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  • 1.
    Abadpour, Shadab
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Halvorsen, Bente
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Sahraoui, Afaf
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Aukrust, Pål
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Scholz, Hanne
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Interleukin-22 reverses human islet dysfunction and apoptosis triggered by hyperglycemia and LIGHT2018In: Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, ISSN 0952-5041, E-ISSN 1479-6813, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 171-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin (IL)-22 has recently been suggested as an anti-inflammatory cytokine that could protect the islet cells from inflammation- and glucose-induced toxicity. We have previously shown that the tumor necrosis factor family member, LIGHT can impair human islet function at least partly via pro-apoptotic effects. Herein, we aimed to investigate the protective role of IL-22 on human islets exposed to the combination of hyperglycemia and LIGHT. First, we found up-regulation of LIGHT receptors (LTβR and HVEM) in engrafted human islets exposed to hyperglycemia (>11 mM) for 17 days post transplantation by using a double islet transplantation mouse model as well as in human islets cultured with high glucose (HG) (20mM glucose) + LIGHT in vitro and this latter effect was attenuated by IL-22. The effect of HG + LIGHT impairing glucose stimulated insulin secretion was reversed by IL-22. The harmful effect of HG + LIGHT on human islet function seemed to involve enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress evidenced by up-regulation of p-IRE1α and BiP, elevated secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IP-10 and MCP-1) and the pro-coagulant mediator tissue factor (TF) release and apoptosis in human islets, whereas all these effects were at least partly reversed by IL-22. Our findings suggest that IL-22 could counteract the harmful effects of LIGHT/hyperglycemia on human islet cells and potentially support the strong protective effect of IL-22 on impaired islet function and survival.

  • 2. Abbas, S
    et al.
    Linseisen, J
    Rohrmann, S
    Beulens, JWJ
    Buijsse, B
    Amiano, P
    Ardanaz, E
    Balkau, B
    Boeing, H
    Clavel-Chapelon, F
    Fagherazzi, G
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gavrila, D
    Grioni, S
    Kaaks, R
    Key, TJ
    Khaw, KT
    Kuehn, T
    Mattiello, A
    Molina-Montes, E
    Nilsson, PM
    Overvad, K
    Quiros, JR
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sacerdote, C
    Saieva, C
    Slimani, N
    Sluijs, I
    Spijkerman, AMW
    Tjonneland, A
    Tumino, R
    van der A, DL
    Zamora-Ros, R
    Sharp, SJ
    Langenberg, C
    Forouhi, NG
    Riboli, E
    Wareham, NJ
    Dietary vitamin D intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: the EPIC-InterAct study2014In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 196-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Prospective cohort studies have indicated that serum vitamin D levels are inversely related to risk of type 2 diabetes. However, such studies cannot determine the source of vitamin D. Therefore, we examined the association of dietary vitamin D intake with incident type 2 diabetes within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct study in a heterogeneous European population including eight countries with large geographical variation.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: Using a case-cohort design, 11 245 incident cases of type 2 diabetes and a representative subcohort (N = 15 798) were included in the analyses. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for type 2 diabetes were calculated using a Prentice-weighted Cox regression adjusted for potential confounders. Twenty-four-hour diet-recall data from a subsample (N = 2347) were used to calibrate habitual intake data derived from dietary questionnaires.

    RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 10.8 years. Dietary vitamin D intake was not significantly associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. HR and 95% CIs for the highest compared to the lowest quintile of uncalibrated vitamin D intake was 1.09 (0.97-1.22) (P-trend = 0.17). No associations were observed in a sex-specific analysis. The overall pooled effect (HR (95% CI)) using the continuous calibrated variable was 1.00 (0.97-1.03) per increase of 1 mg/day dietary vitamin D.

    CONCLUSIONS: This observational study does not support an association between higher dietary vitamin D intake and type 2 diabetes incidence. This result has to be interpreted in light of the limited contribution of dietary vitamin D on the overall vitamin D status of a person.

  • 3.
    Abdullahi Mohamed, Mohamed
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
     GLP-1 REGULATES PROLIFERATION OF GLP-1 SECRETING CELLS THROUGH A FEEDBACK MECHANISM2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Background and aim:

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic and progressive illness that affects all type of populations and ages. According to World health organization (WHO) by 2030 it will be 366 million people effected world wild. Many new drugs are Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) based therapy for treatment of type 2diabetes. GLP-1 is released from the intestinal L-cells, and is a potent stimulator of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of GLP-1 and its stable analogs on cell proliferation of GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cells.

    Material and methods:

    GluTag cells were incubated for 48h in DMEM medium containing (0.5% fetal bovine serum and 100 IU/ml penicillin and 100 μg/ml streptomycin and 3mM glucose concentration) in the present or absence of the agents. DNA synthesis was measured using 3H- thymidine incorporation and Ki67 antigen staining. Western blot were performed to investigate the present of GLP-1 receptor in GLUTag cells.

    Results/conclusions:

    These results suggest that GLP-1 regulates proliferation of the GLP-1-secreting cell through a feedback mechanism via its receptor. Since serum GLP-1 levels are decreased in type 2 diabetic patients, the effect of GLP-1 on the GLP-1-secreting cell proliferation suggested here provides a novel beneficial long-term effect of the incretin-based drugs in clinical practice i.e. through increase of the GLP-1-secreting cell mass, augmenting the incretin effect. In addition, the feedback mechanism action of GLP-1 reveals a new insight in regulation manner of the L-cell proliferation.

    GLP-1(7-36) increased cell proliferation in GLUTag cells, an effect which was blocked by the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39). The GLP-1 receptor was expressed in GluTag cells.

    Keywords:

    Incretin hormone, GLP-1, GLP-1 receptor, Exendin-4, Diabetes

  • 4.
    Abels, M.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Riva, M.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Poon, W.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Bennet, H.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Nagaraj, V.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dyachok, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Isomaa, B.
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Dept Social Serv & Hlth Care, Jacobstad, Finland..
    Tuomi, T.
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Dept Med, Helsinki, Finland..
    Ahren, B.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Lund, Sweden..
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Fex, M.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Renstrom, E.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Groop, L.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lyssenko, V.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wierup, N.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    CART is a novel glucose-dependent peptide with antidiabetic actions in humans2015In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 58, no Suppl. 1, p. S279-S280Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Abels, Mia
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Riva, Matteo
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Bennet, Hedvig
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ahlqvist, Emma
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dyachok, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Nagaraj, Vini
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Shcherbina, Liliya
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Fred, Rikard G.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Poon, Wenny
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Sorhede-Winzell, Maria
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Fadista, Joao
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lindqvist, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Kask, Lena
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Sathanoori, Ramasri
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dekker-Nitert, Marloes
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Kuhar, Michael J.
    Emory Univ, Yerkes Res Ctr, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Ahren, Bo
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wollheim, Claes B.
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Cell Physiol & Metab, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Hansson, Ola
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Fex, Malin
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Renström, Erik
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Groop, Leif
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lyssenko, Valeriya
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden.;Steno Diabet Ctr AS, Gentofte, Denmark..
    Wierup, Nils
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Clin Res Ctr 91 12, Ctr Diabet, Skane Univ Hosp,Dept Clin Sci Malmo,Unit Neuroend, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    CART is overexpressed in human type 2 diabetic islets and inhibits glucagon secretion and increases insulin secretion2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, no 9, p. 1928-1937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis Insufficient insulin release and hyperglucagonaemia are culprits in type 2 diabetes. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART, encoded by Cartpt) affects islet hormone secretion and beta cell survival in vitro in rats, and Cart(-/-) mice have diminished insulin secretion. We aimed to test if CART is differentially regulated in human type 2 diabetic islets and if CART affects insulin and glucagon secretion in vitro in humans and in vivo in mice. Methods CART expression was assessed in human type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic control pancreases and rodent models of diabetes. Insulin and glucagon secretion was examined in isolated islets and in vivo in mice. Ca2+ oscillation patterns and exocytosis were studied in mouse islets. Results We report an important role of CART in human islet function and glucose homeostasis in mice. CART was found to be expressed in human alpha and beta cells and in a subpopulation of mouse beta cells. Notably, CART expression was several fold higher in islets of type 2 diabetic humans and rodents. CART increased insulin secretion in vivo in mice and in human and mouse islets. Furthermore, CART increased beta cell exocytosis, altered the glucose-induced Ca2+ signalling pattern in mouse islets from fast to slow oscillations and improved synchronisation of the oscillations between different islet regions. Finally, CART reduced glucagon secretion in human and mouse islets, as well as in vivo in mice via diminished alpha cell exocytosis. Conclusions/interpretation We conclude that CART is a regulator of glucose homeostasis and could play an important role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. Based on the ability of CART to increase insulin secretion and reduce glucagon secretion, CART-based agents could be a therapeutic modality in type 2 diabetes.

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    On the Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Glucose Homeostasis2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity has grown to epidemic proportions, and in lack of efficient life-style and medical treatments, the bariatric surgeries are performed in rising numbers. The most common surgery is the Gastric Bypass (GBP) surgery, with the Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (DS) as an option for the most extreme cases with a BMI>50 kg/m2.

    In paper I 20 GBP-patients were examined during the first post-operative year regarding the natriuretic peptide, NT-ProBNP, which is secreted from the cardiac ventricles. Levels of NT-ProBNP quickly increased during the first post-surgery week, and later established itself on a higher level than pre-surgery.

    In paper II we report of 5 patient-cases after GBP-surgery with severe problems with postprandial hypoglycaemia that were successfully treated with GLP-1-analogs. The effect of treatment could be observed both symptomatically and in some cases using continuous glucose measuring systems (CGMS).

    In paper III three groups of subjects; 15 post-GBP patients, 15 post-DS, and 15 obese controls were examined for three days using CGMS during everyday life. The post-GBP group had high glucose variability as measured by MAGE and CONGA, whereas the post-DS group had low variability. Both post-operative groups exhibited significant time in hypoglycaemia, about 40 and 80 minutes per day <3.3mmol/l and 20 and 40 minutes < 2.8mmol/l, respectively, longer time for DS-group. Remarkably, only about 20% of these hypoglycaemic episodes were accompanied with symptoms.

    In Paper IV the hypoglycaemia counter regulatory system was investigated; 12 patients were examined before and after GBP-surgery with a stepped hypoglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. The results show a downregulation of symptoms, counter regulatory hormones (glucagon, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, growth hormone), incretin hormones (GLP-1 and GIP), and sympathetic nervous response.

    In conclusion patients post bariatric surgery exhibit a downregulated counter regulatory response to hypoglycaemia, accompanied by frequent asymptomatic hypoglycaemic episodes in everyday life. Patients suffering from severe hypoglycaemic episodes can often be treated successfully with GLP-1-analogues.

  • 7. Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Borjesson, Joey Lau
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Karlsson, F. Anders
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Gastric Bypass Reduces Symptoms and Hormonal Responses in Hypoglycemia2016In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 2667-2675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

  • 8.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Hypoglycemia in everyday life after gastric bypass and duodenal switch2015In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design: Gastric bypass (GBP) and duodenal switch (DS) in morbid obesity are accompanied by marked metabolic improvements, particularly in glucose control. In recent years, episodes of severe late postprandial hypoglycemia have been increasingly described in GBP patients; data in DS patients are scarce. We recruited three groups of subjects; 15 GBP, 15 DS, and 15 non-operated overweight controls to examine to what extent hypoglycemia occurs in daily life. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used during 3 days of normal activity. The glycemic variability was measured by mean amplitude of glycemic excursion and continuous overall net glycemic action. Fasting blood samples were drawn, and the patients kept a food and symptom log throughout the study. Results: The GBP group displayed highly variable CGM curves, and 2.9% of their time was spent in hypoglycemia (< 3.3 mmol/l, or 60 mg/dl). The DS group had twice as much time in hypoglycemia (5.9%) and displayed CGM curves with little variation as well as lower HbA1c levels (29.3 vs 35.9 mmol/mol, P < 0.05). Out of a total of 72 hypoglycemic episodes registered over the 3-day period, 70 (97%) occurred in the postprandial state and only about one-fifth of the hypoglycemic episodes in the GBP and DS groups were accompanied by symptoms. No hypoglycemias were seen in controls during the 3-day period. Conclusion: Both types of bariatric surgery induce marked, but different, changes in glucose balance accompanied by frequent, but mainly unnoticed, hypoglycemic episodes. The impact and mechanism of hypoglycemic unawareness after weight-reduction surgery deserves to be clarified.

  • 9.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Lau Börjesson, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umea Univ, Biomed Engn, Dept Radiat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Gastric bypass reduces symptoms and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia2016In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 2667-2675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

  • 10.
    Acerini, Carlo L.
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Wac, Katarzyna
    University of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Bang, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lehwalder, Dagmar
    Merck KGaA, Germany.
    Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for children receiving Growth Hormone2017In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, ISSN 1664-2392, E-ISSN 1664-2392, Vol. 8, article id 313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The "360 degrees GH in Europe" meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany), examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled "Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral," "Optimizing Patient Management," and "Managing Transition," each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patients journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on-going need for innovations.

  • 11.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    The Swedish National Survey of the Quality and Organization of Diabetes Care in Primary Healthcare—Swed-QOP2010In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe the quality and organization of diabetes care in primary healthcare in Sweden regarding resources and ways of working.

    METHOD:

    A questionnaire was used to collect data from all 921 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden. Of these, 74.3% (n=684) responded to the questionnaire covering list size of the PHCCs, number of diabetic patients, personnel resources and ways of working.

    RESULTS:

    The median list size reported from the PHCCs was 9,000 patients, 294 of whom were diabetic patients. The majority (72%) of PHCCs had diabetes-responsible general practitioners (GPs) and almost all (97%) had diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) with some degree of postgraduate education in diabetes. The PHCCs reported that they used regional/local diabetes guidelines (93%), were engaged in call-recall diabetic reviews by GP(s) (66%) and DSN(s) (89%), checked that patients had participated in the reviews by GP(s) (69%) and DSN(s) (78%), arranged group education programmes (23%) and reported data to a National Diabetes Register (82%).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The presence of diabetes-responsible GP(s) and DSN(s) who use guidelines may contribute to good and equal quality of care. It is, however, necessary to improve the call-recall system and there is an urgent need for all diabetic patients to receive patient education.

  • 12.
    Adolfsson, Peter
    et al.
    Gothenburg Pediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy,University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Örnhagen, Hans
    Swedish Sports Diving Federation, Farsta, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Bengt M.
    Hyperbaric Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Cooper, Ken
    Medtronic Diabetes (Sensor R&D), Northridge CA, USA.
    Jendle, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Endocrine and Diabetes Center, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Continuous glucose monitoring: a study of the Enlite sensor during hypo- and hyperbaric conditions2012In: Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, ISSN 1520-9156, E-ISSN 1557-8593, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 527-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The performance and accuracy of the Enlite(™) (Medtronic, Inc., Northridge, CA) sensor may be affected by microbubble formation at the electrode surface during hypo- and hyperbaric conditions. The effects of acute pressure changes and of prewetting of sensors were investigated.

    Materials and Methods: On Day 1, 24 sensors were inserted on the right side of the abdomen and back in one healthy individual; 12 were prewetted with saline solution, and 12 were inserted dry. On Day 2, this procedure was repeated on the left side. All sensors were attached to an iPro continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) recorder. Hypobaric and hyperbaric tests were conducted in a pressure chamber, with each test lasting 105 min. Plasma glucose values were obtained at 5-min intervals with a HemoCue(®) (Ängelholm, Sweden) model 201 glucose analyzer for comparison with sensor glucose values.

    Results: Ninety percent of the CGM systems operated during the tests. The mean absolute relative difference was lower during hyperbaric than hypobaric conditions (6.7% vs. 14.9%, P<0.001). Sensor sensitivity was slightly decreased (P<0.05) during hypobaric but not during hyperbaric conditions. Clarke Error Grid Analysis showed that 100% of the values were found in the A+B region. No differences were found between prewetted and dry sensors.

    Conclusions: The Enlite sensor performed adequately during acute pressure changes and was more accurate during hyperbaric than hypobaric conditions. Prewetting the sensors did not improve accuracy. Further studies on type 1 diabetes subjects are needed under various pressure conditions.

  • 13.
    Adolfsson, Peter
    et al.
    Gothenburg Pediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Institute for the Health of Women and Children, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Örnhagen, Hans
    Swedish Sports Diving Federation, Farsta, Sweden.
    Jendle, Johan
    Endocrine and Diabetes Center, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden; Faculty of Health Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Accuracy and reliability of continuous glucose monitoring in individuals with type 1 diabetes during recreational diving2009In: Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, ISSN 1520-9156, E-ISSN 1557-8593, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 493-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the accuracy and function of the Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS, Minneapolis, MN) during recreational scuba diving in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS: Twenty-four adults, 12 with type 1 diabetes and 12 healthy controls, were studied during five recreational scuba dives performed on three consecutive days. All the participants used the CGMS on all the days and during all the dives. Comparisons were made between plasma glucose at specific time intervals and the CGMS.

    RESULTS: The recording by the CGMS was robust, with few sensor problems. The mean sensor survival time was >48 h. Eighty-five percent of the individuals used one sensor during the entire length of the trial. The overall mean absolute difference (MAD) within the group with diabetes was 14.4 +/- 6%, and the corresponding daily figures were 23.2 +/- 19.3% on day 1, 11.6 +/- 4.5% on day 2, and 11.2 +/- 5.7% on day 3. A significant improvement regarding MAD when day 1 was compared with day 2 and 3 (P < 0.05). With a limit set at 70 mg/dL, hypoglycemia pre- and post-dive was detected with a positive predictive value of 0.39, negative predictive value of 0.98, sensitivity of 0.64, and specificity of 0.94.

    CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that the CGMS was used with accuracy in such difficult conditions as scuba diving and provided robust information on glucose variations.

  • 14.
    Adolfsson, Peter
    et al.
    Gothenburg Pediatric Growth Research Centre, Department of Pediatrics, Institute for the Health of Women and Children, the Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Örnhagen, Hans
    Swedish Sportsdiving Federation, Farsta, Sweden.
    Jendle, Johan
    Endocrine and Diabetes Center, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The benefits of continuous glucose monitoring and a glucose monitoring schedule in individuals with type 1 diabetes during recreational diving2008In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, E-ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 778-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Our objective is to evaluate the Medtronic CGMS continuous glucose monitoring system and plasma glucose (PG) measurement performed in a monitoring schedule as tools to identify individuals with type 1 diabetes at risk when diving.

    METHODS: We studied 24 adults, 12 type 1 diabetes subjects and 12 controls, during 5 recreational scuba dives performed on 3 consecutive days. The CGMS was used by all participants on all the days and all the dives. Comparisons were made between PG performed in a monitoring schedule during the days of diving, self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) performed 2 weeks prior to diving, and the CGMS during the study.

    RESULTS: One hundred seventeen dives were performed. Hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dl) was found in six individuals and on nine occasions. However, no symptoms of hypoglycemia were present during or immediately postdiving. In one case, repetitive hypoglycemia prediving gave rise to a decision not to dive. None of the dives were aborted. The number of hypoglycemic episodes, 10 min prediving or immediately postdiving, were related to the duration of diabetes, r = 0.83 and p =0.01, and the percentage of SMBG values below target (<72 mg/dl), r = 0.65 and p =0.02. Moreover, the number of hypoglycemic episodes was also related to the total duration below low limit (<70 mg/dl), measured by the CGMS, r =0.74 and p =0.006.

    CONCLUSION: Safe dives are possible to achieve by well-informed, well-controlled individuals with type 1 diabetes. Using downloaded SMBG, CGMS, and repetitive PG in a monitoring schedule, it is possible to identify those subjects who are suitable for diving.

  • 15.
    Agardh, Carl-David
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahrén, Bo
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hanås, Ragnar
    Jansson, Stefan
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Smith, Ulf
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Toft, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Varning för okritisk användning av överviktskirurgi vid typ 2-diabetes2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 25, p. 1208-1209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Överviktskirurgi diskuteras nu som ett behandlingsalternativ även för patienter med typ 2-diabetes där BMI inte överstiger nuvarande indikationsgräns 35 kg/m2. Artikelförfattarna vill varna för en sådan utveckling i avvaktan på kritisk värdering av denna typ av kirurgi.

  • 16.
    Agebratt, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. e0147149-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern.

    Objectives

    To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans.

    Methods

    Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers.

    Results

    Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group.

    Conclusions

    Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including measurement of HFC by MRI.

  • 17.
    Ahlgren, Kerstin M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    von Euler, Henrik
    Sundberg, Katarina
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lobell, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hedhammar, Åke
    Andersson, Göran
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Lernmark, Åke
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lack of evidence for a role of islet autoimmunity in the aetiology of canine diabetes mellitus2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 8, p. e105473-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical presentation of human type 1 diabetes (T1D) and canine diabetes are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported.

    METHODS:

    Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 40 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA) and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT) of human and canine GAD65, followed by immune precipitation. Sections of pancreata from five diabetic dogs and two control dogs were examined histopathologically including immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreas polypeptide.

    RESULTS:

    None of the canine sera analysed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay. Histopathology showed marked degenerative changes in endocrine islets, including vacuolisation and variable loss of immune-staining for insulin. No sign of inflammation was noted.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS:

    Contrary to previous observations, based on results from tests for humoral autoreactivity towards islet proteins using four different assays, and histopathological examinations, we do not find any support for an islet autoimmune aetiology in canine diabetes mellitus.

  • 18.
    Ahlqvist, E.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Karajamaki, A.
    Vaasa Cent Hosp, Primary Hlth Care, Vaasa, Finland..
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Storm, P.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dorkhan, M.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Vikman, P.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Prasad, R. B.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Aly, D. Mansour
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Shaat, N.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lindholm, E.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Tuomi, T.
    Univ Helsinki, Finnish Inst Mol Med, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland..
    Rosengren, A. H.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Groop, L.
    Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden.;Univ Helsinki, Finnish Inst Mol Med, Helsinki, Finland..
    Clustering of diabetes into novel subgroups provides improved prediction of outcome2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, p. S117-S117Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ahlqvist, Emma
    et al.
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Storm, Petter
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Käräjämäki, Annemarie
    Department of Primary Health Care, Vaasa Central Hospital, Finland.
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Dorkhan, Mozhgan
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Vikman, Petter
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Prasad, Rashmi
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Mansour Aly, Dina
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Almgren, Peter
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Wessman, Ylva
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Shaat, Nael
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Spegel, Peter
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Mulder, Hindrik
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Lindholm, Eero
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Melander, Olle
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Hansson, Ola
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Malmqvist, Ulf
    Clinical Research and Trial Center, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lernmark, Åke
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Lahti, Kaj
    Department of Primary Health Care, Vaasa Central Hospital, Finland.
    Forsén, Tom
    Department of Primary Health Care, Vaasa Central Hospital, Finland.
    Tuomi, Tiinamaija
    Abdominal Center, Endocrinology, Helsinki University Central Hospital; Research Program for Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rosengren, Anders
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Groop, Leif
    Lund University Diabetes Centre, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital.
    Novel subgroups of adult-onset diabetes and their association with outcomes: a data-driven cluster analysis of six variables2018In: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, E-ISSN 2213-8595, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 361-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background

    Diabetes is presently classified into two main forms, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but type 2 diabetes in particular is highly heterogeneous. A refined classification could provide a powerful tool to individualise treatment regimens and identify individuals with increased risk of complications at diagnosis.

    Methods

    We did data-driven cluster analysis (k-means and hierarchical clustering) in patients with newly diagnosed diabetes (n=8980) from the Swedish All New Diabetics in Scania cohort. Clusters were based on six variables (glutamate decarboxylase antibodies, age at diagnosis, BMI, HbA1c, and homoeostatic model assessment 2 estimates of β-cell function and insulin resistance), and were related to prospective data from patient records on development of complications and prescription of medication. Replication was done in three independent cohorts: the Scania Diabetes Registry (n=1466), All New Diabetics in Uppsala (n=844), and Diabetes Registry Vaasa (n=3485). Cox regression and logistic regression were used to compare time to medication, time to reaching the treatment goal, and risk of diabetic complications and genetic associations.

    Findings

    We identified five replicable clusters of patients with diabetes, which had significantly different patient characteristics and risk of diabetic complications. In particular, individuals in cluster 3 (most resistant to insulin) had significantly higher risk of diabetic kidney disease than individuals in clusters 4 and 5, but had been prescribed similar diabetes treatment. Cluster 2 (insulin deficient) had the highest risk of retinopathy. In support of the clustering, genetic associations in the clusters differed from those seen in traditional type 2 diabetes.

    Interpretation

    We stratified patients into five subgroups with differing disease progression and risk of diabetic complications. This new substratification might eventually help to tailor and target early treatment to patients who would benefit most, thereby representing a first step towards precision medicine in diabetes.

  • 20. Ahmad, S
    et al.
    Poveda, A
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Diabetes Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Barroso, I
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Diabetes Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Diabetes Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    Established BMI-associated genetic variants and their prospective associations with BMI and other cardiometabolic traits: the GLACIER Study2016In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 1346-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Recent cross-sectional genome-wide scans have reported associations of 97 independent loci with body mass index (BMI). In 3541 middle-aged adult participants from the GLACIER Study, we tested whether these loci are associated with 10-year changes in BMI and other cardiometabolic traits (fasting and 2-h glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures).

    METHODS: A BMI-specific genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated by summing the BMI-associated effect alleles at each locus. Trait-specific cardiometabolic GRSs comprised only the loci that show nominal association (P⩽0.10) with the respective trait in the original cross-sectional study. In longitudinal genetic association analyses, the second visit trait measure (assessed ~10 years after baseline) was used as the dependent variable and the models were adjusted for the baseline measure of the outcome trait, age, age(2), fasting time (for glucose and lipid traits), sex, follow-up time and population substructure.

    RESULTS: The BMI-specific GRS was associated with increased BMI at follow-up (β=0.014 kg m(-2) per allele per 10-year follow-up, s.e.=0.006, P=0.019) as were three loci (PARK2 rs13191362, P=0.005; C6orf106 rs205262, P=0.043; and C9orf93 rs4740619, P=0.01). Although not withstanding Bonferroni correction, a handful of single-nucleotide polymorphisms was nominally associated with changes in blood pressure, glucose and lipid levels.

    CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, established BMI-associated loci convey modest but statistically significant time-dependent associations with long-term changes in BMI, suggesting a role for effect modification by factors that change with time in this population.

  • 21.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Harvard Med Sch, Div Prevent Med, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.
    Steno Diabet Ctr Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Editorial: The Role of Genetic and Lifestyle Factors in Metabolic Diseases2019In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, ISSN 1664-2392, E-ISSN 1664-2392, Vol. 10, article id 475Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Harvard Med Sch, Prevent Med Div, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Fatima, Syeda Sadia
    Aga Khan Univ, Dept Biol & Biomed Sci, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Rukh, Gull
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Smith, Caren E.
    Tufts Univ, Res Ctr Aging, Jean Mayer US Dept Agr, Nutr & Genom Lab, Boston, MA 02111 USA.
    Gene Lifestyle Interactions With Relation to Obesity, Cardiometabolic, and Cardiovascular Traits Among South Asians2019In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, ISSN 1664-2392, E-ISSN 1664-2392, Vol. 10, article id 221Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid rise of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) during the last few decades among South Asians has been largely attributed to a major shift in lifestyles including physical inactivity, unhealthy dietary patterns, and an overall pattern of sedentary lifestyle. Genetic predisposition to these cardiometabolic risk factors may have interacted with these obesogenic environments in determining the higher cardiometabolic disease prevalence. Based on the premise that gene-environment interactions cause obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, we systematically searched the literature and considered the knowledge gaps that future studies might ful fill. We identified only seven published studies that focused specifically on gene-environment interactions for cardiometabolic traits in South Asians, most of which were limited by relatively small sample and lack of replication. Some studies reported that the differences in metabolic response to higher physical activity and low caloric diet might be modified by genetic risk related to these cardiometabolic traits. Although studies on gene lifestyle interactions in cardiometabolic traits report significant interactions, future studies must focus on more precise assessment of lifestyle factors, investigation of a larger set of genetic variants and the application of powerful statistical methods to facilitate translatable approaches. Future studies should also be integrated with findings both using mechanistic studies through laboratory settings and randomized clinical trials for clinical outcomes.

  • 23.
    Akesson, K.
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Tompa, A.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Ryden, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Novo Nordisk Inc, WA USA.
    Faresjo, M.
    Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Low expression of CD39(+)/CD45RA(+) on regulatory T cells (T-reg) cells in type 1 diabetic children in contrast to high expression of CD101(+)/CD129(+) on T-reg cells in children with coeliac disease2015In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 180, no 1, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and coeliac disease are both characterized by an autoimmune feature. As T1D and coeliac disease share the same risk genes, patients risk subsequently developing the other disease. This study aimed to investigate the expression of T helper (Th), T cytotoxic (Tc) and regulatory T cells (T-reg) in T1D and/or coeliac disease children in comparison to healthy children. Subgroups of T cells (Th:CD4(+) or Tc:CD8(+)); naive (CD27(+)CD28(+)CD45RA(+)CCR7(+)), central memory (CD27(+)CD28(+)CD45RA(-)CCR7(+)), effector memory (early differentiated; CD27(+)CD28(+)CD45RA(-)CCR7(-) and late differentiated; CD27(-)CD28(-)CD45RA(-)CCR7(-)), terminally differentiated effector cells (TEMRA; CD27(-)CD28(-)CD45RA(+)CCR7(-)) and T-reg (CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)CD127(-)) cells, and their expression of CD39, CD45RA, CD101 and CD129, were studied by flow cytometry in T1D and/or coeliac disease children or without any of these diseases (reference group). Children diagnosed with both T1D and coeliac disease showed a higher percentage of TEMRA CD4(+) cells (Pless than005), but lower percentages of both early and late effector memory CD8(+) cells (Pless than005) compared to references. Children with exclusively T1D had lower median fluorescence intensity (MFI) of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) (Pless than005) and also a lower percentage of CD39(+) and CD45RA(+) within the T-reg population (CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)CD127(-)) (Pless than005). Children with exclusively coeliac disease had a higher MFI of CD101 (Pless than001), as well as a higher percentage of CD129(+) (Pless than005), in the CD4(+)CD25(hi) lymphocyte population, compared to references. In conclusion, children with combined T1D and coeliac disease have a higher percentage of differentiated CD4(+) cells compared to CD8(+) cells. T1D children show signs of low CD39(+)/CD45RA(+) T-reg cells that may indicate loss of suppressive function. Conversely, children with coeliac disease show signs of CD101(+)/CD129(+) T-reg cells that may indicate suppressor activity.

  • 24.
    Alanentalo, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Hörnblad, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Mayans, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Anna Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sharpe, James
    Larefalk, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Ahlgren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Quantification and 3-D imaging of the insulitis-induced destruction of β-cells in murine type 1 diabetes2010In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 59, no 7, p. 1756-1764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to refine the information regarding the quantitative and spatial dynamics of infiltrating lymphocytes and remaining beta-cell volume during the progression of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model of the disease.

    Research design and methods: Using an ex vivo technique, optical projection tomography (OPT), we quantified and assessed the 3D spatial development and progression of insulitis and beta-cell destruction in pancreas from diabetes prone NOD and non-diabetes prone congenic NOD.H-2b mice between 3 and 16 weeks of age.

    Results: Together with results showing the spatial dynamics of the insulitis process we provide data of beta-cell volume distributions down to the level of the individual islets and throughout the pancreas during the development and progression of type 1 diabetes. Our data provide evidence for a compensatory growth potential of the larger insulin(+) islets during the later stages of the disease around the time point for development of clinical diabetes. This is in contrast to smaller islets, which appear less resistant to the autoimmune attack. We also provide new information on the spatial dynamics of the insulitis process itself, including its apparently random distribution at onset, the local variations during its further development, and the formation of structures resembling tertiary lymphoid organs at later phases of insulitis progression.

    Conclusions: Our data provides a powerful tool for phenotypic analysis of genetic and environmental effects on type 1 diabetes etiology as well as for evaluating the potential effect of therapeutic regimes.

  • 25.
    Alanko, Rosanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Oskarsson, Tina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Kommunikation mellan patient och ortopedingenjör: En kvalitativ studie2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    En studie har genomförts med syftet att undersöka diabetespatienters tolkning av informationen som ges av deras respektive ortopedingenjör under ett patientmöte samt undersöka vad ortopedingenjören anser sig ha förmedlat för information till patienten under patientmötet. Metoden i studien är kvalitativ där intervjuer med semistrukturerade öppna frågor har använts. I studien ingick två ortopedingenjörer samt två diabetespatienter. Efter avslutade intervjuer har materialet från intervjuerna analyserats och bildat kategorier. Dessa kategorier har sedan använts för att finna skillnader samt likheter mellan ortopedingenjörens och patientens tolkningar. Patientmötens har spelats in för att få möjligheten att se vart missförstånd uppstått. Genomgående i resultatet var att ortopedingenjören anser sig ha förmedlat mer information än vad patienten beskriver under intervjuerna. Några missförstånd upptäcktes men kommunikationen mellan parterna var god.  

  • 26. Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Aronson, A. Stefan
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Hagenäs, Lars
    Ivarsson, Sten A.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Kriström, Berit
    Marcus, Claude
    Nilsson, Karl Olof
    Ritzén, E. Martin
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Westphal, Otto
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Dose-dependent effect of growth hormone on final height in children with short stature without growth hormone deficiency2008In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 4342-4350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: The effect of GH therapy in short non-GH-deficient children, especially those with idiopathic short stature (ISS), has not been clearly established owing to the lack of controlled trials continuing until final height (FH).

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect on growth to FH of two GH doses given to short children, mainly with ISS, compared with untreated controls.

    DESIGN AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, long-term multicenter trial was conducted in Sweden.

    INTERVENTION: Two doses of GH (Genotropin) were administered, 33 or 67 microg/kg.d; control subjects were untreated.

    SUBJECTS: A total of 177 subjects with short stature were enrolled. Of these, 151 were included in the intent to treat (AllITT) population, and 108 in the per protocol (AllPP) population. Analysis of ISS subjects included 126 children in the ITT (ISSITT) population and 68 subjects in the PP (ISSPP) population.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured FH sd score (SDS), difference in SDS to midparenteral height (diff MPHSDS), and gain in heightSDS.

    RESULTS: After 5.9+/-1.1 yr on GH therapy, the FHSDS in the AllPP population treated with GH vs. controls was -1.5+/-0.81 (33 microg/kg.d, -1.7+/-0.70; and 67 microg/kg.d, -1.4+/-0.86; P<0.032), vs. -2.4+/-0.85 (P<0.001); the diff MPHSDS was -0.2+/-1.0 vs. -1.0+/-0.74 (P<0.001); and the gain in heightSDS was 1.3+/-0.78 vs. 0.2+/-0.69 (P<0.001). GH therapy was safe and had no impact on time to onset of puberty. A dose-response relationship identified after 1 yr remained to FH for all growth outcome variables in all four populations.

    CONCLUSION: GH treatment significantly increased FH in ISS children in a dose-dependent manner, with a mean gain of 1.3 SDS (8 cm) and a broad range of response from no gain to 3 SDS compared to a mean gain of 0.2 SDS in the untreated controls. 

  • 27.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Goteborg Pediat Growth Res Ctr, Dept Pediat, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kriström, Berit
    Dept Clin Sci, Pediat Unit, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Elena
    Dept Clin Sci, Pediat Unit, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Aronson, A. Stefan
    Dept Pediat, Halmstad Cty Hosp, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hagenäs, Lars
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sten-A.
    Dept Pediat, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ritzen, Martin
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westgren, Ulf
    Dept Pediat, Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Westphal, Otto
    Goteborg Pediat Growth Res Ctr, Dept Pediat, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Growth hormone dose-dependent pubertal growth: a randomized trial in short children with low growth hormone secretion2014In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 158-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i. e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency.

    Methods: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH(33) mu g/kg/day for >= 1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 mu g/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67x1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 mu g/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n = 40). Growth was assessed as height SDS gain for prepubertal, pubertal and total periods, as well as AH SDS versus the population and the midparental height.

    Results: Pubertal height SDS gain was greater for patients receiving a high dose (GH(67), 0.73) than a low dose (GH(33x1), 0.41, p < 0.05). AH(SDS) was greater on GH(67) (GH(67x1), -0.84; GH(33x2), -0.83) than GH(33) (-1.25, p < 0.05), and height SDS gain was greater on GH(67) than GH(33) (2.04 and 1.56, respectively; p < 0.01). All groups reached their target height SDS.

    Conclusion: Pubertal height SDS gain and AH SDS were dose dependent, with greater growth being observed for the GH(67) than the GH(33) randomization group; however, there were no differences between the once-and twice-daily GH(67) regimens. (C) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 28.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol Endocrinol, Medicinargatan 11, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Martensson, Anton
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol Endocrinol, Medicinargatan 11, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Stat Konsultgrp, SE-41319 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Savendahl, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Pediat Endocrinol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Niklasson, Aimon
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Gothenburg Pediat Growth Res Ctr,Dept Pediat, SE-41685 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bang, Peter
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Gothenburg Pediat Growth Res Ctr,Dept Pediat, SE-41685 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Kristrom, Berit
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Norgren, Svante
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Pediat Endocrinol Unit, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pehrsson, Nils-Gunnar
    Stat Konsultgrp, SE-41319 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Oden, Anders
    Stat Konsultgrp, SE-41319 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers, Dept Math Sci, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mortality Is Not Increased in Recombinant Human Growth Hormone-treated Patients When Adjusting for Birth Characteristics2016In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 5, p. 2149-2159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate whether reported high mortality in childhood recombinant human GH (rhGH)-treated patients was related to birth-characteristics and/or rhGH treatment. Design and Setting: We sought to develop a mortality model of the Swedish general population born between 1973 and 2010, using continuous-hazard functions adjusting for birth characteristics, sex, age intervals, and calendar year to estimate standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and to apply this model to assess expected deaths in Swedish rhGH-treated patients with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), idiopathic short stature (155) or born small for gestational age (SGA). Participants:The general population: Swedish Medical Birth Register (1973-2010: 1 880 668 males; 1 781 131 females) and Cause of Death Register (1985-2010). Intervention Population: Three thousand eight hundred forty-seven patients starting rhGH treatment between 1985 and 2010 and followed in the National GH Register and/or in rhGH trials diagnosed with IGHD (n = 1890), ISS (n = 975), or SGA (n=982). Main Outcome Measures: Death. Results: Using conventional models adjusting for age, sex, and calendar-year, the SMR was 1.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-2.19), P = .14, observed/expected deaths 21/14.68. The rhGH population differed (P < .001) from the general population regarding birth weight, birth length, and congenital malformations. Application of an Advanced Model: When applying the developed mortality model of the general population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths in rhGH-treated patients was 21/21.99; SMR = 0.955 (0.591-1.456)P = .95. Model Comparison: Expected number of deaths were 14.68 (14.35-14.96) using the conventional model, and 21.99 (21.24-22.81) using the advanced model, P < .001, which had at all ages a higher gradient of risk per SD of the model, 24% (range, 18-42%; P < .001). Conclusions: Compared with the general Swedish population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths (21/21.99) was not increased in childhood rhGH-treated IGHD, ISS, and SGA patients when applying an advanced sex-specific mortality model adjusting for birth characteristics.

  • 29. Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Anton
    Sävendahl, Lars
    Niklasson, Aimon
    Bang, Peter
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Norgren, Svante
    Pehrsson, Nils-Gunnar
    Oden, Anders
    Birth Characteristics Explain One Third of Expected Deaths in rhGH-treated Patients Diagnosed with IGHD, ISS & SGA2016In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 86, p. 49-49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Alenkvist, Ida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Dyachok, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Tian, Geng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Li, Jia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Mehrabanfar, Saba
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Jin, Yang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Absence of Shb impairs insulin secretion by elevated FAK activity in pancreatic islets2014In: Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0022-0795, E-ISSN 1479-6805, Vol. 223, no 3, p. 267-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein B (SHB) has previously been shown to function as a pleiotropic adapter protein, conveying signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to intracellular signaling intermediates. The overexpression of Shb in β-cells promotes β-cell proliferation by increased insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, whereas Shb deficiency causes moderate glucose intolerance and impaired first-peak insulin secretion. Using an array of techniques, including live-cell imaging, patch-clamping, immunoblotting, and semi-quantitative PCR, we presently investigated the causes of the abnormal insulin secretory characteristics in Shb-knockout mice. Shb-knockout islets displayed an abnormal signaling signature with increased activities of FAK, IRS, and AKT. β-catenin protein expression was elevated and it showed increased nuclear localization. However, there were no major alterations in the gene expression of various proteins involved in the β-cell secretory machinery. Nor was Shb deficiency associated with changes in glucose-induced ATP generation or cytoplasmic Ca(2) (+) handling. In contrast, the glucose-induced rise in cAMP, known to be important for the insulin secretory response, was delayed in the Shb-knockout compared with WT control. Inhibition of FAK increased the submembrane cAMP concentration, implicating FAK activity in the regulation of insulin exocytosis. In conclusion, Shb deficiency causes a chronic increase in β-cell FAK activity that perturbs the normal insulin secretory characteristics of β-cells, suggesting multi-faceted effects of FAK on insulin secretion depending on the mechanism of FAK activation.

  • 31.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Green, Jennifer B.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Stevens, Susanna R.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Reed, Shelby D.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Bethel, M. Angelyn
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Engel, Samuel S.
    Merck and Co Inc, NJ USA.
    McGuire, Darren K.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Van de Werf, Frans
    Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Hramiak, Irene
    Univ Western Ontario, Canada.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hosp, New Zealand.
    Peterson, Eric D.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Holman, Rury R.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Sex differences in management and outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: A report from TECOS2018In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 2379-2388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine sex differences in baseline characteristics and outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Materials and methods: Cox models were used to analyse the association between sex and outcomes in the Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes with Sitagliptin (TECOS), a randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessing the impact of sitagliptin on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Results: A total of 4297 women and 10 374 men were followed for a median of 3.0 years. Women were slightly older and more often had cerebrovascular disease and peripheral arterial disease but less often coronary heart disease than men. At baseline, women were less likely to use aspirin or statins. The primary composite outcome of CV death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina occurred in 418 women (9.7%) and 1272 men (12.3%; 3.48 vs 4.38 events/100 participant-years, crude hazard ratio [HR] 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71-0.89, adjusted HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.55-0.74; P amp;lt; .0001). Women also had a significantly lower risk of secondary CV outcomes and all-cause death. Conclusions: In this large prospective study of people with type 2 diabetes and CV disease, women had different CV disease burden, worse CV risk factor profiles, and less use of indicated medications than men. Despite this, women had significantly lower risk of CV events, suggesting that the cardioprotective effects of female sex extend to populations with type 2 diabetes.

  • 32.
    Ali, Abir A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Grönberg, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Hjortland, G. O.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Oncol, Oslo, Norway.
    Grønbæk, H.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Hepatol & Gastroenterol, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ladekarl, M.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Langer, S. W.
    Rigshosp, Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Vestermark, L. W.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Odense, Denmark.
    Österlund, P.
    Tampere Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Tampere, Finland.;Tampere Helsinki Univ, Tampere, Finland.
    Knigge, U.
    Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Surg C, Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Endocrinol PE, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sørbye, H.
    Univ Bergen, Haukeland Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Bergen, Norway; Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Intravenous versus Oral Etoposide: Efficacy and Correlation to Clinical Outcome in Patients with High-Grade Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (WHO G3)2018In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 106, no Supplement: 1, p. 184-184Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33. Alibegovic, A.
    et al.
    Gannerdahl, P.
    Debeer, L.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Sweden.
    The effect of alpha 2 receptor agonists on central haemodynamic and blood glucose during hemorrhagic stress in the rat1998In: Surgical Research Communications, ISSN 0882-9233, Vol. 9, no 2-4, p. 151-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the selective alpha 2 agonist Mivazerol on catecholamine levels in plasma, and on central hemodynamics and blood glucose levels developments during hemorrhagic stress in rats was investigated. The animals were randomly given either saline, low dose of Mivazerol (0.6 μg/ml) or high dose (2.0 μg/ml) at a rate of 30 μl/100 g/min, beginning the infusions intravenously 30 min before onset and throughout 60 min of hemorrhagic stress. Before hemorrhage, Mivazerol raised mean arterial pressure, and reduced heart rate, adrenaline and noradrenaline levels in a dose dependent fashion. High dose infusion also resulted in an elevation in blood glucose. During hemorrhage, the high dose effectively dampened the catecholamine response. Simultaneously, the same group maintained better mean arterial pressure in response to hemorrhage. Blood glucose levels were elevated to similar levels regardless of treatment. These data indicate that Mivazerol effectively reduced the catecholamine response to severe hemorrhagic stress, while central hemodynamic and blood glucose responses were maintained or improved.

  • 34. Allin, Kristine H.
    et al.
    Tremaroli, Valentina
    Caesar, Robert
    Jensen, Benjamin A. H.
    Damgaard, Mads T. F.
    Bahl, Martin I.
    Licht, Tine R.
    Hansen, Tue H.
    Nielsen, Trine
    Dantoft, Thomas M.
    Linneberg, Allan
    Jørgensen, Torben
    Vestergaard, Henrik
    Kristiansen, Karsten
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hansen, Torben
    Bäckhed, Fredrik
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Aberrant intestinal microbiota in individuals with prediabetes2018In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 810-820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: Individuals with type 2 diabetes have aberrant intestinal microbiota. However, recent studies suggest that metformin alters the composition and functional potential of gut microbiota, thereby interfering with the diabetes-related microbial signatures. We tested whether specific gut microbiota profiles are associated with prediabetes (defined as fasting plasma glucose of 6.1-7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c of 42-48 mmol/mol [6.0-6.5%]) and a range of clinical biomarkers of poor metabolic health.

    Methods: In the present case-control study, we analysed the gut microbiota of 134 Danish adults with prediabetes, overweight, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and low-grade inflammation and 134 age-and sex-matched individuals with normal glucose regulation.

    Results: We found that five bacterial genera and 36 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were differentially abundant between individuals with prediabetes and those with normal glucose regulation. At the genus level, the abundance of Clostridium was decreased (mean log2 fold change -0.64 (SEM 0.23), p adj = 0.0497), whereas the abundances of Dorea, [Ruminococcus], Sutterella and Streptococcus were increased (mean log2 fold change 0.51 (SEM 0.12), p adj = 5 x 10-4; 0.51 (SEM 0.11), p adj = 1 x 10-4; 0.60 (SEM 0.21), p adj = 0.0497; and 0.92 (SEM0.21), p adj = 4 x 10-4, respectively). The two OTUs that differed the most were a member of the order Clostridiales (OTU 146564) and Akkermansia muciniphila, which both displayed lower abundance among individuals with prediabetes (mean log2 fold change -1.74 (SEM0.41), p adj = 2 x 10-3 and -1.65 (SEM0.34), p adj = 4 x 10-4, respectively). Faecal transfer from donors with prediabetes or screen-detected, drug-naive type 2 diabetes to germfree Swiss Webster or conventional C57BL/6 J mice did not induce impaired glucose regulation in recipient mice.

    Conclusions/interpretation: Collectively, our data show that individuals with prediabetes have aberrant intestinal microbiota characterised by a decreased abundance of the genus Clostridium and the mucin-degrading bacterium A. muciniphila. Our findings are comparable to observations in overt chronic diseases characterised by low-grade inflammation.

  • 35. Almby, K. E.
    et al.
    Abrahamsson, N.
    Lundqvist, M. H.
    Hammar, U.
    Thombare, K.
    Panagiotou, A.
    Karlsson, F. A.
    Sundbom, M.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Eriksson, J. W.
    Effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on counterregulatory responses during hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass surgery: no evidence for GLP-1 as a counterregulatory hormone2019In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 62, p. S416-S416Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Almby, K. E.
    et al.
    Abrahamsson, N.
    Lundqvist, M. H.
    Hammar, U.
    Thombare, K.
    Panagiotou, A.
    Karlsson, F. A.
    Sundbom, M.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Eriksson, J. W.
    Effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on counterregulatory responses during hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass surgery: no evidence for GLP-1 as a counterregulatory hormone2019In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 62, p. S416-S416Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Almby, Kristina E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Lundqvist, Martin H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Thombare, Ketan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Panagiotou, Amalia
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Biomed Engn, Umea, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Effects of GLP-1 on counter-regulatory responses during hypoglycemia after GBP surgery2019In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 181, no 2, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the role of GLP-1 receptor activation on the counter-regulation and symptoms of hypoglycemia in subjects who have undergone gastric bypass surgery (GBP).

    Design: Experimental hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp study.

    Methods: Twelve post-GBP subjects participated in a randomized cross-over study with two hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic clamps (glucose nadir 2.7 mmol/L) performed on separate days with concomitant infusions of the GLP-1 analog exenatide or with saline, respectively. Continuous measurements of metabolites and counter-regulatory hormones as well as assessments of heart rate variability and symptoms of hypoglycemia were performed throughout the clamps.

    Results: No effect of GLP-1 receptor activation on counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, GH) or glucose infusion rate was seen, but we found indications of a downregulation of the sympathetic relative to the parasympathetic nerve activity, as reflected in heart rate variability. No significant differences in symptom of hypoglycemia were observed.

    Conclusions/interpretation: Short-term exposure to a GLP-1 receptor agonist does not seem to impact the counter-regulatory hormonal and metabolic responses in post-GBP subjects during hypoglycemic conditions, suggesting that the improvement in symptomatic hypoglycemia post-GBP seen following treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists may be mediated by mechanism not directly involved in counter-regulation.

  • 38. Almby, Kristina E.
    et al.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Lundqvist, Martin H.
    Hammara, Ulf
    Thombare, Ketan
    Panagiotou, Amalia
    Karisson, F. Anders
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Effects of GLP-1 on counter-regulatory responses during hypoglycemia after GBP surgery2019In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 181, no 2, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the role of GLP-1 receptor activation on the counter-regulation and symptoms of hypoglycemia in subjects who have undergone gastric bypass surgery (GBP).

    Design: Experimental hyperinsulinemic–hypoglycemic clamp study.

    Methods: Twelve post-GBP subjects participated in a randomized cross-over study with two hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic clamps (glucose nadir 2.7 mmol/L) performed on separate days with concomitant infusions of the GLP-1 analog exenatide or with saline, respectively. Continuous measurements of metabolites and counter-regulatory hormones as well as assessments of heart rate variability and symptoms of hypoglycemia were performed throughout the clamps.

    Results: No effect of GLP-1 receptor activation on counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, GH) or glucose infusion rate was seen, but we found indications of a downregulation of the sympathetic relative to the parasympathetic nerve activity, as reflected in heart rate variability. No significant differences in symptom of hypoglycemia were observed.

    Conclusions/interpretation: Short-term exposure to a GLP-1 receptor agonist does not seem to impact the counter-regulatory hormonal and metabolic responses in post-GBP subjects during hypoglycemic conditions, suggesting that the improvement in symptomatic hypoglycemia post-GBP seen following treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists may be mediated by mechanism not directly involved in counter-regulation.

  • 39.
    Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. 1Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications2019In: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Absttaract book, 2019, p. 117-117, article id P35.05Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Therapeutic shoes can prevent diabetic foot reulcerations but their use is complicated by the fact that shoes have psychological and social meanings, which is believed to put a larger burden on women than men. The aim was to compare attitudes and attributes of women and men using therapeutic shoes for diabetic foot complications.

    Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1230 people with diabetes who had been fitted with therapeutic shoes. Women's and men's answers were compared using t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests with Fischer's exact tests. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

    Results: Questionnaires from 443 (36.0%) respondents (294 men, 149 women, mean age 69.2 years) were analyzed. More men than women (p < 0.05) had paid employment (20.4% vs 9.4%), had someone who reminded them to wear their therapeutic shoes (27.6% vs 10.0%), and had a history of foot ulcers (62.9% vs 46.3%) or minor amputation (17.7% vs 6.7%). More women than men received disability pension (18.8% vs 10.2%). Women reported worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes to the appearance and price of therapeutic shoes and how they felt about wearing them in public. Other comparisons were non-significant: other shoe attributes, education, diabetes type, current foot ulcers, major amputations, satisfaction with shoe services, understanding of neuropathy as a risk factor, locus of control regarding ulcer healing, belief in the shoes' efficacy to prevent and heal ulcers, worries about ulcer healing and new ulcerations, self-efficacy, depression, shoe use/adherence, paying a fee for therapeutic shoes, and social support.

    Conclusions: Men had worse foot complications. Women had worse general health, lower internal locus of control regarding ulcer prevention, and more negative attitudes toward therapeutic shoes. Clinicians should pay more attention to their female patients' concerns. Future research and development should focus on improving the weight and appearance of therapeutic shoes, particularly for women. Research is also needed on how to facilitate the adaption and reevaluation process where patients change from viewing shoes purely as items of clothing to also viewing them as medical interventions

  • 40.
    Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?2019In: 8th International symposium on diabetic foot: Abstract book, 2019, p. 140-140, article id P45.04Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: There is some debate about laterality for diabetic foot complications, that is, whether the right and left limbs are unequally affected. Coxon and Gallen (1) found that more amputations were performed on the right limb and Evans et al. (2) interpreted this in the context of foot dominance: they found that most foot ulcers occured on the dominant limb (which for most people is the right one) and speculated that the dominant limb may be more exposed to mechanical stresses and injuries. However, Demetriou et al. (3) did not find any laterality in foot ulcer location. The aim was to investigate laterality for foot ulcers and amputations. Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 1245 people who had diabetes, experience of using therapeutic shoes, and who had attended one of two prosthetics and orthotics clinics during a 12 months’ period. The number of ulcers or amputations on the right and left limb were compared with a two-sided chi-square test. Results: 469 (37.7%) questionnaires were returned. 118 (25.2%) participants reported unilateral foot ulcers, 54 (11.5%) reported unilateral minor amputation, and 21 (4.5%) reported unilateral major amputation. There was no statistically significant right-left difference in foot ulcers, minor amputations or major amputations (Table 1, p-values 0.713-1.000). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis about laterality for foot ulcers and amputations.

  • 41. Alnemo, John
    et al.
    Tranberg, Roy
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jarl, Gustav
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Are the left and right limbs unequally affected by diabetic foot complications?2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Alskar, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Karlsson, Mats O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Kjellsson, Maria C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Interspecies scaling of dynamic glucose and insulin using a mathematical model approach2015In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 58, no Suppl. 1, p. S306-S307Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43. Alssema, M
    et al.
    Vistisen, D
    Heymans, MW
    Nijpels, G
    Glümer, C
    Zimmet, PZ
    Shaw, JE
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stehouwer, CDA
    Tabák, AG
    Colagiuri, S
    Borch-Johnsen, K
    Dekker, JM
    The evaluation of screening and early detection strategies for type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (DETECT-2) update of the Finnish diabetes risk score for prediction of incident type 2 diabetes2011In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 1004-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The Finnish diabetes risk questionnaire is a widely used, simple tool for identification of those at risk for drug-treated type 2 diabetes. We updated the risk questionnaire by using clinically diagnosed and screen-detected type 2 diabetes instead of drug-treated diabetes as an endpoint and by considering additional predictors.

    METHODS: Data from 18,301 participants in studies of the Evaluation of Screening and Early Detection Strategies for Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (DETECT-2) project with baseline and follow-up information on oral glucose tolerance status were included. Incidence of type 2 diabetes within 5 years was used as the outcome variable. Improvement in discrimination and classification of the logistic regression model was assessed by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and by the net reclassification improvement. Internal validation was by bootstrapping techniques.

    RESULTS: Of the 18,301 participants, 844 developed type 2 diabetes in a period of 5 years (4.6%). The Finnish risk score had an area under the ROC curve of 0.742 (95% CI 0.726-0.758). Re-estimation of the regression coefficients improved the area under the ROC curve to 0.766 (95% CI 0.750-0.783). Additional items such as male sex, smoking and family history of diabetes (parent, sibling or both) improved the area under the ROC curve and net reclassification. Bootstrapping showed good internal validity.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The predictive value of the original Finnish risk questionnaire could be improved by adding information on sex, smoking and family history of diabetes. The DETECT-2 update of the Finnish diabetes risk questionnaire is an adequate and robust predictor for future screen-detected and clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes in Europid populations.

  • 44.
    Alston-Smith, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Department of Medicine, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Ware, J.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, K. N.
    Regulation of rat hepatocyte fructose 1,6-diphosphatase activity during endotoxemia1991In: Surgical Research Communication, ISSN 0882-9233, Vol. 11, no 1-2, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Alvehus, M.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Simonyte, K.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Andersson, T.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderström, I.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Burén, J.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rask, Eva
    Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mattsson, C.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Olsson, T.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Adipose tissue IL-8 is increased in normal weight women after menopause and reduced after gastric bypass surgery in obese women2012In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 684-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The menopausal transition is characterized by increased body fat accumulation, including redistribution from peripheral to central fat depots. This distribution is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease that are linked to low-grade inflammation. We determined whether postmenopausal women have higher levels of inflammatory markers, compared with premenopausal women. We also wanted to determine whether these markers are reduced by stable weight loss in obese women.

    DESIGN AND METHODS:

    Anthropometric data, blood samples and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were collected from normal weight premenopausal and postmenopausal women and obese women before and 2 years after gastric bypass (GBP) surgery. Serum protein levels and adipose tissue gene expression of inflammatory markers were investigated.

    RESULTS:

    IL-8 expression in adipose tissue and circulating levels were higher in postmenopausal vs premenopausal women. IL-8 expression was associated with waist circumference, independent of menopausal status. IL-6 expression and serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 were higher in postmenopausal vs premenopausal women. Two years after GBP surgery, adipose expression of IL-8, tumour necrosis factor-α and MCP-1 decreased significantly. Serum insulin levels were associated with inflammation-related gene expression before GBP surgery, but these associations disappeared after surgery.

    CONCLUSION:

    Postmenopausal women have an increased inflammatory response in the subcutaneous fat and circulation. Inflammatory markers in adipose tissue decreased significantly after surgery-induced weight loss. This effect may be beneficial for metabolic control and reduced cardiovascular risk after weight loss.

  • 46.
    Alvehus, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Burén, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Goedecke, Julia
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The human visceral fat depot has a unique inflammatory profile2010In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 879-883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity can be considered as a low-grade inflammatory condition, strongly linked to adverse metabolic outcomes. Obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation is characterized by infiltration of macrophages and increased cytokine and chemokine production. The distribution of adipose tissue impacts the outcomes of obesity, with the accumulation of fat in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and deep subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), but not superficial SAT, being linked to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that the inflammatory gene expression in deep SAT and VAT is higher than in superficial SAT. A total of 17 apparently healthy women (BMI: 29.3 +/- 5.5 kg/m2) were included in the study. Body fat (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and distribution (computed tomography) were measured, and insulin sensitivity, blood lipids, and blood pressure were determined. Inflammation-related differences in gene expression(real-time PCR) from VAT, superficial and deep SAT biopsies were analyzed using univariate and multivariate data analyses. Using multivariate discrimination analysis, VAT appeared as a distinct depot in adipose tissue inflammation,while the SAT depots had a similar pattern, with respect to gene expression. A significantly elevated (P < 0.01)expression of the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in VAT contributed strongly to the discrimination. In conclusion, the human adipose tissue depots have unique inflammatory patterns, with CCR2 and MIF distinguishing between VAT and the SAT depots.

  • 47.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Wijk, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet högskola.
    Livheim, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Toft, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Ersta sjukhus.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet högskola, Södersjukhuset.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholms universitet.
    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult type 1 diabetes management: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 1-8, article id e022234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Integrating diabetes self-management into daily life involves a range of complex challenges for affected individuals. Environmental, social, behavioural and emotional psychological factors influence the lives of those with diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a stress management group intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) among adults living with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will use a randomised controlled trial design evaluating treatment as usual (TAU) and ACT versus TAU. The stress management group intervention will be based on ACT and comprises a programme divided into seven 2-hour sessions conducted over 14 weeks. A total of 70 patients who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited over a 2-year period with follow-up after 1, 2 and 5 years.The primary outcome measure will be HbA1c. The secondary outcome measures will be the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey, the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale, The Summary of Self-Care Activities, Acceptance Action Diabetes Questionnaire, Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. The questionnaires will be administered via the internet at baseline, after sessions 4 (study week 7) and 7 (study week 14), and 6, 12 and 24 months later, then finally after 5 years. HbA1c will be measured at the same time points.Assessment of intervention effect will be performed through the analysis of covariance. An intention-to-treat approach will be used. Mixed-model repeated measures will be applied to explore effect of intervention across all time points.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received ethical approval (Dnr: 2016/14-31/1). The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and reports to key stakeholders.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02914496; Pre-results.

  • 48. Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Wijk, Ingrid
    Livheim, Fredrik
    Toft, Eva
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult type 1 diabetes management: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 11, article id e022234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Integrating diabetes self-management into daily life involves a range of complex challenges for affected individuals. Environmental, social, behavioural and emotional psychological factors influence the lives of those with diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a stress management group intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) among adults living with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will use a randomised controlled trial design evaluating treatment as usual (TAU) and ACT versus TAU. The stress management group intervention will be based on ACT and comprises a programme divided into seven 2-hour sessions conducted over 14 weeks. A total of 70 patients who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited over a 2-year period with follow-up after 1, 2 and 5 years.The primary outcome measure will be HbA1c. The secondary outcome measures will be the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey, the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale, The Summary of Self-Care Activities, Acceptance Action Diabetes Questionnaire, Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. The questionnaires will be administered via the internet at baseline, after sessions 4 (study week 7) and 7 (study week 14), and 6, 12 and 24 months later, then finally after 5 years. HbA1c will be measured at the same time points.Assessment of intervention effect will be performed through the analysis of covariance. An intention-to-treat approach will be used. Mixed-model repeated measures will be applied to explore effect of intervention across all time points.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received ethical approval (Dnr: 2016/14-31/1). The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and reports to key stakeholders.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02914496; Pre-results.

  • 49.
    Anagandula, Mahesh
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hyöty, Heikki
    University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Tampere, Finland ,Fimlab Ltd, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Finland.
    Frisk, Gun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Enterovirus-induced changes in explanted human islet of Langerhans resemble findings in islets of fulminant and conventional type 1 diabetesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothesis: Fulminant Type 1 diabetes is a unique subtype of T1D, mostly reported in the Japanese population, which is characterized by extensive beta cell death already at onset, often without any insulitis. Enterovirus (EV) infections are associated with the etiology of both fulminant and conventional T1D. However the causative mechanism is not known for any of these diseases. EVs capability to cause lytic vs non-lytic infection in explanted human islets may have implications on the pathogenesis of these two types of T1D.

    Aim: To study the effect of infection of explanted human pancreatic islets with lytic (CBV-1) and non-lytic (CBV-4) Coxsackie B virus strains on cytopathic effect/islet disintegration and to what extent genes involved in viral sensing, antiviral defense and encoding of islet auto-antigens are affected by the viral replication. Also, to compare these findings with the findings reported in fulminant and conventional T1D.

    Methods: Degree of cytopathic effect/islet disintegration was studied and viral replication was measured. Genes involved in viral sensing (NOD2, TLR7 and TLR4), antiviral pathways (OAS2, MX1, PKR, and IRF7), genes coding for known islet auto antigens (GAD65, ZNT8) and the islet hormones, insulin and glucagon, were studied. Mock-infected explanted islet served as controls.

    Results: All CBV strains replicated in the explanted islets but only the CBV-1 strains caused cytopathic effect/islet cell disintegration. Infection with all CBV strains resulted in the induction of genes encoding OAS2 and MX1. In contrast, mRNA expression levels of the gene encoding insulin was reduced. The gene encoding PKR was induced by one of the lytic strains (CBV-1-11) and also by the non-lytic CBV4 strain, while the mRNA expression levels of genes encoding glucagon, NOD2, TLR7, TLR4, MCL1, GAD65 and ZNT8 were not significantly affected.

  • 50.
    Andelin, M.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden..
    Kropff, J.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Matuleviciene, V.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Joseph, J.I.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA..
    Attvall, S.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hirsch, I.B.
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Imberg, H.
    Statistiska Konsultgruppen, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dahlqvist, S.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Klonoff, D.
    Diabetes Research Institute, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, CA, USA..
    Haraldsson, B.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    DeVries, J.H.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lind, M.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden lind.marcus@telia.com..
    Assessing the Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Calibrated With Capillary Values Using Capillary or Venous Glucose Levels as a Reference.2016In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, E-ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 876-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Using the standard venous reference for the evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems could possibly negatively affect measured CGM accuracy since CGM are generally calibrated with capillary glucose and venous and capillary glucose concentrations differ. We therefore aimed to quantify the effect of using capillary versus venous glucose reference samples on estimated accuracy in capillary calibrated CGM.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We evaluated 41 individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using the Dexcom G4 CGM system over 6 days. Patients calibrated their CGM devices with capillary glucose by means of the HemoCue system. During 2 visits, capillary and venous samples were simultaneously measured by HemoCue and compared to concomitantly obtained CGM readings. The mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was calculated using capillary and venous reference samples.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Venous glucose values were 0.83 mmol/L (15.0 mg/dl) lower than capillary values over all glycemic ranges, P less than .0001. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl), the difference was 1.25 mmol/l (22.5 mg/dl), P = .0001, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl), 0.67 mmol/l (12.0 mg/dl), P less than .0001 and above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl), 0.95 mmol/l (17.1 mg/dl), P less than .0001. MARD was 11.7% using capillary values as reference compared to 13.7% using venous samples, P = .037. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl) MARD was 16.6% and 31.8%, P = .048, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl) 12.1% and 12.6%, P = .32, above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl) 8.7% and 9.2%, P = .82.less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Using capillary glucose concentrations as reference to evaluate the accuracy of CGM calibrated with capillary samples is associated with a lower MARD than using venous glucose as the reference. Capillary glucose concentrations were significantly higher than venous in all glycemic ranges.less thanbr /greater than (© 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.)

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