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  • 1. Abbasi Hoseini, A.
    et al.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Andersson, H. I.
    Finite-length effects on dynamical behavior of rod-like particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow2015In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 76, 13-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) measurements have been performed in dilute suspensions of rod-like particles in wall turbulence. PIV results for the turbulence field in the water table flow apparatus compared favorably with data from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow turbulence and the universality of near-wall turbulence justified comparisons with DNS of fiber-laden channel flow. In order to examine any shape effects on the dynamical behavior of elongated particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow, fibers with three different lengths but the same diameter were used. In the logarithmic part of the wall-layer, the translational fiber velocity was practically unaffected by the fiber length l. In the buffer layer, however, the fiber dynamics turned out to be severely constrained by the distance z to the wall. The short fibers accumulated preferentially in low-speed areas and adhered to the local fluid speed. The longer fibers (l/z > 1) exhibited a bi-modal probability distribution for the fiber velocity, which reflected an almost equal likelihood for a long fiber to reside in an ejection or in a sweep. It was also observed that in the buffer region, high-speed long fibers were almost randomly oriented whereas for all size cases the slowly moving fibers preferentially oriented in the streamwise direction. These phenomena have not been observed in DNS studies of fiber suspension flows and suggested l/z to be an essential parameter in a new generation of wall-collision models to be used in numerical studies.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Sebastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Expanding operation ranges using active flow control in Francis turbines2014Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report contains an investigation of fluid injection techniques used in the purpose of reducing deleterious flow effects occurring in the draft tube of Francis turbines when operating outside nominal load. There is a focus on implement ability at Jämtkrafts hydroelectric power plants and two power plants were investigated, located in series with each other named Lövhöjden and Ålviken. The only profitable scenario found with some degree of certainty was an increase in the operating range upwards to allow overload operation.

    Findings show that both air and water can be introduced in various locations to improve hydraulic efficiency around the turbine parts as well as reduce pressure pulsations in harmful operating regions. Investments in such systems have proven useful and profitable at several facilities with poorly adapted operating conditions. But due to losses in efficiency when operating injection systems, it turns out unprofitable in situations where it does not improve the operating range in a way that is resulting in increased annual or peak production.

  • 3.
    af Klinteberg, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Ewald summation for the rotlet singularity of Stokes flow2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ewald summation is an efficient method for computing the periodic sums that appear when considering the Green's functions of Stokes flow together with periodic boundary conditions. We show how Ewald summation, and accompanying truncation error estimates, can be easily derived for the rotlet, by considering it as a superposition of electrostatic force calculations.

  • 4.
    af Klinteberg, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lindbo, Dag
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Tornberg, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    An explicit Eulerian method for multiphase flow with contact line dynamics and insoluble surfactant2014In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 101, 50-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The flow behavior of many multiphase flow applications is greatly influenced by wetting properties and the presence of surfactants. We present a numerical method for two-phase flow with insoluble surfactants and contact line dynamics in two dimensions. The method is based on decomposing the interface between two fluids into segments, which are explicitly represented on a local Eulerian grid. It provides a natural framework for treating the surfactant concentration equation, which is solved locally on each segment. An accurate numerical method for the coupled interface/surfactant system is given. The system is coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations through the immersed boundary method, and we discuss the issue of force regularization in wetting problems, when the interface touches the boundary of the domain. We use the method to illustrate how the presence of surfactants influences the behavior of free and wetting drops.

  • 5.
    af Klinteberg, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Tornberg, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Fast Ewald summation for Stokesian particle suspensions2014In: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids, ISSN 0271-2091, E-ISSN 1097-0363, Vol. 76, no 10, 669-698 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a numerical method for suspensions of spheroids of arbitrary aspect ratio, which sediment under gravity. The method is based on a periodized boundary integral formulation using the Stokes double layer potential. The resulting discrete system is solved iteratively using generalized minimal residual accelerated by the spectral Ewald method, which reduces the computational complexity to O(N log N), where N is the number of points used to discretize the particle surfaces. We develop predictive error estimates, which can be used to optimize the choice of parameters in the Ewald summation. Numerical tests show that the method is well conditioned and provides good accuracy when validated against reference solutions. 

  • 6. Agarwal, A.
    et al.
    Dowling, A. P.
    Shin, H. -C
    Graham, W.
    Sefi, Sandy
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    A ray tracing approach to calculate acoustic shielding by the silent aircraft airframe2006In: Collection of Technical Papers - 12th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 2006, 2799-2818 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Silent Aircraft is in the form of a flying wing with a large wing planform and a propulsion system that is embedded in the rear of the airframe with intakes on the upper surface of the wing. Thus a large part of the forward-propagating noise from the intake ducts is expected to be shielded from observers on the ground by the wing. Acoustic shielding effects can be calculated by solving an external acoustic scattering problem for a moving aircraft. In this paper, acoustic shielding effects of the Silent Aircraft airframe are quantified by a ray-tracing method. The dominant frequencies from the noise spectrum of the engines are sufficiently high for ray theory to yield accurate results. It is shown that for low-Mach number homentropic flows, a condition satisfied approximately by the Silent Aircraft during take-off and approach, the acoustic rays propagate in straight lines. Thus, from Fermat's principle it is clear that classical Geometrical Optics and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction solutions are applicable to this moving-body problem as well. The total amount of acoustic shielding at an observer located in the shadow region is calculated by adding the contributions from all the diffracted rays (edge-diffracted and creeping rays) and then subtracting the result from the incident field without the airframe. Experiments on a model-scale geometry have been conducted in an anechoic chamber to test the applicability of the ray-tracing technique. The three-dimensional ray-tracing solver is validated by comparing the numerical solution with analytical high-frequency asymptotic solutions for canonical shapes.

  • 7. Agarwal, Akshat
    et al.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Zaki, Tamer A.
    Linear and nonlinear evolution of a localized disturbance in polymeric channel flow2014In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 760, 278-303 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolution of an initially localized disturbance in polymeric channel flow is investigated, with the FENE-P model used to characterize the viscoelastic behaviour of the flow. In the linear growth regime, the flow response is stabilized by viscoelasticity, and the maximum attainable disturbance energy amplification is reduced with increasing polymer concentration. The reduction in the energy growth rate is attributed to the polymer work, which plays a dual role. First, a spanwise polymer-work term develops, and is explained by the tilting action of the wall-normal voracity on the mean streamwise conformation tensor. This resistive term weakens the spanwise velocity perturbation thus reducing the energy of the localized disturbance. The second action of the polymer is analogous, with a wall-normal polymer work term that weakens the vertical velocity perturbation. Its indirect effect on energy growth is substantial since it reduces the production of Reynolds shear stress and in turn of the streamwise velocity perturbation, or streaks. During the early stages of nonlinear growth, the dominant effect of the polymer is to suppress the large-scale streaky structures which are strongly amplified in Newtonian flows. As a result, the process of transition to turbulence is prolonged and, after transition, a drag-reduced turbulent state is attained.

  • 8.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångstrom, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Demonstration of Air-Fuel Ratio Role in One-Stage Turbocompound Diesel Engines2013In: SAE Technical Papers, 2013, Vol. 11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large portion of fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust of internal combustion engines. Turbocompound can, however, recover part of this wasted heat. The energy recovery depends on the turbine efficiency and mass flow as well as the exhaust gas state and properties such as pressure, temperature and specific heat capacity.

    The main parameter influencing the turbocompound energy recovery is the exhaust gas pressure which leads to higher pumping loss of the engine and consequently lower engine crankshaft power. Each air-fuel equivalence ratio (λ) gives different engine power, exhaust gas temperature and pressure. Decreasing λ toward 1 in a Diesel engine results in higher exhaust gas temperatures of the engine.  λ can be varied by changing the intake air pressure or the amount of injected fuel which changes the available energy into the turbine. Thus, there is a compromise between gross engine power, created pumping power, recovered turbocompound power and consumed compressor power.

    In this study, the effects of different λ values and exhaust back-pressure have been investigated on the efficiency of a heavy-duty Diesel engine equipped with a single-stage electric turbocompounding. A one-dimensional gas dynamics model of a turbocharged engine was utilized that was validated against measurements at different load points. Two configurations of turbocompound engine were made. In one configuration an electric turbocharger was used and the amount of fuel was varied with constant intake air pressure. In another configuration the turbocharger turbine and compressor were disconnected to be able to control the turbine speed and the compressor speed independently; then the compressor pressure ratio was varied with constant engine fuelling and the exhaust back-pressure was optimized for each compressor pressure ratio.

    At each constant turbine efficiency there is a linear relation between the optimum exhaust back-pressure and ideally expanded cylinder pressure until bottom dead center with closed exhaust valves. There is an optimum λ for the turbocharged engine with regard to the fuel consumption. In the turbocompound engine, this will be moved to a richer λ that gives the best total specific fuel consumption; however, the results of this study indicates that turbocompound engine efficiency is relatively insensitive to the air-fuel ratio.

  • 9.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Improving Turbocharged Engine Simulation by Including Heat Transfer in the Turbocharger2012In: 2012 SAE International, SAE international , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engine simulation based on one-dimensional gas dynamics is well suited for integration of all aspects arising in engine and power-train developments. Commonly used turbocharger performance maps in engine simulation are measured in non-pulsating flow and without taking into account the heat transfer. Since on-engine turbochargers are exposed to pulsating flow and varying heat transfer situations, the maps in the engine simulation, i.e. GT-POWER, have to be shifted and corrected which are usually done by mass and efficiency multipliers for both turbine and compressor. The multipliers change the maps and are often different for every load point. Particularly, the efficiency multiplier is different for every heat transfer situation on the turbocharger. The aim of this paper is to include the heat transfer of the turbocharger in the engine simulation and consequently to reduce the use of efficiency multiplier for both the turbine and compressor. A set of experiment has been designed and performed on a water-oil-cooled turbocharger, which was installed on a 2 liter GDI engine with variable valve timing, for different load points of the engine and different conditions of heat transfer in the turbocharger. The experiments were the base to simulate heat transfer on the turbocharger, by adding a heat sink before the turbine and a heat source after the compressor. The efficiency multiplier of the turbine cannot compensate for all heat transfer in the turbine, so it is needed to put out heat from the turbine in addition to the using of efficiency multiplier. Results of this study show that including heat transfer of turbocharger in engine simulation enables to decrease the use of turbine efficiency multiplier and eliminate the use of compressor efficiency multiplier to correctly calculate the measured gas temperatures after turbine and compressor.

  • 10.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Temperature Estimation of Turbocharger Working Fluids and Walls under Different Engine Loads and Heat Transfer Conditions2013In: SAE Technical Papers, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbocharger performance maps, which are used in engine simulations, are usually measured on a gas-stand where the temperatures distributions on the turbocharger walls are entirely different from that under real engine operation. This should be taken into account in the simulation of a turbocharged engine. Dissimilar wall temperatures of turbochargers give different air temperature after the compressor and different exhaust gas temperature after the turbine at a same load point. The efficiencies are consequently affected. This can lead to deviations between the simulated and measured outlet temperatures of the turbocharger turbine and compressor. This deviation is larger during a transient load step because the temperatures of turbocharger walls change slowly due to the thermal inertia. Therefore, it is important to predict the temperatures of turbocharger walls and the outlet temperatures of the turbocharger working fluids in a turbocharged engine simulation.

    In the work described in this paper, a water-oil-cooled turbocharger was extensively instrumented with several thermocouples on reachable walls. The turbocharger was installed on a 2-liter gasoline engine that was run under different loads and different heat transfer conditions on the turbocharger by using insulators, an extra cooling fan, radiation shields and water-cooling settings. The turbine inlet temperature varied between 550 and 850 °C at different engine loads.

    The results of this study show that the temperatures of turbocharger walls are predictable from the experiment. They are dependent on the load point and the heat transfer condition of the turbocharger. The heat transfer condition of an on-engine turbocharger could be defined by the turbine inlet temperature, ambient temperature, oil heat flux, water heat flux and the velocity of the air around the turbocharger. Thus, defining the heat transfer condition and rotational speed of the turbocharger provides temperatures predictions of the turbocharger walls and the working fluids. This prediction enables increased precision in engine simulation for future work in transient operation.

  • 11.
    Ahl, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Energy, Environmental and Building Technology.
    Analysis of how different mesh functions influence the result in CFD-simulation of a marine propeller:  2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 12.
    Ahlberg, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    An experimental study of fiber suspensions between counter-rotating discs2009Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The behavior of fibers suspended in a flow between two counter-rotating discs has been studied experimentally. This is inspired by the refining process in the papermaking process where cellulose fibers are ground between discs in order to change performance in the papermaking process and/or qualities of the final paper product.

    To study the fiber behavior in a counter-rotating flow, an experimental set-up with two glass discs was built. A CCD-camera was used to capture images of the fibers in the flow. Image analysis based on the concept of steerable filters extracted the position and orientation of the fibers in the plane of the discs. Experiments were performed for gaps of 0.1-0.9 fiber lengths, and for equal absolute values of the angular velocities for the upper and lower disc. The aspect ratios of the fibers were 7, 14 and 28.

    Depending on the angular velocity of the discs and the gap between them, the fibers were found to organize themselves in fiber trains. A fiber train is a set of fibers positioned one after another in the tangential direction with a close to constant fiber-to-fiber distance. In the fiber trains, each individual fiber is aligned in the radial direction (i.e. normal to the main direction of the train).

    The experiments show that the number of fibers in a train increases as the gap between the discs decreases. Also, the distance between the fibers in a train decreases as the length of the train increases, and the results for short trains are in accordance with previous numerical results in two dimensions.Furthermore, the results of different aspect ratios imply that there are three-dimensional fiber end-effects that are important for the forming of fiber trains.

  • 13.
    Ahlgren, Fredrik
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Ahlgren, Kristoffer
    University of Kalmar, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Gasens inverkan på oljan i ett hydrauliksystem2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    I detta arbete har vi med en litteraturstudie försökt påvisa vad en inblandad gas i oljan i ett hydrauliksystem har för betydelse för funktionen. Vi har använt information i traditionell facklitteratur samt i tidskrifter och vetenskapliga rapporter och upptäckt att problemen som uppkommer av inblandade gaser inte är väl kända. Dagens lösningar på problemen är nästan alltid kostsamma och handlar om att behandla symptomen. Vi har tittat på de olika fysikaliska data som gasen inverkar på i oljan, utifrån detta har vi analyserat vilka effekter detta har för ett hydrauliksystems funktion. Vi kommer att diskutera grundproblemet till kavitation och vanliga problem som ett hydrauliksystem ofta har. Vi har lyckats presentera resultat på att inblandad gas i oljan har en mycket stor inverkan på ett hydrauliksystem. Vi har kommit fram till att mycket av dagens problem med hydrauliksystem helt skulle kunna byggas bort om man tog större hänsyn till oljans förmåga att lösa in luft.

  • 14.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    A study of turbulence and scalar mixing in a wall-jet using direct numerical simulation2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study the dynamics and mixing in a turbulent plane wall-jet. The investigation is undertaken in order to extend the knowledge base of the influence of the wall on turbulent dynamics and mixing. The mixing statistics produced can also be used to evaluate and develop models for mixing and combustion. In order to perform the simulations, a numerical code was developed. The code employs compact finite difference schemes, of high order, for spatial integration, and a low-storage Runge-Kutta method for the temporal integration. In the simulations performed the inlet based Reynolds and Mach numbers of the wall jet were Re = 2000 and M=0.5, respectively. Above the jet a constant coflow of 10% of the inlet jet velocity was applied. A passive scalar was added at the inlet of the jet, in a non-premixed manner, enabling an investigation of the wall-jet mixing as well as the dynamics. The mean development and the respective self-similarity of the inner and outer shear layers were studied. Comparisons of properties in the shear layers of different character were performed by applying inner and outer scaling. The characteristics of the wall-jet was compared to what has been observed in other canonical shear flows. In the inner part of the jet, 0 ≤ y+ ≤ 13, the wall-jet was found to closely resemble a zero pressure gradient boundary layer. The outer layer was found to resemble a free plane jet. The downstream growth rate of the scalar was approximately equal to that of the streamwise velocity, in terms of the growth rate of the half-width. The scalar fluxes in the streamwise and wall-normal direction were found to be of comparable magnitude.

  • 15.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Numerical studies of turbulent wall-jets for mixing and combustion applications2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study turbulent plane wall-jets. The investigation is aimed at studying dynamics, mixing and reactions in wall bounded flows. The produced mixing statistics can be used to evaluate and develop models for mixing and combustion. An aim has also been to develop a simulation method that can be extended to simulate realistic combustion including significant heat release. The numerical code used in the simulations employs a high order compact finite difference scheme for spatial integration, and a low-storage Runge-Kutta method for the temporal integration. In the simulations the inlet based Reynolds and Mach numbers of the wall-jet are Re = 2000 and M=0.5 respectively, and above the jet a constant coflow of 10% of the inlet jet velocity is applied. The development of an isothermal wall-jet including passive scalar mixing is studied and the characteristics of the wall-jet are compared to observations of other canonical shear flows. In the near-wall region the jet resembles a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, while in the outer layer it resembles a plane jet. The scalar fluxes in the streamwise and wall-normal direction are of comparable magnitude. In order to study effects of density differences, two non-isothermal wall-jets are simulated and compared to the isothermal jet results. In the non-isothermal cases the jet is either warm and propagating in a cold surrounding or vice versa. The turbulence structures and the range of scales are affected by the density variation. The warm jet contains the largest range of scales and the cold the smallest. The differences can be explained by the varying friction Reynolds number. Conventional wall scaling fails due to the varying density. An improved collapse in the inner layer can be achieved by applying a semi-local scaling. The turbulent Schmidt and Prandtl number vary significantly only in the near-wall layer and in a small region below the jet center. A wall-jet including a single reaction between a fuel and an oxidizer is also simulated. The reactants are injected separately at the inlet and the reaction time scale is of the same order as the convection time scale and independent of the temperature. The reaction occurs in thin reaction zones convoluted by high intensity velocity fluctuations.

  • 16.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Johansson, Arne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Direct numerical simulation of a plane turbulent wall-jet including scalar mixing2007In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 19, no 6, 065102- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study a turbulent plane wall-jet including the mixing of a passive scalar. The Reynolds and Mach numbers at the inlet are Re=2000 and M=0.5, respectively, and a constant coflow of 10% of the inlet jet velocity is used. The passive scalar is added at the inlet enabling an investigation of the wall-jet mixing. The self-similarity of the inner and outer shear layers is studied by applying inner and outer scaling. The characteristics of the wall-jet are compared to what is reported for other canonical shear flows. In the inner part, the wall-jet is found to closely resemble a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, and the outer layer is found to resemble a free plane jet. The downstream growth rate of the scalar is approximately equal to that of the streamwise velocity in terms of the growth rate of the half-widths. The scalar fluxes in the streamwise and wall-normal direction are found to be of comparable magnitude. The scalar mixing situation is further studied by evaluating the scalar dissipation rate and the mechanical to mixing time scale ratio.

  • 17.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum infusion of cellulose nanofibre network composites: Influence of porosity on permeability and impregnation2016In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 95, 204-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing issues around the processing of cellulose nanofibres (CNF) composites is important in establishing their use as sustainable, renewable polymer reinforcements. Here, CNF networks of different porosity were made with the aim of increasing their permeability and suitability for processing by vacuum infusion (VI). The CNF networks were infused with epoxy using two different strategies. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated. Calculated fill-times for CNF networks with 50% porosity were the shortest, but are only less than the gel-time of the epoxy if capillary effects are included. In experiments the CNF networks were clearly wetted. However low transparency indicated that impregnation was incomplete. The modulus and strength of the dry CNF networks increased rapidly with decreasing porosity, but their nanocomposites did not follow this trend, showing instead similar mechanical properties to each other. The results demonstrated that increasing the porosity of the CNF networks to ≈ 50% gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength, a higher yield strength and no loss in modulus. Better use of the flow channels in the inherently layered CNF networks could potentially reduce void content in these nanocomposites and thus increase their mechanical properties.

  • 18.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum Infusion of Nanocellulose Networks of Different Porosity2015In: 20th International Conference on Composite Materials: Copenhagen, 19-24th July 2015, ICCM , 2015, 4109-1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibres (CNF) have shown good potential as sustainable, biobased reinforcing materials in polymer composites. Addressing issues around the processing of these composites is an important part of establishing their use in different applications. Here, CNF networks of different porosity are made from nanofibrillated hardwood kraft pulp with the aim of increasing the impregnation of the CNF networks and to allow vacuum infusion to be used. Two different vacuum infusion strategies: in-plane and out of plane were used to infuse the CNF networks with a low viscosity epoxy. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated and compared to a micro-fibre based network. Using the out-of-plane permeability measurements and Darcy’s law, the fill-time was calculated and showed that the CNF network with 40% porosity had the lowest fill-time when an out-of-plane impregnation strategy is used. However this exceeded the gel-time of the epoxy system. In experiments, the resin reached the other side of the network but low transparency indicated that wetting was poor. The dry CNF preforms showed a very strong dependence on the porosity with both modulus and strength increasing rapidly at low porosity. Interestingly, the composite based on the 60% porosity network showed good wetting particularly with the in-plane infusion strategy, exhibiting a much more brittle fracture and a high yield strength. This shows that in CNF composites produced by VI, lowering the fibre volume content of the CNF composites gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength but higher yield strength and no loss in modulus.

  • 19. Akiyama, Masahiko
    et al.
    Kamakura, Tomoo
    Hedberg, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Parametric sound fields by phase-cancellation excitation of primary waves.2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By radiating bifrequency primary waves from two ultrasonic emitters with changing the phases of the primary waves, we can obtain the sound fields that are different from the usual in‐phase excitation. Especially, for the excitation of out‐phase by 180 degrees the difference frequency wave has the directivity of almost uniformity near the acoustic axis. Additionally, the sound pressure levels of the harmonic components of the difference frequency and the primary waves as well are suppressed by 10 dB and more

  • 20.
    Akkerman, V'yacheslav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Bychkov, Vitaly
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Bastiaans, R. J. M.
    de Goey, L. P. H.
    van Oijen, J. A.
    Eriksson, L. E.
    Flow-flame interaction in a closed chamber2008In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 20, no 5, 055107-055121 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies of flame interaction with a single vortex andrecent simulations of burning in vortex arrays in open tubesdemonstrated the same tendency for the turbulent burning rate$\propto U_{rms}\lambda^{2/3}$, where  $U_{rms}$ is theroot-mean-square velocity and $\lambda$ is the vortex size. Here itis demonstrated that this tendency is not universal for turbulentburning. Flame interaction with vortex arrays is investigated forthe geometry of a closed burning chamber using direct numericalsimulations of the complete set of gas-dynamic combustion equations.Various initial conditions in the chamber are considered, includinggas at rest and several systems of vortices of different intensitiesand sizes. It is found that the burning rate in a closed chamber(inverse burning time) depends strongly on the vortex intensity; atsufficiently high intensities it increases with $U_{rms}$approximately linearly in agreement with the above tendency. On thecontrary, dependence of the burning rate on the vortex size isnon-monotonic and qualitatively different from the law$\lambda^{2/3}$. It is shown that there is an optimal vortex size ina closed chamber, which provides the fastest total burning rate. Inthe present work the optimal size is 6 times smaller than thechamber height.

  • 21.
    Akkerman, V’yacheslav
    et al.
    Nuclear Safety Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences B. Tulskaya 52, 115191 Moscow, Russia.
    Ivanov, Mikhail
    Department of Physics and Power Engineering, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, Russia.
    Bychkov, Vitaly
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Turbulent flow produced by Piston Motion in a Spark-ignition engine2009In: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987, Vol. 82, no 3, 317-337 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulence produced by the piston motion in spark-ignition engines is studied by 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations in the cylindrical geometry as in the theoretical and experimental work by Breuer et al (Flow Turb. Combust. 74 (2005) 145, Ref. [1]). The simulations are based on the Navier-Stokes gas-dynamic equations including viscosity, thermal conduction and non-slip at the walls. Piston motion is taken into account as a boundary condition. The turbulent flow is investigated for a wide range of the engine speed, 1000-4000 rpm, assuming both zero and non-zero initial turbulence. The turbulent rms-velocity and the integral length scale are investigated in axial and radial directions. The rms-turbulent velocity is typically an order-of-magnitude smaller than the piston speed. In the case of zero initial turbulence, the flow at the top-dead-center may be described as a combination of two large-scale vortex rings of a size determined by the engine geometry. When initial turbulence is strong, then the integral turbulent length demonstrates self-similar properties in a large range of crank angles. The results obtained agree with the experimental observations of [1].

  • 22.
    Albernaz, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Phase change, surface tension and turbulence in real fluids2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sprays are extensively used in industry, especially for fuels in internal combustion and gas turbine engines. An optimal fuel/air mixture prior to combustion is desired for these applications, leading to greater efficiency and minimal levels of emissions. The optimization depends on details regarding the different breakups, evaporation and mixing processes. Besides, one should take into consideration that these different steps depend on physical properties of the gas and fuel, such as density, viscosity, heat conductivity and surface tension.

    In this thesis the phase change and surface tension of a droplet for different flow conditions are studied by means of numerical simulations.This work is part of a larger effort aiming to developing models for sprays in turbulent flows. We are especially interested in the atomization regime, where the liquid breakup causes the formation of droplet sizes much smaller than the jet diameter. The behavior of these small droplets is important to shed more light on how to achieve the homogeneity of the gas-fuel mixture as well as that it directly contributes to the development of large-eddy simulation (LES) models.

    The numerical approach is a challenging process as one must take into account the transport of heat, mass and momentum for a multiphase flow. We choose a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) due to its convenient mesoscopic natureto simulate interfacial flows. A non-ideal equation of state is used to control the phase change according to local thermodynamic properties. We analyze the droplet and surrounding vapor for a hydrocarbon fuel close to the critical point. Under forced convection, the droplet evaporation rate is seen to depend on the vapor temperatureand Reynolds number, where oscillatory flows can be observed. Marangoni forces are also present and drivethe droplet internal circulation once the temperature difference at the droplet surface becomes significant.In isotropic turbulence, the vapor phase shows increasing fluctuations of the thermodynamic variables oncethe fluid approaches the critical point. The droplet dynamics is also investigated under turbulent conditions, where the presence of coherent structures with strong shear layers affects the mass transfer between the liquid-vapor flow, showing also a correlation with the droplet deformation. Here, the surface tension and droplet size play a major role and are analyzed in detail.

  • 23.
    Albernaz, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do, Quang Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for droplet heating and evaporation under forced convection2015In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 91, no 4, 043012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the evaporation of a droplet surrounded by superheated vapor with relative motion between phases. The evaporating droplet is a challenging process, as one must take into account the transport of mass, momentum, and heat. Here a lattice Boltzmann method is employed where phase change is controlled by a nonideal equation of state. First, numerical simulations are compared to the D-2 law for a vaporizing static droplet and good agreement is observed. Results are then presented for a droplet in a Lagrangian frame under a superheated vapor flow. Evaporation is described in terms of the temperature difference between liquid-vapor and the inertial forces. The internal liquid circulation driven by surface-shear stresses due to convection enhances the evaporation rate. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for higher Reynolds numbers, the dynamics of vaporization flux can be significantly affected, which may cause an oscillatory behavior on the droplet evaporation. The droplet-wake interaction and local mass flux are discussed in detail.

  • 24.
    Albernaz, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH.
    Do, Quang Minh
    KTH.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH.
    Multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for droplet heating and evaporation under forced convection2015In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 91, no 4, 043012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the evaporation of a droplet surrounded by superheated vapor with relative motion between phases. The evaporating droplet is a challenging process, as one must take into account the transport of mass, momentum, and heat. Here a lattice Boltzmann method is employed where phase change is controlled by a nonideal equation of state. First, numerical simulations are compared to the D-2 law for a vaporizing static droplet and good agreement is observed. Results are then presented for a droplet in a Lagrangian frame under a superheated vapor flow. Evaporation is described in terms of the temperature difference between liquid-vapor and the inertial forces. The internal liquid circulation driven by surface-shear stresses due to convection enhances the evaporation rate. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for higher Reynolds numbers, the dynamics of vaporization flux can be significantly affected, which may cause an oscillatory behavior on the droplet evaporation. The droplet-wake interaction and local mass flux are discussed in detail.

  • 25.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Simulation of a suspended droplet under evaporation with Marangoni effects2016In: International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, ISSN 0017-9310, E-ISSN 1879-2189, Vol. 91, 853-860 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the Marangoni effects in a hexane droplet under evaporation and close to its critical point. A lattice Boltzmann model is used to perform 3D numerical simulations. In a first case, the droplet is placed in its own vapor and a temperature gradient is imposed. The droplet locomotion through the domain is observed, where the temperature differences across the surface is proportional to the droplet velocity and the Marangoni effect is confirmed. The droplet is then set under a forced convection condition. The results show that the Marangoni stresses play a major role in maintaining the internal circulation when the superheated vapor temperature is increased. Surprisingly, surface tension variations along the interface due to temperature change may affect heat transfer and internal circulation even for low Weber number. Other results and considerations regarding the droplet surface are also discussed.

  • 26.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH.
    Simulation of a suspended droplet under evaporation with Marangoni effects2016In: International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, ISSN 0017-9310, E-ISSN 1879-2189, Vol. 91, 853-860 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the Marangoni effects in a hexane droplet under evaporation and close to its critical point. A lattice Boltzmann model is used to perform 3D numerical simulations. In a first case, the droplet is placed in its own vapor and a temperature gradient is imposed. The droplet locomotion through the domain is observed, where the temperature differences across the surface is proportional to the droplet velocity and the Marangoni effect is confirmed. The droplet is then set under a forced convection condition. The results show that the Marangoni stresses play a major role in maintaining the internal circulation when the superheated vapor temperature is increased. Surprisingly, surface tension variations along the interface due to temperature change may affect heat transfer and internal circulation even for low Weber number. Other results and considerations regarding the droplet surface are also discussed.

  • 27.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    Royal Inst Technol, Dept Mech, Linne Flow Ctr, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Do-Quang, M.
    Royal Inst Technol, Dept Mech, Linne Flow Ctr, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hermanson, J. C.
    University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH.
    Droplet deformation and heat transfer in isotropic turbulence2017In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 820, 61-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat and mass transfer of deformable droplets in turbulent flows is crucial. to a wide range of applications, such as cloud dynamics and internal combustion engines. This study investigates a single droplet undergoing phase change in isotropic turbulence using numerical simulations with a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme. Phase separation is controlled by a non-ideal equation of state and density contrast is taken into consideration. Droplet deformation is caused by pressure and shear stress at the droplet interface. The statistics of thermodynamic variables are quantified and averaged over both the liquid and vapour phases. The occurrence of evaporation and condensation is correlated to temperature fluctuations, surface tension variation and turbulence intensity. The temporal spectra of droplet deformations are analysed and related to the droplet surface area. Different modes of oscillation are clearly identified from the deformation power spectrum for low Taylor Reynolds number Re, whereas nonlinearities are produced with the increase of Re A, as intermediate frequencies are seen to overlap. As an outcome, a continuous spectrum is observed, which shows a decrease in the power spectrum that scales as similar to f(-3) Correlations between the droplet Weber number, deformation parameter, fluctuations of the droplet volume and thermodynamic variables are also developed.

  • 28.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH.
    Lattice Boltzmann Method for the evaporation of a suspended droplet2013In: Interfacial phenomena and heat transfer, ISSN 2167-857X, Vol. 1, no 3, 245-258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we consider a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to investigate the heating and vaporization of a suspended droplet. An important benefit from the LBM is that phase separation is generated spontaneously and jump conditions for heat and mass transfer are not imposed. We use double distribution functions in order to solve for momentum and energy equations. The force is incorporated via the exact difference method (EDM) scheme where different equations of state (EOS) are used, including the Peng-Robinson EOS. The equilibrium and boundary conditions are carefully studied. Results are presented for a hexane droplet set to evaporate in a superheated gas, for static condition and under gravitational effects. For the static droplet, the numerical simulations show that capillary pressure and the cooling effect at the interface play a major role. When the droplet is convected due to the gravitational field, the relative motion between the droplet and surrounding gas enhances the heat transfer. Evolution of density and temperature fields are illustrated in details.

  • 29.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lattice Boltzmann Method for the evaporation of a suspended droplet2013In: Interfacial phenomena and heat transfer, ISSN 2167-857X, Vol. 1, 245-258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we consider a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to investigate the heating and vaporization of a suspended droplet. An important benefit from the LBM is that phase separation is generated spontaneously and jump conditions for heat and mass transfer are not imposed. We use double distribution functions in order to solve for momentum and energy equations. The force is incorporated via the exact difference method (EDM) scheme where different equations of state (EOS) are used, including the Peng-Robinson EOS. The equilibrium and boundary conditions are carefully studied. Results are presented for a hexane droplet set to evaporate in a superheated gas, for static condition and under gravitational effects. For the static droplet, the numerical simulations show that capillary pressure and the cooling effect at the interface play a major role. When the droplet is convected due to the gravitational field, the relative motion between the droplet and surrounding gas enhances the heat transfer. Evolution of density and temperature fields are illustrated in details.

  • 30.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Hermanson, Jim C.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Droplet deformation and heat transfer in isotropic turbulence2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat and mass transfer of deformable droplets in turbulent flows is crucial to a wide range of applications, such as cloud dynamics and internal combustion engines. This study investigates a droplet undergoing phase change in isotropic turbulence using numerical simulations with a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme. We solve the momentum and energy transport equations, where phase separation is controlled by a non-ideal equation of state and density contrast is taken into consideration. Deformation is caused by pressure and shear stress at the droplet interface. The statistics of thermodynamic variables is quantified and averaged in terms of the liquid and vapor phases. The occurrence of evaporation and condensation is correlated to temperature fluctuations, surface tension variation and turbulence intensity. The temporal spectra of droplet deformations are analyzed and related to the droplet surface area.Different modes of oscillation are clearly identified from the deformation power spectrum for low Taylor Reynolds number $Re_\lambda$, whereas nonlinearities are produced with the increase of $Re_\lambda$, as intermediate frequencies are seen to overlap. As an outcome a continuous spectrum is observed, which shows a decrease that scales as $\sim f^{-3}$.Correlations between the droplet Weber number, deformation parameter, fluctuations of the droplet volume and thermodynamic variables are also examined.

  • 31.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Hermanson, Jim C.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Real fluids near the critical point in isotropic turbulenceIn: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the behavior of a uid near the critical point by using numerical simulations of weakly compressible three-dimensional isotropic turbulence. Much has been done for a turbulent ow with an ideal gas. The primary focus of this work is to analyze uctuations of thermodynamic variables (pressure, density and temperature) when a non-ideal Equation Of State (EOS) is considered. In order to do so, a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme is applied to solve the momentum and energy equations. Previously unreported phenomena are revealed as the temperature approaches the critical point. These phenomena include increased uctuations in pressure, density and temperature, followed by changes in their respective probability density functions (PDFs). Unlike the ideal EOS case, signicant dierences in the thermodynamic properties are also observed when the Reynolds number is increased. We also address issues related to the spectral behavior and scaling of density, pressure, temperature and kinetic energy.

  • 32.
    Alenius, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    CFD of Duct Acoustics for Turbocharger Applications2010Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for quieter internal combustion engines drives the quest for a better understanding of the acoustic properties of engine duct components. In this work the main focus is the turbocharger compressor and a discussion of turbocharger acoustics and earlier work within the area is presented, giving an insight into its sound generating mechanisms and the damping effect it has on pressure pulses, i.e. incoming waves. However, despite the fact that turbo-charging was developed during the first part of the 20th century, there is not much research results available within the area of centrifugal compressor acoustics.

    To improve the understanding of the acoustics of engine duct components, methods based on compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) are explored. With these methods it is possible to capture both the complex flow, with sound generating mechanisms, and acoustic - flow interactions. It is also possible to get a detailed insight into some phenomena by access to variables and/or areas where it is difficult to perform measurements. In order to develop these methods the linear scattering of low frequency waves by an orifice plate have been studied, using an acoustic two-port model. This simple geometry was chosen since the flow has several of the characteristics seen in a compressor, like unsteady separation, vortex generation and shock waves at high Mach numbers. Furthermore the orifice plate is in itself interesting in engine applications, where constrictions are present in the ducts. The results have been compared to measurements with good agreement and the sensitivity to different parameters has been studied, showing an expected dependence on inlet Mach number and difficulties to simultaneously keep the amplitude low enough for linearity and high enough to suppress flow noise with the short times series available in LES. 

    During the development of new engines the industry uses 1D engine CFD tools. These tools are developed to give performance data, but sometimes also the acoustic pulsations are studied. The duct components are modelled and the turbocharger is often modelled with a map, representing its fluid mechanical properties measured under steady state conditions. An aim in this work has been to study the limitations of the models available in the commercial software GT-Power. The scattering of incoming waves was simulated and the results were compared to measurements, showing a large discrepancy for the compressor and a significant discrepancy for the orifice plate.

  • 33.
    Alenius, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Flow Duct Acoustics: An LES Approach2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for quieter internal combustion engines drives the quest for a better understanding of the acoustic properties of engine duct components. Simulations are an important tool for enhanced understanding; they give insight into the flow-acoustic interaction in components where it is difficult to perform measurements. In this work the acoustics is obtained directly from a compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES). With this method complex flow phenomena can be captured, as well as sound generation and acoustic scattering.

    The aim of the research is enhanced understanding of the acoustics of engine gas exchange components, such as the turbocharger compressor.In order to investigate methods appropriate for such studies, a simple constriction, in the form of an orifice plate, is considered. The flow through this geometry is expected to have several of the important characteristics that generate and scatter sound in more complex components, such as an unsteady shear layer, vortex generation, strong recirculation zones, pressure fluctuations at the plate, and at higher flow speeds shock waves.

    The sensitivity of the scattering to numerical parameters, and flow noise suppression methods, is investigated. The most efficient method for reducing noise in the result is averaging, both in time and space. Additionally, non-linear effects were found to appear when the amplitude of the acoustic velocity fluctuations became larger than around 1~\% of the mean velocity, in the orifice.

    The main goal of the thesis has been to enhance the understanding of the flow and acoustics of a thick orifice plate, with a jet Mach number of 0.4 to 1.2. Additionally, we evaluate different methods for analysis of the data, whereby better insight into the problem is gained. The scattering of incoming waves is compared to measurements with in general good agreement. Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) is used in order to find significant frequencies in the flow and their corresponding flow structures, showing strong axisymmetric flow structures at frequencies where a tonal sound is generated and incoming waves are amplified.The main mechanisms for generating plane wave sound are identified as a fluctuating mass flow at the orifice openings and a fluctuating force at the plate sides, for subsonic jets. This study is to the author's knowledge the first numerical investigation concerning both sound generation and scattering, as well as coupling sound to a detailed study of the flow.With decomposition techniques a deeper insight into the flow is reached. It is shown that a feedback mechanism inside the orifice leads to the generation of strong coherent axisymmetric fluctuations, which in turn generate a tonal sound.

  • 34.
    Alenius, Emma
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Mode switching in a thick orifice jet, an LES and dynamic mode decomposition approach2014In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 90, 101-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamics of a confined thick orifice plate jet, at Mach 0.4, are studied with dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), of the velocity from a large eddy simulation (LES). The jet exhibits strong periodic structures, due to an initially laminar shear layer, and a non-deterministic switching is observed between an axisymmetric and an azimuthal jet mode. The DMD captures the shape of these structures as different dynamic modes, but (by definition) not their true time-evolution. In order to study the time-evolution of semi-periodic structures in the flow, such as the jet modes that come and go in time, it is suggested to use DMD for identifying the shape of the structures and then calculate time-coefficients for them, by expressing the velocity field as a linear combination of the most important dynamic modes. These time-coefficients are then shown to capture the physics of the flow; they oscillate at the frequency of the corresponding mode, within an envelope with a non-deterministically varying period, representing the mode switching. Additionally, a time variation of the strength of the jet, represented by mode zero, is found to be related to this switching.

  • 35.
    Alenius, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Sound Generating Flow Structures in a Thick Orifice Plate Jet2014In: Progress in Turbulence V: Proceedings of the iTi Conference in Turbulence 2012, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2014, 201-204 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of thiswork is to study sound generating flowstructures in a thickcircular orifice plate jet, placed in a circular duct. Large eddy simulations (LES)are performed for two jet Mach numbers, 0.4 and 0.9. Characteristic frequenciesin the flow, and their corresponding flow structures, are identified with dynamicmode decomposition (DMD). The results show that a tonal noise is generated atfrequencies where the jet displays strong ring vortices, in the plane wave range.The main sound generating mechanisms seems to be a fluctuating mass flow at theorifice opening and a fluctuating surface force at the plate sides, caused by the ringvortices. The frequencies are believed to be chosen, and strengthened, by a feedbackmechanism between the orifice in- and outlet.

  • 36.
    Alenius, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Large eddy simulations of acoustic-flow interaction at an orifice plate2015In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 345, 162-177 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scattering of plane waves by an orifice plate with a strong bias flow, placed in a circular or square duct, is studied through large eddy simulations and dynamic mode decomposition. The acoustic-flow interaction is illustrated, showing that incoming sound waves at a Strouhal number of 0.43 trigger a strong axisymmetric flow structure in the orifice in the square duct, and interact with a self-sustained axisymmetric oscillation in the circular duct orifice. These structures then generate a strong sound, increasing the acoustic energy at the frequency of the incoming wave. The structure triggered in the square duct is weaker than that present in the circular duct, but stronger than structures triggered by waves at other frequencies. Comparing the scattering matrix with measurements, there is a good agreement. However, the results are found to be sensitive to the inflow, where the self-sustained oscillation in the circular duct simulation is an artefact of an axisymmetric, undisturbed inflow. This illustrates a problem with using an undisturbed inflow for studying vortex-sound effects, and can be of interest when considering musical instruments, where the aim is to get maximum amplification of specific tones. Further, it illustrates that at the frequency where an amplification of acoustic energy is found for the orifice plate, the flow has a natural instability, which is suppressed by non-axisymmetry and incoming disturbances.

  • 37.
    Alenius, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    LES of Acoustic-Flow Interaction at an Orifice Plate2012In: 18th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference (33rd AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference), 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scattering of plane waves by a thick orifice plate, placed in a circular or square duct with flow, is studied through Large Eddy Simulation. The scattering matrix is computed and compared to measurements, showing reasonably good agreement except around one frequency ($St \approx 0.4$). Here a stronger amplification of acoustic energy is observed in the circular duct simulations than in the measurements and the square duct simulations. In order to improve the understanding of the interaction between an incoming wave, the flow, and the plate, a few frequencies are studied in more detail. A Dynamic Mode Decomposition is performed to identify flow structures at significant frequencies. This shows that the amplification of acoustic energy occurs at the frequency where the jet in the circular duct has an axisymmetric instability. Furthermore, the incoming wave slightly amplifies this instability, and suppresses background flow fluctuations.

  • 38.
    Alenius, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Scattering of Plane Waves by a Constriction2011In: Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2011, Vol 7, Parts A-C, American Society Of Mechanical Engineers , 2011, 1043-1052 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liner scattering of low frequency waves by an orifice plate has been studied using Large Eddy Simulation and an acoustic two-port model. The results have been compared to measurements with good agreement for waves coming from the downstream side. For waves coming from the upstream side the reflection is over-predicted, indicating that not enough of the acoustic energy is converted to vorticity at the upstream edge of the plate. Furthermore, the sensitivity to the amplitude of the acoustic waves has been studied, showing difficulties to simultaneously keep the amplitude low enough for linearity and high enough to suppress flow noise with the relatively short times series available in LES.

  • 39.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lingwood, Rebecca J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Rotation Effects on Wall-Bounded Flows: Some Laboratory Experiments2014In: Modeling Atmospheric and Oceanic Flows: Insights from Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 83-100 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on three different categories: (1) system rotation vector parallel to mean-flow vorticity; (2) flows set up by the rotation of one or more boundaries; and (3) system rotation aligned with the mean-flow direction. The flows in the different categories above differ with respect to their geometry but, more importantly, in how rotation affects them. The chapter focuses on three different flows that are relatively amenable to laboratory investigation, one from each category described above: One is plane Couette flow undergoing system rotation about an axis normal to the mean flow, another is the von Kármán boundary layer flow, and the third is axially rotating pipe flow. It defines important nondimensional parameters that govern them and discuss some of their interesting flow features in various parameter ranges. Various experimental realizations of the three different flow systems are described and considerations and limitations regarding the laboratory systems are discussed.

  • 40.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot - a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data2010In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 29, no 6, 403-406 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnostic plot is suggested that can be used to judge wall bounded turbulence data of the mean and the rms of the streamwise velocity in terms of reliability both near the wall, around the maximum in the rms as well as in the outer region. The important feature of the diagnostic plot is that neither the wall position nor the friction velocity needs to be known, since it shows the rms value as a function of the streamwise mean velocity, both normalized with the free stream velocity. One must remember, however, that passing the test is a necessary, but not sufficient condition to prove good data quality.

  • 41.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution2011In: 13th European Turbulence Conference (ETC13): Wall-Bounded Flows And Control Of Turbulence, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2011, 022002- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & Orlu [Eur. J. Fluid Mech. B/Fluids, 4 2, 403 (2010)]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is shown as a function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. In the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity is observed independent of Reynolds number. The deviation from this linear region appears in the buffer region and seems to be universal when normalized with the friction velocity. Therefore, a new empirical fit for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution is proposed and the results are compared with up to date reliable high-Reynolds number experiments and extrapolated towards Reynolds numbers relevant to atmospherical boundary layers.

  • 42.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution in wall-bounded turbulent flows2012In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 36, 167-175 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distribution of the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity has recently been discussed in several papers both from the viewpoint of new experimental results as well as attempts to model its behavior. In the present paper numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers, channel and pipe flows over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & ÖrlÌ [P.H. Alfredsson, R. ÖrlÌ, The diagnostic plot-a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data, Eur. J. Mech. B Fluids 29 (2010) 403-406]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is plotted as function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. Alfredsson et al. [P.H. Alfredsson, A. Segalini, R. ÖrlÌ, A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the outer peak, Phys. Fluids 23 (2011) 041702] observed that in the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity independent of the Reynolds number exists. This approach has been generalized for channel and pipe flows as well, and it has been found that the deviation from the previously established linear region appears at a given wall distance in viscous units (around 120) for all three canonical flows. Based on these results, new empirical fits for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution of each canonical flow are proposed. Coupled with a mean streamwise velocity profile description the model provides a composite profile for the streamwise variance profile that agrees nicely with existing numerical and experimental data. Extrapolation of the proposed scaling to high Reynolds numbers predicts the emergence of a second peak of the streamwise variance profile that at even higher Reynolds numbers overtakes the inner one.

  • 43. Alku, Paavo
    et al.
    Airas, Matti
    Björkner, Eva
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    An amplitude quotient based method to analyze changes in the shape of the glottal pulse in the regulation of vocal intensity2006In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 120, no 2, 1052-1062 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents an approach to visualizing intensity regulation in speech. The method expresses a voice sample in a two-dimensional space using amplitude-domain values extracted from the glottal flow estimated by inverse filtering. The two-dimensional presentation is obtained by expressing a time-domainmeasure of the glottal pulse, the amplitude quotient (AQ), as a function of the negative peak amplitude of the flow derivative (d(peak)). The regulation of vocal intensity was analyzed with the proposed method from voices varying from extremely soft to very loud with a SPL range of approximately 55 dB. When vocal intensity was increased, the speech samples first showed a rapidly decreasing trend as expressed on the proposed AQ-d(peak) graph. When intensity was further raised, the location of the samples converged toward a horizontal line, the asymptote of a hypothetical hyperbola. This behavior of the AQ-d(peak) graph indicates that the intensity regulation strategy changes from laryngeal to respiratory mechanisms and the method chosen makes it possible to quantify how control mechanisms underlying the regulation of vocal intensity change gradually between the two means. The proposed presentation constitutes an easy-to-implement method to visualize the function of voice production in intensity regulation because the only information needed is the glottal flow wave form estimated by inverse filtering the acoustic speech pressure signal.

  • 44.
    Allam, S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Cooling fan noise control using micro-perforates2012In: Int. Congr. Expos. Noise Control Eng., INTER-NOISE, 2012, 10434-10445 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Baffle or split silencers are commonly used, e.g., in HVAC systems and as inlet/outlet silencers on gas turbines. Another application is to reduce noise from the cooling fan inlet for large IC-engines. A baffle silencer can be seen as a periodic arrangement of parallel rectangular absorbers which can be placed in a rectangular duct. The noise reduction afforded by parallel baffles depends not only on the physical properties of the lining, but also upon the angle of incidence of the sound waves impinging and the baffle length. In this paper the potential of using baffles made of Micro-Perforated Panels is investigated in particular with the cooling fan inlet application in mind. Theoretical models for the damping is derived and used to design optimum configurations. The models are based on the wave propagation in a periodic array of baffles so that only one period can be investigated in order to find the different modes. In particular the least attenuated mode is important to find in order to optimize the behavior. An important aspect is the inner structure of the MPP baffle, i.e., can it just be an empty air volume or to what extent must internal waves be prevented by putting in walls. From a stiffness point of view some inner walls might also be needed to avoid vibration problems. Due to these complexities the theoretical models are only presented for the simplest cases. In order to validate the models and to get a more complete test of different designs experiments were also carried out. During these experiments the effect of flow was also tested.

  • 45.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. Helwan University, Egypt.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Methods for Accurate Determination of Acoustic Two-Port Data in Flow Ducts2005In: 12th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2005: ICSV 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurement of plane wave acoustic transmission properties, so called two-port data, of flow duct components is important in many applications. It is an important tool for instance in the development of mufflers for IC-engines. Accurate measurement of the acoustic two port data can be used not only to determine the transmission loss but also to determine physical properties like flow resistivty as well as speed of sound and impedance. Measurement of two-port data is difficult when the flow velocity in the measurement duct is high because of the flow noise contamination of the measured pressure signals. Techniques to improve the acoustic two-port determination have been tested in this paper. A number of possible configurations for connecting loudspeakers to the flow duct have been investigated. It was found that using a perforate pipe section with about 50% porosity between the loudspeaker side branch and the duct gave the best signal-to-noise ratio out of the studied configurations. Different signal processing techniques have been tested for reducing the adverse effects of flow noise at the microphones. The most successful techniques require a reference signal which can be either the electric signal being input to the loudspeakers or one of the microphone signals. As a reference technique stepped sine excitation with cross-spectrum based frequency domain averaging was used. This technique could give good results for most cases. Using a periodic signal (saw-tooth) and synchronised time domain averaging good results could be obtained if a sufficient number of averages was used. At flow velocities higher than M=0.2 about 10000 averages were needed. Random excitation together with cross-spectrum based frequency domain averaging also gave good result if the same number of averages was used. Ordinary frequency domain averaging is not sufficient at high flow velocities. It was also shown that using cross-spectrum based frequency domain averaging an improvement could be obtained if the microphone with the highest signal-to-noise ratio at each frequency was used as the reference microphone rather than a fixed microphone.

  • 46.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Signal to noise ratio enhancement methods in acoustic flow duct measurements2004In: ICSV12-St Petersburg, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Over-determination in acoustic two-port data measurement2006In: ICSV13-Vienna / [ed] J. Eberhardsteiner, H.A. Mang, H. Waubke, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurement of plane wave acoustic transmission properties, so called two-port data, of flow duct components is important in many applications. It is an important tool for instance in the development of mufflers for IC-engines. Measurement of two-port data is difficult when the flow velocity in the measurement duct is high because of the flow noise contamination of the measured pressure signals. The plane wave acoustic two-port is a 2x2 matrix containing 4 complex quantities at each frequency. To experimentally determine these unknowns the acoustic state variables on the inlet and outlet side must be measured for two independent test cases. The two independent test cases can be created by: changing the acoustic load on the outlet side leading to the so-called two-load technique or by using one acoustic source on the inlet side and one acoustic source on the outlet side leading to the so-called two-source technique. In the latter case the independent test cases are created by first using the source on the inlet side and then the source on the outlet side. As pointed out by Åbom it is also possible to run both sources simultaneously to create more than two independent test cases. This over-determination could be used to improve the measurement results for instance if the data is contaminated by flow-noise. In this paper over-determination is tested by applying up to 5 different test cases. This procedure has been applied to a single orifice test object.

  • 48. Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    A New Type of Muffler Based on Microperforated Tubes2011In: Journal of Vibration and Acoustics-Transactions of the ASME, ISSN 1048-9002, Vol. 133, no 3, 031005- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microperforated plate (MPP) absorbers are perforated plates with holes typically in the submillimeter range and perforation ratios around 1%. The values are typical for applications in air at standard temperature and pressure (STP). The underlying acoustic principle is simple: It is to create a surface with a built in damping, which effectively absorbs sound waves. To achieve this, the specific acoustic impedance of a MPP absorber is normally tuned to be of the order of the characteristic wave impedance in the medium (similar to 400 Pa s/m in air at STP). The traditional application for MPP absorbers has been building acoustics often combined with a so called panel absorber to create an absorption peak at a selected frequency. However, MPP absorbers made of metal could also be used for noise control close to or at the source for noise control in ducts. In this paper, the possibility to build dissipative silencers, e. g., for use in automotive exhaust or ventilation systems, is investigated.

  • 49.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Acoustic modeling and testing of a complex car muffler2006In: International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2006, 2006, 1119-1126 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perforated mufflers are used by exhaust system manufacturers to improve the broadband attenuation at low frequencies, with the drawback that this normally also implies an increased pressure drop. The detailed modelling of this type of muffler depends on knowledge of the perforate impedance which is influenced by hole geometry as well as the details of the flow distribution. The existing formulas for calculation of perforate impedance are semi-empirical and a number of alternatives have been published. One motivation behind this work was to review the existing formulas for perforate impedance using accurate measured data for perforated mufflers. A modified model presented by Bauer 1977 was found to be the best. A second motivation was to show that for a detailed analysis, using 3D acoustic FEM, the mean flow can be neglected except for calculating the perforate impedances.

  • 50.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Advanced experimental procedure for in-duct aero-acoustics2006In: 13th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2006, ICSV 2006, 2006, 1185-1192 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to present a method for characterization of in-duct aero-acoustic sources that can be described as active acoustic two-ports. The method is applied to investigate the sound produced from an orifice plate. The motivation is to obtain better data for the development of improved prediction methods for noise from flow singularities, e.g., in HVAC systems on aircrafts. Most of the earlier works fall into two categories; papers modeling the scattering of acoustic waves and papers modeling the sound generation. Concerning the scattering it is possible to obtain estimates of the low frequency behavior from linear perturbations of the steady state equations for the flow. Concerning the sound generation most of the presented work is experimental and follows a paper by Nelson&Morfey, which present a scaling law procedure for the in-duct sound power based on a dipole model of the source. One limitation with the earlier works is that the sound power only was measured on the downstream side. Also data was only obtained in 1/3-octave bands, by measuring the sound radiated from an open duct termination. Assuming plane waves and linear acoustics the flow duct singularity can be completely modeled as an active 2-port. The experimental determination of its properties is done in a two steps procedure. In the first step the passive data, i.e., the scattering matrix S, is determined using external (independent) sources. In the second step the S matrix is used and the source vector is determined by testing the system with known acoustic terminations.

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