Methodology: In this thesis I have compared entrepreneurship in Sweden and in Japan. This I have done by obtaining secondary data from GEM’s report from 2007. My approach in this thesis has foremost been abductive. 

    Theoretical perspectives: Wennekers (2006) have studied the U-shape curve that occurs when you put entrepreneurship in relation to economic growth. Countries tend to go from a high level of entrepreneurship to a low level when they go from agricultural economy to an industrial economy. Then they tend to go up again when they reach a advanced level of economic development. However countries seem to differ when it comes to entrepreneurship despite this relation and the differences seems to be lasting. Wennekers (a.a.) believe that these differences has to do with cultural differences rather than economics differences since cultural differences are relatively immutable over time.

    Empirical foundation: GEM stands for Global Entrepreneurship Monitor and is a not-for-profit academic research consortium. Their goal is to make international research of high quality about entrepreneurial activity in the world that is able to reach a wide public. GEM’s study is the biggest study in the world about entrepreneurial activity and started 1999. In this thesis I have used data from GEM’s report from 2007, which is the latest report with both Sweden and Japan.

    Conclusions: In a comparison between Japan and Sweden I have found some similarities but mostly differences. This suggests that there are no simple answers to a low level of entrepreneurship in a country. However, in my opinion, I think that the national experts were right to put government policies as the biggest problem for Sweden and Cultural, Social norms as Japan’s biggest problem.

  • 25.
    Aaby, Peter
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    The state of Guinea-Bissau: African socialism or socialism in Africa?1978Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Aadland, Cornelia
    Swedish Defence University.
    Wardens fem ringar - ett koncept för framtida militära interventioner?2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades airpower has become a useful tool for military interventions. Earlier research argues that air operations during the first Gulf war proved that strategic bombing could be effective due to modern technology and precision guided munitions. John Warden developed a theory based on strategic bombing, where he sees the enemy as a system, which is illustrated by a five-ring-model. The theory is widely discussed in the modern airpower debate, and has also been criticized because it has not been proved in any large-N study. Therefore, this essay aims to test Wardens five-ring-model in a comparative case study where two modern air operations have been chosen for investigation. The two operations are Operation Deliberate Force that took place Bosnia, 1995, and Operation Odyssey Dawn/Unified Protector that took place in Libya, 2011. The two operations have many similarities but differ in the time it took to reach their designated goals.

    The results indicate that Wardens theory is not capable of explaining why the two operations differed in the time it took to achieve its goals. The operations did not act according to Wardens five-ring-model to a sufficiently large extent when other targets were more frequently attacked than the ones that Warden advocates to be the most effective. Warden states that his theory is very general and can be used for any opponent, but the results of this essay indicate that it may be to general to be able to explain the outcome of an operation.

  • 27.
    Aadland, Katarina
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Copingstrategier för att hantera stress och oro hos KBT- och övriga studenter2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    How stress and anxiety are handled is vital to health. To develop knowledge about coping this study aims to investigate differences in the prevalence and correlation between problemfocused, emotionfocused and avoidanceoriented coping and also in defensive pessimism. A quantitative survey was conducted with 62 CBT-students and 87 other students from different courses. The results showed that CBT students use problemfocused coping more than other students, that other students use emotionfocused coping more than CBT-students and that older CBT-students use defensive pessimism less than younger CBT-students. A negative correlation was also found between problemfocused and emotionfocused coping and a positive correlation between emotionfocused coping and defensive pessimism. In summary, the study shows that there are correlations between, as well as age- and educational differences in the use of different coping strategies.

  • 28.
    Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie
    et al.
    Adelphi University, USA.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm University.
    Cooper, Angela
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Macdonald, James
    Headington Psychotherapy, England.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Uppsala University.
    Patients Affective Processes Within Initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy Sessions2017In: Psychotherapy, ISSN 0033-3204, E-ISSN 1939-1536, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that patients in-session experience of previously avoided affects may be important for effective psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients in-session levels of affect experiencing in relation to their corresponding levels of insight, motivation, and inhibitory affects in initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy (EDT) sessions. Four hundred sixty-six 10-min video segments from 31 initial sessions were rated using the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale. A series of multilevel growth models, controlling for between-therapist variability, were estimated to predict patients adaptive affect experiencing (Activating Affects) across session segments. In line with our expectations, higher within-person levels of Insight and Motivation related to higher levels of Activating Affects per segment. Contrary to expectations, however, lower levels of Inhibition were not associated with higher levels of Activating Affects. Further, using a time-lagged model, we did not find that the levels of Insight, Motivation, or Inhibition during one session segment predicted Activating Affects in the next, possibly indicating that 10-min segments may be suboptimal for testing temporal relationships in affective processes. Our results suggest that, to intensify patients immediate affect experiencing in initial EDT sessions, therapists should focus on increasing insight into defensive patterns and, in particular, motivation to give them up. Future research should examine the impact of specific inhibitory affects more closely, as well as between-therapist variability in patients in-session adaptive affect experiencing.

  • 29.
    Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie
    et al.
    Adelphi University, NY 21402 USA; University of Oxford, England.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Cooper, Angela
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Macdonald, James
    Headington Psychotherapy, England.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patients Affective Processes Within Initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy Sessions2017In: Psychotherapy, ISSN 0033-3204, E-ISSN 1939-1536, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that patients in-session experience of previously avoided affects may be important for effective psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients in-session levels of affect experiencing in relation to their corresponding levels of insight, motivation, and inhibitory affects in initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy (EDT) sessions. Four hundred sixty-six 10-min video segments from 31 initial sessions were rated using the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale. A series of multilevel growth models, controlling for between-therapist variability, were estimated to predict patients adaptive affect experiencing (Activating Affects) across session segments. In line with our expectations, higher within-person levels of Insight and Motivation related to higher levels of Activating Affects per segment. Contrary to expectations, however, lower levels of Inhibition were not associated with higher levels of Activating Affects. Further, using a time-lagged model, we did not find that the levels of Insight, Motivation, or Inhibition during one session segment predicted Activating Affects in the next, possibly indicating that 10-min segments may be suboptimal for testing temporal relationships in affective processes. Our results suggest that, to intensify patients immediate affect experiencing in initial EDT sessions, therapists should focus on increasing insight into defensive patterns and, in particular, motivation to give them up. Future research should examine the impact of specific inhibitory affects more closely, as well as between-therapist variability in patients in-session adaptive affect experiencing.

  • 30. Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie
    et al.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Cooper, Angela
    McDonald, James
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Patients’ Affective Processes Within Initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy Sessions2017In: Psychotherapy, ISSN 0033-3204, E-ISSN 1939-1536, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that patients’ in-session experience of previously avoided affects may be important for effective psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ in-session levels of affect experiencing in relation to their corresponding levels of insight, motivation, and inhibitory affects in initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy (EDT) sessions. Four hundred sixty-six 10-min video segments from 31 initial sessions were rated using the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale. A series of multilevel growth models, controlling for between-therapist variability, were estimated to predict patients’ adaptive affect experiencing (Activating Affects) across session segments. In line with our expectations, higher within-person levels of Insight and Motivation related to higher levels of Activating Affects per segment. Contrary to expectations, however, lower levels of Inhibition were not associated with higher levels of Activating Affects. Further, using a time-lagged model, we did not find that the levels of Insight, Motivation, or Inhibition during one session segment predicted Activating Affects in the next, possibly indicating that 10-min segments may be suboptimal for testing temporal relationships in affective processes. Our results suggest that, to intensify patients’ immediate affect experiencing in initial EDT sessions, therapists should focus on increasing insight into defensive patterns and, in particular, motivation to give them up. Future research should examine the impact of specific inhibitory affects more closely, as well as between-therapist variability in patients’ in-session adaptive affect experiencing.

  • 31.
    Aagaard, Anna-Eva Sparf
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Group Structure: Specialists and Generalists2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to discuss and explore the subject of organizing generalists and specialists. The purpose of this thesis is to explore and discuss different alternatives on organizational grouping from a generalists and specialists perspective. It will explore theories around organizational design, different organizational structures and give insight to the specialist and generalist function that can be found in most types of organizations. The aim is to be able to present different aspects of organizing generalists and specialists and to be able to answer the problem question: Is there a best organizational structure for specialist and generalist groups? The study is a qualitative study and the process of induction will be used. The epistemological standpoint is interprevistic and the ontological is more towards constructionism. The methods used are 1) the collection of and qualitative analysis of texts and documents and 2) qualitative semi-structured interviewing. The analysis is based on grounded theory method. The result and conclusions of the study is that generalists most likely do fit better in organizational forms such as simple structure, adhocracy and network organizations. Specialists tend to prefer bureaucracy or functional/unitary organizations. Keywords: generalists, specialists, organization, group structure

  • 32. Aagaard, Harriet
    Kvalitetssäkring: det digitala referenssamtalet2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33. Aagaard, Harriet
    et al.
    Andersson, Cajsa
    Karlsson, Linda
    Sjögren, Linnea
    Vad är kvalitet i virtuellt referensarbete? Paneldebatt. Sammanställning av de inledande presentationerna2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Aagaard, Kirsten
    et al.
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Halttunen, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Hansen, Brian Benjamin
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Nistrup, Ulla
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Quality in Validation of Prior Learning: Experiences in researching the practice of the Nordic Model for Quality in Validation of Prior Learning2017In: The Learner at the Centre: Validation of Prior Learning strengthens lifelong learning for all / [ed] Ruud Duvekot, Dermot Coughlan and Kirsten Aagaard, Houten/Aarhus: European Centre Valuation of Prior Learning/ VIA University College , 2017, p. 89-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents findings from a study of quality work in validation (recognition of prior learning) in three cases in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. The quality work is based on a Nordic model for quality in validation and the study has an interactive approach.

  • 35.
    Aagaard, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Underhållsbidrag till make efter äktenskapsskillnad: en probleminventering2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 36.
    Aagah, Awa
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Economics.
    Baydono, Sibel
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Economics.
    Does openness affect economic growth?: A panel data on developing and developed countries2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the impact of trade openness on economic growth through a panel analysis containing a set of 61 countries over 15 years. The method we use is the fixed effect regression model in Stata, to see whether openness to trade has explanatory power over GDP per capita growth. We use secondary data taken from World bank and Worldwide Governance Indicators. The data used is a panel data containing 61 countries and the period we are studying starts at 2002 and ends in 2016, a 15 years' time interval. Our empirical results suggest that openness during these years have had a small negative impact on growth, but although this, the variable does not seem to have a statistical significance upon per capita growth within this period of time. Therefore, with reference to this study we cannot see any significance of openness upon growth.

  • 37.
    Aagard Nielsen, Kurt
    et al.
    Roskilde Universitet, Denmark.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Action Research and Interactive Research: Beyond pratice and theory2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Aagard Nielsen, Kurt
    et al.
    Roskilde Universitet.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    How to Learn Action Research2006In: Action Research and Interactive Research: beyond practice and theory / [ed] Kurt Aagaard Nielsen and Lennart Svensson, Hamburg: Shaker Verlag , 2006, p. 389-398Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    24. The state: economic policy and democracy2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 322-332Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    25. Economic Instruments: Three Interlinkages Between Ecology and Economics2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 280-293Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    46. Trends in economic transition2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 591-600Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    50. EU enlargement2001In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2001, 1, p. 630-638Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    51. The environment2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 639-650Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    BSR Section 8: Introduction2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 588-590Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Accessible luxury fashion brand building via fat discrimination2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if accessible luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: The physical sizes of garments are surveyed in-store and compared to the body sizes of the population. A gap analysis is carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the demand of each market segment.

    Findings: The surveyed accessible luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The survey is limited to London while the corresponding population is British. It is therefore possible that the mismatch between assortments and the population is in part attributable to geographic and demographic factors. The study’s results are however so strikingly clear that even if some of the effect were due to extraneous variables, it would be hard to disregard the poor match between overweight and obese women and the clothes offered to them.

    Practical implications: For symbolic/expressive brands that are conspicuously consumed, that narrowly target distinct and homogenous groups of people in industries where elitist practices are acceptable, companies can build brands via customer rejection.

    Social implications: The results highlight ongoing discrimination of overweight and obese fashion consumers.

    Originality/value: The study is the first to provide quantitative evidence for brand building via customer rejection, and it delineates under which conditions this may occur. This extends the theory of typical user imagery. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 46.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Intermediate Luxury Fashion: Brand Building via Fat Discrimination2016In: 11th Global Brand Conference / [ed] Stuart Roper, Saltaire, UK: Greenleaf Publishing , 2016, p. 23-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate if intermediate luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: 1,454 intermediate luxury garments were tallied and measured in-store in London. The physical sizes of the garments were matched to the body sizes of the population, and a gap analysis was carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the relative importance of each market segment.

    Findings: While previous research shows that mass-market fashion companies do not discriminate overweight and obese consumers, intermediate luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The findings show that purveyors of intermediate luxury fashion limit assortments of garments so they avoid fat typical user imagery.

    Practical implications: Companies that market products that are sensitive to the typical user imagery can optimize their brands by limiting undesirable customer types access to their brands, provided that 1) they have the financial strength to reject customers whose image would be detrimental to the brand, 2) the companies are active in an industry in which people would tolerate customer rejection, and 3) they sell a product that actually can be denied undesirable customers.

    Social implications: The study shows that fat consumers are relegated to mass-market fashion but are excluded from intermediate luxury fashion. This constitutes a social inequality.

    Originality/value: The result of this study provides quantitative evidence that companies control assortments to exclude undesirable typical user imagery. It also delineates under which conditions they do it. This adds to the theory of user imagery.

  • 47.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 557-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of obese models vs. normal weight models on fashion brands’ attractiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 1,225 university students in Sweden and Brazil rated the attractiveness of a fashion brand worn by a normal weight model and an obese model.

    Findings: The overall effect of obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness was insignificant. Further, neither culture, nor the consumer’s own weight had a significant effect. There was, however, a significant effect of the participant’s own gender; women rate fashion brands worn by obese models significantly higher on attractiveness than they did fashion brands worn by normal weight models. Men displayed the inverse response.

    Research limitations/implications: The effect of the model’s ethnicity was beyond the scope of the experiment, and the brand attractiveness scale captured only one aspect of brand character, leaving other potential brand effects for future studies.

    Practical implications: Companies can use obese models with no overall brand attractiveness penalty across markets and for marketing to women of all sizes. Given men’s negative reactions, such models might however be unsuitable for the male-to-female gift market.

    Social implications: The results support the use of obese models, which can lead to greater representation of larger women in the media, and consequently, reduced fat stigma.

    Originality/value: The study validates the theory of user imagery, and it extends the theory by examining how different target consumers react to user imagery traits and thus provides evidence for gender bias towards obese models. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 48.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Department of Business Administration School of Business, Economics and Law University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Impact of User Weight on Brands and Business Practices in Mass Market Fashion2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. If they were, it would be in line with branding theory supporting the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands. However, fashion companies do not confess to such practices.

    To shed some light on the subject, I have conducted two studies.

    The first attempts to illustrate what effect, if any, user imagery has on fashion brands. It is an experiment designed to show how the weight of users affects consumers’ perceptions of mass market fashion brands. The findings show that consumers’ impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of its users. The effect of male user imagery is ambiguous. For women’s fashion on the other hand, slender users are to be preferred.

    In the second study I examine what effects these effects have on assortments. I compare the sizes of mass market clothes to the body sizes of the population. No evidence of discrimination of overweight or obese consumers was found -quite the contrary.

    The reasons for these unexpected findings may be explained by the requirements a brand must fulfil to make management of the customer base for user imagery purposes viable. The brand must be sensitive to user imagery; a requirement that mass market fashion fulfils. However, it must also be feasible for a company to exclude customers, and while garment sizes can be restricted to achieve this, the high volume sales strategy of mass market fashion apparently cannot.

  • 49.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). School of Business, Economics, and Law, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The influence of real women in advertising on mass market fashion brand perception2011In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 486-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the weight of ideal users affects the perception of mass market fashion brands. Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 640 university students replied to a web survey, rating the brand personality of jeans and shirts according to Aaker's Big Five construct. The garments were worn by thin, overweight, and obese models. Findings: The findings show that consumers' impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of ideal users. Slender models lead to the most positive brand perception followed by obese models. Overweight user imagery is for pure fashion brand building the least attractive kind. Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is the use of convenient student samples. Consequently, the generalization of the results beyond this convenience sample may be limited. It is further possible, even probable, that high fashion would suffer more from the negative imagery of overweight and obese users than mass market fashion. It would therefore be interesting to replicate this experiment using clothes of higher fashion grade and price. Practical implications: The demonstrated effects of user imagery support the industry practice of slim ideal female imagery. Social implications: The results inform the debate over skinny models vs real women in advertising. Originality/value: Previous research regarding the effectiveness of real women in advertising has been inconclusive. This paper demonstrates not only that model weight affects consumers' brand perception, but also how. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 50.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Department of Business Administration School of Business, Economics and Law University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    To sell or not to sell: overweight users’ effect on fashion assortmentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. Fashion companies disagree. Despite the controversy, actual research has been scarce. This study compares the sizes of clothes the four leading mass marketing fashion retailers in Sweden offer to the body sizes of the population. Although branding theory would support the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands, such practices were not evident. The main contribution of this paper is that it provides the first quantified empirical evidence on the theory of typical user imagery.

    In the discussion, it is posited that although mass market fashion brands should be susceptible to negative user imagery related to overweight and obese users, the companies avoid such problems by making garments that are not directly attributable to a specific brand, thus mitigating the negative effect of overweight and obese user imagery. 

1234567 1 - 50 of 299343
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf