Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 9999
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    A Asif, Farazee M
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Circular Manufacturing Systems: A development framework with analysis methods and tools for implementation2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The society today lives on the philosophy of ‘take-make-use-dispose.’ In the long run, this is not sustainable as the natural resources and the waste carrying capacity of the earth are limited. Therefore, it is essential to reduce dependency on the natural resources by decoupling the growth from the consumption. In this venture, both the society and the manufacturing industry have a vital role to play. The society needs to shift towards Circular Economy that rests upon the philosophy of ‘take-make-use-reuse’ and the manufacturing industry has to be a major stakeholder in this shift. Despite being proven to be both economically and environmentally beneficial, successful examples of circular systems are few today. This is primarily due to two reasons; firstly, there is a lack of systemic and systematic approach to guide industries and secondly, there is a lack of analysis methods and tools that are capable of assessing different aspects of circular manufacturing systems. Taking on to these challenges, the objective of this research is to bring forward a framework with methods and decision support tools that are essential to implement circular manufacturing systems. The initial conceptual framework with the systemic approach is developed based on extensive review and analysis of research, which is further adapted for industrial implementation. Systematic analysis methods, decision support and implementation tools are developed to facilitate this adaptation. This development has been supported by four cases from diverse manufacturing sectors. Behind each decision support tool, there are analysis methods built upon mainly system dynamics principles. These tools are based on simulation platforms called Stella and Anylogic. Among other things, these tools are capable of assessing the performance of closed-loop supply chains, consequences of resource scarcity, potential gains from resource conservation and overall economic and environmental performance of circular manufacturing systems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    A Asif, Farazee M
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Bianchi, Carmine
    University of Palermo (ITALY) Faculty of Political Sciences - Department of International Studies .
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Performance analysis of the closed loop supply chain2012In: Journal of Remanufacturing, ISSN 2210-4690, Vol. 2, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The question of resource scarcity and emerging pressure of environmental legislations has brought a new challenge for the manufacturing industry. On the one hand, there is a huge population that demands a large quantity of commodities; on the other hand, these demands have to be met by minimum resources and pollution. Resource conservative manufacturing (ResCoM) is a proposed holistic concept to manage these challenges. The successful implementation of this concept requires cross functional collaboration among relevant fields, and among them, closed loop supply chain is an essential domain. The paper aims to highlight some misconceptions concerning the closed loop supply chain, to discuss different challenges, and in addition, to show how the proposed concept deals with those challenges through analysis of key performance indicators (KPI).

    Methods

    The work presented in this paper is mainly based on the literature review. The analysis of performance of the closed loop supply chain is done using system dynamics, and the Stella software has been used to do the simulation. Findings The results of the simulation depict that in ResCoM; the performance of the closed loop supply chain is much enhanced in terms of supply, demand, and other uncertainties involved. The results may particularly be interesting for industries involved in remanufacturing, researchers in the field of closed loop supply chain, and other relevant areas. Originality The paper presented a novel research concept called ResCoM which is supported by system dynamics models of the closed loop supply chain to demonstrate the behavior of KPI in the closed loop supply chain.

  • 3.
    Aardal, Karen
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, Linköping Institute of Technology.
    Ari, Aysen
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Decomposition principles applied to the dynamic production and work-force scheduling problem1987In: Engineering Costs and Production Economics, ISSN 0167-188X, E-ISSN 1878-4011, Vol. 12, no 1-4, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most important problems in the production and inventory planning field, is the scheduling of production and work force in a dynamic environment. Although this problem can be formulated as a linear program, it is often quite difficult to solve directly, due to its large scale. Instead, it might be fruitful to use a decomposition approach. Decomposition, in general, means decomposing a difficult problem into several easier, or a sequence of easier problems which are later coordinated to reconstruct the original problem.In this report we discuss several possibilities of applying the most common decomposition principles, namely Benders (primal) and Datnzig-Wolfe (dual), as well as a relatively new decomposition method, called cross decomposition, to the dynamic, multiproduct production and employment planning problem. A number of special cases are also presented.

  • 4.
    Aardal, Karen
    et al.
    CORE, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
    Ari, Aysen
    Luleå University of Technology.
    On the resemblance between the Kornai-Liptak and cross decomposition techniques for block-angular linear programs1990In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 393-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the resemblance is demonstrated between the master- and subproblems generated by the Kornai-Liptak algorithm and the subproblems obtained by using the cross decomposition method on linear optimization problems with block-angular structure. The significance of the similarity between these two algorithms becomes apparent considering the main disadvantage attributed to cross decomposition. In cross decomposition a master problem has to be solved from time to time since the subproblems alone do not always give a converging sequence of primal and dual solutions. But if the cross decomposition algorithm is modified in such a way that the successive primal and dual subproblem solutions are taken into consideration with equal weights, this results in the Kornai-Liptak algorithm for which convergence is guaranteed

  • 5.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    et al.
    Helsingfors Universitet.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Higher Education and Research: Who should pay?2014Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 6.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    et al.
    Helsingfors Universitet.
    Berg, Elisabeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Introduction2014In: Higher Education and Research in Academe: Who should pay?, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014, p. 11-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 7.
    Aas, Gro Hanne
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Kvinneforskningspolitiske (pr)øvelser1999Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Målsettingen for licentiatuppsatsen er å analysere nordisk kvinneforsknings formuleringer av forskningspolitiske felter, problemstillinger og utfordringer, og gjennom kontakt og diskusjon bidra til samarbeid, diskusjoner og offentlighet om forskingspolitikk i kvinneforskning. Arbeidet har tatt utgangspunkt i relativt nytt materiale fra Danmark, Norge og Sverige. I kap. 1 presenteres prosjektet, problemstillinger og materiale. Kapitlene 2-6 består av innledninger og artikler holdt eller skrevet i løpet av de to senaste åren. Diskusjoner om kjønn og akademia står i fokus i kap. 2 - "Universities have politics". I kap. 3, artikkelen "Gamle og nye drømmer", diskuteres et kvinneforskningspolitiske intervensjonsprosjekt som blev utført for en del år tilbake, og det antydes noen nye omdreiningspunkter for et slikt arbeid. Enkelte perspektiver utdypes i kap. 4, "Kvinneforskningens samfunnskontrakt", hvor termen "kvinneperspektiv" som forskningspolitisk term granskas krtitiskt. De to siste kapitlene tar utgangspunkt i den norske forskningsmeldingen som kom våren 1999. Ut fra tre lesestrategier forsøkes det leses muligheter for kvinneforskningspolitiske strategier. Det ses også på innholdet i regjeringens forskningspolitiske verdidebatt, og det diskuteres mulige intervensjoner i denne ut fra feministiske vitenskaps- og teknologistudier.

  • 8.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, University of Umeå, Sweden.
    Jensen, B. R.
    Sandfeld, J.
    Richter, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The impact of object size and precision demands on fatigue during computer mouse use2011In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 118-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prolonged computer use, especially if fatigue ensues, is associated with visual and musculoskeletal symptoms. The aim was to determine the time-course of perceived fatigue in the wrist, forearm, shoulder and eyes during a 60-min mouse task (painting rectangles), and whether object size and/or mouse use demands were of influence. Also, we investigated performance (number of rectangles painted), and whether perceived fatigue was paralleled by local muscle fatigue or tissue oxygenation. Ten women performed the task for three conditions (crossover design). At condition 1, rectangles were 45 × 25 mm, square paint cursor size 1.3 × 1.3 mm, and mousepointer movement ratio 1:26. At condition 2, the same cursor size and mousepointer movement ratio was used, but rectangles were smaller. At condition 3, the smaller rectangles were used, but the cursor size was also smaller and mousepointer movement ratio was 1:8. The results showed increased self-reported fatigue over time, with the observed increase greater for the eyes, but no change in physiological responses. Condition 2 resulted in higher performance and increased eye fatigue. Perceived fatigue in the muscles or physiological responses did not differ between conditions. In conclusion, computer work tasks imposing high visual and motor demands, and with high performance, seemed to have an influence on eye fatigue. 

  • 9.
    Aava, Nils
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ericson, Ronald
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Esberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Belysning i bilverkstäder: förslag till belysningsplanering1979Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Abbas, Anwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Faruk Acar, Ömer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Simulation as an Enabler for ProductionSystem Development within the Indoor Vertical Farming Industry2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the increase in food consumption, new ideas, and technologies began to be developed. Inaddition, the developments generated by Industry 4.0 technologies have started to be applied tothe entire manufacturing sector and the indoor farming industry, which is currently trending.Many studies and articles have been prepared on this subject, and the main goal of each study isto produce quality products and to ensure continuity in production to cover the nonendingincrease in demand.

    This paper discusses how simulation technology, which is one of the industry 4.0 technologies,can be used in the production system development of the indoor farming industry. According tomany researchers, the biggest obstacle for the vertical farming industry is start-up cost, andsimulation technologies can be the solution for this since it allows future production systems tobe analyzed without any investment. To have a clear vision of how these technologies can beadapted in the indoor farming industry, this paper will find the answers to these questions, RQ1:How can simulation facilitate production system development and Industry 4.0 projects withinthe indoor farming industry? RQ2: What are the benefits and challenges when using simulationas a tool for production system development within the indoor farming industry? To reach thegoal of this paper, the case study method was used, and an indoor farming company was selectedto get more realistic data about the vertical farming system. BlueRedGold AB is a start-upcompany in the indoor farming industry, and it has a huge growth potential since they aim totransform its current production lines to be fully automated. Many articles and studies were usedto approach the solution of the research questions from a more technical and academic point ofview, and the analysis of these articles was carried out with the structured literature review method.

    After conducting this research, answers have been obtained for the research questions. Theauthors' solution to the layout issue, one of the case company's main challenges as indicated inthis study, was developed after extensive simulation model testing. As highlighted in this paper,it has been stated by many researchers, there are several simulation approaches to follow.However, the authors have developed a simulation modeling approach to be followed in theindoor vertical farming industry to overcome the complexity of these systems as well as thesimulation program complexity. In addition, several challenges and benefits have beenhighlighted in this paper such as the lack of ready models of the equipment used in indoorfarming which requires a knowledge of a programing language to overcome. Finally, despitechallenges, simulation technology can provide an applicable solution for production systemproblems of vertical farming companies/organizations to obtain continuous improvementphilosophy which is the main principle of Lean thinking. The generated simulation model in thisthesis project was successfully implemented, demonstrating how this technology might be aneffective solution for complex production systems as in the indoor farming sector. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Abbas, Maryam
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Knowledge Management vid uppdragsarbete2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 12.
    abbas, Noah Wessam
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. UofSC.
    Sheikh Osman, Jegar
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Production Flow Improvements in a Mixed-Model Assembly Line - A Case study at a large manufacturing plant2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to improve the production flow in a mixed-model assembly line. This has been achieved by first identifying the problems in a mixed-model assembly line and proposing the solutions that can be applied to the problems. In addition, the purpose will be fulfilled with the help of the existing studies and by answering the research questions.

  • 13.
    Abd-Aljawad, Baraa
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Grönberg, Camilla
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Vem tar hand om chefen?: En explorativ studie om första linjens- och mellanchefers upplevda organisatoriska och sociala arbetsmiljö.2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Who takes care of the manager?”An exploratory study of manager´s perceived organizational and social work environment. 

    The study aims to create a deeper understanding of managers' experiences, of their organizational and social work environment. Furthermore, the study aims to examine managers' perceptions of health factors that they perceive as health-promoting. The main question of this study is; “How do managers experience their organizational and social work environment?”. As previous research has often focused on preventive factors, this study focuses on a health-promoting perspective. Which refers to the study's second question; "What health factors do managers perceive as health-promoting?". The study applies a qualitative method through semi-structured interviews for the collection of empirical material. The sample consists of eight first-line and middle managers in various industries. The study has an exploratory focus in order to create a basis for further research. 

    The results of the study show that recovery, communication, colleagues, social relationships, clear roles, goals and tasks are perceived as important organizational and social aspects in the manager's own work environment. The results also show that perceived health factors are flexibility in working hours, being heard, support from colleagues, functioning social relationships and recovery by adapting their meetings.  

    Keywords: Organizational and social work environment, management, health factors, health promotion.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Abdalrahman, Moutoz
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Brice, Alistair
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Effektivisering av en produktionsprocess: En fallstudie på Corroventa AB2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A major concern for companies today is the necessity to manufacture a wide range of products with short lead times and at a low cost. This puts greater demands on companies to have a good product mix and volume flexibility while maintaining a high level of efficiency. In addition, companies need to be aware of the source of unknown losses in their organisation and production process in order to minimise them.  This study was conducted at Corroventa avfuktning AB in Bankeryd, Sweden, a company that specialises in products that are used to dehumidify buildings and neutralise radon radiation. Their production process mainly focuses on maintaining stock levels, but adverse weather conditions that cause flooding and water damage could push demand levels to a point where they are unable to guarantee a short enough lead time to win a customer order. This puts pressure on them to make their production process more flexible and efficient while reducing their lead time.  The case study was carried out in a pre-assembly department for the final assembly of adsorption dehumidifiers. The department had been identified as a bottleneck for the whole system during high demand, and the study was undertaken to identify the underlying problem. With a firm theoretical framework and in-depth status analysis the authors identified key areas to improve the overall performance of the pre-assembly department. The improvements included a new production layout, a more balanced assembly process and a reduction in material handling. This led to improved product mix and volume flexibility, and reduced lead times. As a final step, a discussion and conclusion has been written that discusses the validity and reliability of the study, sums up all the areas of improvement and determines further studies that need to be undertaken in order to facilitate future improvements throughout the plant.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Abdelkarim, Sofia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hasan Hawre, Hazhwan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kartläggning av ergonomin i en produktionscell: Med utformningsförslag för en ergonomisk arbetsplats2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Purpose: The aim of the work is to map the ergonomics in a production cell and propose and compare the solutions to identified problems. In order to identify the problem and come up with some solutions, these questions have been answered.• What factors lead to operations that are harmful to the body?• How can a production cell be designed to be more ergonomic for employees?• What are the advantages / disadvantages of ergonomics in a production company?

     

    Method: To perform the study and achieve the purpose of the work, the authors used a case study company where observations were made in parallel with a literature review mainly on ergonomics variety of analysis and quality. The case study company has been used as the basis for the case study where ergonomics are mapped by means of observations, interviews and data that were analyzed by means of literature study done in parallel.

    Study results: The study resulted in a survey of ergonomics in a production cell at the case study company and 5 different suggestions for improvement. The production cell on the case study company is a red cell today, which means that the production cell is in a non-accepted position and in need for urgent changes in ergonomics. Factors leading to bad ergonomics and a non-accepted position as Volvo's requirements have been identified. Many heavy lifting and many torque is what has the highest negative impact on the working environment and ergonomics. Lack of adequate lifting tools have led to those not used in the production cell today. This leads to repetitive work and encumbrance at the case study company. Further, also the working height of the paths contributed to an increased workload as operators are in an unnatural posture. All of these factors are the basis of the 5 suggestions for improvement as the study also resulted in. New custom lifting tools, job rotation, reverse the order of the court, new packaging and pallet to the gears and the robot turn. All these proposed solutions lead to reduced stress and improved ergonomics in the production cell as manual lifting and twists are reduced. The solutions also leads to the production cell shifting from a non-accepted position with demands of urgent change to a yellow production cell that requires an action plan for the future.

     

    Implications: The aim of this study was to map the ergonomics in a production cell. With the study in hand, a conclusion is drawn that the aim has been achieved when all three of the questions have been addressed. Factors leading to poor ergonomics are identified. As well the advantages and disadvantages of investing in ergonomics identified and how production cells should be formed. With this information in mind, a number of proposed solutions have been developed.

     

    Recommendations: Further studies on the subject are recommended to increase knowledge and interest. It may be appropriate to carry out more case studies at more industries to strengthen the study’s results and generalizability. Furthermore, studies are recommended where the entire work environment is studied and not only physical ergonomics. By studying the whole working environment and the many factors that interact it can lead to a greater force being created for higher efficiency and quality in production.

     

    Keywords: Ergonomics, Ergonomics, Work, Volvo CE, Load, Lifting Tools, Body Injury, Advantages, Improvements, Quality

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Abdelmageed, Mohamed Elnourani
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Skärin, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Developing a line balancing tool for reconfigurable manufacturing systems: A tool to support investment decisions2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This thesis aims to developing a decision-making tool which fits in a reconfigurable manufacturing system (RMS) milieu used to identify whether to introduce and produce a new product into an already existing assembly line or to invest in a new assembly line. To fulfil the purpose, four research questions were developed. 

    1. Which line balancing problem-solving techniques exist in the literature?
    2. Which investment costs can be considered vital for new assembly lines as a    consequence from new product introductions?
    3. Can a decision-making tool be designed to evaluate new product introductions which considers both line balancing KPIs and investment costs in an assembly line?
    4. To what extent can criteria in the RMS theory be linked with the attributes of the    designed decision-making tool to support its applicability?

    Method - Literature studies were performed in order to create a theoretical foundation for the thesis to stand upon, hence enabling the possibility to answer the research questions. The literature studies were structured to focus on selected topics, including reconfigurable manufacturing systems, line balancing, and assembly line investment costs. To answer the third research question, which involved creating a decision-making tool, a single-case study was carried out. The company chosen was within the automotive industry. Data was collected through interviews, document studies and a focus group.

    Findings & analysis - An investigation regarding which line balancing solving-techniques suit RMS and which assembly line investment costs are critical when  introducing new products has been made. The outputs from these  investigations set the foundation for developing a decision-making tool which enables fact-based decisions. To test the decision-making tool’s compatibility with reconfigurable manufacturing systems, an evaluation against established characteristics was performed. The evaluation identified two reconfigurable manufacturing system characteristic as having a direct correlation to the decision-making tool. These characteristics regarded scalability and convertibility.

    Conclusions - The industrial contribution of the thesis was a decision-making tool that enables fact-based decisions regarding whether to introduce a new product into an already existing assembly line or invest in a new assembly line. The academic contribution involved that the procedure for evaluating the tool was recognized as also being suitable for testing the reconfigurable correlation with other production development tools. Another contribution regards bridging the knowledge gaps of the classifications in line balancing-solving techniques and assembly line investment costs.

    Delimitations - One of the delimitations in the thesis involved solely focusing on developing and analysing a decision-making tool from an RMS perspective. Hence, other production systems were not in focus. Also, the thesis only covered the development of a decision-making tool for straight assembly lines, not U-shaped lines.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Abdelmageed & Skärin (2021)
  • 17.
    Abdollahpour, N.
    et al.
    Department of Ergonomics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Science, Tehran.
    Helali, Faramarz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Hoseini, M.A.
    Department of Rehabilitation Management, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Science, Tehran.
    Ghomshe, F. Tabatabaei
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institute for Higher Education of Kar, Qhazvin.
    Ziarani, M. Hamzeiyan
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institute for Higher Education of Kar, Qhazvin.
    Peysepar, S.
    HSE Unit of MAPNA Turbine Blade Engineering and Manufacturing Company-PARTO, Karaj.
    An improving working condition system (health, safety and ergonomics) survey and analysis with macroergonomics approach in a manufacturing company from Iran Power Plant Industry in 20102013In: Iran Occupational Health, ISSN 1735-5133, E-ISSN 2228-7493, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: World experience has shown the positive effect of applying ergonomics in improving work conditions, of quality and quantity of production, reducing prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, saving costs and increase of productivity in the different contents. These are possible only with utilizing properly improving work condition system and Macroergonomics approach. The aim of the study was how determine situation and analyzing the working conditions using the macroergonomics approach in a Power Plant Industry. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study. First, the program for improvement of work conditions were evaluated using three questionnaires including managers viewpoint (29 samples), health, safety and environment employees viewpoint (5 samples) and operating workers viewpoint (85 samples) and then three other instruments of macroergonomics were used. Results: According to the results of 1) questionnaires and corresponding tests, three of the program's goals of improving working conditions and promotion practices that have the same opinions, but in some cases had different opinions. 2) Future workshops and interviews, the lack of participatory leadership and lack of collaborative work systems for the company stated. 3) Apply ergonomics checklist of ILO, an appropriate interaction between the top and bottom surfaces revealed. Conclusion: Awakened needs of change in the middle and lower levels of organization to solve problems relate to improving working conditions of the system was created. To implement an Ergonomics Intervention Programme Technique Process requires the full support management and employees.

  • 18.
    Abdollahpour, Nosrat
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Health, School of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz.
    Dastranj, Farahnaz
    Occupational Health, International Campus of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences (IC-SSUMS) Yazd – Iran.
    Helali, Faramarz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Ziarani, M. Hamzeian
    Zeiaei, M.
    Stress Prevention at Work Checkpoints: Practical improvements for stress prevention the workplace2016 (ed. Free)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Abdollahpour, Nosrat
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Health Engineering, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences Tabriz, Iran.
    Helali, Faramarz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Implementing 'Awakened Need of Change' for Applying Ergonomics to Work System with Macroergonomics Approach in an Industrially Derveloping Country and its Meta-Reflection2016In: Journal of Ergonomics, E-ISSN 2165-7556, Vol. 6, no 6, article id 182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Abdollahpour, Nosrat
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Health Engineering and Ergonomics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Helali, Faramarz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Implementing Practical Ergonomics Knowledge Transfer Using Ergonomic Checkpoints to Support the Participatory Ergonomics Process in an Industrially Developing Country2022In: IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, ISSN 2472-5838, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 59-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implementing ergonomics principles in workplaces requires good knowledge transfer with the participation of professionals, workers, and managers.

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate practical ergonomics knowledge transfer to support the participatory ergonomics process that could lead problem identification and the implementation and development of feasible and low-cost solutions.

    Methods: This was action research on the type of intervention and conducted in four phases. Accordingly, 106 participants from different organizational levels of a manufacturing company, facilitated by an ergonomist by forming 14 action groups, were involved in practical ergonomics knowledge transfer to identify and solve problems of work divisions. Participant reflections were obtained through interviews and field notes.

    Results: The results contributed to the presentation of 145 solutions to improve working conditions by the action groups. Most solutions were low-cost and 57.5% were implemented. The interviews showed the development of a participation culture, learning and institutionalizing ergonomics principles in practice, and improving competence in identifying problems and implementing solutions.

    Conclusions: The key findings were achieved by the participatory ergonomics intervention approach through different tactics of participant engagement, including a pushing tactic for intentional learning and a pulling tactic for voluntary learning, which resulted in the improvement of working conditions and promotion of a participatory culture.

  • 21.
    Abdollahpour, Nosrat
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Health and Ergonomics, Faculty of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Helali, Faramarz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology.
    Rasoulzadeh, Yahya
    Department of Occupational Health and Ergonomics, Faculty of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; Iranian Traffic Injuries Research Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Hassankhani, Hadi
    Centre of Qualitative Studies, Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Barriers and Challenges to Human Factors/Ergonomics Knowledge Transfer to Small Business Enterprises in an Industrially Developing Country2023In: IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, ISSN 2472-5838, Vol. 11, no 1-2, p. 14-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OCCUPATIONAL APPLICATION

    We found that small business enterprises (SBEs) face intra- and extra-organizational barriers in different dimensions related to their work system to practically implement human factors/ergonomics (HFE) knowledge transfer and to achieve its benefits in an industrially developing country. Utilizing a three-zone lens, we evaluated the feasibility of overcoming the barriers identified by stakeholders, especially ergonomists. To overcome the identified barriers in practice, three types of macroergonomics interventions (top-down, middle-out, and bottom-up) were distinguished through macroergonomics theory. The bottom-up approach of macroergonomics, as a participatory HFE intervention, was considered as the entry point to overcome the perceived barriers in the first zone of the lens, which included such themes as lack of competence, lack of involvement and interaction, and inefficient training and learning approaches. This approach focused on improving emotional literacy as a care zone among the small business enterprise personnel.

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT

    Background: The human factors/ergonomics (HFE) knowledge transfer process is one of the potential challenges for organizations in industrially developing countries (IDCs), especially in small business enterprises (SBEs).

    Purpose: We explored perceived barriers and challenges to the practical implementation of HFE knowledge transfer to SBEs in Iran, as an IDC, to improve their work systems.

    Methods: An exploratory qualitative study was conducted using a conventional content analysis. To identify perceived barriers, we conducted individual interviews (n = 38) and a focus-group discussion (n = 17) with the participation of the SBEs personnel and the officials of related organizations. Inductive content analysis was used for data analysis. We then categorized the identified perceived barriers (themes) to determine the feasibility of overcoming them.

    Results: Regarding perceived barriers, the following nine themes were extracted: lack of competence, resistance to change, technological infrastructure problems, lack of involvement and interaction, using an inappropriate mode of knowledge, lack of culture-building about HFE, inefficient training and learning approaches, lack of scientific management, and extra-organizational problems. Further, a three-zone lens was identified for the extracted themes to check the feasibility of overcoming them.

    Conclusions: We identified nine intra- and extra-organizational barriers in the HFE knowledge transfer process to SBEs. We further evaluated the ways of overcoming perceived barriers defined in the three-zone lens to adapt them for building creative workplace culture zones (care, creative, and improvement). We distinguished three types of macroergonomics interventions (top-down, middle-out, and bottom-up) and three supporting strategies, including, knowledge, management and employees, and participatory HFE.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Abdollahpour, Nosrat
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Health, School of Health, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil.
    Helali, Faramarz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Ziaei, M
    Department of Occupational Health, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz.
    Hamzeian, M
    Department of Ergonomics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Science, Tehran.
    Keikhamoghadam, AA
    Department of Occupational Health, School of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz.
    Gholamnia, R
    Department of Occupational Health Engineering, School of Health, Safety and environment, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran.
    Ghaffari, A
    HSE Unit of National Iranian Gas Company, Tehran, Iran.
    Assessment of risk factors and the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders by QEC and Body Map operational units of the gas refinery in Iran and its Meta-Reflection2016In: Journal of Health, ISSN 2382-9710, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 35-50, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This study aims to evaluate the risk factors and the prevalence of WMSDs disorders using QEC and Body Map techniques in operational units took a gas refineries and its Meta-Reflection.Method and Material: This case study assessed 254 operators in three distinct phases. First, 72 workstation posture was evaluated by using of QEC. Secondly was intended for employees of WMSDs were assessed using by Body Map. After conducting interview with relevant directors, the effectiveness of such studies has been analyzed through Meta-Reflection.Results: Based on results came from QEC survey, the operators’ average scores was %53/8. Moreover, results of Body Map assessment showed that the highest organs of WMSDs were back and knee extrusions (47% and 46% respectively). Also, lack of ergonomics policy and plan within refinery has demonstrated by interviews. Meta-Reflection, on the other hand, showed that because of incomplete learning cycles in the mentioned surveys which only provide WMSDs’ status, workstations’ ergonomics condition, and introduce expert based solutions. Thus, such surveys not only have incomplete study plan, but also have less impact on improving overall health, safety and ergonomics within this organization.Conclusion: This research proves that non-ergonomic conditions result in awkward postures and subsequent physical disorders. Overall, this study has showed a gap from this kind of the work on the learning cycles at organizational levels, a trend should be considered to interactive research work on the workplaces with improved and promoted system ergonomics attitude.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Abdul Malek, Nurul Aida
    et al.
    Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM), Malaysia / Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Shahzad, Khuram
    Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Takala, Josu
    Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Bojnec, Stefan
    Faculty of Management, University of Primorska, Slovenia.
    Papler, Drago
    Faculty of Management, University of Primorska, Slovenia.
    Liu, Yang
    Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Analyzing Sustainable Competitive Advantage: Strategically Managing Resource Allocations to Achieve Operational Competitiveness2015In: Management and Production Engineering Review, ISSN 2080-8208, E-ISSN 2082-1344, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 70-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s dynamic business environment, a key challenge for all companies is to make adaptive adjustments to their manufacturing strategy. This study demonstrates the competitive priorities of manufacturing strategy in hydro-power case company to evaluate the level of sustainable competitive advantage and also to further analyze how business strategies are aligned with manufacturing strategies. This research is based on new holistic analytical evaluation of manufacturing strategy index, sense and respond, and sustainable competitive advantage models. These models help to describe, evaluate, and optimize resource allocation to meet the performance requirements in dynamic decision making. Furthermore, these models evaluate operational competitiveness for manufacturing strategies according to the multi-criteria priority. The results show that the adjustments of competitive priorities in manufacturing strategies by implementing the proposed holistic analytical models are helpful in strategically managing business operations. The discussion derives the most critical attributes in business operations while alignment of resource allocation with competitive priorities help to strategically focus those attributes. In conclusion, we argue that resource allocation and manufacturing strategies have become the most important capabilities in a business environment where companies focus to get a sustainable competitive advantage.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Abdul, Nishan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Palmborg, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Analys och lösningsförslag för logistik inom Volvo Powertrain2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Volvo Powertrain in Skövde is a factory that manufactures truck and bus engines with various volumes. The factory has several departments and functions that together make up the three main parts: foundry, processing, and assembly. One of these departments is logistics, which has the task of organizing internal logistics activities at the company. The logistics department strives to provide good customer service with low costs and environmental impact. The work carried out concerns parts of the current data management system used within the departments warehouse management structure. The current system is not very user-friendly which makes it difficult to get an overview of the storage areas. This, together with other problems, causes the logistics department to experience the system as time-consuming and deficient. The purpose of this work is to produce solution proposals that address the shortcomings of the current system utilizing minimal investments, while facilitating data management and providing better visualization of the warehouses. The methods chosen to achieve the purpose of the work are motivated by a literature study.

    To compare solution proposals, standard IEEE-830 was used as a basis for producing a requirements specification. The requirements specification based on observations and interviews conducted with the logistics department. The solution proposals presented are based on interviews conducted at other sites within the Volvo Group and have been compared with the requirements specification to see how well they fit the needs of the logistics department. The methods used during the execution of the work are also discussed, and finally, recommendations are made for future work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25. Abdul Rashid, S. H.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Kristina M.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Human Values: Increasing importance in the automotive production systems2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Abdulhadi, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Haradinaj, Vjollca
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Kvinnors och mäns arbetsmiljö: En kvantitativ jämförande studie om hur kvinnor och män upplever den psykosociala arbetsmiljön2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of our study is to investigate men's and women's experiences of their psychosocial work environment. To fulfil our purpose and our questions the following research question were formulated “Is there any difference between men and women's experience of stress, bullying, sexual harassment, social support, management support and autonomy in their work environment?” The study has been conducted via our web survey on social media, Facebook and LinkedIn. Our method has been of a quantitative nature and implemented with 112 respondents. To get as many answers as possible, we have shared the questionnaire publicly and via messenger with friends who could take part of it. The reason why this material is used in this study is that it can contribute to an understanding of the respondents' experience of stress, bullying, social support, manager support, sexual harassment, autonomy, influence and self-control, and to be able to compare differences between men and women in these aspects. The result showed that in some cases there are differences between men and women. However, the result showed that there were no significant gender differences. This suggests that further research should continue to investigate gender differences regarding stress, bullying, sexual harassment, social support, managerial support, autonomy, influence and self-control, since the result can be interpreted as being that generalizing conclusions in this regard cannot be drawn at this time.

    Download full text (pdf)
    A-K2019:4
  • 27.
    Abdul-Jalbar, Beatriz
    et al.
    Universidad de La Laguna.
    Segerstedt, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sicilia, Joaquín
    Universidad de La Laguna.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    A new heuristic to solve the one-warehouse N-retailer problem2010In: Computers & Operations Research, ISSN 0305-0548, E-ISSN 1873-765X, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We deal with a multi-echelon inventory system in which one warehouse supplies an item to multiple retailers. Customer demand arrives at each retailer at a constant rate. The retailers replenish their inventories from the warehouse that in turn orders from an outside supplier. It is assumed that shortages are not allowed and lead times are negligible. The goal is to determine replenishment policies that minimize the overall cost in the system. We develop a heuristic to compute efficient policies, which also can easily be used in a spreadsheet application. The main idea consists of finding a balance between the replenishment and the inventory holding costs at each installation. This new heuristic we compare with two other approaches proposed in the literature; the computational studies show that in most of the instances generated the new method provides lower costs.

  • 28.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Resource Conservative Manufacturing: New Generation of Manufacturing2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of resource scarcity and emerging pressure of environmentallegislations have put the manufacturing industry with a new challenge. On theone side, there is a huge population that demands a large quantity ofcommodities, on the other side, these demands have to be met by minimumresources and with permissible pollution that the earth’s ecosystem can handle.In this situation, technologic breakthrough that can offer alternative resourceshas become essential. Unfortunately, breakthroughs do not follow any rule ofthumb and while waiting for a miracle, the manufacturing industry has to findways to conserve resources. Within this research the anatomy of a large body ofknowledge has been performed to find the best available practices for resourceconservation. Critical review of the research revealed that none of the availablesolutions are compatible with the level of resource conservation desired by themanufacturing industry or by society. It has also been discovered that a largegap exists between the solutions perceived by the scientists and theapplicability of those solutions. Through careful evaluation of the state-of-theart,the research presented in this thesis introduced a solution of maximizingresource conservation i.e., material, energy and value added, as used inmanufacturing. The solutions emerged from the novel concept named asResource Conservative Manufacturing, which is built upon the concept ofMultiple Lifecycle of product. Unlike other research work, the researchdocumented in this thesis started with the identification of the problem andfrom which a ‘wish to do’ list was drawn. The seriousness of the problem andpotential of adopting the proposed concept has been justified with concreteinformation. A great number of arguments have been presented to show theexisting gaps in the research and from that, a set of solutions to conserveresources has been proposed. Finally, one of the prime hypotheses concerningclosed loop supply chain has been validated through the system dynamicsmodeling and simulation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Minimizing Uncertainty Involved in Designing the Closed-loop Supply Network for Multiple-lifecycle of Products2010In: Annals Of DAAAM for 2010 & Proceedings of 21st DAAAM Symposium: Intelligent Manufacturing and Automation / [ed] Branko Katalinic, Zadar: DAAAM International , 2010, p. 1055-1056Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To ensure multiple-lifecycle of products through remanufacturing intervention requires a well-functioning closed-loop supply network. Generally, the unpredictability of quantity, timing and quality (physical/functional) of the returned products and demand fluctuation of the remanufactured products are the main sources of uncertainty of closed-loop supply network. To some extent, efficient recollection strategies and separate distribution channels for remanufactured products can minimize the uncertainty. Nevertheless, efficient recollection does not necessarily close the loop if the recovered products do not enter into the main stream of the supply network. Beside, products that are distributed through separate channels create an open loop. Thus, the problem of uncertainty remains unsolved. The aim of this paper is to propose solutions to minimize the uncertainty involved in designing a well-functioning closed-loop supply network using the system dynamics principle and tool.

  • 30.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH.
    Lieder, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Štimulak, M.
    Halvordsson, E.
    De Bruijckere, R.
    A practical ICT framework for transition to circular manufacturing systems2018In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2018, p. 598-602Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition towards a circular economy has become important. Manufacturing industry being a major stakeholder in this transition has started exploring the potential of this transition and challenges in implementation. Ambitious companies such as Gorenje d.d. has taken the circular economy transition seriously and aims to become a pioneer in implementing circular manufacturing systems. One vital step in this transition is the business model shift from the linear (sales model) to a circular model such as 'product as a service'. This brings new challenges to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) that have never been experienced in their conventional businesses. One of the challenges is to establish an information communication and technology (ICT) infrastructure that enables information management and sharing as well as establishes a real-time communication between relevant stakeholders. Outlining such an ICT infrastructure is the objective of this paper.

  • 31.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Salehi, Niloufar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Lieder, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Consumer perceptions of circular business model: a case of leasing strollers2022In: Manufacturing Driving Circular Economy: Proceedings of the 18th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing, October 5-7, 2022, Berlin / [ed] Holger Kohl, Günther Seliger, Franz Dietrich, Springer Nature , 2022, p. 953-960Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular Economy (CE) promotes trading functions of a product as aservice instead of selling the product in conventional ways. For a product like ababy stroller, the function means ensuring mobility with infants without needingto own a stroller. This approach of acquiring functions only when needed opensup the possibility to share the same products with multiple users. For a manufacturer that has built its business on a conventional sales model over the decades,this shift may be too radical. Therefore, for the manufacturers, it is important tounderstand consumer perceptions of the service-oriented business model beforeentering this unknown territory. To develop a thorough understanding of consumerperceptions of leasing a stroller instead of buying one, a survey among 200 parentsin Stockholm is conducted. The survey brings out quantitative results such as 39%of respondents are open to leasing and identifies key influencing factors such asconvenience and environmental image that play a key role for the remaining 61%of respondents to choose leasing. This research concludes that a large numberof consumers are open to leasing if a high level of service and environmentallysustainable strollers are offered at a competitive price.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Semere, Daniel Tesfamariam
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Haumann, Michail
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    METHODS ANALYSIS OF REMANUFACTURING OPTIONS FOR REPEATED LIFECYCLE OF STARTERS AND ALTERNATORS2010In: 7th International DAAAM Baltic Conference"INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING"22-24 April 2010, Tallinn, Estonia / [ed] R. Kyttner, Estonia: Tallinn University of Technology , 2010, p. 340-345Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Design for Repeatedly Utilization (DFRU) is a proposed conceptto be used in the product realizationprocess to ensure optimum useable life (forinstance in terms of economy, resourceusage, environmental impact etc.) ofproducts or parts of products enablingmultiple lifecycle. In the DFRU approachproducts are restored as new like productsthrough remanufacturing processes. Theterm remanufacturing has been interpreteddifferently by different researchers and theindustries that are involved inremanufacturing business use differentapproaches to remanufacture theirproducts. In this paper the starter motorand alternator of automotives has beenused to demonstrate the novel concepts.The purpose of this paper is to expresswhat remanufacturing means in ourconcept, model their major lifecycleaspects and create a simulation modelfrom it. This is a preliminary work towardsdefining and specifying the processes,methods and design properties in DFRU.The work will be further extended to aholistic business model which can facilitateDFRU approach in an efficient way. Infuture the model will be developed andadopted to create new models for otherproducts appropriate for remanufacturingand eventually DFRU.

  • 33.
    Abebe Mengistu, Bemnet
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Internal sensor measurement to reduce the need of coordinate measuring machines2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents the approach of determining the machining  errors on a five axis CNC machine using sensors already fitted in the machine to extract valuable data up on process called CITE(CNC Integrity Tracing Equipment) system and measuring the machined workpiece geometry using CMM(Coordinate measurement machine). CITE measurement system is the data acquisition hardware and software system developed by University West for collecting position information from encoders of a machine tool. The collected information could then be used to assess the quality and adjustment of a machine tool, CNC programs and the CNC control parameters. The aim of this study is to examine the roundness and concentricity detection capacity of the CITE system by conducting different milling methods and a turning process. In an example cutting of a workpiece, the CITE measurement system was used for recording the machining process. After that, radial error, centre point deviation and circle roundness errors, analysed using MATLAB based on collected CNC tool movement data. CMM measurement used to verify the results obtained from the CITE measurement system. The investigation conducted on the small circles shows that the CITE measurement system have capability of identifying radial errors in different method of millings (slot, up and down). Centre point deviation and roundness errors measured by the CITE system doesn`t show significant differences between milling methods as seen on CMM measurement.

  • 34.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Diversified design needs of personal protective devices and clothing in cold climate: an example in the design needs of protective outdoor winter shoes2000In: Ergonomics of protective clothing: proceedings of NOKOBETEF 6 and 1st European conference on protective clothing held in Stockholm,Sweden, May 7-10, 2000 / [ed] Kalev Kuklane; Ingvar Holmér, Stockholm: Arbetslivsinstitutet , 2000, p. 62-66Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ergonomic problems outside work establishments in industrially developing countries: an example from Sri Lanka1997In: From experience to innovation: proceedings of the 13th triennial congress of the International Ergonomics Association, June 29 - July 4, 1997, Tampere, Finland / [ed] Pentt Seppälä, Taylor and Francis Group , 1997, p. 63-65Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ergonomics aspects of personal protective devices1993In: Occupational and environmental economics / [ed] Rabindra Nath Sen; Haripada Chattopadhyay; Subir Das, Indian Society of Ergonomics. , 1993, p. 109-114Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of a personal protective device (ppd) is a widely accepted method of safeguarding workers from occupational hazards in industrialized countries (IC) and an important method employed in developing countries (DC). Though protection is assured if the devices are worn constantly, it is unfortunate that due to discomfort and inconvenience, the majority of those exposed to hazards do not wear them. DCs which mainly import ppds from ICs are confronting many ergonomics problems, because the equipment designed for IC conditions is inappropriate for use in DCs, due to significant differences in user body sizes, environments and working methods. A questionnaire survey conducted among ppd manufacturers in 11 ICs revealed that 90% followed standards in manufacturing. Another survey conducted among health and safety authorities who responded on behalf of ppd users in 35 DCs revealed that the most common ergonomic causes of non-use are stresses from hotness, weight, improper fit and obstruction at work. While manufacturers place greater emphasis in the protection performance of the equipment, users in DCs refuse to wear it because the comfort needs are not fulfilled. Developing ergonomics standards for ppds seems to be a feasible way of persuading the manufacturers to provide ergonomic values in ppds. The need for maximum allowable comfort in the design, taking into consideration the user characteristics and protection factor is emphasized. To overcome the inherent discomforts that are extremely difficult to reduce without compromising the protection efficiency of a ppd, the principle of user adaptation seems to be a very important facet which has to be developed. A case study on safety helmets is reported. The use of a personal protective device (ppd) is a widely accepted method of safeguarding workers from occupational hazards in industrialized countries (IC) and an important method employed in developing countries (DC). Though protection is assured if the devices are worn constantly, it is unfortunate that due to discomfort and inconvenience, the majority of those exposed to hazards do not wear them. DCs which mainly import ppds from ICs are confronting many ergonomics problems, because the equipment designed for IC conditions is inappropriate for use in DCs, due to significant differences in user body sizes, environments and working methods. A questionnaire survey conducted among ppd manufacturers in 11 ICs revealed that 90% followed standards in manufacturing. Another survey conducted among health and safety authorities who responded on behalf of ppd users in 35 DCs revealed that the most common ergonomic causes of non-use are stresses from hotness, weight, improper fit and obstruction at work. While manufacturers place greater emphasis in the protection performance of the equipment, users in DCs refuse to wear it because the comfort needs are not fulfilled. Developing ergonomics standards for ppds seems to be a feasible way of persuading the manufacturers to provide ergonomic values in ppds. The need for maximum allowable comfort in the design, taking into consideration the user characteristics and protection factor is emphasized. To overcome the inherent discomforts that are extremely difficult to reduce without compromising the protection efficiency of a ppd, the principle of user adaptation seems to be a very important facet which has to be developed. A case study on safety helmets is reported.

  • 37.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Human factors of personal protective devices1998In: Global ergonomics: proceedings of the Ergonomics Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, 9-11 September 1998 / [ed] Pat A. Scott; R.S. Bridger; Jack Charteris, 1998, p. 157-164Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Masters program in ergonomics at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden2000In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 569-570Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Some ergonomics issues in the design of personal protective devices1992In: Performance of protective clothing: fourth volume / [ed] Norman W, Henry; James P. McBriarty, Philadelphia, Pa.: ASTM International, 1992, p. 651-659Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of personal protective devices (ppd) is an important method to safeguard workers from occupational hazards both in industrialized and developing countries. Surveys have indicated that majority of those exposed to hazards are reluctant to use ppd because they are uncomfortable for such reasons as hotness, heaviness, ill fit, inconvenient, etc. Investigations have revealed that user-centered designs which satisfy the human factors needs of ppd, can reverse this trend and make ppd more acceptable. Because a questionnaire survey has shown that manufacturers are more inclined to adhere to standards, developing ergonomic standards seems to be a feasible method to persuade the manufacturers to provide the user needs in the design. Any unavoidable discomforts in ppd can be controlled by adaptation of users to ppd wearing.  

  • 40.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    The 10th Anniversary Ergonomics Conference, 29-30 October, 1999 Luleå University of Technology, Sweden2000In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 571-572Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå University of Technology.
    The use of personal protective clothing and devices in the cold environment1992Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the use of personal protective devices (ppd) in the cold environment the wearability problems become more aggravated as the ppd must be worn over the cold protective clothing. Research in the area of human factors of ppd in cold environment has been scarce in the past. The lack of adequate user needs in currently used ppd in the cold environment, has resulted in discomfort, injury, non-use, and performance decrement among outdoor workers, particularly in the extreme cold regions, viz. Arctic countries. A preliminary study on the 'state of the art' was carried out on the use of ppd in cold environment which consisted of a literature survey, questionnaire survey among outdoor workers and information search through visits to relevant research institutions, discussions with researchers and participation in Conferences. The literature search carried out in 6 data bases revealed useful information about specific areas where wearability problems exist in ppd as well as some methods to be employed in research. The results of the questionnaire survey carried out in the Luleå region confirm that workers confront many inadequacies in the use of ppd in the cold climate. From the findings of this preliminary study three important kinds of ppd viz. safety gloves, safety shoes and safety helmets are discussed in this report. Human factors research for ppd in the cold environment with a view for improvement of wearability and use seem urgent.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 42.
    Abeysekera, John
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Barabash, V.
    Human factors of clothing and work-wear: a review1994In: Proceedings: Second International Congress on Physiological Anthropology : September 12 - 16, 1994, University of Kiel, Germany, Kiel: German Society of Physiological Anthropology , 1994, p. 137-142Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An extraordinarily large share of research carried out in the near past on clothing comfort has been in the area of thermal comfort. Accordingly standards, norms and guidelines on thermal requirements of work-wear have been developed. Through behavioural adjustments people have learned to achieve thermal comfort even if the work clothes have slight deficiencies in thermal characteristics. It is beyond doubt that the thermal characteristics need careful consideration in the manufacture of work clothes. At the same time one must be aware that other human factors can also influence the overall wearability of clothing. This paper reviews the wearability and comfort of the clothing and work-wear to provide better understanding of the priorities in user needs in work clothes which can help plan future research and the need for new standards

  • 43.
    Abeysekera, John D.
    Division of Occupational Hygiene, Department of Labour, Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Thermal environment and subjective discomfort of glass-factory workers in Sri Lanka1981In: Journal of Human Ergology, ISSN 0300-8134, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 185-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Abeysekera, John D. A.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bergquist, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology.
    The need for research on human factors regarding personal protective devices in the cold environment1996In: Performance of protective clothing / [ed] James S. Johnson; S.Z. Mansdorf, West Conshohocken, Pa: ASTM International, 1996, Vol. 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human factors or wearability needs of personal protective devices (ppd) and clothing (ppc) worn in the cold environment become more important as they must compromise with, and be adapted to, the clothing worn for cold protection. The occupational risks among outdoor workers in the cold can be aggravated if the wearability demands of ppd are not met. Failure to adequately meet user needs in currently used ppd in the cold environment has resulted in discomfort, injury, non-use and performance decrement among outdoor workers, particularly in the extreme cold regions. A preliminary study consisting of a literature survey in popular data bases and questionnaire survey among users of ppd, were carried out to ascertain what studies have already been conducted in this area and whether a wearability problem really exists among users, respectively. The literature revealed some specific areas where wearability problems exist and some research carried out on methods of testing of ergonomic characteristics of ppd. The questionnaire among ppd users in the cold climate confirmed that the workers do confront many inadequacies in the use of ppd. A case study carried out on ergonomic demands of safety shoes in the cold climate among users, manufacturers and experts revealed a similar trend of demands and priorities in ergonomics of shoes among all three groups. From the findings of the preliminary study it can be concluded that human factors research in ppd and particularly ppd worn on body extremities, viz. safety helmets, shoes and gloves, for use in the cold environment, seem urgent. Some research needs in the development of methods of testing for ppd evaluation are suggested.

  • 45.
    Abeysekera, John D. A.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Shahnavaz, Houshang
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Adaptation to discomfort in personal protective devices: an example with safety helmets1990In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discomfort in the use of personal protective devices (PPD) has been one of the chief causes of their non-use. A field trial using industrial helmets was carried out to ascertain whether by training and repeated wearing subjects could experience a significant adaptation to discomfort. Ten subjects took part in the trial in a tropical environment by wearing helmets repeatedly (6 h a day) for one month. Subjective evaluations of discomfort were made at the end of the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 14th and 30th day. It was revealed that complaints of discomfort, viz. hotness, heaviness, bad fit, etc., decreased markedly throughout the 30 day period. Though positive responses of adaptation to discomfort seem to reach an optimum towards 30 days, it is difficult to draw any conclusions on the optimum period of adaptation for each discomfort factor. In relation to inherent discomforts that are extremely difficult to overcome without compromising the protection efficiency of a PPD, the principle of adaptation seems to be a very important facet which has to be developed for an effective PPD programme.

  • 46.
    Abeysekera, John D.A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    A comparative study of body size variability between people in industrialised countries and industrially developing countries, its impact on the use of imported goods1987In: Ergonomics in developing countries: international symposium : proceedings : Jakarta, Indonesia, 18-21 November 1985, Geneva: Arkansas Philological Association, 1987, p. 65-91Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Abeysekera, John D.A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ergonomic aspects of personal protective devices in industrially developing countries1989Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 48.
    Abeysekera, John D.A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ergonomics and technology transfer1990In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 181-184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49. Abeysekera, John D.A.
    Ergonomics for effective collaboration1997In: African Newsletter on Occupational Health and Safety, ISSN 0788-4877, no 2, p. 27-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Abeysekera, John D.A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    The Need for National and International Ergonomics Standards for Personal Protective Devices1989In: Advances in industrial ergonomics and safety 1: proceedings of the annual International Industrial Ergonomics and Safety Conference held in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., 5-9 June 1989 / [ed] Anil Mital, London: Taylor and Francis Group , 1989, p. 809-816Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 9999
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf